Tax Roundup, 7/25/2012: Thrifty thief sentenced; trashy trusts; fleeing France

July 25th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

Thrifty thief gets 5 1/2 years.  The woman who got a fraudulent $2.1 million tax refund from Oregon and who subsequently went on the thriftiest spending spree ever was sentenced yesterday to 5 1/2 years behind bars.  From the Huffington Post:

Before her June 6 arrest, Reyes’ spending spree included about $1,800 in cash to buy a 1999 Dodge Caravan and spending $851 on tires and wheels.

She did allow herself a few little luxuries, too:

The affidavit says other purchases included a queen-sized air mattress, a deep fryer, an air conditioner and a cream and gray floral rug. She bought a sofa and recliner with brown leather trim.

Sadly, she was more careful with the money than the state was:

The return was set aside for review by processing staff and managers for potential fraud. But “some time later,” the affidavit said, a Revenue employee overrode the flagged payment and the refund was issued.

By policy, three agency employees are required to verify the override, the newspaper said. However, according to the affidavit, no one responsible for reviewing the return opened the file to look at it or looked at the W-2 form Reyes filed.

Call me when the state fills out its vehicle fleet with 12-year old used cars.

 In Sod We Trust.  From ArgusLeader.com:

The owner of a Sioux Falls sod business ducked taxes for almost 10 years before investigators caught on to the trust fund scheme he had used to evade capture, federal prosecutors said.

Jerome Adrian, 70, was arrested and appeared Friday in U.S. District Court in South Dakota on one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States, 12 counts of willful failure to collect or pay over tax, two counts of evasion of payment, five counts of tax evasion, four counts of willful failure to file tax returns, and one count of false tax refund.

Bogus trusts are an IRS ”Dirty Dozen” tax scam.  They don’t work, though they might seem like they do until you get caughtRuss Fox has more.

Congress is pretending to address Taxmageddon, the expiration of the Bush-Obama era tax cuts at the end of the year.  Coverage includes Anthony Nitti’s Republicans Propose Their Own Way of Dealing With the Bush Tax Cuts, Kay Bell’s Republican definition of ‘temporary’ tax breaks depends on your income bracket, and Howard Gleckman’s Senate Democrats Would Keep Dividend Taxes Low, But Why?

“Tax Fairness” advocates, like the President and Citizens for Tax Justice, seem to think that there can never be bad consequences for jacking up taxes on “the rich.”  France is about to give a lab test on such ideas, including a 75% rate on income exceeding €1 million.  Veronique de Rugy, a newly-naturalized U.S. citizen who got out of France while the getting was good, explains the Consequences of High Taxes: French Edition.

Surprise! IRS Audits of S Corporation Returns: No-Change Rate Remains High, TIGTA Finds. But there has to be a pony in there somewhere.

The Iowa Department of Revenue has issued its summary of 2012 lowa tax law changes.

I hate to disagree with anything in Peter Reilly’s space, but I can’t abide the notion that it is the fault of the taxpayers and their advisors that the IRS is valuing at $65 million an artwork that cannot legally be sold.  The artwork contains an American Eagle, the sale of which is subject to severe penalties.  But read “‘Canyon’ Controversy – Blame The Advisers Not The IRS,” a guest piece in Peter’s space by Matthew Erskine, and decide for yourself.

Robert D. Flach has a new “Buzz” roundup of tax news.

Jason Dinesen: Same-Sex Marriage, Community Property, and Self-Employment Earnings

Jim Maule concludes a riveting 14-part series on the idea of having the IRS prepare returns for individuals using third party information reporting.

Where to start? What is Wrong with the Press? (David Brunori,Tax.com).

 

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,