Tax Roundup, 2/4/2013: District Court declines to stay decision stopping IRS preparer rules. And ___ Anniversary!

February 4th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130121-2Not surprisingly, the judge who ordered the IRS to shut down its preparer regulation program declined to stay his order.  The IRS asked James Boasberg, the U.S. District Court Judge who ordered the IRS to stop its preparer regulation program, to stay his order pending an appeal.  The judge declined:

As the factors beyond likelihood of success do not decisively tilt in favor of the IRS — indeed, they tip somewhat against — the Court sees no basis to lift its injunction pending appeal. Nor does the Court believe it warranted to suspend the injunction for fourteen days to permit the IRS to seek a stay in the Court of Appeals. This would only lead to more confusion for preparers and their clients as the tax season gets underway. While nothing in this decision prevents the IRS from seeking such relief there, the Court sees no benefit of a brief stay while it does so.

So where do things stand?  The IRS will be allowed to continue to administer the Registered Tax Return Preparer test and issue PTINs, but it cannot require RTRP tests or CPE, or collect fees for them.  Whether the IRS will continue testing on a voluntary basis, or whether there will be takers, remains to be seen.

More coverage from TaxGrrrl: IRS Loses Big In Court (Again), Tax Season Chugs Along; and Russ Fox: IRS Loses Again to Institute for Justice.

 

You surely didn’t miss the 100th anniversary of the 16th Amendment yesterday.  They had a football game and everything to observe it.  The 16th Amendment, which gave rise to the current income tax, was ratified by Delaware on February 3, 1913, making it official.  And yes, it is official.  While some tax protesters insist that the 16th Amendment was never properly ratified, all the federal judges say otherwise — not to mention the folks at IRS, the U.S. Marshals Service and the Bureau of Prisons.  So, in any way that matters, it’s official.  Still, I can’t bring myself to say “Happy” anniversary.

More from Richard Morrison:  100 Years of the Federal Income Tax (Tax Policy Blog)

 

Iowa’s oldest judge, age 90, steps downRuth Klotz, a Polk County Probate Judge, remains respected by the lawyers I know who practiced in her court.   Happy Retirement, Judge Klotz!

 

Paul Neiffer,  Many States Are Delaying Farmer Filing Deadline

Jack Townsend, UBS Depositors Fail on Pleadings in Civil Case Against UBS

Kay Bell, Tips are taxable income

TaxGrrrl, Pay Taxes On Your Super Bowl XLVII Winnings? You Can Bet On It

Trish McIntire,  Gambling 1099MISCs.  They don’t make your winnings taxable, they just let the IRS in on the secret.

Patrick Temple-West,  Early payouts of dividends, bonuses spur a windfall, and more (Tax Break)

Martin Sullivan, Is Aggressive Tax Avoidance Moral? (Tax.com).  Strange question.  If you are paid to maximize shareholder returns, is it moral to do less than your best to do so?

Rudy Penner,  The Risks of Dumbing Down Fiscal Goals (TaxVox).  It’s hard to think they could get any dumber than they are now.

 

Jim Maule,  Looking Again at Tax and Political Ignorance:

The study’s conclusion is disheartening. The authors conclude that incumbents can get themselves elected by associating themselves with good news for which they ought not take credit because they are not responsible, support policies that generate good news for their districts even if they are bad for the nation, and to use rhetoric to distract voters from the incumbents’ histories.

Perhaps this will lead the good Professor to reconsider his preference for government solutions over market outcomes.

Linda Beale,  Red state tax “reform” and “economic growth”

Robert D. Flach, JUST ONE MORE THING, HE SAID COLUMBO-LIKE

 

The Critical Question: The Devil Wears Prada, But Does Her Boyfriend Pay Taxes? (Robert Goulder, Tax.com).

What this country needs is a good 25-cent sneaker.  Illinois Proposes 25-Cent Sneaker Tax (TaxProf)

It’s the little things.  The mark of a true craftsman is attention to detail.  Two Ohioans’ alleged failure to mind the details has led to trouble.  From the Columbus Dispatch:

Roma L. Sims, 34, and Samantha C. Towns, 30, were arrested on Thursday and charged with aggravated identity theft, conspiracy and wire fraud for using the identities to file tax returns and rake in $1.3 million.

But they misspelled several cities when they listed return addresses: Louieville and Pittsburg, according to the criminal complaint. Those geographic goofs caught the attention of investigators.

So did misspelling some of the occupations they listed on the phony tax returns.

I bet they thought those spelling drills in grade school were pointless.

 

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