Tax Roundup, 7/9/2013: IRS identity-theft assistance edition.

July 9th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130419-1Social Security numbers make the world of identity theft tax fraud go around.  Grifters get them from published lists of dead taxpayers, from stolen medical records — anywhere they can.  They use them to steal untold billions from the IRS while creating tax nightmares for the real owners of the numbers.

And the IRS is here to help!

Public.Resource.Org has discovered that the Internal Revenue Service has posted the Social Security Numbers of tens of thousands of Americans on government web sites. The database in question contains the filings of Section 527 political organizations such as campaign committees. This Section 527 database is an essential tool used by journalists, watchdog groups, congressional staffers, and citizens. While the public posting of this database serves a vital public purpose (and this database must be restored as quickly as possible), the failure to remove individual Social Security Numbers is an extraordinarily reckless act.

What does the IRS have to say for itself?  Tax Analysts reports ($link):

     The IRS said that the Service is required to disclose approved exemption applications and information returns, and advises groups to not include SSNs on those forms or attachments. According to a statement dated December 19, 2012, on the IRS website, “By law, with limited exceptions, the IRS has no authority to remove that information before making the forms publicly available. Documents subject to disclosure include attachments filed with the form and correspondence with the IRS about the filing.”

     Malamud (Carl Malamud of Public.Resource.Org) said that he disagreed with the IRS position that it could not redact the SSNs and that it ran counter to privacy laws and federal guidance protecting the disclosure of personal information.

This level of competence and restraint really makes me want the IRS to regulate preparers more.  Oh, and to run the health care system, too.

(Hat tip to Twitterite @kermalou)
Nothing to see here, move along.   IRS supporters 0-for-3 on putting scandal to rest (Daily Caller)

Since it was revealed in May that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) improperly targeted the tax-exempt nonprofit status of conservative groups between 2010 and 2012, defenders of the beleaguered agency have offered three broad attempts to suppress the growing IRS scandal and put the matter to rest. However, each of these three attempts failed outright, and the scandal continues, with tenacious investigations underway by the House Oversight Committee and House Ways and Means Committee.

Sorry, Linda.  (via Instapundit)

 

 

 

Martin Sullivan, Effective Corporate Rate 13 Percent? (Tax Analysts Blog):

Putting all this together it seems reasonable to not revise the general consensus view that worldwide effective corporate tax rates are on-average in the mid-twenties when we are not in the throes of a recession. Moreover, it is important to remember that these broad averages hide a lot of interesting detail. Multinationals in the oil and mining businesses generally pay very high rates. Purely domestic firms generally have an effective rate close to 35 percent. And pharmaceutical and tech companies generally have effective rates much lower than average.

But I thought corporations “never had it so good“!

 

Jeremy Scott, Summers Pushes for Tax Break on Foreign Profits (Tax Analysts Blog)

Jack Townsend, Swiss Court Ruling in Credit Suisse Case.  “The Swiss Federal Supreme Court has ruled, here, that the U.S. “group requests” under the treaty exchange of information provision are permissible if the request includes enough detail to establish grounds for suspicion of tax fraud and the like.”

Donald Marron, Smart Tax Reform Could Shrink the Government (TaxVox).  If it doesn’t, it’s not very smart.






It’s Tuesday, so let’s Buzz with Robert D. Flach!


News you can use.  How Not to Commit Tax Evasion (Russ Fox)

 

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