Tax Roundup, 9/24/2013: Departures edition – with and without benefits. And: Career Corner!

September 24th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

The IRS official at the center of the Tea Party scandal is retiring.  Iowa Public Radio reports that Lois Lerner is retiring:

The IRS announced Monday that Lerner would step down after being placed on paid leave in May. She refused that month to answer questions at a congressional hearing, citing the Fifth Amendment right not to incriminate herself.

The scandal involved groups applying for 501(c)(4) status in the period 2010-2012. Organizations with the words “Tea Party” or “patriot” in their names faced more questions and bureaucratic delays, although some progressive groups also encountered bureaucratic hassles, according to an inspector general’s report.

In a statement emailed to NPR, the IRS said the problems identified with screening tax-exempt status requests were the result of “mismanagement and poor judgment.” 

In a change of procedure, the IRS announced the retirement via a press release, rather than by planting a question at a continuing education event.

Tax Analysts ($link) reminds us of the compliance hassles that Ms. Lerner piled on all sorts of exempt organizations:

One of the more notable developments during Lerner’s tenure as exempt organizations director was the comprehensive redesign of Form 990, “Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax.” The new version requires EOs to provide much more information about their activities than previously. 

Anyone who works with exempt organizations, or who serves on an EO board, knows how much additional useless busywork costs the new 990 imposes.

Lerner also oversaw a massive IRS outreach to get EOs that had not filed information returns for three straight years to come into compliance to avoid automatic revocation of exemption.

By “outreach” they mean “revoked their tax-exempt status.”  Thanks for leaving, Ms. Lerner, you’ve done quite enough.

Related: TaxGrrrl, Lesson Lerner-ed? Disgraced IRS Official Tenders Resignation  

 

 

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Rashia Wilson in happier days.

While we say good-bye to Ms. Lerner, let’s spare a moment to note a different sort of departure, one involving somebody who may have had more influence on tax administration than Ms. Lerner.  TBO.com reports (my emphasis):

Three years after Tampa police stumbled on the first active tax-refund fraud operation they had seen, one of the suspects was sentenced Monday to eight years and five months in federal prison.

Maurice “Thirst” Larry faces even more prison time when he is sentenced today in another case in which his girlfriend, Rashia Wilson, is serving 21 years of federal time. Larry is expected to face a longer term in the second case because it involves the theft of millions of dollars, while the other case involved hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Larry and Wilson, along with Marterrance “Qat” Holloway, are viewed as pioneers in the wave of stolen identity tax-refund fraud that has flooded the streets of Tampa, dubbed the epicenter of a national epidemic that has cost U.S. taxpayers billions and left countless identity theft victims to pick up the pieces.

This sort of fraud costs the Treasury around $5 billion annually, while creating financial nightmares for taxpayers whose identities are stolen.  The flat-footed IRS response is one of the greatest failures of tax administration since the tax law was enacted.

What sort of devious criminal geniuses could crack open the Treasury like a pinata?

Authorities said Larry, a high school dropout with five young children fathered out of wedlock, has been a jet-setter, flying between Miami, New York and Las Vegas. He and Holloway also drove expensive cars and wore pricey clothes.

Just like James Bond, then.

 

Jana Luttenegger,  Deducting Clothing as a Business Expense:

Practically speaking, not many individuals can use the un-reimbursed clothing expense deduction. If your clothing expenses do qualify, in addition to providing receipts, be prepared to prove the apparel is not suitable for everyday wear.

Me,  Dress for success, but don’t look to the IRS for any fashion help.  My latest post at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record blog for business professionals.

 

Brian Mahany,  Have A Government Security Clearance? Watch Out for IRS Tax Liens!

Paul Neiffer,  How Zero Equals $380.  How gambling losers can lose again at tax time under the new Obamacare Net Investment Income Tax.

Jim Maule, Deductions Require Evidence and a Bit of Care:

The first aspect of the case that caught my eye was the attempt of a tax return preparer to deduct a vacation as a business expense. She explained that she operated her tax return business from her home, and explained that “living in her neighborhood was stressful and that she felt harassed by her clients who would call her home at any hour.” Accordingly, she concluded that she needed to travel “just to get rest so that . . . [she] could function.” The Court, not surprisingly, denied the deduction, characterizing the cost of the vacation as a personal expense.

Peter Reilly, Musician Wins Hobby Loss Case   Peter covers the Gullion case that I covered last month, but he went further by contacting the victorious taxpayer, getting a perspective that you can’t get from reading the Tax Court opinion.

 

Linda Beale,  Beanie Baby creator to pay more than $50 million for offshore accounts

TaxProf,  The IRS Scandal, Day 138

Kay Bell, Dolce & Gabbana use their tax troubles as fashion inspiration

Jack Townsend,  Schedule UTP and Criminal Penalties. “Moreover, in almost all cases in which such behavior would be material, a knowingly incomplete or missing Schedule UTP could be used in support of the various penalties that might apply to the related underreported taxes — the 75 % civil fraud penalty and the accuracy related penalties.”

Jeremy Scott, Sun Capital Might Be Bigger Than You Think (Tax Analysts Blog)

Tax Justice Blog, When Congress Turns to Tax Reform, It Should Set These Goals.  Not necessarily my goals.

Andrew Lundeen, Elimination of State and Local Tax Deduction Possible (Tax Policy Blog)

Clint Stretch, Shopping for Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog)

 

It’s Tuesday, so it’s a Buzz-day for Robert D. Flach!

 

Quotable:

Perhaps if people with low incomes made really good decisions about how to spend their money, then poverty would be near zero. However, over the course of their lifetimes, many people make many bad decisions, and as a result they will spend a lot of time dealing with financial adversity. The moral and practical implications of this view of poverty are not as clearcut as either a progressive or a conservative would like.

Arnold Kling.

 

Career Corner: If You Can’t Admit You’ve Committed CPE Fraud, Then You Need to Take Another Ethics Course (Going Concern)

 

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