Tax Roundup, 10/16/2013: Extension season is over, now what? And the joy of infinite marginal tax rates.

October 16th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20111040logoI hope you don’t have to.  Filing Tax Returns after the October 15th Deadline (William Perez):

You’ll need to mail in your return to the IRS, whether you prepare the return yourself or hire an accountant. That’s because the IRS’s electronic filing servers start going offline after October 15th to prepare for the next filing season.

If you are filing after October 15 this year, my first advice is to file quickly, as you are likely to never file if you don’t get it done now.  My next advice is to make sure it doesn’t happen next year.

Most people who file late make it harder than it needs to be.  90% of the stuff that could possibly go on their returns comes from third parties — things like W-2s, 1099s, mortgage interest and property tax statements, and thank-you notes from charities.  People who can’t seem to file on time should get a big envelope.  They should put these items in the envelope as they come in starting in early January.  They should seal the envelope on February 28 and give it to their preparer.  For most taxpayers, that is all you need to get a reasonably accurate return.

The procrastinators want to go through their checkbooks and find every last $10 charitable gift, and then they never get around to it.  When they finally do, it’s almost certainly a poor use of their time, and when it causes them to file late, it costs them a lot more than that last $10 deduction will save.

Related:  2012 Tax Season Officially Bites the Dust (Paul Neiffer)

 

 

Implicit marginal ratesAlan Cole, Obamacare Puts Infinite Marginal Tax Rates in Action (Tax Policy Blog):

The moment your modified AGI reaches 400% of the poverty line, you instantly lose a subsidy that could easily be worth $15,000. This is a discontinuity in public policy with respect to income. It is a place where an infinitesimal change can result in disastrous consequence for a taxpayer. At 400% of the poverty line, the marginal tax rate is infinite.

It’s an extreme example of the way means-tested welfare benefits can impose high hidden tax rates on poor and middle class taxpayers — punishment ignored by advocates of higher benefits in the name of “compassion.”  More from Arnold Kling.

 

Tony Nitti,  A Quick Look At Expiring 2013 Tax Provisions: What To Do Before Year-End

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 160

 

Kyle Pomerleau, What is the Debt Ceiling and Why Does it Matter? (Tax Policy Blog) ‘

Howard Gleckman, The U.S.May Not Default on Friday But Washington Is Still Playing A Dangerous Game

Joseph Thorndike, Debt Limit Fights Are All the Same – Except for This One (Tax Analysts Blog)

But in fact, the nation’s fiscal shortfall can’t be permanently finessed with any sort of measures, be they ordinary, extraordinary, or even superhuman. Default will happen — the only question is when.

Have a nice day.

 

 Jason Dinesen,  If EAs are Liechtenstein and CPAs are the U.S., What are the Unenrolled?   That’s not fair to CPAs; I don’t know any who’ve been shut down for the last two weeks.

 

Leslie Book, Potential Storm Over Removal Power of Tax Court Judges (Procedurally Taxing):

Kuretski is like one of the many thousands of CDP cases where the parties disagree on some aspect of a collection determination, but also has one very big wrinkle: the taxpayers are using the case as a vehicle challenging the constitutionality of the President’s powers to remove Tax Court judges under Section 7443(f).

I didn’t know the President could do that.

 

2014 State Business Tax Climate IndexTax Justice Blog, State News Quick Hits: Criticism of “Business Climate” Rankings Grows, and More.  Most of the criticism comes from politicians in states with poor business tax climates, and their allies, for some reason.

 

Brian Mahany, High Intrigue in Florida FBAR Trial!

Lush Caribbean islands, secret unreported Swiss accounts, tens of millions of dollars and a husband who disappears into the night. Is this the plot of a new best seller suspense novel? No! It’s some of the events unfolding in a Ft. Myers federal court room where prosecutors say that Patricia Hough conspired to defraud the IRS and filed false tax returns.

I prefer a boring life, at least compared to something like this.

 

Kay Bell, Supreme Court says ‘no’ to NY strip club’s tax relief plea.

The Critical Question: Do Women in Accounting Really Have More Opportunities Than They Did Ten Years Ago? (Going Concern)

 

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