Tax Roundup, 10/23/2013: The Earned income tax credit thief subsidy feature. And: tax season delayed!

October 23rd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Some smart people are big fans of the Earned Income Tax Credit. Some see it as a way to help the working poor, and some see it as a less destructive way to achieve the goals of minimum wages.

Yesterday the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration reported that from 21% to 25% of the earned income credit was paid improperly for the most recent fiscal year, and that $110 to $130 billion has been “paid improperly” over the past decade. That’s a nice way of saying “stolen.”

 

EITC error chart

Just because there is a lot of theft doesn’t by itself make a program bad — though that kind of loss rate would bankrupt anybody in the private sector.   Most people would send food to starving people in a war zone knowing that local warlords will be plundering some of it. But a program that comes at the cost of sending $11 billion annually to thieves needs to otherwise be a very good thing.   That’s not so clear with the EITC.

The credit does help the working poor — as long as they stay poor. As they work their way out of poverty, it becomes a trap. The phase-out of the credit imposes a punishing unstated, but very real, marginal tax rate.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The EITC is only one program that does this; all “means-tested” welfare programs do this to some degree. It’s not uncommon for this implicit tax rate to exceed 100% at some income levels.

I don’t know what the right answer is (Arnold Kling has some ideas), but increasing the EITC, like Iowa did this year, isn’t it.

 

Oh, Goody. 2014 Tax Season to Start Later Following Government Closure; IRS Sees Heavy Demand As Operations Resume (IRS Press Release)

The IRS is exploring options to shorten the expected delay and will announce a final decision on the start of the 2014 filing season in December, Acting IRS Commissioner Danny Werfel said. The original start date of the 2014 filing season was Jan. 21, and with a one- to two-week delay, the IRS would start accepting and processing 2013 individual tax returns no earlier than Jan. 28 and no later than Feb. 4. 

20131023-1It’s funny how programming IRS computers isn’t “essential,” but barricading open-air monuments is.

Other coverage:

William Perez, IRS Expects to Delay the Start of the 2014 Filing Season

Kay Bell, IRS won’t accept 2013 tax returns until Jan. 28, 2014

Russ Fox, Sigh: 2014 Tax Season to be Delayed up to Two Weeks

TaxGrrrl, IRS Announces Delayed Start To 2014 Tax Season   

 

Robert D. Flach, HOW TO DEAL WITH THE IRS AND LIVE TO FIGHT ANOTHER DAY

Paul Neiffer,  Taxpayers Want Their Cake, Frosting and Candles! Live by the low estate-tax value, die by the low estate-tax value.

Jack Townsend, Has the U.S. Aided International Tax Evasion?

Russ Fox,  Coming Attractions: When the IRS Writes New Law When They’re Not Allowed To.  A federal judge has allowed a suit challenging the IRS unilaterally extending the tax credit for insurance purchased on state-sponsored exchanges to policies sold on federally-run exchanges.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 167

 

President Reagan signs PL 99-514, the Tax Reform Act of 1986.The Tax Policy Blog takes us on a nostalgia tour in  8 Technological Changes Since the 1986 Tax Reform.  Take a trip back to the days of “car phones.”

 

Clint Stretch, Whom Do Tax Reformers Want to Help? (Tax Analysts Blog):

When congressional leaders start talking about tax reform as if it will benefit everyone, someone should be asking: Whom are you trying to help? The answer may be Americans earning more than around $75,000 who have fewer itemized deductions, fewer kids, fewer healthcare benefits, and lower retirement savings than most.

I’m not convinced that’s the right way to look at it.  Getting rid of complexity and lowering rates helps everybody by eliminating dead weight loss and redirecting resources from tax planning and compliance to more useful pursuits.

Andrew Lundeen, A Lot Has Changed in the 27 Years Since the Last Major Tax Reform (Tax Policy Blog).  “The amount of credits, loopholes, and deductions has increase by 44 percent, from $844 billion (2013 dollars), to over $1.2 trillion (2013 dollars), with much of that growth coming from the expansion of refundable tax credits.”

 

Howard Gleckman, Congress Shouldn’t Forget About Tax Entitlements In Its Search for Deficit Reduction (TaxVox)

 

Tax Justice Blog,  Governor Scott Walker Appropriates State Budget Surplus for Campaign Season Tax Cut.  In Tax Justice World, returning money taken by force of law to the taxpayers is “appropriating” it.

 

David Brunori, Eliminating the Sales Tax Is a Very Good Idea (Tax Analysts Blog) “But ending a tax that preys on the poor and is increasingly difficult to collect may provide the economic boost Rhode Island needs.”

Brian Strahle, BLAMING THE PLAYERS FOR THE RULES.  “Regardless, most taxpayers are simply trying to comply with the maze and complexity of non-uniform multistate tax laws”

Joseph Thorndike, The Gas Tax Doesn’t Work Because Politicians Broke It (Tax Analysts Blog).  By not raising it, apparently.

 

The Critical Question:  JD Salinger – Was January 27 2010 A Good Day To Die ?  (Peter Reilly)

Career Corner.  First Round Interview Tips for This Fall’s Accounting Recruits (Going Concern)

 

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