Tax Roundup, 2/19/14: Irish Democracy on Independence Day Edition.

February 19th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

My Poli-sci professors didn’t teach “Irish Democracy“:

More regimes have been brought, piecemeal, to their knees by what was once called ‘Irish Democracy,’ the silent, dogged resistance, withdrawal, and truculence of millions of ordinary people, than by revolutionary vanguards or rioting mobs.

One regime with buckling knees is Iowa’s 76-year ban on fireworks.  From the Des Moines Register:

On Monday, a subcommittee passed Senate Study Bill 3182, which would allow Iowans to shoot off firecrackers, bottle rockets, Roman candles and similar devices. The measure, which won approval despite objections from medical groups worried about public safety, now goes to the Iowa Senate State Government Committee.

Sen. Jeff Danielson, D-Cedar Falls, a professional firefighter who chairs the Senate panel and is sponsoring the legislation, sees the bill as acknowledging reality. Iowa is one of only four states to ban most fireworks but allow sparklers and novelties, including toy snakes and caps used in cap pistols. Selling or firing anything else is a simple misdemeanor that can result in a fine of $250.

Danielson noted that Iowans already have fireworks in their car trunks and in their basements that are purchased in other states, even if they can’t legally explode them.

In other words, Iowans are ignoring the law.  It’s funny that we celebrate U.S. independence via Irish Democracy.  Of course there’s a tax angle:

Collecting tax revenue from legal sales of fireworks has been the crux of the argument in states where laws have recently changed, said Julie Heckman, executive director of the American Pyrotechnics Association. 

Count on legislators to do what constituents want when they finally see that there’s revenue to be had.

 

In other Iowa legislative news:

A bill has been introduced to repeal Iowa’s inheritance tax.  S.F. 2222 is an excellent idea that was consigned to its doom by being assigned to a subcommittee of Bolkcom, Bertrand and Quirmbach.

A state general fund spending limitation, with savings assigned to reserve funds and a “personal income tax rate reduction fund,” would be created by S.F. 2220.  I love the idea, but until Iowa’s long term pension funding problem is addressed, it’s all window dressing.

20120906-1A new form of corporate welfare for developers is contemplated in H.F. 2305.  It would create a “workforce housing tax incentives program” whose requirements imply that some lobbyist has specific projects in mind:

First, the housing project must consist of a certain type and number of dwelling units. The project must include, at a minimum, four or more single-family dwelling units, one or more multiple dwelling unit buildings that each contain three or more individual dwelling units, or two or more dwelling units located in the upper story of an existing multi-use building…

Second, the housing project must involve a certain type of development in a certain geographic location. The project may involve the rehabilitation, repair, or redevelopment of any dwelling unit if it occurs at a brownfield or grayfield site, as those terms are defined in the bill, or in a distressed workforce housing community. The project may involve the rehabilitation, repair, or redevelopment anywhere in the state of a dilapidated dwelling unit or a dwelling unit located in the upper story of an existing multi-use building. The project may involve the new construction of a dwelling unit if it is in a distressed workforce housing community, but shall not include the new construction of a multi-use building…

Third, the average dwelling unit cost of a housing project must not exceed $200,000 per dwelling unit, or $250,000 per dwelling unit if the project involves the rehabilitation, repair, redevelopment, or preservation of “eligible property”, which means the same as defined for purposes of the historic preservation and cultural and entertainment district tax credit in Code chapter 404A…

The median price of a home sold in Iowa was $132,453 in 2013.  This bill would subsidize construction of much more expensive dwellings than we already have for “workforce housing.”   That means builders of unsubsidized units would lose out to whoever is behind this credit.  Owners of houses already built will have their values reduced by the addition of subsidized units to the market.  But the Economic Development bureaucrats will have more money to give to their friends.

 

 

David Henderson, Krugman on Supply-Siders and Incentive Effects of Tax Cuts:

This is an interesting admission on Krugman’s part for two reasons. First, he recognizes, as one must, that the Laffer curve exists. Second, he admits that supply-siders don’t kid themselves that we are in the backward-bending portion, the part where an increase in tax rates reduces government revenues and a decrease in tax rates increases government revenues. I so miss the Paul Krugman of the 1990s.

To be honest, some do kid themselves, just as many of their oppenents deny that taxes have any disincentive effects.

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Andrew Lundeen, Share of U.S. Corporate Income and Taxes by Size (Tax Policy Blog).  ”In 2010, U.S. corporations paid about $223 billion in income taxes on slightly more than $1 trillion in taxable income. However, the vast majority of this income and taxes is attributable to the roughly 2,700 corporations with assets above $2.5 billion.”

 

Jason Dinesen, The Iowa Taxpayers Trust Fund Tax Credit   

Joseph Thorndike, Harry Truman Knew the Truth: IRS Budget Cuts Are Very Expensive (Tax Analysts Blog).

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 286

David Brunori, Blaming Big Corporations Is Not the Answer (Tax Analysts Blog) “Following the law is hardly a corrupt activity.”

 

Tax Justice Blog, Tax Preparers Should Be Regulated.  Nonsense based on the unwarranted assumption that the regulations will actually solve anything.

Kay Bell, Guns & taxes converge again, this time in Connecticut, Florida

 

News from the Profession.  The CPA Exam is Broken Into Parts But These Sentences Not So Much (Going Concern)

 

20130316-1Maybe Irish Democracy is better than voting democracy.  From Arnold Kling:

James Lindgren reports,

in 2012 a majority of Democrats (51.6%) cannot correctly answer both that the earth revolves around the Sun and that this takes a year. Republicans fare a bit better, with only 38.9% failing to get both correct.

I file this under “libertarian thought,” because to me it speaks to the issue of how romantic one should be about democratic voting.

Science!

 

Programming Note: I am airborne much of today.  I am improvising the back end of my travel plans to avoid the blizzard of doom slated for Iowa.  In short, no posting is likely tomorrow.  See you Friday!

 

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