Tax Roundup, 9/24/15: Small partnership, big late-filing penalties. And: tax tips from the Duke and the Yogi.

September 24th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150813-1Didn’t file that 1065? The penalties can add up, even for small partnerships. Congress decided a few years ago that late-filed partnership returns could be an IRS profit center. They imposed a penalty of $195 per partner for returns filed even one day late — a penalty repeated for each additional month the return is late. Needless to say, a ten-person partnership can rack up a big bill.

When Congress enacted that penalty, it left in place an escape hatch. Back in 1984, the IRS issued a ruling providing a standard exemption from the late filing penalty for “small partnerships.” Rev. Proc. 84-35 allows partnerships composed only of individuals with straight-up allocations of income and loss to be excused from the late filing penalty. But there’s a catch: the penalties are excused only:

…provided that the partnership, or any of the partners, establishes, if so requested by the Internal Revenue Service, that all partners have fully reported their shares of the income, deductions, and credits of the partnership on their timely filed income tax returns.

A Federal Court in South Dakota this week ruled that this catch means a late-filing small partnership is at the mercy of its least responsible partner to avoid penalties. One late-filing partner can cause penalties for the whole partnership.

Battle Flat, LLC filed its 2007 and 2007 Form 1065s over six months late. It requested a penalty waiver based on Rev. Proc. 84-35. Unfortunately, none of the six partners filed a timely 1040 for 2007, and three of them also filed their 2008 returns late — four years late in one case. The IRS denied the penalty relief because the partnership was unable to demonstrate “that all partners have fully reported their shares of the income, deductions, and credits of the partnership on their timely filed income tax returns.”

The partnership argued that the requirement for timely-filed partner returns isn’t a requirement that the statute allows. On brief, the partnership argues:

Congress did not impose or even mention an intent to require that each individual partner’s (sic) must timely file his or her individual return in order for the partnership to qualify for a “reasonable cause” forgiveness of a late filing penalty. But, the IRS has engrafted such a requirement in Revenue Procedure 84-35.

20140321-4The IRS disagrees, and so does the Federal Judge (citations and footnotes omitted, emphasis added):

The IRS’ position is persuasive. Although § 6698 does not expressly impose a timeliness requirement by which partners in a “small” partnership must file their personal income tax return in lieu of filing a partnership tax return, this is exactly the type of interpretative question left to the discretion of the IRS in implementing our nation’s tax laws. The IRS’ interpretation that partners in a “small” partnership timely file their personal income tax returns is reasonable and is a highly practical aid in its assessment of the tax consequences of a partnership for a given year and on a year-over-year basis. IRS’ interpretation is consistent with the legislative history of § 9968 in that it strains credulity to characterize a personal income tax return filed years after the reporting deadline as an adequate, full reporting of each partner’s share of the partnership’s income and deductions.

Conversely, Battle Flat’s interpretation that § 9968’s “reasonable cause” exception is satisfied so long as the partners in a “small” partnership file their personal income tax returns at some unspecified future date is unreasonable. The interpretation would result in a system where the tax consequences of a “small” partnership would go unassessed for years at a time. Furthermore, under Battle Flat’s interpretation, the IRS would be required to track the status of each partner’s personal income tax return until every partner’s tax return was received before it could accurately calculate the annual tax consequences of the partnership.

At least one commentator appears to argue that small partnerships are excused from annual 1065 filing requirements. That’s not how the judge ruled in this case. While this case may be appealed, partners should consider this a warning that the IRS and at least one federal judge aren’t on board with a blanket filing exemption for small partnerships. Considering how fast that $195 per partner, per month penalty can add up, filing timely 1065s for small partnerships seems like a prudent bet.

Cite: Battle Flat, LLC (USDC-SD, No. 5:13-5070-JLV)

Related: Roger McEowen, The Small Partnership Exception – A Possible Way to Avoid Failure to File Penalities, but Not Complexity

 

Liz Malm, Does Your State Levy a Capital Stock Tax? (Tax Policy Blog):

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“In broad economic terms, capital stock taxes (referred to as franchise taxes in many states) are destructive because they disincentivize the accumulation of additional wealth, or capital, which distorts the size of firms.”

 

Robert D. Flach, DO NOTHING TILL YOU HEAR FROM ME:

If you receive a balance due notice from the IRS or a state tax agency DO NOT AUTOMATICALLY PAY THE AMOUNT REQUESTED!

In my 40+ years of preparing tax returns I have found that more often than not (actually in my experience it is more like 75% of the time) a balance due notice from “Sam” or your state is wrong. And, again in my experience, notices from a state tax agency (at least when it comes to NJ and NY) are wrong more than ones from the IRS.

Robert speaks wisely. As scammers are getting more sophisticated — sometimes even mailing authentic-looking “IRS notices” — this advice becomes even more important.

 

Jason Dinesen, When Do I Have to Take My RMD? If you don’t start withdrawing from your retirement accounts on time, penalties can be ugly.

Tony Nitti, Tax Court: Drop In Property Value Does Not Create Deductible Loss. You usually have to sell out, as a real estate investor  learned the hard way this week in tax court.

 

TaxGrrrl, Profiting From Star Wars, Michael Jackson & Taylor Swift Memorabilia: There’s A Tax On That

Russ Fox, Are Turf Rebates Taxable?

Robert Wood, Why Churches Are The Gold Standard Of Tax-Exempt Organizations

 

Stephen Olsen, Summary Opinions for the Week Ending 8/21/15. It’s the Procedurally Taxing roundup of recent developments in the tax procedure world.

Kay Bell, How charitable are you and your neighbors? “Overall, ALEC’s analysis found that for every 1 percent increase in a state’s total tax burden, there is a 1.16 percent decrease in the state’s rate of charitable giving.”

Peter Reilly, Yogi Berra’s Sayings Worked Their Way Into Tax Decisions.

 

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Renu Zaretsky, A lawmaker’s work is never done. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup ranges from Russian tax revenue problems to improper EITC credits, plus much more.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 868

 

He was a quiet guy, but he seemed a little odd. Peculiar Man Indicted for Tax Evasion (Kansas City InfoZine). “Tammy Dickinson, United States Attorney for the Western District of Missouri, announced that a Peculiar, Missouri, resident has been indicted by a federal grand jury for tax evasion.”

 

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