Tax Roundup, 3/15/16: Deadline Day, Coupling Vote Day. And: Arnold Palmer’s worst golf partner goes to Tax Court. (Updates)

March 15th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

coupling20160129Coupling day in the General Assembly. The bills to couple Iowa’s 2015 tax law with federal 2015 tax changes (HF 2433 and SF 2303) are scheduled for debate today in the Iowa House and Senate. I expect them to pass easily. The Governor is on vacation in Florida, but GlobeGazette.com reports that he “is expected to return to Iowa later this week” and sign the bill. We will update this post if and when the votes come down.

Update, 3:40 p.m.: The Senate passes the House bill without amendment, 50-0. On to the Governor.

Update, 1:09 p.m.: A glitch? The Iowa Society of CPAs twitter feed reports:

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I know nothing more, but if they approve an amended version, it has to go back to the House for a re-vote. I’ll monitor and update if I learn more.

Update, 10:26 am: coupling bill HF 2433 passes Iowa House, 78-17. On to Senate later today.

 

Deadline day! Corporation returns are due today. Also due are two key international tax forms, for trusts and withholding on interest, dividend and other non-business income paid to foreign taxpayers. Russ Fox has more on that.

e-file logoTake care to document that you are filing your returns or extensions timely. E-file is best if you can, as you have no worries about mail truck mishaps. If you file on paper, Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested, is the tried-and-true way to prove you filed your returns on time.

If you don’t get to the post office on time, you can file up until midnight at the UPS Store or Fed-ex store, but be careful. Make sure you use one of the IRS-approved shipping services (for example, UPS Ground doesn’t qualify, but “Next-Day Air does). Make sure that you shipping slip has a pre-midnight time stamp. And you have to use the street addresses of the IRS service centers, rather than their P.O. boxes.

Related: William Perez, How to Mail Tax Returns to the Internal Revenue Service

 

(also see [1]). Direct image URL [2], Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2199960

By U.S. Coast Guard – U.S. Coast Guard historical photo

Worst Golf Partner Ever. Arnold Palmer, the famous golfer, did less well in the auto business, thanks to a partner involved in a Tax Court case released yesterday. The companies, BOH and APAG, were funded in part by Mr. Palmer. Judge Nega sets the stage:

Petitioner began siphoning money from Arnold Palmer Motors, Inc., as early as October 1985. When one dealership ran short on cash, petitioner transferred money from another dealership to cover the shortfall. Rather than transferring funds directly between dealership accounts, petitioner routed transfers through his personal bank account. Petitioner routinely kept some of the transferred funds in his own account instead of transferring them to the appropriate dealership. Messrs. Palmer and McCormack did not authorize petitioner to take money from the dealerships.

The bad partner diversified into stealing from other S corporations funded by Mr. Palmer and others, but in which he held a 1/3 interest. After some time he was caught, and the tax man came calling.

The taxpayer took a bold tax return position. You need basis in an S corporation to take losses. Loans you make to an S corporation can create basis for taking losses. The taxpayer said that he made loans to the corporations he was stealing from, giving him basis.

The Tax Court found this improbable (my emphasis):

The record contains no evidence reliably establishing petitioners’ bases, if any, in the Arnold Palmer dealerships or their entitlement to NOLs arising therefrom. Petitioners have not provided any Forms 1120S, U.S. Income Tax Return for an S Corporation, or Forms 1065, Schedule K-1, Partner’s Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc., for any of the Arnold Palmer dealerships in which petitioner was a one-third shareholder. They contend that he contributed “significant funds” to the dealerships but do not identify any specific dollar amounts contributed. In contrast, the record reflects that petitioners misappropriated amounts in excess of $6 million from the Arnold Palmer dealerships during the late 1980s which they did not report on their 1988 or 1989 income tax return.

As you may guess, the Tax Court ruled against the taxpayer, big time, with 75% civil fraud penalties.

I assume, dear reader, that you aren’t stealing from your employer. If you are, you should be reading another tax blog. But even non-thief readers can draw a lesson. You need basis to take an S corporation loss, and you need the records to show it. The taxpayer here was claiming losses from net operating loss carryforwards created by alleged S corporation losses. He failed to provide sufficient records from the loss years to convince the Tax Court.

The Moral? If you are claiming loss carryforwards, you need to preserve the tax records for the years in which the losses arise, and all intervening years, to document your right to the losses. That’s true even though the statute for limitations for the loss years has expired. Net operating losses carry forward for 20 years. That means you may need to maintain the records for the loss years for 23 years — and for all of the years in between — if you take 20 years to use them up.

Cite: O’Neal, Jr., T.C. Memo 2016-49.

 

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TaxGrrrl, IRS Alerts Taxpayers To New Tax Season Related Phone Scam:

Here’s how the new scam works. The scammer calls you and says that are with the IRS and have your tax return. They then say they need to verify some information to process your return. Those details generally involve asking for your personal information such as a Social Security number or personal financial information, such as bank numbers or credit cards.

To make the scam appear legitimate, scammers often alter caller ID numbers to make it look like the IRS or another government agency is calling. The callers may refer to IRS titles, fake names and fake badge numbers. They may know your name, address and other personal information that they offer to make the call sound official.

Be careful, and remember: if the caller says he’s from the IRS, he’s lying.

 

Peter Reilly, Sales Tax Collection By Out Of State Vendors May End Up At Supreme Court Again. “The reporting requirements may have created a situation illustrative of Reilly’s Second Law of Tax Planning – Sometimes it’s better to just pay the taxes.”

David Vendler, Can a Receiver Take Advantage of the Claim of Right Provisions to Benefit Defrauded Consumers? (Procedurally Taxing)

Paul Neiffer, When Not To Take A Discount? “When a farmer has a taxable estate, we usually try to obtain a discount by splitting up land ownership into “fractional” ownership.”

Kay Bell, How long are you willing to wait for your tax refund? I.D. theft has forced tax agencies to slow down refunds to keep them from going to thieves.

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1041.

J.D. Tucille, Poor Americans Will Be Stuck With the Tab for Bernie Sanders’ Generous Promises (Reason.com). “At the end of the day, grandiose promises of massive government programs are cheap. But paying for them has a high price tag—and it will be shouldered by those with the fewest means to afford the cost.” In other words, the rich guy isn’t picking up the tab, because he can’t.

Kyle Pomerleau, It Was Not A Good Week For The Patent Box (Tax Policy Blog):

A patent box, or “innovation box,” is a tax policy that provides a lower tax rate on income related to intellectual property. The stated goal of a patent box is to promote research and development, encourage companies to locate intellectual property in the country with the incentive, and to make a country’s tax code more internationally competitive.

Just as the research credit is an incentive to call more of what you do “research,” the patent box would end up broadening the definition of intellectual property income. The only innovation it would generate would be on the part of the same sort of specialty companies that make their living doing research credit studies.

Renu Zaretsky, Only Thirty-three days till Tax Day! Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers tax refund statistics so far this season and the hiring by H&R Block of a former senator as a lobbyist for increasing barriers to competition and H&R Block profits through regulation of (other) tax preparers.

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