Tax Roundup, 3/26/14: Using Bitcoins regularly will get you a really long Form 8949. And: underpants!

March 26th, 2014 by Joe Kristan


Bitcoin
Bitcoins may act like money, but IRS says they aren’t.  
The IRS yesterday announced how that it will treat Bitcoin “virtual currency” as property, rather than currency, for tax purposes.  Notice 2014-21 lays out the IRS treatment of Bitcoin and similar virtual money.  Some key points:

- As property, gains and losses on Bitcoin are normally capital gains and losses, unless the taxpayer is a dealer in Bitcoins.  That means losses are limited to capital gains plus $3,000 for individuals.  This contrasts with currency transactions, which normally generate ordinary income and loss under Section 988.

Transactions in virtual currency will normally generate gains and losses:

If the fair market value of property received in exchange for virtual currency exceeds the taxpayer’s adjusted basis of the virtual currency, the taxpayer has taxable gain. The taxpayer has a loss if the fair market value of the property received is less than the adjusted basis of the virtual currency.

That makes using Bitcoins a hassle for taxpayers who try to follow the law.  Everytime you buy something with Bitcoin, you will have a capital gain or loss, depending on fluctuations in the Bitcoin market.  Imagine if you had to record a little capital gain or loss based on the currency markets anytime you bought anything with cash.  If you use Bitcoins every day you’ll have a horrifying Form 8949 to report all of your gains and losses.

The basis in virtual currency is its value on date of receipt, if you acquire it in a transaction.  That same value is the amount you use to compute income if you are paid in virtual currency

- They point out the obvious:  ”A taxpayer who receives virtual currency as payment for goods or services must, in computing gross income, include the fair market value of the virtual currency, measured in U.S. dollars, as of the date that the virtual currency was received.” Also, payments in virtual currency are subject to information reporting, same as cash.

Virtual currency “miners” generate ordinary income.  If they do it as a trade or business, it’s subject to self-employment tax.

The TaxProf has more; Accounting Today also has coverage.  Peter Reilly has Bitcoins Not Tax Fairy Dust – Second Life Still A Tax Haven?, wisely noting that the virtual currency isn’t generated by the Tax Fairy.  And TaxGrrrl weighs in with IRS Says Bitcoin, Other Convertible Virtual Currency To Be Taxed Like Stock .

 

Ashlea Ebeling, Supreme Court Says FICA Tax Due On Severance Pay:

What the Supreme Court decision means for employers is that what had long been the case –severance pay is subject to FICA tax—remains the case. And for employees who are laid off, it means that they will continue to get a little less in “take-home” severance because it’s dinged for their share of FICA tax.

It seemed like a reach to say otherwise, but now it’s not even that.

 

 

A hard-working fictional student.

A hard-working fictional student.

O. Kay Henderson, Legislators ponder tax credit for student loan payments.  A truly awful idea.  This credit doesn’t encourage getting higher education; it encourages borrowing to pay for higher education.  As an unintended but obvious consequence, it discourages saving to pay for college — there’s no tax credit for foregoing current consumption to pay for college later.  It’s stunning that lawmakers actually want to encourage more student debt when many students already are entering a brutal job market with crushing loan obligations.

Joseph Henchman has two posts at Tax Policy Blog that should be read together: Wisconsin Approves Income Tax Reduction, Business Tax Reforms and Who Would Pay a Higher Illinois Income Tax?  Not the folks that move to Wisconsin, for sure.

 

Jason Dinesen, More on the 0.9% Medicare Tax and Iowa Tax Returns

Paul Neiffer, Schedule F Reporting Update:

I got some feedback on my previous post on Tax Reform and low Schedule F reporting of income. Several sources of farm income does not show up on a Schedule F. This includes many common sales of farm assets such as breeding stock and equipment. Most of the expenses associated with this income is deducted on Schedule F, however when these assets are sold, none of the gains appears on Schedule F.  Rather, this income is usually reported on Form 4797.

That still doesn’t change the fact that these simple farmers play the cash method like a violin to achieve tax results other businesses can only dream of.

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Demystifying The Deduction Rules For Accrued Liabilities   

William Perez, Identity Theft and Your Income Taxes

Kay Bell, IRS gives Colorado flood victims until Oct. 15 to file 2012 or 2013 tax returns claiming disaster losses

Janet Novack, Gotcha! Tax Court Penalizes IRA Rollover That IRS Publication Says Is Allowed   

 

David Brunori, Hang On to Your Wallets (Tax Analysts Blog)

Howard Gleckman, Dave Camp’s Plan for the Expired Tax Provisions: An Almost-Good Idea (TaxVox)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 321

Tax Justice Blog, State News Quick Hits: To Cut or Not to Cut?

 

Joseph ThorndikeRaising Taxes on the Rich Won’t Balance the Budget — But It’s Still Important (Tax Analysts Blog):

 The modern American fiscal state is predicated on a bargain. During World War II, lawmakers were forced to expand the personal income tax to help pay for the fighting. Over the course of just a few years, they added millions of middle-class Americans to the tax rolls for the first time, transforming the income tax from a rich man’s burden to a middle-class millstone. In return, however, these same lawmakers offered the middle class an implicit (and sometimes nearly explicit) guarantee — rich people would be asked to pony up, too.

Cool story.  Let’s see how that works nowadays:

Top 1 pays more than bottom 90

Chart by Tax Foundation

So now the “rich” aren’t paying their “fair share,” they’re picking up most of the tab.  How does it work if you break it down further?

20131030-2

So not only do “the rich” pay their share of the freight, they pay a lot more than their share of earnings.  And when you take government benefits into account, the whole “fair share” argument is tough to support:

givers and takers

Chart by Tax Foundation

I don’t buy Joseph’s “social contract” thinking.  The whole emphasis on inequality being peddled by the administration is a diversion, an attempt to change the subject from the manifest failures of Obamacare and foreign policy blundering.  No matter how hard they hit “the rich,” or how bad doing so is for the overall economy, there is never a point where the politicians will say the rich are being hit enough.

To the extent “inequality” persists, it’s clearly not a direct function of the tax code or government spending.  Politicians, though, find it useful to encourage the belief that they can spend on whatever pleases the crowd by just by making the rich pay their “fair share” — as if they weren’t already.  It’s the flip side of the widespread belief that the government can just balance the budget by cutting foreign aid.   It’s just an attempt to fool the gullible long enough to win another election.

 

Going Concern, Thrift Shops Issue Specific Guidance on Deduction Amounts for Used Underpants.  I didn’t know there was a deduction for toxic waste.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/25/14: Shaky foundations can be costly. And: monitors!

March 25th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140325-1Not a firm foundation.  A U.S. District Court case out of Texas last week shows why using a tax-exempt entity can be hazardous to your health.  A Mr. Ziegenhals was “manager, director, trustee, and registered agent” of The Le Tulle Foundation, which was “formed in 1991 as a testamentary trust with the stated purpose of operating ‘exclusively for charitable purposes for the benefit of the citizens of Matagorda County, Texas [and] for no other purposes.’”

The court said an IRS audit found that Mr. Ziegnhals “used funds from the Foundation to obtain personal benefits and pay his expenses unrelated to the purported charitable purposes.”  That triggered a revocation of charitable status and taxes on “self-dealing,”  The total amount of “self-dealing” is alleged as $46,266.21.

What did that cost the alleged self-dealer?  From the decision (my emphasis):

The amount allegedly owed by Ziegenhals – $461,125.44 as of November 29, 2013 — is based on the IRS’s calculations of penalties, statutory additions, and interest that have accrued from his unpaid private foundation excise taxes in 2003 and his unpaid federal income taxes in 2007. See Docket Entry Nos. 42-13, 42-14, 42-15. The current amount owed is much larger than the original unpaid taxes of $46,266.21 from 2003 and $6,829.98 from 2007 because the IRS assessed several statutory taxes and penalties on Ziegenhals as both a self-dealer and foundation manager for each year until he was issued the notice of deficiency in 2009 -- an example of what can happen when someone fails to pay his taxes in the first place and then also does not cooperate in repaying the delinquencies in a timely manner.

For example, the IRS imposed a first tier tax of 5 percent for each act of self-dealing, see 26 U.S.C. § 4941(a)(1), a second tier tax of 200 percent of the amount involved for each act of self-dealing that was not corrected within the taxable period, see § 4941(b)(1), a first tier tax of 2.5 percent against Ziegenhals as the foundation manager, see § 4945(a)(2), and a second tier tax of 50 percent of the amount involved for refusing to agree to corrections, see § 4945(b)(2). In addition, the IRS determined that Ziegenhals’ actions constituted willful and flagrant conduct, and thus imposed a penalty equal to the amount of the private foundation excise taxes pursuant to § 6684. 

I don’t recommend private foundations for taxpayers who lack a huge amount of money.  While it can seem attractive to have something named for you that will outlive you, you need a lot of money to make it worth the hassle.  You have to file very detailed and complicated annual reports with the IRS, with $100 daily penalties for late filing.  Those filings are open to the public.  And if you or your heirs get careless in managing the foundation, the taxes and penalties can explode, as the gentleman from Texas now knows.

It’s much easier to use a donor-advised fund run by a competent charity, like The Community Foundation of Greater Des Moines.  They take care of the filings and hassles, and you get at least as good of a tax benefit as you get from having your own foundation.

Cite: Zeigenhals (USDC SD-TX, 3:11-cv-00464)

 

20120906-1Special interest break approaches the checkered flag.  The bill to extend the special sales tax spiff for the Newton racetrack passed the Iowa Senate yesterday.   The bill lets the track keep sales tax it collects from customers, up to a 5% rate.

The break was first passed when the track opened, with requirement that 25% of the ownership be from Iowa and with a 2016 expiration.  When NASCAR bought the track, that ended the deal.  SF 2341 extends the deal through 2025 and lets NASCAR, owned by a wealthy out-of-state family, keep this special deal that is unavailable for any other tourist and entertainment facilities competing for Iowa dollars (though an athletic facility under construction in Dyersville will have a similar break).  I’m sure they have a good story why they needed to pass this, but I don’t buy it; the track isn’t going anywhere, and NASCAR bought it knowing they didn’t qualify.

Like much bad legislation, it had bipartisan support, passing 36-9.  There is a glimmer of good news.  The total of nine “no” votes is the most I’ve seen for an “economic development” giveaway.  Hats off to Senators Behn (R, Boone), Bowman (D, Jackson), Chapman (R, Dallas), Chelgren (R, Wappelo), Guth (R, Hancock) , Quirmbach (D, Story), Schneider (R, Dallas), Smith (R, Scott) and Whitver (R, Polk).

 

Time for Project Oblivion!  The Des Moines Register reports West Des Moines data center project gets $18 million in incentives:

Iowa’s next major data center prospect seeking state-incentive money is headed to the Iowa Economic Development Authority with a stamp of approval from the West Des Moines City Council.

The council on Monday endorsed “Project Alluvion” as a consent agenda item without any discussion, offering up to $18 million in local incentives to land the major project.

Council documents show Project Alluvion would create at least 84 jobs and a minimum of $255 million in taxable valuation.

“People might say, ‘Geez, giving $18 million for only 84 jobs.’ The jobs are important, but it’s more than the jobs,” Councilman Russ Trimble said after Monday’s meeting. “It’s going to help us build the tax base and keep property taxes down.”

That’s 214,285.71 per “job.”   So, if we were to move our firm to West Des Moines, that would qualify us for about $7.5 million.  Hey, we use computers — we’re high-tech!  We’d even call it a cool name, like Project Oblivion!  Or Des Moines can pay us to stay, whatever.

Related:  LOCAL CPA FIRM VOWS TO SWALLOW PRIDE, ACCEPT $28 MILLION

 

Joseph Henchman, Wisconsin Approves Income Tax Reduction, Business Tax Reforms (Tax Policy Blog).

 

Kris20140321-3ty Maitre, Changes Coming for IRA Rollovers in 2015. (ISU-CALT)  ” So going forward, advise your client to make only one IRA rollover per tax year, or to be on the safe side one rollover every 366 days.”

Peter Reilly, No Margin For Error When Using IRA Rollover As Bridge Loan   

Kay Bell, IRS offers an easier way to deduct your home office 

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): M Is For Medicare Payments   

Paul Neiffer, One More Reason Why Tax Reform is Going After Cash Method:

 I ran across a posting on the net farm income and loss reported by Schedule F farmers for 2011 and 2012.  During each of these years, the USDA estimated that farmers had net farm income in excess of $120 billion.

However, on schedule Fs reported by individual farmers, they showed a net loss in 2011 of about $7.11 billion and for 2012 a net loss of $5.06 billion. 

Yeah, “simplification” is really why farmers need accrual accounting.  Not paying tax is a lot simpler.

 

Jeremy Scott, Portman’s Disappointing Tax Reform Plan (Tax Analysts Blog).

Len Burman, Profiles in Courage at the IRS (Really) (TaxVox).  It’s a good post, once you get past the manifestly false statement that the current scandals are “fake.”  And you’ll notice that Doug Shulman, unlike the hero of the Burman post, left on his own terms.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 320

 

 

Going ConcernThe Debate Heats Up Over How Many Computer Monitors You Should Have.  The good folks at GC quote some loser who says nobody needs more than one monitor.  Here’s how I feel about the issue:

monitors

Now if the one monitor was, oh, 3′ x 5′, I’d reconsider.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/24/14: Iowa corporate tax, $409 million; Iowa tax credits, $337 million. And: Bozo no-nos!

March 24th, 2014 by Joe Kristan


20120906-1
How about a trade: Corporate Income Tax for Corporate Welfare.
  Interesting numbers from The Des Moines Register:

The state awarded $278.5 million in tax credits during the 2013 fiscal year, down 9.3 percent from the year before, according to a new revenue report.

The department estimates that Iowa will have to pay a maximum of $436.9 million for fiscal 2014, and $487.9 million in fiscal 2015. Those numbers are considered the state’s “contingent liabilities.” However, the department expects claims on the awards will be less.

The department expects the state will pay about $337.9 million in fiscal 2014, and $366.8 million for fiscal 2015.

The entire net revenue from Iowa’s corporation income tax for 2013 was $403.6 million, with an estimate for fiscal 2014 of about $409 million.  So the entire Iowa corporate tax system takes about $400 million from corporations and then hands over 75-85% of it to other businesses.   Let’s consider the difference to be a fee for administering this system of taking from the productive and giving to the well-connected.  It’s about a wash.

From the outside, the answer seems obvious: no tax credits, no corporation tax.  Iowa would go from having one of the very worst corporation income taxes — and the one with the highest stated rate — to one of the very best.  The downside is that it would displace a little industry of tax credit middlemen and fixers idle economic development officials.   If that’s a downside…

Related: The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.

Chelsea Keenan, Are tax incentives an effective economic development tool? (Cedar Rapids Gazette). “But an October 2013 study published in the Journal of Regional Science that examined the possible benefits to states that offer manufacturers tax incentives receive, and determined there is no measurable gain.”

Lyman Stone, Illinois Speaker Madigan Proposes 3 Percent High-Earner Tax (Tax Policy Good).  Illinois is doing its best to make Iowa look good.

 

20121120-2Jonathan Adler, Was Delaying the Employer Mandate Legal? Did the IRS Even Check? (Volokh Conspiracyvia the TaxProf):

The legal justification for the employer mandate delay offered by the Treasury Department has been exceedingly weak.  Perhaps this is because the Treasury Department never considered whether it had legal authority to delay the employer mandate until after it made the decision to delay it.

More of the results-driven regulation we’ve been talking about.

 

roses in the snowPeter Reilly, Do Some Looking And Thinking Before Signing Form 1040 .  ”I’d like to suggest that you take a deep breath and actually look at your return before you take that final step.”  Excellent advice.

Kay Bell, 4 tax breaks for older filers

William Perez: What to Do if You Get a Call from the IRS Asking for Money.  If they haven’t contacted you by mail, hang up.   It’s a scam.

Kristy Maitre, recently of IRS and now with the ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation, tells how to go about Requesting the Transfer an of IRS Audit.  ”Do not simply say that you want to transfer the audit. That will result, in nearly all cases, with a non-transfer.   You must state your case.”

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): L Is For Lost Property

Jack Townsend, Another UBS Depositor Indicted; the Russian Connection

Keith Fogg, What is the scope of a tax lien discharge versus the remaining tax lien (Procedurally Taxing)

 

haroldJoseph Henchman, Kevin Spacey at Annapolis Bar Tonight to Lobby Legislators for Subsidies (Tax Policy Blog):

Kevin Spacey is my favorite actor—I spent my entire recent vacation flight watching his movies—so it’s hard for me to say bad things about him. But he’s also a celebrity with an alleged net worth of $80 million lobbying for tax subsidies from Maryland taxpayers.

Sure, asking folks to subsidize Hollywood millionaires may seem odd, but as an Iowan said during the height of our starry-eyed film credit debacle:

But some benefits can’t just be measured on a dollar-for-dollar basis. The movies provide employment to local actors, construction crews, artists, caterers, drivers and a host of others. They expose non-Iowans to what the state has to offer. More intangible is the benefit of interactions in a state that can be cut off from the trends and centers of power. Not to mention the excitement factor. We’ve relied on caucuses every four years to bring action and celebrities to town. Now, sightings are anytime, any place.

So pay up, peasants!  You might see a star!

 

Renu Zaretsky, Tax Talk in the District, the Midwest, and Abroad.  It’s the TaxVox news roundup.

Tax Justice Blog, Big News in Ohio: Governor’s Unfair Tax Cut Plan Unveiled.  

Annette Nellen,Book recommendation – Geezer Rap

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 319

News from the Profession.  PwC Competing Against Shaving, Toys and Delicious Food for Guinness World Record Award (Going Concern).

 

Sometimes bad examples are the best teachers.  Blogger  Russ Fox provides some with his “Bozo Tax Tips” series for this year, beginning with Bozo Tax Tip #10: Email Your Social Security Number.  Don’t do it!  ”As I tell my clients, email is fast but it’s not secure.”

 

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IRS releases Applicable Federal Rates (AFR) for April 2014

March 21st, 2014 by Joe Kristan

The IRS has issued (Rev. Rul. 2014-12) the minimum required interest rates for loans made in April 2014:

Short Term (demand loans and loans with terms of up to 3 years): 0.28%

-Mid-Term (loans from 3-9 years): 1.81%

-Long-Term (over 9 years): 3.32%

The Long-term tax-exempt rate for Section 382 ownership changes in April 2014 is 3.56%.

Historical AFRs may be found here or from prior Tax Update posts.

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Tax Roundup, 3/21/14: Reforming S corporations to a frazzle. And: cleaning up at the laundromat!

March 21st, 2014 by Joe Kristan

S-SidewalkThe legislative process has been likened to sausage making.  Sausage doesn’t get more appetizing if you keep looking at it closely over a period of weeks, and neither does the Camp “tax reform” plan.  Andrew Lundeen and Kyle Pomerleau at the Tax Policy Blog today highlight some gristly features of the grand effort by the head GOP taxwriter:

The proposal leaves in place high tax rates for many S corporations, subjects them to additional payroll taxes, creates new distortions between types of industries, and produces two tax rate bubbles.

They note these major S corporation changes:

Creates Different Tax Treatment for Manufacturing and Non-Manufacturing Industries

Camp’s tax reform package introduces complication with a new 10 percent surtax for non-manufacturing income. To make things more complicated, the additional 10 percent surtax would be calculated on a different income scale: modified adjusted gross income or MAGI. This essentially creates two side by side tax codes, a la the AMT, and individuals and businesses would have to calculate their AGI for one and their MAGI for the other.

As I noted, it doesn’t simplify the code by getting rid of the economically foolish Section 199 production deduction; it just moves it to a different section.

20140321-1

The Difference between Active and Passive Shareholders

The difference between active and passive shareholders is important for determining the marginal tax rates for S corporations under Chairman Camp’s plan.

That’s true now, but you’d expect a “reform” plan to get rid of this sort of gratuitous and difficult-to-enforce difference.

20140321-2

Changes to Self-Employment Taxes: the 70/30 Split Rule for SECA Taxes

Under current law, the IRS requires business owners to pay themselves a reasonable wage in order to prevent people from gaming this income distinction in order to avoid the extra 15.3 percent payroll tax hit.

Camp’s plan would replace the current reasonable wage standard with a 70/30 split, changing the rules for active shareholders. The rule would require that active shareholders of S corporations report 70 percent of their total earning as wage income.

I think it’s just one step on the way to a 100/0 split.

Tax Rate Bubble

Another element of Camp’s tax plan is the creation marginal tax rate bubbles. This occurs when a marginal tax rate, for example, goes from 10 percent to 15 percent and back down to 10 percent. We have a post that discusses the marginal tax rates under Camp’s plan, which you can find here.

When a “reform” plan comes with so many phase-outs and distortions, it’s not actually reforming anything.  I think the Camp plan will come to be seen as a false move and a lost opportunity.

 

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): K Is For Keogh Plans   

20140321-3TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 316

William Perez, Average Sales Tax Rates by State: 2014, highlighting a Tax Policy Blog analysis.

Annette Nellen, Revenues versus tax collections.  ”A recent blog post on LinkedIn’s Sales and Use Tax Legislative Updates included a comment from B.J. Pritchett suggesting that what governments collect in taxes should not be called “revenues” because it is not from selling goods and services.”

Tax Justice BlogState News Quick Hits: Don’t Expect Much from Congress.  Always a good idea.

Kay Bell, Senate Finance plans tax extenders vote for week of March 31.  She links to an article quoting a Senate Finance spokeswoman as saying “No decisions have been made on the content of the measure or the timing for a committee session and vote.”

Howard Gleckman, Fiscal Reality Check: Will Congress Pay for the Tax Extenders and the Doc Fix?  Extenders themselves are a scam.  Congress passes them over and over a year at a time so they can pretend that they cost less than they do — funky accounting that would get a public company CFO jail time, but standard procedure in Congress.

 

Jack Townsend, U.S. Attorney Enabler Sentenced for Assisting Offshore Evasion 

 

A new Cavalcade of Risk is up at Insurance Regulatory Law.  The Cavalcade is a venerable roundup of insurance and risk-management posts.  Hank Stern’s contribution, an interview with Neal Halder of Principal Financial Group about their “accelerated underwriting” process for life insurance, is a great read.

Jason Dinesen, Fair Warning: More Baseball Posts to Pop Up this Year.  That’s a good thing.

 

20140321-4Think he reported this income?  Man With Deep Pockets Busted Stealing a Lot of Laundry Money (Going Concern):

Just how many loads of laundry could one do with $460,000 in stolen quarters?

That’s probably not the question asked by public works inspector Thomas Rica, who pleaded guilty this week to stealing that much in quarters from the meter collection room of the New Jersey town for which he worked.

At the laundromats I used back in school, that would have been nearly enough quarters to get your clothes dry.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/20/14: An optional mandate? And: baseball-tax convergence!

March 20th, 2014 by Joe Kristan


20121120-2
Is the Obamacare individual mandate penalty now optional?  
 A couple of weeks ago the Wall Street Journal editorial page published ObamaCare’s Secret Mandate Exemption; HHS quietly repeals the individual purchase rule for two more years.  That’s a pretty bold statement, especially because the Administration has adamantly rejected calls for a delay in the individual mandate, after having delayed the business mandate twice.  If there is no mandate, Obamacare will likely lead to huge losses for insurers (to be subsidized by taxpayers), who need the forced patronage of the healthy to cover the sick that they can no longer exclude or charge risk-adjusted premiums.  Did they really do that and not tell anyone?

Here’s what WSJ says happened:

But amid the post-rollout political backlash, last week the agency created a new category: Now all you need to do is fill out a form attesting that your plan was cancelled and that you “believe that the plan options available in the [ObamaCare] Marketplace in your area are more expensive than your cancelled health insurance policy” or “you consider other available policies unaffordable.”

This lax standard—no formula or hard test beyond a person’s belief—at least ostensibly requires proof such as an insurer termination notice. But people can also qualify for hardships for the unspecified nonreason that “you experienced another hardship in obtaining health insurance,” which only requires “documentation if possible.” And yet another waiver is available to those who say they are merely unable to afford coverage, regardless of their prior insurance. In a word, these shifting legal benchmarks offer an exemption to everyone who conceivably wants one.

Did this really happen? The IRS has just issued Tax Tip 2014-04, The Individual Shared Responsibility Payment – An Overview.  It says:

You may be exempt from the requirement to maintain qualified coverage if you:

  • Have no affordable coverage options because the minimum amount you must pay for the annual premiums is more than eight percent of your household income,

  • Have a gap in coverage for less than three consecutive months, or

  • Qualify for an exemption for one of several other reasons, including having a hardship that prevents you from obtaining coverage, or belonging to a group explicitly exempt from the requirement.

So what kind of “hardship” would that involve?  The list of eligible hardships at Healthcare.gov provides a long list of qualifying hardships, including “You recently experienced the death of a close family member.”  I’m sure you can come up with one, but if that doesn’t work, try “You experienced another hardship in obtaining health insurance.”  Like, “Healthcare.gov” crashed, for example?  It’s your word against — whose?

So how do you claim “hardship?”  The first way is “You can claim these exemptions when you fill out your 2014 federal tax return, which is due in April 2015.”   

So somebody fills out the form and finds out the government wants hundreds of dollars in penalties for not buying insurance.  I bet they’ll come up with either a loss in the family or a hardship in a hurry.  There will be tens of thousands of these.  The IRS can’t possibly police this.

It appears the Wall Street Journal is on to something.  Considering the high cost of policies on the exchanges, a struggling young single really would incur hardship buying mandated coverage.  And if you feel it’s a hardship, they are practically inviting you to opt out.  It’s hard to see this ending well.

This also poses ethical issues for practitioners, which I’ll address another time.

 

IRS Bars Appraisers from Valuing Facade Easements for Federal Tax Purposes for Five Years (IRS Press Release):

The appraisers prepared reports valuing facade easements donated over several tax years. On behalf of each donating taxpayer, an appraiser completed Part III, Declaration of Appraiser, of Form 8283, Noncash Charitable Contributions, certifying that the appraiser did not fraudulently or falsely overstate the value of such facade easement. In valuing the facade easements, the appraisers applied a flat percentage diminution, generally 15 percent, to the fair market values of the underlying properties prior to the easement’s donation.

There’s a lot of interesting things here.  For example, they never mention the name of the appraiser group.  It would seem like that would be useful information to taxpayers.  Sometimes people who seem to be barred from a line of work apparently neglect to mention that to prospective clients.

It also shows that you can’t count on a too-good-to-be-true result just because a lot of other people have gotten it.  They just might not have been caught yet.  You can be sure the IRS is working its way down the appraisal group’s client list.

 

Principal Park, as seen from my office window.

Principal Park, as seen from my office window.

Baseball-Tax Convergence.  Over at Cubs Fan site Bleacher Nation, Proprietor Brett yesterday posted The Chicago Cubs Financial Story: the Payroll, the Debt, and the Syncing of Baseball and Business Plans.  A lawyer by training, Brett digs deep into the leverage partnership deal where the Ricketts family bought the Cubs in a way structured to defer taxes to the Tribune Company:

In a leveraged partnership, a “seller” partners with a “buyer” to form a new entity, which takes on the assets and distributes cash to the “seller.” In its formation, the partnership takes on a great deal of debt, which is guaranteed by the seller. Doing so allows the “seller” to receive the cash distribution, and defer the taxes associated with the sale of the asset. 

At least that’s the idea. Brett notes that the IRS doesn’t have to agree, and that they didn’t when the Trib tried a similar trick when it sold Newsday.  After tax season, and after I wander down to Principal Park for the noon I-Cubs game on April 16, I’ll try to explain this.

 

Tony Nitti, What Are The Penalties For Failing To File Your Tax Return On Time? .  A lot more than failing to pay.  It’s worth getting that extension in, even if you can’t pay right now.

Kay Bell, Missing your 2010 tax refund? Claim deadline is 4-15-2014

William Perez, Tax Reform Act of 2014, Part 1, Tax Rates

Russ Fox, IRS Releases New Forms W-8BEN and W-8ECI.  Important if you find you are doing business with an offshore payee.

Iowa Public Radio, State Tax Laws ‘A Mess’ For Same-Sex Couples And Employers.  That’s where specialists like Jason Dinesen can really help.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 315

Bloomberg, Buffett Cuts Tax Bill, Tells Others Not to Complain.  He’s tired of hearing you complain about subsidizing him, peasant. (Via TaxProf)

Chris Sanchirico, As American as Apple Inc. (TaxVox).  A complaint that Apple doesn’t voluntarily increase its own taxes.

ThinkAdvisor offers 8 Tax Evaders Who Should’ve Known Better — public servants biting the hand that feeds them.

 

Scott Drenkard, Richard Borean, Cigarette Smuggling Across the States (Tax Policy Blog) “Smuggled cigarettes make up substantial portions of cigarette consumption in many states, and greater than 25 percent of consumption in twelve states.”

 

20140320-1

Almost one in five Iowa smokes are smuggled.

 

Cara Griffith, City of Tacoma Considers Contingent-Fee Auditors (Tax Analysts Bl0g) It’s a bad idea, but it’s hard to see where it’s any different from red-light cameras, where the camera companies collect a bounty of their own.

TaxGrrrl, 10 Tips For Making The Most Of March Madness  My strategy is to ignore it.

 

The Critical Question. Can the IRS Tell a Good Story? (Susan Morse, Procedurally Taxing)

 

 

20130419-1You lied to the IRS all these years, but you’re telling me the truth?  Sometimes business owners get away with tax evasion for years.  Then they try to sell their business.

A Henderson, Nevada auto body shop owner decided it was time to cash out.  KTNV reports:

Robert E. D’Errico, 64, was sentenced Wednesday morning to six-months in federal prison for tax evasion.

According to the plea agreement, D’Errico owned Sunset Collision Center in Henderson. In 2009, he began listing the business for sale on small business listing sites and with small business brokers. D’Errico stated in his listings that, “Seller states that his discretionary take-home cash is $150,000 per year and has receipts to prove it.”

When contacted by a potential buyer, D’Errico re-iterated, “Seller’s discretionary cash take home beyond stated net income is approx. $150,000 avg. per year and is verifiable with receipts.”

During a meeting with a potential buyer, D’Errico stated he stopped accepting checks and was taking cash deductibles from customers, as well as selling excess inventory for cash. 

Either the “potential buyer” ratted him out, or he was an IRS secret shopper.  The IRS got a search warrant, found the real ledgers, and things got ugly.  

Tax returns are sometimes the only financial statements a small business has.  Buyers naturally want to see them, and it can be awkward trying to convince a buyer that they aren’t the “real” financial statements.  But it can get a lot more awkward than that.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/19/14: Are taxes turning Iowa red? And: Statehouse Update!

March 19th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Is Iowa really a red state?  According to personal finance site WalletHub, Iowa is a red state.  But didn’t Iowa vote for Obama the last two elections?  Not that kind of red state.  WalletHub’s map has states with the most burdensome taxes as red states, and those with less burdensome taxes as green:

 

WalletHub

From WalletHub:

 WalletHub analyzed how state and local tax rates compare to the national median in the 50 states as well as the District of Columbia.  We compared eight different types of taxation in order to determine:  1) Which states have the highest and lowest tax rates; 2) how those rates compare to the national median; 3) which states offer the most value in terms of low taxation and high cost-of-living adjusted income levels.

WalletHub says Iowans have a tax burden 26% above the national average.  They note, though, that when the rank is adjusted based on our cost of living, Iowa improves 10 places on their rankings.

This is a different measurement than the Tax Foundations well-known Business Tax Climate Indexwhich places Iowa at 11th-worst.  Either way, it’s not a healthy system.  And nothing major is likely to happen to change it anytime soon.  Still, the The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan shows the way!

 

20130117-1Supplies sales tax exemption advances.  The Iowa General Assembly isn’t entirely idle on the tax front.  Sometimes that’s a good thing, as in the House passage yesterday of HF 2443, exempting supplies used in manufacturing from sales tax.  Business inputs in general should not be subject to sales tax, as they are likely to be taxed again when the finished product is sold.

Other than that, there isn’t a lot else to report on the Iowa tax legislative scene.  The speedway tax break remains alive.  The bill to broaden the Iowa capital gain “ten and ten” exclusion hasn’t cleared the committee level.  Silly legislation continues to be introduced, like a 50% state tax credit for payments of principal and interest on student loans (HSB 673).  Let’s encourage crushing student debt burdens!

But sometimes its best when the legislature does nothing.  It’s hard to complain that HF 2770, the bill to pay doctors at their average charge rates with tax credits for “volunteering,” has languished.

 

Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how big is legacy is.

Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how big is legacy is.

The TaxProf notes the Death of Former IRS Commissioner Randoph Thrower; Was Fired for Refusing President’s Request to Audit His Enemies, quoting a New York Times story:

The end came in January 1971, after Mr. Thrower requested a meeting with the president, hoping to warn him personally about the pressure White House staff members had been placing on the IRS to audit the tax returns of certain individuals. Beginning with antiwar leaders and civil rights figures, the list had grown to include journalists and members of Congress, among them every Democratic senator up for re-election in 1970, Mr. Thrower told investigators years later. He was certain the president was unaware of this and would agree that “any suggestion of the introduction of political influence into the IRS” could damage his presidency, he said.

Mr. Thrower received two responses. The first was a memo from the president’s appointments secretary saying a meeting would not be possible; the second was a phone call from John D. Ehrlichman, the president’s domestic affairs adviser, telling him he was fired.

I’ll just note here that Doug Shulman, worst commissioner ever, left on his own terms.

 

David Brunori, Hawaii Tax Credit Craziness (Tax Analysts Blog):

According to some excellent reporting in the Honolulu Civil Beat, the Legislature is considering a slew of tax incentives to promote manufacturing in the state. Yes, there are those (particularly established manufacturers) who would like to promote something other than tourism, hosting of naval bases, and pineapple production. The main proposal (SB 3082) would provide tax credits for employee training and some equipment purchases. The goal is to turn Hawaii into 1960s Pittsburgh or Flint Mich., in their heyday. I have my doubts. 

I don’t think that really plays to Hawaii’s strengths.

 

20120817-1Howard Gleckman, A Terrible Response to the Internet Tax Mess (TaxVox)

Under the plan, the federal government would let retailers collect tax based on the levy where the seller is located, no matter where the purchaser resides. This would apply to all retailers, as long as they had no physical presence in the consumer’s state.

A firm could base its “home jurisdiction” on the state where it has the most employees, the most physical assets, or the state it designates as its principal place of business for federal tax purposes.

Given the nature of online sellers, changing locations to a no-sales-tax state would be fairly easy.

Interesting.  I wonder if a “universal mail order sales tax rate” might ultimately be the answer.  You could set this universal rate at, say, the average national sales tax rate, collect it from all buyers, and remit it to the delivery state through a clearinghouse run by the state revenue agencies.

 

Paul Neiffer, Cash Rents Equals Extra 3.8% on Sale. “However, once you are done farming and are simply renting the ground to other farmers (including relatives), then the rental income will be subject to the tax and even worse, selling the farmland for a large gain will result in extra tax.”

Jana Luttenegger, Filing From Home, and Health Insurance Reporting on W-2s (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): J Is For Jury Duty Pay   

 

Everything is spinning out of control! Suburban Cleveland Councilman Denies Getting in Brawl With Liberty Tax Sign Spinner (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/18/14: Now it gets serious. And: a foolproof plan goes awry.

March 18th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

 

Flicker image courtesy Michael Coghlan under Creative Commons license.

Flicker image courtesy Michael Coghlan under Creative Commons license.

OK, we’ve got all of the corporations done or extended.  Now it gets serious.

For the last several years, our 1040 practice has become more and more a three or four-week death sprint.  Most of our individual returns are business owners or executives, or their families.  That means most of them are waiting on K-1s.  Ever since the enactment of the reduced dividend rate, it has taken longer every year for brokerages to issue their 1099s.  It’s common for “corrected” 1099s to come out several weeks after the originals.  So it just takes longer for our clients to assemble their 1040 data.

While the start of the returns is delayed, April 15 is still April 15.  That means all of the most complicated returns hit in the four weeks after the corporate return deadline.  This isn’t good for many reasons — not least of which is that you don’t want a bleary-eyed tax pro helping you deal with big-dollar decisions, like the grouping options under the passive activity rules that kick in this year.

What I’m getting at: if your tax pro recommends an extension, don’t object.  This stuff is hard — if it wasn’t, you wouldn’t be paying someone else to do it.  You don’t want to risk an expensive mistake by rushing things.  There is nothing to the myth that extensions increase your risk of getting examined.  I have extended my own 1040 every year for 20+ years without an exam.   Errors, on the other hand, absolutely do increase your audit risk.

Your tax return is worth the wait.

 

Russ Fox, The Flavor of the Season

 

20140303-1Paul Neiffer, Real Estate Includes Land but Not For Depreciation Purposes.

William Perez, Alternative Minimum Tax

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): I Is For Internal Revenue Code

Leslie Book, Insider Trading and Forfeiture of Millions in Stock Gains Runs into Section 1341 and Issue Preclusion (Procedurally Taxing)

Janet Novack, Former Qwest CEO Could Score $18 Million Tax Refund For Forfeited Insider Trading Profits

Kay Bell, College bowl tax audits and Colorado pot taxes.

 

Marc Ward, Annual Financial Statements Must Now be Delivered to Shareholders:

One of the changes to the Iowa Business Corporation Act that went into effect this year is a new requirement that corporations deliver financial statements to their shareholders. These financial statements must include a balance sheet, an income statement and a statement of changes in shareholders’ equity.  The financial statements must be sent within 120 days of the end of the fiscal year.

I did not know that.

 

taxanalystslogoJeremy Scott asks, Would a Republican Senate Improve the Chances for Tax Reform? (Tax Analysts Blog):

Republican chances for retaking the Senate have improved… 

And that would be good for tax reform proponents, even those who don’t support GOP policies or want to see Republicans in office. Senate Democrats aren’t interested. And they aren’t going to work with a Republican House at all. Tax reform takes a lot of legislative groundwork, and right now at least, the GOP is the only party with any real interest in doing it.

There is, of course, another factor.  I don’t think President Obama will sign anything big coming out of a GOP Congress.

William McBride, Some Questions Regarding the Diamond and Zodrow Modeling of Camp’s Tax Plan. (Tax Policy Blog).

Eric Todor, Who Should Get the Tax Revenue from Apple’s Intellectual Property? (TaxVox)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 313

 

Great moments in tax evasion.  A Texan who was worried about being sentenced to prison came up with an ingenious plan: hire someone to murder the sentencing judge.  Because then the court system would just forget about him, or something.

Somehow that plan went awry, and Phillip Ballard was sentenced to 20 years in federal prison yesterday for his trouble. Mr. Ballard is 72.  This will impact his retirement options.  (via Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/17/14: Celebrate the corporation due date responsibly! And more.

March 17th, 2014 by Joe Kristan


daydrinkers
Corporate 2013 returns are due today! Or at least the extensions.  It looks like massive celebrations are in store this year, for some reason, but be sure to get your filing in before you hit the bars.  A late S corporation return results in a stiff penalty: $195 per K-1.  That penalty will be repeated for each additional month the filing is late.

C corporations have their own late filing penalty, 5% of any deficiency.  If you owe but can’t pay, you should still file or extend; then the penalty is only 1/2% of the deficiency.

How should I file or extend?  Glad you asked.  Electronic filing is the best and safest way, because you can get electronic confirmation.  No trip to the post office, no holding on to a postmarked receipt, no worrying about the mail truck going up in flames.

If you prefer not to e-file, then take the trouble to get proof of filing.  The cheapest is to go to the post office and mail your return or extension Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested.  Get a stamped postmark for your package and put it in a safe place.  It also helps to write the certified mail receipt number on top of the return or extension before sealing the envelope for additional proof.

If you lose track of time because of all the festive distractions today, and you find the local post office has closed, you still may be able to get your filing in.  The IRS treats shipping on the due date by a designated private delivery service as a timely filing.  That means your local Fed-Ex office or UPS store might be able to take care of you.  If you do go that route, be sure you use one of the specific services approved by the IRS, and make sure the shipping slip uses today’s date.  You also will need the street address for the IRS service center that your filing is going to, as private delivery services can’t use P.O. Box addresses.

Oh, and apparently green is the official color for corporate return day this year.

Russ Fox, The Other March 17th Deadline: Form 1042s. “The form 1042 series (1042, 1042-S, and 1042-T) is used to report annual withholding for US-source income of foreigners.”

 

20120906-1The revival of the sales tax subsidy for the Iowa Speedway advances in the legislaturereports The Des Moines Register:

The Newton track has received a tax break since it opened in 2006 — a 5 percent rebate of state sales tax collected at the track, totaling about $3.5 million so far. But the law authorizing the tax break required that the facility must be owned at least 25 percent by Iowans.

The purchase by NASCAR, stock-car racing’s sanctioning body, means ownership is 100 percent from outside Iowa. A law change is required to keep the tax-rebate money flowing. Supporters of the tax break say it will help bolster Iowa tourism and spur the state’s economy.

Of course, this favors the track over every other entertainment and tourist venue in Iowa, none of whom get to keep the sales taxes they collect.

 

William Perez, Itemizing Deductions. “If the total of all these itemized deductions is higher than the standard deduction, then a person usually obtains the least amount of tax by itemizing.”

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): H Is For Holding Period

Kay Bell, Dealing with a 1099-K for tax-free residential rental income

Jason Dinesen, Glossary of Tax Terms: Refundable Credits  “The term “refundable credit” refers to a tax credit that can produce a tax refund even if your tax liability is $0.”

Peter Reilly, Building Repair Deductions – Thirty Per Cent Of What?  ”All the toilets together perform a discrete and critical function in the operation of the plumbing system” is the best line that I could find in the ninety odd pages of Regulation 1.263(a)-3 “Amounts paid to improve tangible property”commonly known as the “repair regs”.    Peter makes a good effort at explaining a brutally boring set of rules that is actually also important.

Keith Fogg, Confusing Lien and Levy (Procedurally Taxing).  May you never need to know the difference.

Tony Nitti, Online Sportsbook Founder Held Liable for $36 Million In Tax And Penalties

 

20130121-2Annette Nellen, Brick wall hit by IRS in its efforts to regulate all return preparers.  Too bad, so sad.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 312

Alan Cole, Cadillac Tax Confirms: Employers Respond to Tax Changes (Tax Policy Blog). “According to the report, many companies are already making changes in anticipation of the tax, converting to less generous plans.”

Bill Gale, Howard Gleckman, Dave Camp’s Most Valuable Contribution to Tax Reform (TaxVox):

 Still, the 1000-page bill puts his plan out there in all its gory detail. It shows just how tough it is to pull together a reform that cuts rates and trims tax preferences while maintaining today’s revenue and the distribution of burdens.

It will be easier if you worry less about “maintaining today’s distribution of burdens.”  As far as I know, we haven’t achieved some perfect distributional model that should never be messed with.

 

From the Wall Street Journal comes Audit Bait: The Dirty Dozen — Moves That Could Trigger IRS Scrutiny:

  1. Forget to claim reported income.
  2. Take outsize deductions, especially for charitable gifts or travel and entertainment.
  3. Hide offshore accounts.
  4. Claim certain items on small-businesses returns.
  5. Pretend a money-losing pastime is a business.
  6. Use suspiciously round numbers.
  7. File an amended return.
  8. Use a dubious tax preparer.
  9. Be a tax protester.
  10. Provoke a whistleblower.
  11. Fail to claim canceled debt as income.
  12. Fail to file.

Yes, all those things are true.  But if you really want to get examined, you might consider putting your returns claiming refunds on absurd grounds on a website that purports to “crack the code.”  Just a thought, in case you don’t find your life exciting enough. (Hat tip: TaxProf.)

 

News from the Profession. Deloitte Exec Gets Six-Week Vacation Thanks to Wife’s Heavy Foot, Russian Frivolity (Going Concern)

I hear his parents are upset.  32-yr-old Playboy ‘playmate of the year’ in trouble over 90-YEAR-OLD BOYFRIEND (Malaysia Times)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/14/14: Unhappy with your state revenue exam? Iowans can appeal to the examiner’s boss! And: stealing the wrong identity.

March 14th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

 

Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

How would you feel about going to court and finding out that if you win, the appeal will be heard by your opponent?  That’s pretty much how the Iowa internal tax appeals process works.  And while a reform bill is getting attention in the legislature, that feature isn’t going to change just yet, reports Maria Koklanaris in a State Tax Analysts article

In a letter to legislators, DOR Director Courtney Kay-Decker said the department was able to successfully draft legislation for some of the priorities outlined in the report, including implementing a small claims process and eliminating the State Board of Tax Review for all matters except property tax protests. But she said it could not come up with language this year for what she called her highest priority, which is also the top priority of taxpayers in the eyes of many.
“Most importantly, we were unable to cohesively and comprehensively incorporate the recommendation to remove the Director from the appeals process,” Kay-Decker said in her letter. “This is disappointing as it was perhaps my highest priority.”

The Council on State Taxation gives the current Iowa system failing marks.  From Tax Analysts:

Ferdinand Hogroian, tax and legislative counsel at the Council On State Taxation, said Iowa’s tax appeals process is the only area in which the state earns poor marks in COST’s most recent report on tax administration.  The report specifies the director’s involvement in tax appeals as a major problem.
“Although an Administrative Law Judge of the Department of Inspections and Appeals conducts evidentiary hearings, IA DOR can retain jurisdiction and override,” the report says.

Attorney Bruce Baker, who frequently does battle against the Department of Revenue, points out the obvious problem with the current system: “I’ve often joked that my clients would like to be able to appeal to the chairman of the board.”  But the Department of Revenue will retain that option, at least for now.

While the legislation they are working on (SSB 3203) is an improvement, I still think Iowa needs an independent tax court — perhaps three judges from around the state who will agree to serve as tax judges as part of their caseloads to develop expertise.  It could be modeled on the specialty business litigation court that Iowa is experimenting with.  Now if you leave the current internal Department of Revenue Process — appealable by the Department to the Director of the Department — you litigate before generalists judges who may have never heard a tax case before.  They tend to defer to the Department, even when it seems clear the department is wrong.

 

Paul Neiffer, A Bad Day in Court.  A bookie who tried to hide funds overseas does poorly.

Tony Nitti, Professional Gambler Bets Wrong In Tax Court – Takeout Expenses Are Gambling Losses, Not Business Expenses   

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): G Is For Garnished Wages .  I hope not yours or mine!

Kay Bell, Sorry tax pros, more taxpayers filing on their own.  Taxpayers always have that option, and preparer regulation would drive more taxpayers to do so by increasing the cost of preparers.  Whether that will improve compliance is left as an exercise for the reader.

 

taxanalystslogoChristopher Bergin, It’s Not Just About Lois Lerner (Tax Analysts Blog):

But we need to remind ourselves that there is a lot more potential abuse going on at the IRS than what’s been associated with Lois Lerner. Here are a few examples. I talk to many practitioners who (a) don’t want to be identified, probably for fear of retaliation, and (b) question the independence of the IRS Appeals Office. That is a big problem.

In 2012 a high-ranking IRS executive said in a speech that she believes the government has a higher duty than that of a private litigant. “The government,” the executive said, “represented by the tax administrator, should not pursue a particular outcome and then look for interpretations in the law that support it. The tax administrator should do nothing more or less than find the law and follow it, regardless of outcome. The separation of powers, a bedrock principle of our Constitution, demands it.”

I have a few questions. How many private tax litigators believe that’s actually how the IRS operates? If this noble statement is taken seriously by others in the IRS, why did Tax Analysts have to go to court to get training materials? And why is the IRS being questioned so strongly by Congress on its belief – or, more accurately, the lack thereof – in the bedrock principle of the separation of powers?

The results-driven IRS approach to non-political issues doesn’t lead you to think Lois Lerner was acting with Olympian detachment in the Tea Party scandal.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 309

Len Burman, How the Tax System Could Help the Middle Class (TaxVox)

My most “innovative”—some would say “radical”—policy option would replace across-the-board price indexing, which exists under current law, with indexation that reflects changes in economic inequality.

An awful idea.  The tax code will never “solve” the problem of inequality.  This is a clever-sounding idea that will do nothing but create complexity.

 

Sauce for the gander, indeed.  Identity Thief Sentenced for Filing Tax Returns in the Names of the Attorney General and Others:

A federal judge sentenced Yafait Tadesse to one year and one day in prison for using the identities of over ten individuals, including the Attorney General of the United States, to file false and fraudulent tax returns.

I don’t wish identity theft on anybody, not even a politician.  It can lead to all kinds of expensive and time-consuming inconveniences and embarrassments.  But if it had to happen to someone, why couldn’t it have been Doug Shulman, who let identity theft spin out of control while he pursued his futile and misguided preparer regulation crusade?

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/13/14: Looming Payday Edition. And: incentives galore!

March 13th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20130104-1Deduction day looms.   March 15 is the deadline for calendar-year corporate return filings and payments.  It’s also an important deadline for accrual-basis taxpayers for another reason:  compensation accrued at year-end by a calendar-year accrual-basis taxpayer has to be paid by March 15 of the following year to be deductible in the year accrued.

As every first-year accounting student learns, accrual accounting tries to match expenses with the period in which the income is earned.  If a bonus is based on calendar-year sales or profits, it normally can’t be paid until after year-end, when the numbers are sorted out; still, the bonus is related to those sales, so accrual accounting counts the expense against that year’s income.

The tax law has many limits on accrual accounting.  For example, accrued expenses to “related parties,” typically owners and their families, can’t be deducted until the expenses are actually paid.  The tax law gives accrual businesses 2 1/2 months after year-end to pay accrued compensation to non-related employees.  Otherwise, the deduction is deferred until the year in which the employee is paid.

Does the compensation have to be paid by Saturday, or can I wait until Monday?  The tax law provides that when tax returns are due on a weekend, the deadline is extended to the following monday.  That’s why 2013 calendar-year corporation returns  are due March 17, 2014 – March 15 is on Saturday this year.

But the IRS says that doesn’t work for compensation.  Rev. Rul. 83-116 holds that it only applies to “acts required to be performed in connection with the determination, collection, or refund of taxes”  – things like filing returns.  So, according to IRS, the March 15 deadline still stands for payment 0f 2013 accrued compensation.  It’s not clear that the IRS would win in court on this — they have lost on a similar issue — but you don’t want to be the test case.  If you want to deduct 2013 accrued compensation on your 2013 return, pay it by Saturday.

 

 

haroldIncentives!  Coralville Likely on the Hook for Large Chunk of Von Maur Taxes.  Coralville marches to the beat of its own drummer, who apparently is heavily medicated.

Hey, let’s pay $34 million to build a Des Moines Convention Hotel!  Brian Gongol reports “The city financed the hotel to help spur convention business…but now it’s in danger of losing money.”  You don’t say.

Tax Justice Blog, Film Tax Credit Arms Race Continues: “Saying “no” to Hollywood can be a difficult thing for states, but here are a few examples of lawmakers and other stakeholders questioning the dubious merits of these credits within the last few weeks”.

Good.  Iowa doesn’t seem to have been badly hurt since it turned from subsidizing filmmakers to jailing them.

Related: Robert Wood, Film Taxes Ensnares Beckhams, Bob Geldof, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Annie Lennox & More

 

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): F Is For Foreign Tax Credit.  ”For many taxpayers, it’s more advantageous to claim income taxes you paid or accrued during the year to a foreign country or U.S. possession as a credit than as a deduction.”

William Perez, Chart: Total Refundable Credits from 1990 to 2011.  There are more of them now.

Peter Reilly, Hedge Fund, TEFRA And Community Property Give Woman Tax Nightmare

Russ Fox, The IRS Needs Volunteers for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

 

Cara Griffith, States’ Perspectives on Federal Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog)

Joseph Henchman, Nebraska Legislators Approve Inflation Indexing But Drop Major Tax Overhaul (Tax Policy Blog)

Howard Gleckman, Mike Lee’s Tax Plan: An Intriguing Idea That Would Add $2.4 Trillion to the Deficit (TaxVox)

Kay Bell, House panel finally looking at Internet sales tax legislation

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 308

News from the Profession.  Tweeting a Lot About Audit Stuff Can Get You a Job at Deloitte.  (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/12/14: Hundreds of Panthers fear ID-theft. And: more smidgens!

March 12th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

uni-logoID Theft may affect 200 University of Northern Iowa employees.  KWWL.com reports:

In February, when the issue was first discovered, about 50 people had reported issues filing their federal income taxes. Now, University officials say 200 employees have come forward, and but not all of those are fraud. Still, that has psychology department secretary Jan Cornelius concerned. She said her social security number was stolen.

The problem was identified by taxpayers whose returns were rejected because somebody else had already filed under their numbers.  You need to be careful with your Social Security Number, and you should never transmit tax documents as unencrypted email attachments.  Use a secure file transfer portal, like Roth & Company’s Filedrop, to send tax files electronically.

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

More Smidgens.  The House Oversight Committee investigating the Tea Party Scandal issued a report yesterday blasting the idea that the IRS stall on right-side 501(c)(4) groups was just a non-political coincidence involving bumblers in Cincinnati.  Using IRS documents and e-mails, the report paints a picture of an effort driven by a highly-political bureaucrat to “do something” through IRS regulation to administratively reverse the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision.  From the report’s conclusion:

Evidence indicates Lerner and her Exempt Organizations unit took a three pronged approach to “do something about it” to “fix the problem”of nonprofit political speech:

1) Scrutiny of new applicants for tax – exempt status (which began as Tea Party targeting);

2) Plans to scrutinize organizations, like those supported by the “Koch Brothers,” that were already acting as 501(c)(4) organizations; and

3)“[O]ff plan” efforts to write new rules cracking down on political activity to replace those that had been in place since 1959. Even without her full testimony, and despite the fact that the IRS has still not turned over many of her e-mails, a political agenda to crack down on tax-exempt organizations comes into focus. Lerner believed the political participation of tax-exempt organizations harmed Democratic candidates, she believed something needed to be done, and she directed action from her unit at the IRS. Compounding the egregiousness of the inappropriate actions, Lerner’s own e-mails showed recognition that she would need to be “cautious” so it would not be a “per se political project.”

Committee Democrats continue to insist that there is no “political motivation,” and no evidence of White House involvement.  To deny that targeting “Tea Party” and “Koch-funded” organizations is political is to insult our intelligence.  As far as White House involvement, the Chicago Way isn’t for the Boss to pick up the phone and call the Cincinnati service center.  The President’s public in-your-face criticism of the Supreme Court for Citizens United at a State-of-the-Union address gave his supporters in the bureaucracy all the guidance they needed.

The TaxProf has a roundup.

 

roses in the snowWilliam Perez, Deductions for Self-Employed Persons.  ”Deductions that go on Schedule C reduce both the self-employment tax and the federal income tax.”

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): E Is For EE Bonds   

Russ Fox, The Moral Climate may have Changed but the Law Hasn’t. “Thus, until Congress changes the law a professional gambler cannot deduct gambling losses in excess of wins.”

Kay Bell, Beware tax break bait and switch.  ”Yes, gifts to your favorite charity can be deducted, but only if you itemize on Schedule A.”

Paul Neiffer, Permanent Means Permanent:

North Dakota law regarding easements is unique.  It appears to be the only state in the country that limits easements to 99 years by law.  Since the Tax Code requires that the conservation easement be of a permanent nature, the Tax Court ruled in favor of the IRS and disallowed all of the easement charitable donations.

Oops.  Still, I think anything “permanent” should be looked at skeptically.  Nobody knows whether it will seem wise to lock up a parcel 100 years from now.

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Tackling The Dreaded Section 754 Adjustment   

 

20120906-1David Brunori, Where Is the Outrage? (Tax Analysts Blog):

According to Good Jobs First, there are 514 economic development programs in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. More than 245,000 awards have been granted under those programs. I ask again, where is the outrage? The system is antithetical to the idea of free markets. A quarter of a million times, state governments decided what is best for producers and consumers. That should make us cringe. First, the government is inefficient at providing public goods, and it is terrible at manipulating the markets for private goods. But more importantly, those 514 economic development programs are almost all the result of insidious cronyism. Narrow business interests manipulate government policymakers, and those interests prosper to the detriment of everyone else. Free markets be damned.

And while I’m looking for outrage, where are the liberals? The 965 companies in the report received over $110 billion of public money. Berkshire Hathaway, a company with $485 billion in assets and $20 billion in profits, received over $1 billion of that money. Its chair, William Buffett, is worth about $58 billion. Buffet, by the way, is still a darling of the left. He has some nerve to call for higher taxes. The billion dollars his companies took would pay for a lot of teachers, healthcare, and other public goods. 

They take just a little bit at a time from all of us so we don’t notice, and they give it in big chunks to their well-connected friends, who certainly do notice.   The report David refers to is here.

 

Joseph Henchman, State Sales Tax Jurisdictions Approach 10,000 (Tax Policy Blog).  Small wonder online sellers don’t want to collect everyone’s sales tax.

Elaine Maag, The Many Moving Parts of Camp’s Tax Reform for Low-Income Families (TaxVox)

 

Joseph Thorndike, The Last Time Everyone Gave Up on Tax Reform, It Actually Happened (Tax Analysts Blog).  But not this time:

Ultimately, Reagan agreed to make tax reform a priority. And his support was crucial. No lawmaker, no matter how exalted, well intentioned, or energetic, can move the ball like a president.

Which is one very important reason why 2014 is different from 1984. President Obama has no discernible interest in fundamental tax reform. So conventional wisdom is right: The Camp tax plan is going nowhere fast.

I think that’s right.

 

All it needs is a little pasta and fresh lemon.  Argentina: Authorities investigate tax evasion via garlic exports through shell companies

Career Corner.  It Is Almost Certain You Will One Day Be Replaced by Machines (Going Concern).  

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/11/14: The Taxpayer Hotel Edition. And: private-sector Kristy!

March 11th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Des Moines public officials think a fancy new convention center hotel is just what we need to hang with the cool kids, reports KCCI.com:

A plan to build a four-star hotel next to Hy-Vee Hall and Wells Fargo Arena won’t happen unless Des Moines city leaders can convince the state’s economic development authority to fork over millions in tax incentives for the project.

Des Moines Assistant City Manager Matthew Anderson said this week is a prime example that proves why a hotel is needed next to the Iowa Events Center.

Fans from across the state are coming to downtown Des Moines in droves to cheer on their favorite teams at the boy’s state basketball tournament.

Cindy Curran said there’s something missing. “Accommodations to stay overnight,” said Curran. “A nice hotel with restaurants in there, amenities to go with that.”

wells fargo arena

A casual reader could be forgiven for thinking that there are no hotels within a few blocks of Wells Fargo Arena.  They might think that the Des Moines Marriot Downtown, with its own nice restaurant and bar, had suddenly vanished.  They might think the historic Renaissance Savery Hotel, home of Bos Restaurant, had closed down.  They might think the new Hyatt Place in the Liberty Building had already failed.  And has the historic Hotel Fort Des Moines and its Django Restaurant disappeared after all these years?

Nope, they’re all going strong, and all still connected to Wells Fargo Arena by an enclosed all-weather skywalk system.  In fact, Downtown Des Moines has more restaurants and places to stay than ever.  They need a new competitor, apparently, but one that can’t happen  without $34 million in subsidies tax incentives.

If a business can’t happen without taxpayer subsidies, that’s a sure sign that it shouldn’t happen in the first place.  Convention centers have been a money pit for governments around the country, as the think tank Heartland Institute reports:

As convention planners seek to have large new hotels and related facilities built for their events, taxpayers are often stuck footing the bill for what could be a building that sits empty much of the year.

It’s always easier to support a new business when you invest somebody else’s money.

Related: The Convention Center Shell Game.

 

KristyMaitreIowa’s IRS stakeholder liaison privatizes herself.   From the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation:

CALT is pleased to announce that Kristy Maitre, the former IRS Senior Stakeholder Liaison for the State of Iowa, has joined our staff. Kristy brings 27 years of IRS experience to her role as CALT’s new tax specialist.

Practitioners who have attended our seminars are already familiar with Kristy and her vast breadth of practical knowledge of tax and estate planning. Kristy has taught hundreds of continuing education classes to tax practitioners around the country. At CALT, she will continue to offer training through live seminars, but will expand her reach with frequent webinars and other educational offerings through the CALT website. Stay tuned as CALT will soon unveil more exciting changes enabling us to better serve the tax practitioner community.

Great news for Kristy and ISU-CALT, bad news for IRS service.

 

William Perez, Free Tax Software Available Through IRS Free File

Russ Fox, Regulating Tax Preparers Always Prevents Tax Preparer Fraud (Not True, of Course)

potleafTaxGrrrl, It’s No Toke: Colorado Pulls In Millions In Marijuana Tax Revenue.  I think popular support for pot prohibition, with its attendant violence, prison crowding, and other social costs, will continue to decline.  At some point the lure of revenue will overcome the reflexive instinct of politicians to preserve control over things.

Jason DinesenWhat’s So Bad About More People Preparing Their Own Taxes?  “My goal is to have clients who actually need a professional preparer, or at the very least, people who could prepare their own taxes but who like the comfort provided by having a professional take care of it for them.”

One of these is not like the others  Filing season 2014: Death, taxes, root canals and refunds.  (Kay Bell)

 

Carlton Smith, Tax Court dodges CDP record rule ruling (Procedurally Taxing)

Jim Maule, Cracking the Tax Protest Movement.  ”The unfortunate thing about the tax protest movement is that most of the people in it are vulnerable folks who fall for the siren song of the ringleaders, just as those who support special tax breaks, even without benefitting from them, have fallen for the siren songs of those who procure special tax breaks for themselves and their clients.”

 

Joseph Henchman,  Idaho Considering Complicated and Gimmicky Job Creation Tax Credit.  (Tax Policy Blog) The best tax incentive is a simple, low-rate tax system without gimmicky incentives.

taxanalystslogoMartin Sullivan, If the Camp Tax Reform Bill Won’t Pass, Why Is It So Important? (Tax Analysts Blog):

The Camp discussion draft has changed the tax policy landscape like no other single document in the last three decades, for two reasons. First, it has burst the bubble of all the feel-good tax reformers who have been wasting our time promoting unrealistic tax plans. The Camp plan is the ultimate reality check on tax reform. It is far more complicated and painful than marketers of tax reform have told the public to expect. It is unlikely that any realistic tax reform would be any shorter or sweeter than the Camp draft.

The second reason the Camp reform is monumentally important is the extensive and detailed workmanship that went into it.   

I’m not convinced — I think the initial draft of a tax reform plan should be a lot more idealistic.  The cynical, politically-necessary modifications will arrive soon enough on their own, and conceding so many of them up front only invites more.

 

Jeremy Scott, Camp Hits Popular Deductions Hard (Tax Analysts Blog).  ”The elimination of the state and local tax deduction is one of the larger revenue raisers in Camp’s plan.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 306

 

Quotable:

When the law interferes with people’s pursuit of their own values, they will try to find a way around. They will evade the law, they will break the law, or they will leave the country. Few of us believe in a moral code that justifies forcing people to give up much of what they produce to finance payments to persons they do not know for purposes they may not approve of. When the law contradicts what most people regard as moral and proper, they will break the law–whether the law is enacted in the name of a noble ideal such as equality or in the naked interest of one group at the expense of another. Only fear of punishment, not a sense of justice and morality, will lead people to obey the law.

Milton Friedman, via David Henderson.

 

News from the Profession: The Profession is Really Reaching For the “I Still Let My Mom Pick Out My Outfits” Demographic (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/10/14: Sioux City $afety Edition. And: rogue dentistry!

March 10th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Sioux City Revenue Camera Windfall.  The Des Moines Register today lists the winners from revenue cameras around the state.  Public safety isn’t up there:

Tickets from automatic traffic cameras totaled $19.7 million for nine Iowa cities during the last fiscal year, but more than 34 percent of that money went to out-of-state vendors.

The summary:

20140310-1

Sioux City benefitted richly from Iowa’s status as the only state allowing revenue cameras on interstate highways:

Iowa is the only state in the country that allows speed cameras to be permanently placed on highways and interstates. The data collected by the DOT shows those cameras are the most lucrative: The two placed in a construction zone on Interstate Highway 29 in Sioux City brought in more than $4.5 million for the fiscal year ending in June.

gatsoThe evident failure of the cameras to stop construction zone speeding tells you how much they help public safety.  If they stopped speeding, there wouldn’t be so much revenue.  Of course, Sioux City also has a big incentive to generously define “construction zones” and leave them in place after construction is completed.  I drove through the I-29 zone on a Sunday night (no ticket for me!);  with no no workers around at the time, the only point of the construction zone speed limits when I drove through was camera revenue.

Some good news from the piece: “The number of red-light cameras nationally is dropping, according to a study by the Reason Foundation, a libertarian-leaning think tank.”  That’s because they’re a crock, a corrupt bargain between the operators and the municipalities, and people hate that.

 

William Perez, Need Extra Time to Finish up Your 2013 Tax Return?:

The IRS will grant a person an additional six months to file their tax return. To request this extra time, file an extension with the IRS on or before the deadline.

Filing an extension provides several benefits. Besides extra time to file the tax return, an extension also provides extra time to fund a self-employed retirement plan and to recharacterize IRA contributions.

And, contrary to myth, it doesn’t increase your chances of getting audited.  In contrast, filing an erroneous return to beat the deadline or get a quicker refund definitely increases your audit risk.

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): D Is For DRIP   

Kay Bell, Daylight Saving Time + gas taxes = boon for tax collectors, but some money-saving options for added daylight drivers 

Janet Novack, Pensions Create Yet Another Tax Trap For U.S. Expatriates

Russ Fox, False Checks, Trusts, and Ignoring Taxes Lead to Real Prison.  Indeed they do.

 

 Joseph Henchman, State Tax Reforms Are More Than Just Revenue Changes (Tax Policy Blog):

But more to the point, we consider 2013 one of the most successful years for tax reform we’ve seen in a while. We saw North Carolina cut its taxes but, more importantly, massively restructure them to become flatter, simpler, and more competitive. The real improvement in North Carolina wasn’t just the amount of taxes (though they did cut taxes, as noted above), but the structure of the tax code.

Beyond North Carolina’s landmark reform, Indiana under Governor Mike Pence (R) also moved to cut its personal income taxes and abolish its death tax. Wisconsin also made significant income tax cuts accompanied by positive structural changes authored by Representative Dale Kooyenga. Even in states that couldn’t achieve such sweeping reforms, valuable progress was made. Arizona implemented an important simplification of its sales tax code. Governor Martinez of New Mexico worked with her legislature to cut her state’s corporate tax. Texas made some positive reforms to its damaging gross receipts tax, the margin tax.

Notice one state missing there?  Anyone?  Iowa?  The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan is ready to go!  How about a 4% top individual rate, repeal of the Iowa corporation tax, and massive simplification — or do you like massive complexity, special favors for special friends, and the nation’s highest stated corporate rate?

 

Eric Todor, Tax Reform’s Quiet Protectionism (TaxVox): “In effect, income from the sale in the United States of goods manufactured overseas by controlled foreign subsidiaries (CFCs) of U.S.-resident multinational companies would be taxed at a higher U.S. rate than other income from the same factory”

 

William Gale, Alan Auerbach, Forgotten but Not Gone: The Long-Term Fiscal Imbalance (TaxVox):

First, ignoring projections for the future, the current debt-GDP ratio is far higher than at any time in U.S. history except for a brief period around World War II. While there is little mystery why the debt-GDP ratio grew substantially over the last six years – largely the recession and, to a smaller extent, countercyclical measures – today’s higher debt-GDP ratio leaves less “fiscal space” for future policy.

Second, while we clearly face no imminent budget crisis, our new projections suggest the 10-year budget outlook remains tenuous and is worse than it was last year, primarily due to changes in economic projections.

And the rich guy can’t pick up the tab.

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

George Will, The IRS’s behavior taxes credulity:

Obama breezily says there was nothing more sinister than “boneheaded decisions” by wayward and anonymous IRS underlings. Certainly boneheadedness explains much about this administration. Still, does he consider it interesting that the consequences of IRS boneheadedness were not randomly distributed but thwarted conservatives?

The rules that Obama says befuddled the IRS boneheads — to his benefit — read today exactly as they have read since 1959. For half a century they did not prevent the IRS from processing applications for tax-exempt status in less than three months. Some conservative group should offer $10,000 to anyone who can identify a liberal group that had the experience scores of conservative groups have had — an application delayed more than three years and receipt of an IRS questionnaire containing at least 60 questions.

Believing that there isn’t a “smidgen of corruption” is about as much of an intellectual leap as, say, believing dinosaurs and humans co-existed.

Via Instapundit

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 305

 

Jack Townsend has a List of 14 Swiss Banks Under Criminal Investigation

Quotable: 

Many smart people think preparers should be regulated. I just don’t agree. There is no market failure. If you don’t like your preparer, find another one. Or better yet, write your representative and ask for a tax system that doesn’t require low-income people to pay preparers.

David Brunori, State Tax Notes ($link)

 

I suspect he won’t need a preparer for awhile now.  From Going Concern:

Xzavier allegedly beat up a tax preparer when he found out the woman he was with wouldn’t be getting her refund in cash. After a security guard intervened, he is accused of whipping out his heat and shooting both the guard and two women. A fourth person was grazed by a bullet but not shot.

I’m sure that really helped her get that refund sooner.

 

Crazy news from Canada: Rogue dentist fined $33,000 for unpaid tax; Tung Sheng Wu practised dentistry illegally in the tri-cities and Burnaby

I’m pretty sure I’ve never seen the phrase “rogue dentist” before.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/7/14: Expanded Iowa 10-and-10 capital gain break advances. And: more rave reviews for Camp plan!

March 7th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1Expansion of Iowa 10-and-10 gain exclusion advances.  The bill to expand the availability of Iowa’s super-long-term capital gain break cleared its first legislative hurdle this week, as a House Ways and Means subcommittee approved H.F. 2129.

Iowa allows an exclusion from state taxable income of certain capital gains when the taxpayer meets both a 10-year material participation test and a ten-year holding period test.  This exclusion is available for liquidating asset sales and the individual tax on corporate liquidations, but is not available if the taxpayer is selling partnership assets or corporation stock to a third party, or for sales of less than “substantially all” of a business.

H.F. 2129 expands the exclusion “to include the sale of all or substantially all of a stock or equity interest in the business, whether the business is held as  a sole proprietorship, corporation, partnership, joint venture, trust, limited liability company, or other business entity.”

This would be a big change for Iowa entrepreneurs.  Consider how the current law affects a business started by two partners, with one older than the other.  The older partner retires more than ten years and pays full Iowa capital gain tax when he is redeemed out.  A few years later, the younger partner sells the business and retires himself.  The younger guy gets out with no Iowa capital gain tax under current law.  Under H.F. 2129, in contrast the 10-and-10 exemption would be available in both cases.

A “Fiscal Note” prepared by the Legislative Services Agency on the bill provides some statewide numbers:

Using State and federal tax returns of Iowa taxpayers, the Department of Revenue identified 369 tax returns reporting a capital gain for tax year 2012 where the taxpayer had participated in the business for a minimum of 10 years.

The total capital gain identified on those 369 returns that would be eligible under the capital gains exclusion expansion proposed in HF 2129 is $28.0 million.

Is this a good thing?  I think all capital gains should be tax-free, because they represent either a double-tax on the capital invested in them or, worse, a tax on inflation.  Anything that relieves this is arguably a good thing.  Still, it’s a complex carve-out for a limited class of taxpayers, one that creates a lot of errors by taxpayers who take the deduction erroneously or fail to use it when they are eligible; that sort of thing is almost a definition of bad tax policy. The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan would provide a much better approach.

 

O. Kay Henderson, Two tax cuts passed in 2013 showing up in February’s state tax report (Radio Iowa).  The increase in the Iowa Earned Income Tax Credit is properly understood as an increase in a welfare program and a poverty trap,  not a tax cut.

 

20140307-1Jason Dinesen, Glossary of Tax Terms: Passive Activity/Passive Activity Losses   

William Perez, Need to File a 2010 Tax Return? Deadlines and Resources.  Why 2010?  The statute of limitations for 2010 refunds expires April 15, 2014.

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): C Is For Clothing And Costumes.  Good stuff.    Related: Dress for success, but don’t look to the IRS for any fashion help.

Russ Fox, Your Check Might Not be in the Mail:

I used to live in Orange County, California. Earlier this week a US Postal Service caught fire as it was heading toward an airport after leaving the Santa Ana mail sorting center. So if you mailed something on Monday, March 3rd from ZIP Codes starting with 926, 927, 928, 906, 917 and 918, it might have been burnt to a crisp. All the mail the truck was carrying was destroyed (an estimated 120,000 pieces).

Another argument for electronic filing and payment.

Kay Bell, IRS criminal investigators are putting more tax crooks in jail.  If you are cheating on taxes big-time, you are a lot more likely to get caught than you might think.

 

taxanalystslogoThat means it must be a weekday.  More Arrogance and Secrecy From the IRS  (Christopher Bergin, Tax Analysts Blog):

I don’t know if these apparent political decisions were made by Lerner or others either inside or outside the IRS, because trying to get information out of that agency is like trying to get sweat out of a rock. Over the years, it has fought the silliest things. I’m only half kidding when I say that if you asked the IRS to see the kind of staplers it’s using, it would tell you it doesn’t have staplers.

The IRS will go to great lengths not to be scrutinized. And that breeds an atmosphere of no accountability — which leads to arrogance. We have seen that arrogance consistently throughout the congressional investigations of several IRS officials. And where will it lead us? Not to a good place, especially for those of us getting ready to file our yearly income tax returns. A tax collector that treats its “customers” as guilty until proven innocent is a tax collector out of control. That is precisely what the national taxpayer advocate has been warning about. If IRS officials don’t believe they are accountable to Congress, the rest of us don’t stand a chance.

This is part of an excellent and thoughtful post, written more in sorrow than anger by a long-time observer of the agency; you really should read the whole thing.  I’ll add that all of these seemingly endemic problems in IRS should warn us off the Taxpayer Advocate’s awful idea of giving IRS more control over the tax preparers who help taxpayers deal with the out-of-control agency.

 

Jack Townsend, Fifth Amendment and Immunity in Congressional Hearings.  Good discussion of the law, in spite of his calling the Issa investigations a “witch hunt.”  It’s the job of Congress to oversee federal agencies, especially an agency that has already admitted gross misbehavior here.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 302

 

20130113-3More rave reviews for the Camp “Tax Reform” plan:

William McBride, Camp and Obama Gang up on Savers

Kyle Pomerleau, Are Capital Gains and Dividend Income Tax Rates Really Lower Under the Camp Tax Reform Plan?  “If you take into account all the phase-outs of deductions and benefits in the Camp plan, marginal tax rates on capital gains and dividends are higher than current law at certain income levels.”

Tax Justice Blog, House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp Proposes Tax Overhaul that Fails to Raise Revenue, Enhance Fairness, or End Offshore Tax Shelters

 

Roberton Williams, A Web Tool to Calculate ACA Tax Penalties  (TaxVox).  ”It is often said the tax is $95, but for many people it will be much more.”

News from the Profession.  Some CPA Exam Candidates Skeptical the Illinois Board of Examiners Can Tell Time (Going Concern)

 

Peter Reilly, Could You Make Tax Protester Theories Work For You?:

If you are willing to entirely discount the quite remote chance of criminal prosecution, it may well be a decent percentage play particularly if you are just about maximizing your current lifestyle rather than accumulating net worth and entirely amoral when it comes to meeting tax obligations…

I still think it is a really terrible idea to enact Hendrickson’s strategy, but that’s just me.

No, it’s not just you, Peter.  And unless your income is generally not subject to third-party reporting like W-2s or 1099s, you will be caught, and then clobbered by back taxes, penalties and interest.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/6/14: My lips are sealed edition. And: more budget!

March 6th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner still isn’t talking.  That would seem to make for a dull hearing of the House Committee investigating the harassment of Tea Party organizations by the IRS, but there was some interest.  From the Wall Street Journal:

A House hearing on the Internal Revenue Service scandal ended in acrimony, as the ranking Democrat, Rep. Elijah Cummings (D., Md.) accused Republicans of a “one-sided investigation” and GOP members walked out.

Chairman Darrell Issa (R., Calif.) ended the hearing after the lone witness, former IRS official Lois Lerner, declined to answer several of his questions, citing her Fifth Amendment privilege.

Yes, everyone is entitled to the protection of the Constitution, but those of us not sitting on a jury are also entitled to draw our own conclusions.  When the key figure in the scandal fears honest testimony will incriminate herself, you can be forgiven for questioning the President’s assertion that there is “not even a smidgen of corruption” involved.

Take it away, GoGos:

 

Althouse, After Lois Lerner re-asserts the 5th, Cummings yells at Issa and Issa cuts the microphone.  “Issa is closing down the meeting, Cummings asserts what he calls a “procedural question” that’s really a political scolding, and Issa cuts the microphone and walks out. It’s pretty unpleasant.”  Video provided.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 301

TaxGrrrl, Former IRS Official Refuses To Testify Again, Lawyer Blasts “Partisan” Hearing.

Kay Bell, Tempers flare at IRS hearing. Reality show, anyone?

Peter Reilly, Lois Lerner Takes The Fifth Again – Political Theater?:

There are two narratives about this whole mess.  One is that there was something of a left wing conspiracy inside the IRS to pick on the political activity of organizations that were not supposed to be mainly political, which hurt those groups in their effort to prevent the President from being re-elected.  My blogging buddy, Joe Kristan, supports that theory having grown up in Chicago, where all sorts of enforcement is politically motivated.The other narrative is that the whole thing is a phony scandal.  I think that I am the only person left who has looked at this without fully making up his mind.

As Peter notes, I think the science is settled.

 

William Perez, Health Savings Accounts Provide a Tax-Deductible Way to Save for Medical Expenses

 

Economic supergenius

Smidgenless.

Andrew Lundeen, Kyle Pomerleau, The Tax Changes in President Obama’s Fiscal Year 2015 Budget (Tax Policy Blog):

He proposes to expand the child tax credit and the EITC, two of the largest family tax benefits. His budget also proposes to alter retirement plans and create an auto-enrollment IRA program. In order to pay for these expansions, his budget will raise taxes on high-income earners through a series of changes to tax expenditures, most notably placing a cap on the value of itemized deductions.

It will never be enough.  The rich guy isn’t buying.

Renu Zaretsky, Obama’s 2015 Budget Hits Capitol Hill (TaxVox)

Tony Nitti, Tax Aspects Of The President’s FY 2015 Budget . “…in simple terms, the President’s proposal would add a(nother) alternative minimum tax calculation to the current individual income tax regime.”

Paul Neiffer, How Much Longer for Section 1031 Exchanges?  “  Most likely, nothing will happen this year, but in 2015, watch out.”

 

Cara Griffith, California Needs a Dose of Sunshine (Tax Policy Blog):

This issue arose after references to two forms were noticed in an FTB multistate audit technique manual

 By not disclosing forms like this, the FTB is enabling its auditors to take inconsistent positions regarding similarly situated taxpayers. If that’s the case, any guidance the FTB puts out on its application of the unitary business principle is meaningless.

When you have to disclose the standards you apply, you risk being held to them.

 

News from the Profession.  The Latest New Jersey CPA Magazine Cover is a Little Freaky (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/5/14: President proposes $1 million Sec. 1031 cap. And: other doomed stuff!

March 5th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Economic supergenius

0-99, 0-414

The President trotted out his old petty tax increases in his 2015 budget yesterday, and a few new ones.  The  new taxes would go towards, among other spending increases, an increase in the Earned Income Tax Credit welfare program for childless taxpayers.

If history is a guide, the Obama budget isn’t going to do well in Congress.  His own party leadership in the Senate has already pledged to pass no budget at all.  When his 2013 budget plan came up for a vote in Congress, it was rejected 99 -0 in the Senate and 414-0 in the House.

Still, it is worth mentioning some of the tax proposals, just so you are aware of them and their low likelihood of passage anytime soon.  Also, in light of the recent Camp “tax reform” proposal, apparently no tax provision is too dumb to get bipartisan consideration, so some of these might even pass someday.

S corporations: the bill would tax as self-employment income 100% of K-1 income from professional S corporations and partnerships of materially-participating owners.  Businesses covered would include health, law, engineering, architecture, accounting, actuarial science, performing arts, consulting, athletics, investment advice or management, brokerage services, and lobbying.  For some reason, regular compensation would no longer be wages, but would instead be self-employment income.  That would wreak havoc on everybody’s 401(k) and profit-sharing plans.

- Like-kind exchange benefits would be capped at $1 million per taxpayer per year.  That won’t be popular with the real estate industry.

The bill also drags out dozens of the old proposals from his prior budgets, including LIFO repeal, ordinary income treatment for carried interests, capping the value of deductions at 28%, and capping build-ups in retirement plans.  Nothing at all is likely to happen before the next election on these proposals, but as many Obama proposals are also included in some form in the GOP Camp plan, they all have to be considered viable next time a major tax bill shows signs of moving.

The TaxProf has a good link-filled roundup.  The official explanation of the revenue-raisers is here.

Other coverage:

Kay Bell, Obama budget proposes more child care help for younger kids

Leslie Book, President’s Budget Proposes Major Procedural and Administrative Changes (Procedurally Taxing).  ”The popular media has generally described the plan overall the way Reuters did in reporting that it ‘stands little or no chance of being approved as is by Congress, where Republicans, who control the House of Representatives, disagree with the president’s policy priorities.’”

 

Des Moines Register, Voters OK increasing franchise fee in Des Moines.  The vote is the result of the city being ordered to repay an illegally-collected utility tax:

The money raised by increasing the franchise fee to 7.5 percent from 5 percent for seven years will be used to pay off about $40 million in bonds issued by the city to pay for the refund and administrative costs.

Among the “administrative costs” is $7 million in legal fees Des Moines was ordered to pay to the winning taxpayer attorneys after a scorched-earth court battle by the city to avoid repaying the illegal tax.  Next time, don’t collect an illegal tax, and pay up if you’re called on it.

 

Alan Cole, True Marginal Tax Rates under Chairman Camp’s Proposal (Tax Policy Blog).  Full of high-income phase-outs, it creates all sorts of goofy marginal rate anomalies:

Marginal Tax Rates Camp Tax Reform

Note the spike in rates at the low-end as a result of the earned-income tax credit phase-out.  That doesn’t even include the effect of the state EITCs that piggyback on the federal credit.  All of this is the opposite of tax reform.  Apparently neither party is ready for reform.

William Gale and Donald Marron, The Macro Effects of Camp’s Tax Reform (TaxVox): “How would Camp’s plan increase growth, and why is the range of estimates so wide?”

 

Paul Neiffer, Additional Tax Reform Items.  ”Remember, this is just a proposal and nothing will happen this year.”

Gene Steurle, A Camp-ground for Tax Reformers (TaxVox).

 

20130419-1Russ Fox, Deadlines for Us, but Not for Them:

For practitioners, the current state of the IRS is such that you can expect a lot of delays in responding to notices. Think months instead of weeks. Expect to have to call the IRS to verify that your response was received, and make sure clients are aware that the IRS is moving like molasses rolling uphill. Make sure anything you send is documented: certified mail with proof of receipt if by mail; if faxing, make sure you have the proof of receipt. Given the lengthy delays our clients are going to be in fear for far longer…

For taxpayers, you need to be aware that expediency is not part of today’s IRS. You have to be expedient in responding to notices but don’t expect the IRS to be expedient in getting back to you. Do not worry if it takes a long, long time to resolve something with the IRS. That’s just par for the course today.

Unfortunately, clients generally assume that if the IRS has sent a letter, that means the practitioner screwed up.  Many people, especially old folks, just pay up when they get an IRS notice.

 

William Perez, Tax-Deductible Relocation Expenses

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): B Is For Basis   

David Brunori, Taxing Coca Cola while Exempting Broccoli is Bad Policy Even for Native Americans (Tax Analysts Blog):

 In any event, several newspapers reported that one of the sponsors of the proposal was himself obese. He decided to change his life and lost 100 pounds. And he did it without any tax increases or help from the government.

Like so many reformed smokers/overeaters/drinkers, he has become annoying about it.

Tax Justice Blog, State News Quick Hits: State Policy Makers Need a Tax History Lesson

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 300.

 

Cheer up!  Filing Your Tax Return Is Terrible — But It Was Worse 100 Years Ago (Joseph Thorndike, Tax Analysts Blog).

News from the Profession.  The Real Loser at the Oscars This Year Was PwC.  (Going Concern)

20140305-1Jason Dinesen shares his Tax Season Tunes:

Here’s a sampling of other tunes I listen to while working when not getting my Gordon Lightfoot fix:

  • Neil Diamond. Generally not his “famous” songs. I detest — and I mean absolutely revile — “Sweet Caroline,” for example. The original recording is okay, but he’s turned it into a hokey, over-the-top, karaoke show-tune over the last few decades. Blech. I like the more introspective songs like “Shilo,” “If You Know What I Mean,” “Stones,” pretty much anything from his relatively new “12 Songs” and “Home Before Dark” albums,  and a host of other Neil Diamond songs that most people have probably never heard of.

  • An mix of songs that include Billy Joel, pop rock from the 60s and early 70s, Elvis, Willie Nelson, Conway Twitty, AC/DC, Juanes, Bon Jovi, CCR, Johnny Cash and Jimmy Buffett.

In case you were wondering, I believe Jason works alone.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/4/14: Des Moines votes on refunding illegal tax. And: life after football!

March 4th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20121002-2Des Moines voters decide today whether to approve a legal tax to refund a similar tax imposed illegally.  The Des Moines Register reports:

A special election Tuesday will determine how the city pays back a portion of a franchise fee it illegally collected from 2004 to 2009.

The Iowa Legislature gave Des Moines the authority to temporarily increase its franchise fee — a tax assessed on anyone who connects to electric and natural gas utilities — to pay off the judgment.

However, if voters reject the proposal, city officials will be forced to raise property taxes for at least 20 years in order to issue and pay municipal bonds to cover the court judgment.

When the tax was ruled illegal, the city appealed all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court before finally conceding that it would have to issue refunds — incurring enormous legal bills in the process, including a $7 million bill to the winning lawyers on the other side.  From the District Court opinion awarding the fee:

This case has been in our courts since 2004.  To say it was highly contested would be a gross understatement.  The history of this case shows that the City, while it was entitled to do so, erected one barrier after another in an attempt to prevent the class from being successful in obtaining a refund.  Almost without exception, class counsel was successful in dismantling each of those barriers.

It just goes to show that the city will do the right thing, once it has exhausted all appeals.  Maybe next time they won’t be so quick to enact an illegal tax.

The state legislature voted to allow Des Moines to impose the tax legally to repay the illegal tax.  Somehow I doubt the legislature would do a similar favor for taxpayers by letting them, say, legally not pay income tax for a few years to help them repay the taxes they had illegally avoided in prior years.  

 

William Perez, Deducting Work-Related Expenses

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): A is for Affordable Care Act

Leslie Book, EITC Snapshot: Overclaims and Commercial Preparer Usage (Procedurally Taxing).  ”In fact, there is a steady decline in the use of paid preparers among EITC claimants, while the rate of paid preparer usage overall has remained fairly steady.”

Another reason why preparer regulation to cut fraud is like pushing on a string.

Jack Townsend, The Scariest Tax Form? Scary Is in the Eye of the Beholder.  I think the article he cites, which chooses Form 5471, makes a good case, considering the almost-automatic $10,000 fine for filing it late.

Kay Bell,  Tax moves to make in March 2014

 

TaxProf, Tax Court Issues 63-Page Opinion Debunking Cracking the Code Book

 

taxanalystslogoTax Analysts Blog is having a tax reform party:

Clint Stretch, 10 Reasons Republicans Should Embrace the Camp Tax Bill.  This is pretty faint praise:  ”2. If they want a credible claim that Obama and Democrats are responsible for the failure of tax reform, they must pass a bill in the House.”

Jeremy Scott, Comparing the Camp and Obama Bank Taxes:

Including the bank tax in his plan is one of Camp’s most intriguing decisions, if only because the gain for him isn’t obvious, even after a closer look. The tax doesn’t raise much money. It is very similar to an Obama proposal that congressional Democrats didn’t really like, meaning it doesn’t buy the chair any bipartisan support. And it comes about four years too late to take advantage of widespread public anger at financial institutions. All Camp seems to have accomplished is legitimizing a revenue raiser for future use by the progressive caucus and undermining his own party’s opposition to this kind of tax increase.

Just… brilliant.  I prefer ending the “too big to fail” subsidy directly, if necessary by denying deposit insurance to such institutions.

Martin Sullivan, 25 Interesting Features of Camp’s New Tax Reform Plan.  ”Biggest disappointment. Camp and fellow House Republicans all but promised to reduce the top rate to 25 percent. They failed.”

Christopher Bergin, Tax Reform Only a Mother Could Love:

Many political observers think the GOP has a good chance of not only increasing its majority in the House, but also taking the majority in the Senate. I’m among those who believe that the Republicans will shoot themselves in the foot before that happens. I’ll bet there are more than a few Republicans this week who fear that Camp just put a bullet in the chamber.

I think the Camp plan will be quietly forgotten long before November, but there is still plenty of time for the GOP to demonstrate its skills with a Glock 40.

Norton Francis, Camp Tax Reform Would Create New Challenges for States (TaxVox).  The repeal of the deduction for state and local taxes and limits on muni bonds won’t win friends in the state capitals.

 

National Review, via InstapunditThe IRS Is the Problem:

Representative Camp’s thou-shalt-not list is fine so far as it goes, and, unlike the IRS bureaucracy, Congress does have the authority to rewrite the law. But his proposal falls short in that it assumes that the IRS is a proper and desirable regulator of political speech. It is not. It is not even particularly admirable in its execution of its legitimate mission, the collection of revenue: Its employees have committed felonies in releasing the confidential tax information of such political enemies as the National Organization for Marriage and Mitt Romney, and the agency itself has perversely interpreted federal privacy rules as protecting the criminal leakers at the IRS rather than the victims of their crimes. 

Instapundit comments: “Abolish governmental immunity and make them personally liable for damages for misconduct.”  Hard to argue with that; it would be a good addition to my “Sauce For the Gander” reforms.  I still don’t understand why a nonprofit should lose its exempt status for being primarily political.  Isn’t freewheeling debate a good thing?  The IRS certainly hasn’t shown itself a neutral observer here.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 299

 

Scott Drenkard, Johannes Schmidt, Guess Which State Has the Highest Liquor Taxes in the Nation? (Tax Policy Blog).  Think coffee.

 

Preparing for life after football.  Two former members of a Sioux Falls indoor football league team may have to change their post-athletic career plans.  From the Sioux Falls Argus:

A federal grand jury has indicted six people for conspiracy to defraud the United States and aggravated identity theft.

Two of those indicted – Undra Stewart Franks, 27, and Donta Moore, 28 – are former Sioux Falls Storm players.

The new federal indictment says Moore, Franks and the others conspired to defraud victims by using names, Social Security numbers and dates of birth stolen from others to file fraudulent income tax returns that claimed false income tax refunds.

Identity theft isn’t just a Florida thing.  If you deal with Social Security numbers at work, treat them as valuable confidential data — because that’s what they are.  Guard your own identity by never giving out your social security numbers, protecting your bank account info, and being sure never to transmit those things in unencrypted e-mails.  If you need to send documents with that info electronically, use a secure file transfer site, like our rothcpa.filetransfers.net.

 

News from the Profession.  10 People Not Cut Out to Be Partner (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/3/2014: For whom does the AMT toll this year? And Lois Lerner: will she or won’t she?

March 3rd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Laura Saunders, Beware the Stealth Tax; How to minimize the damage of the alternative minimum tax:

…the AMT now applies to eight times as many taxpayers as it did 20 years ago, and common AMT “triggers” often are less esoteric than in the past. “They can be as simple as having three or more children, taking a large capital gain, or—especially—deducting state and local taxes,” says Dave Kautter, managing director at American University’s Kogod Tax Center, who studies the AMT.

20140303-1

That’s pretty much what I see in our practice.  AMT is rare for taxpayers with income under $100,000, and usually occurs in large families.  It can be impossible to avoid AMT in the $200,000 – $500,000 income range, especially in a state with an income tax.  Above $500,000, it typically involves large capital gains.  Both AMT and regular tax have the same 20% tax on capital gains, and the AMT doesn’t let you deduct the related state income taxes, so the AMT will kick in.

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Ann Althouse,  Who put “acute political pressure” on Lois Lerner “to crack down on conservative-leaning organizations,” and why did Lerner need a “plan” to avoid “a per se political project”?:

I think it must mean that it was a political project and they were hard at work figuring out how to make it not look like what she knew it was. That’s a smoking gun.

Phony scandal.  Nothing to see here…

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 298

WSJ, No Change: Former IRS Official to Take the Fifth.  ”A lawyer for former Internal Revenue Service official Lois Lerner said Sunday that she will decline to testify about IRS targeting of grass-roots conservative groups, contradicting a top GOP lawmaker.”  Presumably because there’s not a smidgen of wrongdoing.

 

TaxProf, Mulligan: ObamaCare’s Multiple Taxes Are Shackling the Job Market.  The TaxProf quotes from the University of Chicago’s Casey Mulligan: 

Once we consider that the new law has an employer penalty, too, the labor market will be receiving three blows from the new law: the implicit employment tax, the employer penalty and the implicit income tax. Regardless of how few economists acknowledge the new employment tax, it should be no surprise when the labor market cannot grow under such conditions.20140106-1

It’s funny how the same people can argue for high tobacco taxes to curb smoking insist that employment taxes won’t curb hiring.

 

Jason Dinesen,  Accounting for the 0.9% Medicare Surtax on Iowa Tax Returns

Kay Bell, Delayed Tax Refunds, TC 570 And An Important Distinction .  Don’t jump to conclusions about your delayed refunds.

William Perez, Resources for Filing Corporate Taxes for 2013.  ”March 17th, 2014, is the due date for filing corporate tax returns.”

 Kay Bell, 5 ways to maximize tax-deductible business entertainment

Russ Fox, Former Chairman of Woodland Park, NJ Democratic Committee Bribes His Way to ClubFed

Jack Townsend, IRS CI Is Looking at Renunciations of Citizenship Just in Case .  Looking to take one last shot at the fleeing jaywalkers.

 

Jim Maule, Find Some money, Pay Some Tax:20131017-2

Every now and then we read of someone finding something valuable. This time, it’s a California couple who found a stash of gold coins on their property. According to this story, the couple found eight cans containing 1,400 coins, valued at approximately $10 million.

The joy of the moment is tempered, of course, by the existence of income taxes, both federal and state. Must the couple pay tax? Yes. The value of the coins is included in the couple’s gross income. It is ordinary income. The law is settled. 

Easy come, easy go…

 

Martin Sullivan, The Beginning of the End of Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog):

Enactment of the research credit in 1981 was the antithesis of simplification. It has a highly complex incremental structure and, even more problematic, it assigns tax directors and IRS agents the impossible task of distinguishing research from ordinary business expense. The Camp draft retains the credit and eliminates expensing. The opposite approach would be more sensible.

The research credit study industry is full of former Congressional staffers who like things the way they are.

William McBride, Scott Hodge, Top Line Assessment of Camp’s Tax Reform: Increases Progressivity and Taxes on Business and Investment (Tax Policy Blog):

In general, Camp simplifies and lowers tax rates for many taxpayers and businesses, but does so through a net tax increase on businesses and taxpayers earning over $200,000. As a result, the plan makes the individual tax code even more progressive, it increases the amount of redistribution from high-income taxpayers to other taxpayers, and it worsens the current bias against saving and investment—all of which will be a drag on long-run economic growth.

It looks more and more like the Camp plan was a false move.

William Gale, Dave Camp’s pitch to overhaul U.S. taxes: An impossible dream? (TaxVox)

 

It’s getting real in New Jersey, according to the London Daily Mail online:   ’Ready to plead guilty’: Teresa and Joe Giudice set to reach plea deal on 41 charges of fraud and tax evasion.  If they were cheating on taxes, becoming national celebrities could have been a bad move.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/28/14: Somber reasoning and copious citation edition. And: tax soda, not pop!

February 28th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

crackedThe courts rarely spend much time on tax protesters.  While optimistic and deluded folks may spend lots of time submitting documents trying to convince the judge that he is sitting in an admiralty court or something, courts rarely rise to the bait.  They typically dismiss the nonsense filings this way, in language arising from Crain (CA-5, 1984):

We shall not painstakingly address petitioner’s assertions with somber reasoning and copious citation of precedent; to do so might suggest that these arguments have some colorable merit.

The Tax Court made an exception yesterday.   A taxpayer whose tax information apparently appears on a well-known tax protester site showed up before Judge Buch, and the judge decided to take advantage of a teaching opportunity:

The Court has taken the time, however, to address those arguments because Mr. Waltner appears to be perpetuating frivolous positions that have been promoted and encouraged by Peter Hendrickson’s book Cracking the Code: The Fascinating Truth About Taxation in America (2007). Indeed, it appears not merely that Mr. Waltner’s positions are predicated on that book but that his returns and return information have been used to promote the frivolous arguments contained in that book. Consequently, a written opinion is warranted.

I have mentioned Mr. Hendrickson before.  His most recent appearance here involved an appeal of his sentence on tax convictions.  Needless to say, if Mr. Hendrickson has “cracked the code,” a lot of good it did him.  Judge Buch addresses some of the contentions Mr. Hendrickson’s book makes, including the idea that most of us aren’t “persons” subject to the tax law and that “private sector” income is non-taxable.  Judge Buch addresses Mr. Hendrickson’s qualifications in tax law (let’s just say they are non-traditional, including a firebombing conviction).

The opinion describes Mr. Hendrickson’s main tax tactic:

This misguided view leads to the author’s strategy for filing tax returns, which was mirrored by Mr. Waltner’s returns. The author recommends “correcting” Forms 1099 by including a declaration that nothing that was received was taxable. Mr. Waltner did this. The author recommends creating substitute W-2s by changing only the amount of the reported wages. Mr. Waltner did this. The author recommends filing a Form 1040 based on these inappropriately revised forms. Mr. Waltner did this. The author recommends including FICA taxes amongst the taxes withheld. Mr. Waltner did this. 

In the end, this long Tax Court opinion comes to the same conclusion as all of the shorter ones addressing the same arguments, concluding that they don’t work.  The taxpayer, Mr. Waltner, was hit with a $2,500 penalty for making frivolous arguments.

The Moral:   No matter how many words they throw out there, tax protest arguments don’t work.  Also, it’s unwise to take tax advice from advisors whose arguments can’t keep themselves out of prison.

Cite: Waltner, TC Memo 2014-35

Related: Russ Fox, He Cracked the Code (but Won’t be Happy with the Result)

 

William Perez, Tax Credits for Families with Children

Me, IRS issues 2014 auto depreciation limits; luxury begins at $15,800

Jack Townsend, Another Sentencing of UBS Client.  In case you think bank secrecy still works.

 

20131209-1Len Burman, Hidden Taxes in the Camp Proposal (TaxVox):

The plan resurrects the 1960s era add-on minimum tax—the granddaddy of today’s uber-complex Alternative Minimum Tax. Effectively, the surtax can be0 thought of as an additional tax on certain preference items such as the value of employer-sponsored health insurance, interest on municipal bonds, deductible mortgage interest, the standard deduction, itemized deductions (except charitable contributions), and untaxed Social Security benefits. Although the list of preference items differs from the old add-on minimum tax, the idea is eerily similar.

The more I see of the Camp plan, the less it seems like reform.

 

Clint Stretch, 10 Reasons Democrats Should Like the Camp Tax Bill. (Tax Analysts Blog)  Generally reasons why it doesn’t count as actual reform.

Joseph Rosenberg, How Does Dave Camp Pay for Individual Tax Cuts? By Raising Revenue from Corporations (TaxVox)

Kay Bell, GOP’s tax reform bill DOA

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 295

Johannes Schmidt, New Soda Tax Proposed in Illinois (Tax Policy Blog).  That must mean it only applies in Southern Illinois, because it’s (properly) called “Pop” everywhere else in the state.

20140228-4

News from the Profession: Big 4 Firms Making Necessary March Madness Preparations as Usual (Going Concern)

 

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