Posts Tagged ‘2015 year-end tax tips’

Tax Roundup, 12/30/15: What needs to be paid by tomorrow. And: NY Times has fun with a chart.

Wednesday, December 30th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20141226-1Things that have to be paid for by the end of the day tomorrow. The unforgiving calendar is nearly ready to turn, and that leaves only today and tomorrow to do some things to help lower 2015 taxes. Some expenses are only deductible if they are paid by the deadline.

For cash basis business taxpayers, payment needs to be made for most business expenses by the end of the day tomorrow. “Payment” means the check is written and postmarked, or a wire transfer is completed, or a legitimate liability has been incurred. If it’s on the credit card by the end of the day tomorrow, it’s considered paid for.

The only business expenses that normally can be paid and deducted after year-end for cash-basis taxpayers are pension and profit-sharing contributions. these are deductible this year if paid by the due date of the 2015 tax return, including any extensions.

For accrual-basis taxpayers, any expenses owed related parties are deductible only if paid by the end of the day tomorrow (Section 267). For C corporations, this generally includes expenses owed to 50% owners and their family members, and to corporations and partnerships owned by 50% owners. For S corporations and partnerships, any ownership at all makes you “related,” and the definition of “family” goes beyond ancestors, descendants and siblings to include aunts, uncles, nephews and nieces.. These rules can get complicated, so be sure to pay by tomorrow or consult your tax advisor if you aren’t sure.

Gifts are a different story. It’s not enough to mail a check by tomorrow to count as a 2015 gift; the check actually must be cashed. If you are trying to get an annual exclusion gift under the wire by tomorrow, consider a wire transfer or a cashiers check.

Charitable contributions can deducted this year if mailed this year, but be sure to get a certified mail postmark if it’s a big one — or better yet, use a credit card. If you are making a gift of appreciated stock, it has to be in the charity’s brokerage account by the end of the day tomorrow to count.

Finally, if you are spending money on depreciable property, even if you plan to use the Section 179 deduction, it’s not enough to buy and pay for the property by tomorrow. It must be “placed in service.” That means on-site, ready to go, not at the dealership or in crates on the dock.

This is the penultimate entry of our 2015 year-end planning tips series. Come back tomorrow for the finale!

 

The New York Times yesterday ran an article headlined For the Wealthiest, a Private Tax System That Saves Them Billions: The Very Richest Are Able to Quietly Shape Tax Policy That Will Allow Them to Shield Billions in Income. It offers a lot less than it promises. It pretty much establishes that really rich people can afford expensive tax advice, and they buy it.

The article includes this misleading chart:

 

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This shows that those 400 people are really putting one over on the IRS with their clever planning, doesn’t it?  Well, not really. I’ll superimpose the top capital gains rates that applied for the years on the chart (sourced here):

 

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Funny how that income tax rates of those sneaky 400 people correspond with the top capital gain rates. Why would that be — because those dastardly 400 rich people conspire to incur capital gains?

No. As we’ve pointed out here, capital gains are what get people on that top 400 list. They normally hit the top 400 only once, by having a once-in-a-lifetime capital gain, like the sale of a business.

You also may notice that the New York Times cuts off the chart conveniently right before two big increases in the capital gain rate — the 2013 expiration of the Bush 15% capital gain rates and the 2013 effective date of the 3.8% net investment income tax. You can bet that the line goes right back up starting in 2013.

Update, 12/30/15, 4:25 pm, from The Washington Post:

On Wednesday, the Internal Revenue Service published an update to its annual assessment of how much the 400 highest-earning Americans pay in taxes. It showed that the effective tax rate paid by those Americans jumped in 2013 to nearly 23 percent.

Gee, amazing how that works! I’ve updated the chart to show the new number.

Correction: this post originally stated in error that the Net Investment Income Tax took effect in 2014, instead of 2013.

Related: Scott Hodge, New Treasury Data Shows How Progressive America’s Tax Code Really Is (Tax Policy Blog):

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More coverage: TaxProf, NY Times:  How The Ultra Wealthy Buy Tax Policy

Robert D. Flach, THE YEAR IN TAXES 2015

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2015: The Innocence Project

Robert Wood, Tax Double Whammy: IRS Can Revoke Passports And Uses Collection Agencies

Peter Reilly, World Class Rider Does Not Insure Allowable Tax Losses In Horse Case

Kay Bell, IRS seeks tax pros’ input on fighting tax ID theft fraud

William Perez, Forgiven or canceled mortgage debts could be nontaxable

Paul Neiffer, 50% Bonus Depreciation Applies to More Property. “Any interior improvement made to non-residential real estate will qualify for bonus depreciation with certain exceptions for (1) elevators and escalators, (2) internal structural framework, and (3) enlarging a building.”

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 965:

Donors listing the IRS as their employer have donated roughly $453,800 to Democratic candidates and causes and $221,400 to Republican candidates and causes since 1990. About one in four of the dollars for Democrats, or roughly $117,500, went to President Barack Obama.

But IRS employees since 1990 have also donated $203,000 to the National Treasury Employees Union, which in turn has given about 95 percent of its $6 million in political contributions to Democrats over the last 25 years, OpenSecrets.org data shows.

Yet we are asked to believe the IRS operates in a fair and neutral manner towards all political persuasions.

 

Harvey Galper, Five Questions to Ask When You Look at a Presidential Candidate’s Tax Plan (TaxVox). How about, “Should I seek counseling?”

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/29/15: No year-end basis, no S corporation loss. And: ACA 1095 deadlines extended.

Tuesday, December 29th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

S-SidewalkBasis or bust. With the re-enactment of bonus depreciation for 2015, some S corporations find themselves with taxable losses for 2015. That won’t do much for the 2015 tax returns of S corporation shareholders who have no basis in their stock at year-end. While they also have to get by the “at-risk” and “passive loss” limits, they don’t even get to those problems without basis.

A taxpayer’s initial basis in an S corporation is the amount paid for the stock. It is increased by capital contributions and by undistributed income of the S corporation. It is reduced by distributions of S corporation earnings and by S corporation losses. If there have been 2015 distributions, they count before the losses do.

A shareholder with no stock basis can still get deductions by loaning money to the S corporation by year-end. The loan has to meet the at-risk rules (it can’t be funded by another shareholder or by the corporation, for example), but if it meets those requirements, it can create basis for S corporation losses. But don’t do anything hokey like making a loan on December 31 and having the corporation repay it on January 3.

It’s a trap! Well, it doesn’t have to be, but remember that any losses you take against a loan reduce the basis of the loan. That means that if the loan is repaid before the losses are restored by S corporation income, the repayment will be taxable gain to the extent of the unrestored losses.

This is another installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series running through December 31. Collect them all!

 

1095-C cornerIRS delays due dates for 1095-B and 1095-C reporting2015 is the first year many employers are required to file a new form documenting insurance coverage, or offers of coverage, for their employees. Apparently many employers are still scrambling to figure out how to comply with the complex rules, because yesterday the IRS announced (Notice 2016-4) a delay in the deadlines for providing these forms to employees and to the IRS. A summary:

2016-4 deadlines

Employers are encouraged to file under the old deadlines if they can, but they now have a blanket extension, with no need to file any extension request.

While the IRS will be processing forms starting January 16, this announcement tells us that millions of taxpayers will lack the forms they need to properly report their ACA tax credits or penalties for inadequate coverage. The IRS says that employees can rely upon “other information received” from employers or insurers, and do not have to amend returns if the 1095s they receive later show that their original amounts are incorrect. What could possibly go wrong with this? Aside from rampant errors and outright fraud, I mean.

We are now approaching six years since the enactment of the ACA, and it’s still a mess.

Related: Russ Fox, IRS: We’ll Trust You on Health Insurance for 2015 Because… “We won’t have delays regarding filing returns because taxpayers haven’t received Forms 1095-B or 1095-C as long as they’re aware of their health insurance coverage. That’s a very good thing for all.”

 

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If you are trying to lose weight added by holiday treats, go to Robert D. Flach’s place for a “slender” Tuesday Buzz!

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2015: Red Paw Emergency Relief Team

Robert Wood, House Oversight Probes Hillary Speech Fees To Clinton Foundation. The assignment of income rules only apply to little people.

Leslie Book, PATH, CDP Venue and Berglund v Commissioner, A Recent Tax Court Case Where Venue Matters (Procedurally Taxing)

Jason DinesenFrom the Archives: Taxation of Emotional Distress Payments

Kay Bell, 10 tax-saving things to do by December 31

Jana Luttenegger WeilerLast Minute Tax Extenders – 2015 Edition (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

William Perez, Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015

Annette Nellen, Top Ten Items of Tax Policy Interest for 2015 – #6 and #7. Includes coverage of the return due date changes enacted this year.

Me, Forget April 15. Well, don’t, actually, but Dec. 31 matters more. My latest at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record Business Professionals’ Blog.

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 964.

Renu Zaretsky, Bans, Subsidies, Searches, and Bubbles. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers new EITC restrictions and Nevada’s corporate welfare cornucopia for Tesla, among other morsels.

Stephen Entin, Disentangling CAP Arguments against Tax Cuts for Capital Formation: Part 4 (Tax Policy Blog). “Most major tax bills of the last thirty years have provided serious tax reductions or refundable credits (resulting in negative taxes) for lower income families. These are extraordinarily expensive, but do next to nothing to promote capital formation to raise productivity, wages, and employment.”

 

Caleb Newquist, Opening Day of Tax Season Less Than a Month Away (Going Concern). “Anyone with a PTIN is due to report on January 4.” Haven’t renewed your PTIN yet? Get on it!

 

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Altaring your tax planning

Sunday, December 27th, 2015 by Joe Kristan
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Margaret and John Kristan, Newlyweds, 1952.

Today is the 63rd anniversary of my parents’ wedding, so today’s post goes up in their honor.

Love is a many-splendored thing, but love is even better when it saves taxes. Your marital status at year-end is your filing status for the entire year, so maybe you want to run down to the courthouse and tie the knot before the ball drops before midnight January 1, local time. Sure, call me a hopeless romantic. The Tax Update just rolls that way.

A quick trip to the preacher may be in order in the following circumstances — assuming, of course, you have sufficient non-tax reasons to get married:

– One prospective spouse has a big capital gain, and the other has capital losses that would otherwise go unused.

– One of you has passive income, the other has passive losses. If you are married on the last day of the year, the losses can offset the income on a joint return.

– One of you has substantial income in 2013, and the other doesn’t. If you have only one income between the two of you, you’ll save taxes on a joint return because of the wider tax brackets on a joint filing.

– If you are Iowans, and one of you has pension income, marriage will enable you to exclude up to $12,000 from your Iowa income tax return. A single filer can only exclude $6,000.

– One of you has AGI over $200,000 and investment income, and the other has AGI under $50,000.  A quick wedding gets the higher-earning spouse out of the new Obamacare Net Investment Income Tax.

But it’s a complicated calculation, as this Tax Foundation chart illustrates:

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There are  other special circumstances that could lead you to tie the knot. A good tax marriage results when one partner has tax attributes, like capital losses, that can be used on a joint return but would not be useful on a single return. Other such items could include tax credit carryforwards and investment interest carryforwards.

‘Til death do us part, but you first! For the wealthy single taxpayer, the estate tax can also offer a more macabre tax planning opportunity. By marrying and surviving a poor spouse, the rich spouse can pick up an extra $5.4 million in estate tax exemption. That’s because a widowed spouse can now inherit the short-lived spouse’s unused exemption.

Of course these things apply to couples pondering divorce, too, but that’s too sad to dwell on this time of year. Oops, I just did. And some couples, particularly those where both have good incomes, are better off postponing marriage, or (shudder) accelerating divorce.

Anyway, you should marry for the right reasons. But if you can both be in love and cut your taxes, why not let IRS help pay for your honeymoon?

Check back tomorrow for another installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series

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Keep on giving! A high-end tax planning tip.

Saturday, December 26th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20151226-1As the holiday giving frenzy morphs into the holiday return frenzy, many tax-wise folks are still thinking of giving. Taxpayers with enough net worth to worry about paying estate tax are considering their annual gifts to family (the estate tax kicks in for estates starting at $5.43 million in 2015). For such taxpayers, the basic tool is the $14,000 per-donor, per-donee gift tax exclusion. A couple with four kids maximizing annual giving can reduce their taxable estates by $560,000 over five years, not even counting appreciation of the gift.

Taxpayers often ignore the opportunities for annual giving, thinking “the annual exclusion will be there for me next year.” While true, that’s the 2016 exclusion. But then the 2015 opportunity is lost forever – for our hypothetical four-child couple, it’s a $560,000 tax-saving move lost.

If it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing right. To get the gift to count in 2015, here are some tips:

– If you’re writing a check, march the lucky recipient down to the bank to cash it by December 31. Checks not cashed by year-end normally won’t count as 2015 gifts.

– If you are donating private company stock, make sure the corporate secretary records the transfer on the company’s books by year-end. Also make sure the tax returns reflect the gift – if you make a December 28 gift of S corporation stock, make sure the donee gets a K-1 showing income for the 12/28 through 12/31 period.

– If you are donating public company stock, make sure it’s in the donee’s brokerage account before the end of the day December 31.

Personal gifts are neither deductible to the donor nor taxable to the recipient. For non-cash gifts, the recipient steps into the donors basis for a future sale if the property has appreciated.  If the value at the date of gift is less than the basis, the recipients basis for determining loss only is the date of gift value.

Plan on filing a gift tax return for any property gifts, even if you owe not gift tax; a properly prepared gift tax return starts the three-year statute of limitations, preventing any future IRS quibbling over the values.

Check back tomorrow for another installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series

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Year-end tip: The Iowa Student Tuition Organization Tax Credit

Thursday, December 24th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20151224-1If you’re in a generous mood on Christmas Eve but want more out of your charitable gift than a straight-up deduction, consider a gift to an Iowa Student Tuition Organization. A gift to an STO yields a 65% non-refundable Iowa tax credit, in addition to the federal charitable deduction. You don’t get an Iowa charitable deduction, but that trades an 8.9-cent benefit for a 65-cent tax benefit, so that works.

Student Tuition Organizations exist to help make private K-12 schools affordable for lower-income families. Iowa has 12 STOs, listed here.

The credit is capped annually, though, so some STOs may have already used up their 2015 credits, and you would have to wait until 2016 to get one. Eligible donors get a certificate with a unique identification number that they use when they claim the credit. 

More information is available from Jason Dinesen or the Iowa Alliance for Choice in Education.

Programming note: The Tax Update is taking it easy the rest of this week. Tax Roundups resume Monday, but check back every day the rest of the year for another installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series

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Tax Roundup, 12/22/15: If you want a 2015 qualified plan, time to fly! And lots more.

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
The view from Tax Update world headquaters yesterday.

The view from Tax Update world headquaters yesterday.

10 days to get a qualified plan in place. Some of the best deductions for sole proprietors and one-owner corporations are found in the tax law’s “qualified plan” rules. A payment to a qualified pension or profit-sharing plan is deductible now, grows tax free, and is only taxable on retirement. For one-employee companies, it’s a deduction for taking money from one pocket and putting it in another.

One of the best of these opportunities is the “Solo 401(k),” which allows a deduction of up to $53,000 for contributions to a solo owner-employee’s retirement plan. But there’s one little catch: the plan has to be in place by December 31 of this year to allow a 2015 deduction.

If that sort of deduction sounds attractive, you should consult a qualified plan professional. Some brokerage houses can steer you the right way, as can the Vanguard mutual fund company.

Remember, though, that once money is in a qualified plan, expect it to stay there. Early withdrawals face a 10% penalty, as well as income tax liability. 401(k) plans generally can’t be investors in or lenders to the plan owner’s business. There are annual compliance costs that inevitably reduce the tax benefits. Still, for an annual deduction that size, some inconvenience can be tolerated.

This is the second installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series. Collect them all!

 

Kay Bell, Upcoming filing season will start on time: Jan. 19, 2016. Almost none of my clients are ready by then. While I’m glad that the season isn’t delayed by a failure to pass an extender bill, I think identity theft requires a later start to issuing tax refunds. They shouldn’t be processed until W-2 and 1099 information is in the IRS system – preferably with special W-2 codes like those the IRS is experimenting with this season to catch fraudulent claims. 

Of course, that means the government will sit on overpayments longer. That should be addressed by changing the “I got a big refund!” culture. That could be done by lowering to 75% the amount of taxes that have to be paid in by April 15 to avoid a penalty and by changing the withholding tables to make refunds less likely.

 

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Robert D. Flach comes through with a “meaty” Christmas Week Buzz, with lots of Extender bill discussion and a hint of perhaps the most unusual Christmas Eve tradition ever.

Tony Nitti, Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2015: #4 – Who Can Qualify As A Real Estate Pro?

Russ Fox, Are Tips (Gratuities) at the Poker Table Deductible? “As long as the tip is reasonable, it’s clear that a professional poker player can deduct the tip as a business expense.” You’ll have to read the post to see whether it works for amateurs.

William Perez, All About the Earned Income Tax Credit. “The easiest way to find out if you qualify for the earned income credit is to use an application found on the IRS Web site called the EITC Assistant.”

Andrew Mitchel offers a True / False Quiz on FAST Act Passport Revocation Provisions

Hank Stern, Major O’Care Disappointment (Insureblog). “Now that the (disastrous) first phase of the 2016 Open Enrollment season is behind us, lets’ take a look at what a huge disappointment it was.”

Carlton Smith, Tilden v. Comm’r: Postal Service Tracking Data Determines Timeliness of Tax Court Petition (Procedurally Taxing)

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2015: PACT For Animals

 

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Scott Greenberg, Fact-checking Hillary Clinton on Millionaires’ Taxes (Tax Policy Blog). “There are very few millionaires in the U.S. that pay “10 percent to nothing” in taxes.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 957. Today’s link goes to a Washington Post story that says “There is no love lost between Republicans in Congress and the Internal Revenue Service, whether it’s their dislike for the tax code, the current tax commissioner or their fury at the agency’s treatment a few years ago of conservative groups.” If you want to see increases in the IRS budget, you want Commissioner Koskinen to resign.

Howard Gleckman presents The TaxVox Lump of Coal Awards for the Ten Worst Tax Ideas of 2015. While I might quibble with one or two of the choices, it’s a strong list. For example:

8. Tax credits for what ails you. Hillary Clinton has taken a page out of Bill Clinton’s fiscal playbook: Identify a kitchen table problem and propose a modest tax subsidy to relieve the pain. She has tax credits for families burdened by the high costs of education, caring for aging parents, and high medical costs. And she’s proposed another credit to encourage employers to give workers a stake in their companies. My TPC colleague Gene Steuerle has a name for this: tax deform.

It’s more than a federal problem, for sure.

 

Matt Gardner, What Apple’s Tim Cook Gets Wrong About Its Tax Avoidance (Tax Justice Blog). Mr. Cook has the temerity to think that he has a duty to shareholders, instead of to grasping politicians.

 

Career Corner (or, News from the Profession). Former EY Employee Who Liked Secretly Filming People in the Bathroom Given Four Years to Think About His Choices (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/21/15: Winter’s here, along with a new tax law. Fixed-asset planning time!

Monday, December 21st, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20151211-1It’s the darkest day of the year, but with the signing of the Extender Bill, H.R. 2029, we are no longer in the dark for year-end fixed asset tax planning. The “PATH” act has some important fixed-asset provisions:

A permanent (and inflation-indexed) $500,000 annual limit for Section 179 deductions. This provision lets qualifying taxpayers deduct currently fixed asset costs that would otherwise have to be capitalized and depreciated over multiple years.

“Bonus Depreciation” is extended through 2019. This provision allows taxpayers to deduct 50% of the cost of depreciable property in the first depreciable year, with the remaining cost depreciated over the property’s normal tax life. Unlike Section 179, it cannot be taken for used property, but unlike Section 179, it can be used to generate net operating losses.

-15-year depreciation is made permanent for “Qualified Leasehold Improvement Property , Qualified Restaurant Buildings and Improvements, and Qualified Retail Improvements. These rules enable taxpayers to depreciate these items over 15 years, rather than the usual 39 year life for commercial buildings.

In theory, this provides a great opportunity to knock down your 2015 tax bill with last-minute purchases of fixed assets. But there’s a catch. It’s not enough to buy and pay for new fixed assets to deduct them this year. They also have to be “placed in service” by year end. From the IRS publication on depreciation:

You place property in service when it is ready and available for a specific use, whether in a business activity, an income-producing activity, a tax-exempt activity, or a personal activity. Even if you are not using the property, it is in service when it is ready and available for its specific use.

Example 1.

Donald Steep bought a machine for his business. The machine was delivered last year. However, it was not installed and operational until this year. It is considered placed in service this year. If the machine had been ready and available for use when it was delivered, it would be considered placed in service last year even if it was not actually used until this year.

It’s not enough to have a new machine in crates on the loading dock. It has to be set up and ready to go. If you are buying a farm building, having it in pieces waiting for assembly doesn’t get you there.

That’s why year-end purchase of vehicles and farm equipment are popular. Once they arrive, they are pretty much ready to go. But you have to actually take delivery. “On order” isn’t enough. And remember that there are limits on the amount of Section 179 deduction and depreciation for passenger vehicles.

This is the first installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series

 

6th avenue 1910

 

Russ Fox, Once Again, the IRS Doesn’t Start by Calling You:

My mother received a phone call on Saturday morning at 6 am from “Agent Smith” of the IRS demanding immediate payment of her taxes or she would find herself “thrown in jail.” Yes, the scamsters are still out there.

Now imagine you’re a senior citizen, and you get a phone call waking you up telling you to pay the IRS or you’ll find yourself in prison. It doesn’t take a genius to know that these scamsters can intimidate their victims.

Remember, if the caller demanding payment and saying the police are coming says he’s from IRS, he’s not from IRS.

Tony Nitti, Tax Court: Luring Pigs To Untimely Demise With Kool-Aid Counts As Material Participation. Sooey!

Robert D. Flach, THERE IS STILL TIME TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF A “QCD” FOR 2015!

 

Paul Neiffer, Wind Energy Credits Extended and Phased-Out

Annette Nellen is counting down the “Top Ten Items of Tax Policy Interest for 2015.” #1 is non-tax bills used to change the tax law; #2 is IRS Funding Challenges. Anybody who is serious about improving IRS funding should be demanding the resignation of Commissioner Koskinen. Nobody’s going to trust him with extra funding.

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: Insolvency and Canceled Debt: Make Sure You Can Prove It!

Jim Maule, Winning Back Your Tax Payments. “A reader made me aware of a recent suggestion that every taxpayer who files a timely and honest tax return, along with timely payment, be entered into a lottery.” It a way, that’s already true.

Leslie Book, Extenders Bill Gives IRS Additional Powers to Impose Penalties on Preparers and Disallow Refundable Credits (Procedurally Taxing). “Under the new law,  the accuracy-related penalty can be applied to any part of a reduced refundable credit subject to deficiency procedures.”

Peter Reilly, Bernie Sanders And The 90% Income Tax Rate That He Does Not Call For. ” Bernie Sanders wants us to have an economy like it was in the sixties and early seventies, when a summer of hard work could pay a year’s tuition and there were plenty of factory jobs that would support a family.” Maybe Bernie should reconsider his nostalgia.

Robert Wood, New Law Says Money For Wrongful Convictions Is Tax Free

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2015: Wounded Warrior Project

Kay Bell gets into the holiday spirit with Christmas gifts for tax and financial geeks

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 954Day 955Day 956. Coverage of the limits on IRS power included in the extender and omnibus legislation.

Alex Tabarrok, Subsidies Increase Tuition, Part XIV (Marginal Revolution):

Remarkably, so much of the subsidy is translated into higher tuition that enrollment doesn’t increase! What does happen is that students take on more debt, which many of them can’t pay.

So naturally the Extenders bill made the American Opportunity Tax Credit permanent.

Jared Walczak, The Opening Salvo of 2016’s Soda Tax Battle (Tax Policy Blog). “Soda taxes are poised to be on the agenda in many cities in 2016, an effort spearheaded by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.” I propose a tax on people who can’t mind their own business.

Renu Zaretsky, Promises, Hopes, and Complaints. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers Hillary promises, Nevada trolling for ribbon-cuttings with taxpayer money, and Apple’s CEO tax code thoughts: “He wants changes to the US tax code, which ‘was made for the Industrial Age, not the Digital Age… It’s backwards. It’s awful for America.'”

 

News from the Profession. Let’s Help Deloitte Global CEO Punit Renjen With His First Tweet (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/5/15: Early year-end planning edition. And: too cold for a film credit trial?

Monday, January 5th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today “In the Blogs” visitors: the tax and AMT article is here. You may also be interested in these thoughts on when prepaying tax is unwise, even without AMT.

 

20150105-1Now that you’re done with 2014 year-end tax planning, let’s get started on 2015. Procrastination is as human as liking sugar and shiny things. It’s natural to get serious about anything right at the deadline, whether it’s homework or tax planning.

But it’s often wiser to get started early. That’s especially true when looking at contributions to tax-advantaged savings accounts. You should look to fund these as soon as you can, rather than putting them off to the last minute. The sooner you fund your 2015 IRA, your Health Savings Account, or your Section 529 education savings account, the sooner your funds are earning their return tax-free.

So if you have the funds on hand, here’s a new year’s resolution to keep today — fully fund your tax-advantaged savings accounts. Your limits for 2015:

Contributions can not exceed the amount necessary to provide for the qualified education expenses of the beneficiary. If you contribute to a 529 plan, however, be aware that there may be gift tax consequences if your contributions, plus any other gifts, to a particular beneficiary exceed $14,000 during the year.

Taxpayers filing in Iowa can deduct their contributions to the College Savings Iowa Section 529 plan up to $3,163 per beneficiary, per donor on their Iowa income tax return. A married couple funding plans for their two children can therefore deduct up to $12,652 in 2015 CSI contributions.

 

Enjoying a short Des Moines winter commute.

Too cold for a film tax credit trial? A strange development in the Iowa Film Credit scandal, reported by the Des Moines Register:

A new fraud trial for a Nebraska filmmaker accused of using a fake purchase agreement to get tax credits should be delayed because two elderly witnesses have left Iowa for the winter, according to a prosecutor handling the case.

Yes, it’s cold here. We’re supposed to get a snowstorm today, and it’s supposed to be 1 on Wednesday. For a high temperature. And I can’t say I have a great deal of sympathy for somebody who got millions in tax credit money.

But a criminal trial is serious business, and the film scandal has been going since 2009. The prosecution says the witness is worried that he might fall. I think arrangements can be made to get him safely from the car.

What’s the case about?

Dennis Brouse, 64, has been waiting for a second trial after judges on the Iowa Court of Appeals overturned a felony fraud conviction against him in April. Brouse’s company, Changing Horses Productions, received $9 million in tax credits from Iowa’s scandal-ridden film tax credit program.

Brouse faces a single fraud charge and potentially a prison sentence, stemming from the purchase of a 38-foot camper trailer he bought from Prole couple Wayne and Shirley Weese. Prosecutors say Brouse paid the couple $10,500 in cash for the trailer, but he claimed it cost twice that amount in a statement for tax credits given to the Iowa Film Office.

The state auditor’s report on the Iowa Film Office showed a lot of creative accounting for Changing Horses, including the claim of a $1 million expense for non-cash “sponsorship” considerations. I am guessing that they are going after the trailer case because there are e-mails from the Iowa Department of Revenue blessing the “in-kind” expense concept. I’m pretty sure that there is no such endorsement of doubling expenditures.

 

Roger McEowen, Top 10 Agricultural Law and Taxation Developments of 2014 (ISU-CALT). The impact of Obamacare is #1.

20121120-2Alan Cole rings in the new year with New Year, New Individual Mandate Penalty and New Year, New Employer Mandate (Tax Policy Blog). What new individual mandate penalty?

However, it’s also worth remembering that the penalty will be doubled (or more than doubled) for 2015. 2014’s penalty is $95 or 1% of your household income, whichever is higher. 2015’s penalty is $325 or 2% of your household income, whichever comes higher.

And the employer mandate? It’s the penalty on taxpayers with 100 or more “full-time equivalent” employees. A blog post can’t really do it justice:

The IRS has issued a truly epic 56-question FAQ to help explain the even-more-epic final regulations for the employer shared responsibility provision. In case you are wondering, those final regulations total to over seventy thousand words – similar in size to the novel Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.

It will get more epic if the Supreme Court rules that the individual tax credit only applies in the 14 states that have established their own ACA exchanges. The employer mandate only applies if an employee has qualified for the credit, and the individual mandate penalty will not apply to taxpayers whose insurance becomes “unaffordable” if the credits go away.

 

Robert Wood, Think Filing Taxes Was Tough Before Obamacare? Just Wait. “This year for the first time, the Affordable Care Act has created a trickier tax season. It is more expensive too, as virtually all Americans filing tax returns will have to consider the law’s impact on them and their taxes.”

Annette Nellen, ACA – Affordability of health insurance and age

William Perez, Directory of tax extensions for each state

Russ Fox, 1099 Time (2015 Version). “It’s time for businesses to send out their annual information returns.”

 

Kay Bell, Cigarettes are a bigger state tax target than booze. I think that explains the hostility of state governments to e-cigs.

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About EAs, #4: The SEE Isn’t a Tax Prep Exam

Peter Reilly, IRS Revokes Exempt Status Of Faux Veterans Groups

 

20150105-2

 

Renu Zaretsky, Cap and Trade Plans, Tax Deadlines, and Rate Drops. The TaxVox headline roundup covers gas taxes, dynamic scoring, and an insane plan in Washington state for a state-only “cap and trade” carbon program.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 606

News from the Profession: Celebrate the New Year with Accounting Salaries Charted by Company Type, Role, Service Line and More (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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