Posts Tagged ‘Andrew Lundeen’

Tax Roundup, 4/11/14. Why we extend. And: Tax Doctor, Tax Fairy?

Friday, April 11th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

4868Some folks just don’t like extensions.  Maybe they want their refund NOW.  Maybe they have never extended their return before, and they think it is somehow against the rules.  Some people believe an extension invites the IRS to come in and audit them.  And some people think they are just so special that they can bring in a complex return missing K-1s on April 10th and the preparers should just drop everything and get them filed somehow.

There isn’t much to do for the last category, except perhaps medication, or a thrashing by a crazed sleep-deprived preparer, but for more sensible folks, a basic understanding of extensions might help.

Extensions aren’t against the rules; the rules specifically provide for them.  Even in simpler times, tax administrators knew that it isn’t always possible for a busy person to put together all of the pieces of a tax return by April 15.

You still should pay up.  While extensions give you more time to file your tax return, they don’t give you extra time to pay.  The tax law asks you to estimate your tax liability and penalizes you  if you don’t have at least 90% of your taxes paid in by the April 15 deadline; the penalty is 1/2 percent per month.

Why bother with an extension if I can’t delay payment?    Probably the most important one is that if you are short of cash, the penalty for late payment on a return that you didn’t bother to extend is 5% per month — ten times the penalty for late payment on an extended return.  It forces you to at least take a stab at guessing your liability, helping you identify what pieces you have to gather to complete your extended return.  It also keeps you in compliance, and once you stop filing on time, it can be a hard habit to break.

But won’t it get me audited?  There’s no evidence that an accurate extended return filed during the extension period is any more likely to be audited than it would be filed on April 15.  The IRS selects returns based on what’s on them, now on whether they are extended.

There’s plenty of evidence that returns with errors are more likely to get extra IRS attention.  A return thrown together at the last minute is more likely to have errors than an extended return done during normal working hours by somebody who’s had some sleep.    For what it’s worth, I have extended my own return every year since 1991 with no IRS examination (knock wood).

Efile logoEfile logoe-file logoHow do I extend?  You file Form 4868 either on paper or electronically, along with any necessary payment, by April 15.  The IRS has more details here. It’s common to pay in enough to also cover your first quarter estimated tax payment with the extension.  It gives you some cushion in case you find more 2013 income while completing your return, and you can apply your return overpayment to your  2014 estimated tax when you do file your 2013 1040.

States have their own rules.  Iowa automatically extends your return without the need to file an extension form if you are at least 90% paid-in by the April 30 due date.  If you need to send them some money to get to 90%, you send it with Form IA 1040-V.

Our series of 2014 Filing Season Tips goes right through April 15.  Check back tomorrow for another one!

Russ Fox, Bozo Tax Tip #3: Be Suspicious!

 

tax fairyBelief in the Tax Fairy peaks at tax time.  The Tax Fairy is that magical sprite who will make all of your taxes go away painlessly while your sucker friends still send checks to the tax man.  It’s amazing what Tax Fairy adherents will believe.  Consider a Californian who worked as a software consultant.  He was put in touch with a “Tax Doctor” (my emphasis):

Early in 2006 petitioner’s friends recommended that he talk to the “Tax Doctor Corporation” (Tax Doctor) operated by a person representing himself to be Dr. Lawrence Murray (Murray). Petitioner spoke with Murray and members of Murray’s staff. Petitioner’s discussions with Murray and his staff consisted mostly of “a bit of a sales pitch”. They explained how they would handle his tax return preparation, what the tax savings would be, and the “structure” they would use.

Murray proposed setting up two corporations and preparing petitioner’s individual and corporate Federal income tax returns. Murray explained to petitioner that one corporation would be “operational” and the other would focus on “management”. Petitioner was unsure at trial which corporation was the operations entity and which was the management entity. Under the agreement with Murray petitioner would pay the Tax Doctor, as a fee for setting up the structure, the amount of the tax savings generated by the use of the structure. 

What could go wrong?

His C.P.A. told him that she was willing to incorporate his business activity but she would not do what the Tax Doctor had proposed because it was very aggressive. Petitioner, despite the advice of his C.P.A., decided to accept the proposal of the Tax Doctor.

I don’t need a CPA, I have a Tax Doctor!

Petitioner filed his 2006 Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, showing taxable income of zero. Nev Edel, one of the corporations the Tax Doctor formed for petitioner, filed a Form 1120, U.S. Corporation Income Tax Return, for the fiscal year ending (FYE) November 30, 2007. Nev Edel reported gross receipts of $285,785, total income of $291,669, and total deductions of $295,214. The largest single deduction was $237,600 for “contracted services”. Smoge Corp., the other corporation the Tax Doctor formed for petitioner, filed a 2006 Form 1120S, U.S. Income Tax Return for an S Corporation. Smoge Corp. reported total income of $186,640 and total deductions of $188,644. The largest single deduction was $172,166 for “contracted services”.

Somehow things went awry.

Murray was prosecuted and convicted in 2010 of Federal crimes associated with the preparation of his own returns and the returns of others.

This presumably led to IRS attention to our consultant’s returns, and a big assessment.  The taxpayer tried to avoid penalties because he relied on the Tax Doctor in good faith.  The Tax Court thought otherwise:

The advice of the C.P.A., who had no financial stake in the outcome of petitioner’s return positions, should have put petitioner on notice that additional scrutiny of Murray’s advice was required.

The moral?  If your tax professional, who does this for a living, says something is bogus, they just might be right.  And there is no Tax Fairy.

Cite: Somogyi, T.C. Summ. Op. 2014-33.

 

20140411-1William Perez, Six Things to Do Before April 15th

Kay Bell, What are ordinary & necessary business expenses? It depends

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 337.  More a boatload than a smidgen today.

That’s OK, you can just send me a gift card. Christopher Bergin, The Gift That Is Lois Lerner (Tax Analysts Blog):

Something bad happened here. And however bad her behavior, the problem isn’t Lerner. The problem is a culture that allows what she did to continue and that probably allows behavior that’s much, much worse.

Andrew Lundeen, What Could Americans Buy with the $4.5 Trillion They Pay in Taxes? (Tax Policy Blog).  A nice gift card, perhaps.

TaxGrrrl, House Committee Votes To Hold Lerner In Contempt, Others Push For Criminal Prosecution

Joseph Thorndike, How Dave Camp’s Failure Might Be Michael Graetz’s Victory (Tax Analysts Blog)

Peter Reilly, Clergy Out In Force To Defend Their Housing Tax Break   

Sports Corner: David Cay Johnston vs. Tax Girl on Twitter: PLACE YOUR BETS (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/8/14: So what do I do with the K-1? And: they also serve who go away!

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

So the K-1 finally showed up from my partnership or S corporation investment.  Now what?

Remember that the K-1 represents your share of the income and expenses of the partnership/S corporation/trust (henceforth “thing”) that issued it.  Different pieces of income and expense are treated differently on your tax return, and the K-1 tells you where your pieces go.  Sort of.  Before you get started plugging in your numbers, you should answer some questions for yourself.

- Do I “materially participate” in this thing? Your level of participation determines the forms you start with in preparing your returns, whether you can deduct losses, and whether your income from the thing is is subject to the Obamacare 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax.  If you spent more than 500 hours working in the thing, that usually means you materially participate; a more complete discussion of material participation is found here.

- Did the thing lose money?  If it lost money, then you have to clear three hurdles to deduct the losses:

1. You have to have basis.  This starts with your investment in the thing.  If you loaned money directly to the thing, you will get basis for the loan.  If you have a partnership, you will get basis for your share of the partnership debt, shown in part L of your K-1.  S corporation shareholders don’t get basis for their share of the corporation’s debt, even if it is guaranteed by hte shareholder.  Your basis is increased for your share of the thing’s income, and it is reduced for losses and distributions.  If you have no basis, you can’t take losses.

2. Your basis has to be “at-risk.”  This normally means that you are out-of-pocket for the investment.  If your basis comes from borrowed funds, you have to be personally on the hook for the debt — but if you borrowed from somebody with an interest in your thing, you might not be “at-risk” even if you will have to pay up if thing defaults.

If your basis comes from a share of the partnership debt, you are normally considered “at-risk” for debt shown on the “Recourse” and “Qualified Nonrecourse financing” lines on part K of your partnership K-1.  Your at-risk amount is computed on Form 6198,

3. You have to materially participate (see above), or have “passive” income from other activities.  If you don’t materially participate, you need to go to Form 8582 to figure how much, if any, of your loss is deductible this year.

 Got that?  Tomorrow we’ll look at what you have to do after you answer these questions.  Come back every day through April 15 for more !

 

Senator Hubert Houser

Senator Hubert Houser

Legislator of the Century.  Yes, the century is young, but it will be hard to beat the accomplishment of Iowa state senator Hubert Houser.  He went home.  From The Des Moines Register:

At issue is the fact that Houser, a Republican from Carson in southwest Iowa, hasn’t resigned. He has simply stopped coming to the Statehouse, saying he isn’t needed as a minority caucus member and doesn’t have a role in any legislation. He says it’s more important for him to spend time on his family’s farm, where he is expanding the livestock facilities.

Houser was not present in the Senate chamber again on Monday.

Secretary of the Senate Michael Marshall said Monday that Houser is still receiving his annual salary of $25,000.

The coverage implies that Sen. Houser is doing a bad thing.  Considering the dubious accomplishments of the ones that do show up, I can’t agree.  We’d be better off if they all went home.  The legislators should get all of their pay on Day 1 of the session, and they should get docked if it goes past a month.

 

Of course they do.  Iowa House panel OKs $2 million tax break for Knoxville Raceway.  (Des Moines Register)

 

RashiaQueen of IRS tax fraud needs a break.  Rashia Wilson, who famously held up big wads of cash on her Facebook page and taunted the feds to come and get her, is less liquid nowadays, according to a report by tampabay.com:

Busted down to a federal prison in Aliceville, Ala., she earns just $5.25 a month, she declares in newly filed court papers. That’s a problem because Wilson, 28, was ordered to pay a token $25 per calendar quarter toward the $3.1 million in restitution that she owes the IRS for filing false tax returns using stolen identities. She needs money to buy vitamins and hygiene items, too, she says. So she’s asking U.S. District Judge James S. Moody Jr. to suspend restitution payments until after her release date: Jan. 5, 2031. 

Then she’ll really get after it, I’m sure.

 

Peter ReillyNo Money For April 15 1040 Balance Due? Don’t Panic!

Tony Nitti, Where Is Your Tax Home When You Work In A Foreign Land?   

Jason Dinesen, Tax Court Case Involving Radio DJ Strikes Close to Home for Me.  “I used to work in radio. I was the news director at KNOD radio station in Harlan, over in the western part of Iowa.”

I had a brief stint as an unpaid intern for KHAK, a country station in Cedar Rapids, in 1980.  I learned that I have a face for radio and a voice for print.

 

Roger McEowen and Kristine Tidgren, Understand That Easement Agreement Before You Sign It

 

Locust Street, Des Moines

Locust Street, Des Moines

TaxGrrrl, New IRS Commissioner Talks Tax, Scandal and Congress.  She gives him more credit than I do.

Andrew Lundeen, Kyle Pomerleau, Americans Pay More in Taxes than on Food, Clothing, and Housing Combined (Tax Policy Blog)

Renu Zaretsky, Ethics and Fairness, Growth and the Environment, Retirement and Tax Shelters.  The TaxVox headline roundup ponders, among other things, whether we should subsidize wind turbines forever.

Kay Bell, Energy efficient home improvement tax break might be back

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 334

News you can use. How to Cheat on Your Taxes. (David Cay Johnston, via The Taxprof)

News from the Profession.  According to Research, You Are Fat Because Busy Season (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/7/14: Where’s my K-1? And why you should e-file that extension.

Monday, April 7th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

1040 2013The deadline for 2013 1040s is a week from tomorrow, so we may as well start our annual Filing Season Tips feature.  

Many folks arrive here with a search engine query that goes something like “why don’t I have my K-1, should the partnership go to jail?”  A quick reminder of what a K-1 does, and why they often arrive late in the tax season.

K-1s come from partnerships, S corporations and trusts.  Partnerships and S corporation businesses don’t pay the tax on their income.  The income is instead taxed on your 1040.  They have to compute their own taxable income first — as you might imagine, a more complex process than doing the average 1040.  They then have to sort the income into a bunch of different bins so that all the pieces end up on the right spot on the owner 1040s.  The K-1 is best understood as the collection bins for your shares of the various pieces of the business’ income and expense items.

Furthermore, many businesses and trusts that issue K-1s are awaiting K-1s of their own.  Even if they have their own tax information ready, if the business is still waiting on a K-1, it can’t issue yours.

But, but! Aren’t K-1s supposed to be out by January 1?  You’re thinking of 1099s.  K-1s are due with the S corporation returns (March 15) or the partnership returns (April 15), but they can be, and often are, extended to as late as September 15 — legally.

So what to do?  If you don’t have your K-1 yet, try to at least get an idea of what the income will be, and extend your own return accordingly.  It’s always better to extend than to amend.

This is the first 2014 filing season tip — come back for one each day through April 15!

 

Russ Fox, Bozo Tax Tip #6: Just Don’t File

 

e-file logoKristy Maitre, IRS Change in Extension Processing Makes E-Filing That Extension Critical.

The campus could take up to 6 weeks to process a [paper] extension, and it will not show up on the transcript until processed. With that time delay, it is helpful to have the acknowledgement of an e-filed extension.

With the delay in processing of the extensions, remember if you file a return within that 6 week timeframe, it may not show the extension on the module, and your client could get a penalty for filing late if there is a balance due. This will also have an impact on refund returns if they are later picked up for audit, a balance due results, and the extension was not processed properly.

And why, if you do paper file, you shouldn’t bundle extensions for your family or clients to save postage.

TaxGrrrl, Not Ready To File Your Taxes? Don’t Stress Out, File For Extension 

William Perez, Federal Tax Relief for Victims of Washington State Mudslide and Flooding

Jana Luttenegger, DIY Will is a ‘Cautionary Tale’ (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). “As a result, two of Ann’s nieces received property that it appears clearly from the will and attempted amendment was meant for Ann’s brother instead.”

 

20140321-3Kay Bell, 3 popular refundable tax credits: Are they worth it?  Good question, and no.

Peter Reilly, Easement Valuations Not So Easy Anymore

Keith Fogg, Reliance on Counsel to Avoid Tax Liability.  (Procedurally Taxing).  Not likely to work.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 333.  Featuring the Washington Post “fact checker” calling shenanigans on IRS Commissioner Koskinen for denying that IRS had “targeted” Tea Party groups.  It’s safe to say Mr. Koskinen has botched his entrance.

Andrew Lundeen, Senate Finance Committee Passes $85 Billion Tax Extenders Bill (Tax Policy Blog)

20121120-2Tax Justice Blog, Five Key Tax Facts About Healthcare Reform.  Ones they like that I despise: “Only two percent of Americans will pay the tax penalty for not having insurance and  “95 percent of the tax increases included to pay for health reform apply solely to businesses or married couples making over $250,000 and single people making over $200,000.”

This attitude is exactly what is awful about the TJB mindset.  No matter how fickle, arbitrary,   unworkable or economically harmful a tax is — and the Obamacare taxes are all of those — we’re supposed to be OK with them as long as they apply only to “the rich.”  Carried to the logical conclusion, it would be just fine to execute the 1-percenters, confiscate their property, and sell their families into slavery — it only affects the rich anyway, and they don’t count.

 

Arnold Kling has a little reminder for folks hung up on inequality, quoting Lawrence Kotlikoff:

The US fiscal gap now stands at an estimated $205 trillion, or 10.3 percent of all future US GDP. Closing this gap is imperative, and requires a fiscal adjustment of an immediate and permanent 37 percent reduction in spending (apart from servicing official debt), an immediate and permanent 57 percent increase in all federal taxes, or some combination of the two. The necessary size of this adjustment increases the longer it is put off.

And remember, the rich guy isn’t picking up the tab.

 

O. Kay Henderson, No traction for increasing state gas tax.  Not happening this year, apparently.

 

haroldJennifer Carr at Tax Analysts has a good summary of the research as to the economic effect of state film tax credits:

The film industry and lawmakers doubtless believe that film credits are a great deal for everyone involved — and that would be fantastic if it were true — but the most credible studies don’t reflect that.

Her article (unfortunately available only to State Tax Notes subscribers) discusses the funky analysis that film credit boosters use to justify the subsidies.  The boosters like to overstate the tourism effects of films and assume fantastical “multiplier” effects of film spending.  They also ignore opportunity costs — assuming that if the taxpayer money was not spent on Hollywood, it would just crawl in a hole and die.

 

Career Corner.  Crime May Not Pay But Whistleblowing Certainly Does (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/21/14: Reforming S corporations to a frazzle. And: cleaning up at the laundromat!

Friday, March 21st, 2014 by Joe Kristan

S-SidewalkThe legislative process has been likened to sausage making.  Sausage doesn’t get more appetizing if you keep looking at it closely over a period of weeks, and neither does the Camp “tax reform” plan.  Andrew Lundeen and Kyle Pomerleau at the Tax Policy Blog today highlight some gristly features of the grand effort by the head GOP taxwriter:

The proposal leaves in place high tax rates for many S corporations, subjects them to additional payroll taxes, creates new distortions between types of industries, and produces two tax rate bubbles.

They note these major S corporation changes:

Creates Different Tax Treatment for Manufacturing and Non-Manufacturing Industries

Camp’s tax reform package introduces complication with a new 10 percent surtax for non-manufacturing income. To make things more complicated, the additional 10 percent surtax would be calculated on a different income scale: modified adjusted gross income or MAGI. This essentially creates two side by side tax codes, a la the AMT, and individuals and businesses would have to calculate their AGI for one and their MAGI for the other.

As I noted, it doesn’t simplify the code by getting rid of the economically foolish Section 199 production deduction; it just moves it to a different section.

20140321-1

The Difference between Active and Passive Shareholders

The difference between active and passive shareholders is important for determining the marginal tax rates for S corporations under Chairman Camp’s plan.

That’s true now, but you’d expect a “reform” plan to get rid of this sort of gratuitous and difficult-to-enforce difference.

20140321-2

Changes to Self-Employment Taxes: the 70/30 Split Rule for SECA Taxes

Under current law, the IRS requires business owners to pay themselves a reasonable wage in order to prevent people from gaming this income distinction in order to avoid the extra 15.3 percent payroll tax hit.

Camp’s plan would replace the current reasonable wage standard with a 70/30 split, changing the rules for active shareholders. The rule would require that active shareholders of S corporations report 70 percent of their total earning as wage income.

I think it’s just one step on the way to a 100/0 split.

Tax Rate Bubble

Another element of Camp’s tax plan is the creation marginal tax rate bubbles. This occurs when a marginal tax rate, for example, goes from 10 percent to 15 percent and back down to 10 percent. We have a post that discusses the marginal tax rates under Camp’s plan, which you can find here.

When a “reform” plan comes with so many phase-outs and distortions, it’s not actually reforming anything.  I think the Camp plan will come to be seen as a false move and a lost opportunity.

 

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): K Is For Keogh Plans   

20140321-3TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 316

William Perez, Average Sales Tax Rates by State: 2014, highlighting a Tax Policy Blog analysis.

Annette Nellen, Revenues versus tax collections.  “A recent blog post on LinkedIn’s Sales and Use Tax Legislative Updates included a comment from B.J. Pritchett suggesting that what governments collect in taxes should not be called “revenues” because it is not from selling goods and services.”

Tax Justice BlogState News Quick Hits: Don’t Expect Much from Congress.  Always a good idea.

Kay Bell, Senate Finance plans tax extenders vote for week of March 31.  She links to an article quoting a Senate Finance spokeswoman as saying “No decisions have been made on the content of the measure or the timing for a committee session and vote.”

Howard Gleckman, Fiscal Reality Check: Will Congress Pay for the Tax Extenders and the Doc Fix?  Extenders themselves are a scam.  Congress passes them over and over a year at a time so they can pretend that they cost less than they do — funky accounting that would get a public company CFO jail time, but standard procedure in Congress.

 

Jack Townsend, U.S. Attorney Enabler Sentenced for Assisting Offshore Evasion 

 

A new Cavalcade of Risk is up at Insurance Regulatory Law.  The Cavalcade is a venerable roundup of insurance and risk-management posts.  Hank Stern’s contribution, an interview with Neal Halder of Principal Financial Group about their “accelerated underwriting” process for life insurance, is a great read.

Jason Dinesen, Fair Warning: More Baseball Posts to Pop Up this Year.  That’s a good thing.

 

20140321-4Think he reported this income?  Man With Deep Pockets Busted Stealing a Lot of Laundry Money (Going Concern):

Just how many loads of laundry could one do with $460,000 in stolen quarters?

That’s probably not the question asked by public works inspector Thomas Rica, who pleaded guilty this week to stealing that much in quarters from the meter collection room of the New Jersey town for which he worked.

At the laundromats I used back in school, that would have been nearly enough quarters to get your clothes dry.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/6/14: My lips are sealed edition. And: more budget!

Thursday, March 6th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner still isn’t talking.  That would seem to make for a dull hearing of the House Committee investigating the harassment of Tea Party organizations by the IRS, but there was some interest.  From the Wall Street Journal:

A House hearing on the Internal Revenue Service scandal ended in acrimony, as the ranking Democrat, Rep. Elijah Cummings (D., Md.) accused Republicans of a “one-sided investigation” and GOP members walked out.

Chairman Darrell Issa (R., Calif.) ended the hearing after the lone witness, former IRS official Lois Lerner, declined to answer several of his questions, citing her Fifth Amendment privilege.

Yes, everyone is entitled to the protection of the Constitution, but those of us not sitting on a jury are also entitled to draw our own conclusions.  When the key figure in the scandal fears honest testimony will incriminate herself, you can be forgiven for questioning the President’s assertion that there is “not even a smidgen of corruption” involved.

Take it away, GoGos:

 

Althouse, After Lois Lerner re-asserts the 5th, Cummings yells at Issa and Issa cuts the microphone.  “Issa is closing down the meeting, Cummings asserts what he calls a “procedural question” that’s really a political scolding, and Issa cuts the microphone and walks out. It’s pretty unpleasant.”  Video provided.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 301

TaxGrrrl, Former IRS Official Refuses To Testify Again, Lawyer Blasts “Partisan” Hearing.

Kay Bell, Tempers flare at IRS hearing. Reality show, anyone?

Peter Reilly, Lois Lerner Takes The Fifth Again – Political Theater?:

There are two narratives about this whole mess.  One is that there was something of a left wing conspiracy inside the IRS to pick on the political activity of organizations that were not supposed to be mainly political, which hurt those groups in their effort to prevent the President from being re-elected.  My blogging buddy, Joe Kristan, supports that theory having grown up in Chicago, where all sorts of enforcement is politically motivated.The other narrative is that the whole thing is a phony scandal.  I think that I am the only person left who has looked at this without fully making up his mind.

As Peter notes, I think the science is settled.

 

William Perez, Health Savings Accounts Provide a Tax-Deductible Way to Save for Medical Expenses

 

Economic supergenius

Smidgenless.

Andrew Lundeen, Kyle Pomerleau, The Tax Changes in President Obama’s Fiscal Year 2015 Budget (Tax Policy Blog):

He proposes to expand the child tax credit and the EITC, two of the largest family tax benefits. His budget also proposes to alter retirement plans and create an auto-enrollment IRA program. In order to pay for these expansions, his budget will raise taxes on high-income earners through a series of changes to tax expenditures, most notably placing a cap on the value of itemized deductions.

It will never be enough.  The rich guy isn’t buying.

Renu Zaretsky, Obama’s 2015 Budget Hits Capitol Hill (TaxVox)

Tony Nitti, Tax Aspects Of The President’s FY 2015 Budget . “…in simple terms, the President’s proposal would add a(nother) alternative minimum tax calculation to the current individual income tax regime.”

Paul Neiffer, How Much Longer for Section 1031 Exchanges?  ”  Most likely, nothing will happen this year, but in 2015, watch out.”

 

Cara Griffith, California Needs a Dose of Sunshine (Tax Policy Blog):

This issue arose after references to two forms were noticed in an FTB multistate audit technique manual

 By not disclosing forms like this, the FTB is enabling its auditors to take inconsistent positions regarding similarly situated taxpayers. If that’s the case, any guidance the FTB puts out on its application of the unitary business principle is meaningless.

When you have to disclose the standards you apply, you risk being held to them.

 

News from the Profession.  The Latest New Jersey CPA Magazine Cover is a Little Freaky (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/27/14: Doomed Tax Reform Frenzy Edition.

Thursday, February 27th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

President Reagan signs PL 99-514, the Tax Reform Act of 1986.
When I think of income tax reform, I think big.  I think of massive elimination of tax deductionPresident Reagan signs PL 99-514, the Tax Reform Act of 1986.s, with great big rate reductions as consolation for taxpayers that lose their breaks.  I look for elimination of alternative ways of tracking income and deductions, with the idea that one way that everyone can understand is better than special breaks for different industries.  I look to eliminate double taxation of income everywhere, including elimination of capital gain taxes and integration of the corporate and individual systems.

By these standards, the tax reform plan put forth by Dave Camp, the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, is a disappointment.  While it would make many simplifying changes to the tax law while rates, it would leave behind a system that would still be very recognizable to a Rip Van Taxman who fell asleep in 1993.  It prunes tax complexity, but it doesn’t begin to clear the forest.

Still, politics being what it is, trimming the weed sanctuary is probably the best we can expect.  Maybe better than we can expect.

 

Tony Nitti has already posted detailed walk-throughs of the individual and business parts of the proposal, so there’s no point in me repeating his work.  Instead I will list some of the bigger changes proposed, with my commentary.  I don’t expect anything like the Camp plan to be enacted during the current administration, but I think it gives us an idea of the kinds of changes that could happen after 2016, if the stars align.

Individual Rates.  The bill would have a three-bracket tax system: 10%, 25%, and 35%.  The 35% bracket would replace the current 39.6% bracket, and would only apply to income other than “qualifying domestic manufacturing income.”  Lowering rates is fine, but this would retain the stupid difference between manufacturing income and other income embodied in the current Section 199 deduction.  It’s a complex and economically illiterate break for a favored class of income paid for by higher rates on all other income.

Capital gains and dividends would be taxed as ordinary income, but only after a 40% exclusion.  That would be a 21% net rate on 35% taxable income. (Initially I said 14%, math is hard).

Against the forces that have risen on K Street, there is no victory.

Against the power that has risen on K Street, there is no victory.

Deductions would be trimmed back.  The maximum home mortgage interest debt allowed for deductions would be $500,000, instead of the current $1.1 million.  Medical deductions would go away.  Standard deductions would increase to $11,000 for individuals and $22,000 for joint filers.  Many itemized deductions would reduce taxes only at the 25% rate, rather than the 35% top rate.  Charitable deductions would be simplified, but only deductible to the extent they exceed 2% of AGI.  The deduction for state and local taxes would be eliminated.

The increase in the standard deduction is an excellent idea.  I’m fine with reducing the mortgage interest deduction.   The limiting of deductions to the 25% rate is pointless revenue-raising complexity.  The elimination of the medical deduction will be a real burden on people in skilled nursing care; they are the people who generally can take this deduction.  Taxing them while they burn through their assets paying nursing home costs  will only put them into title 19 that much sooner.

While I am sympathetic with the policy reasons for not allowing a deduction for state and local taxes, those reasons don’t apply to taxes arising from pass-through business income.  State taxes are a cost of doing business for those folks, and should be deductible accordingly.

Alternative Minimum Tax would go away.  About time.

Corporate rates.  The proposal replaces the current multi-rate corporate tax with a flat 25% rate.  Excellent idea, as far as it goes, but it is flawed by the 35% individual top rate; it provides a motivation to game income between the individual and corporate system.

The proposal eliminates a number of energy credits while retaining the research credit.  I think that it would be better to get rid of the research credit and lower rates.  I think the IRS is no more capable of identifying and rewarding research than it is of fairly administering political distinctions.  Unfortunately, the credit seems to be a sacred cow among taxwriters.

Incredibly, the Camp corporate system gets rid of the Section 199 deduction while retaining a similar concept for individual rates.  Here it doesn’t get rid of pointless and economically foolish complexity; it just moves it around in the code.

LIFO inventories go away under the proposal.  As this comes up every proposal, it’s going to happen sometime.

Carried interests become taxable as ordinary income.  This is more complexity, apparently a sop to populist rhetoric.

Pass-throughs would be tweaked.  S corporation elections would be easier to make, and could be delayed until return time.  Built-in gains would only be taxable in the first five years after an S corporation election, instead of ten years.  Basis adjustments on partnership interest transactions would be mandatory, instead of elective.

Fixed assets would have mixed treatment.  While the Secti0n 179 deduction would permanently go to $250,000, depreciation would go to a system more like the pre-1986 ACRS system than the current MACRS system.

20120702-2Cash basis accounting would be more widely available, and fully available to Farmers and sole proprietors.  This is a step in the wrong direction.  Advocates of cash accounting say that it provides “simplicity,” implying that poor farmers just can’t handle inventory accounting.  Meanwhile these “poor” bumpkins play this system like a fiddle, manipulating cash method accounting to achieve results that are only available through fraud to the rest of us.  Modern farm operations with GPS, custom planting and nutrient plans, and multi-million dollar asset bases are as able to handle accrual accounting as any other business of similar size.

There’s plenty more to the plan, but you get the idea.  I find it disappointing that they don’t replace the current system of C and S corporations with a single system with full dividend deductibility.  I find the treatment of preferences and tax credit subsidies half-hearted.  I think there should be fewer deductions, fewer credits, and a much bigger standard deduction.  That’s why I’d never get elected to anything, I suppose.

The TaxProf rounds up coverage of the proposal.  Other coverage:

Peter Reilly, The Only Comment On Camp Tax Proposal You Need To Read – And Some Others

Paul Neiffer, Tax Reform – Part ?????!!!!!  “Since this is a mid-term election year, it has little chance of passing this year, but it is important to note possible changes that Congress is pondering.”

Annette Nellen, Congressman Camp’s Tax Reform Act of 2014 Discussion Draft

Leslie Book, Quick Thoughts on Procedural Aspects of Camp’s Tax Code Overhaul Proposal and the Spate of Important Interest Cases (Procedurally Taxing)

Joseph Thorndike, Democrats and Tax Reform: Can’t Do It With ‘Em, Can’t Do It Without ‘Em (Tax Analysts Blog).  “If you’re a left-leaning populist, what’s not to like?  Well, at least one big thing: The bill doesn’t raise taxes.”

TaxGrrrl, Camp’s Tax Proposal: The First Thing We Do, Let’s Kill All The Lawyers 

Kyle Pomerleau, Andrew Lundeen, The Basics of Chairman Camp’s Tax Reform Plan (Tax Policy Blog).  “We’ll have more analysis on the plan soon – it will take us days to get through the 979 pages of legislative text – but in the meantime, here are the basics.”  They note that the plan uses tax benefit phase-outs based on income — a bad idea that creates hidden tax brackets.

Renu Zaretsky, Tax Reform: one foot in front of the other (TaxVox)

 

Other Things:

William Perez, Last Year’s State Tax Refund Might Be Taxable

Jason Dinesen, Glossary of Tax Terms: Depreciation 

Trish McIntire, Brokerage Statements.  “Actually, my problem is clients who don’t bring in the whole statement.”

 

Jack Townsend, Wow! Ty Warner Is Ty Warner is Not Quite the Innocent Abroad 

Janet Novack, Senate Offshore Tax Cheating Report Skewers Credit Suisse And U.S. Justice Department 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 294.  I note that Lois Lerner won’t testify without being immunized from prosecution.  “Not a smidgeon” of wrongdoing, indeed.

 

Finally, Seven People Who Have a Worse Busy Season Than You, from Going Concern.  That’ll cheer you right up.

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/21/14: Weaponizing the IRS. And: whither Section 179?

Tuesday, January 21st, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

The new, “weaponized” IRS is a focus of Glenn Reynolds, the Instapundit, in a USA Today Column:

Since then, of course, the new “weaponized IRS” has, in fact, come to be seen as illegitimate by many more Americans. I suspect that, over time, this loss of moral legitimacy will cause many to base their tax strategies on what they think they can get away with, not on what they’re entitled to. And when they hear of someone being audited, many Americans will ask not “what did he do wrong?” but “who in government did he offend?”

This is particularly true since the Obama administration is currently changing IRS rules to muzzle Tea Partiers.

While I don’t think it’s that bad yet, it’s headed that way if things don’t change.  And, as Glenn points out, it’s not changing:

Meanwhile, the person chosen to “investigate” the IRS’s targeting of Tea Party groups in 2010-2012 is Barbara Bosserman, a “long-time Obama campaign donor.” So the IRS’s credibility is in no danger of being rebuilt any time soon.

I think this is a terrible and shortsighted mistake by the Administration.  So much of its agenda, especially Obamacare, depends on effective IRS administration, but as the recent budget agreement proved, the GOP isn’t going to fund the IRS when it thinks that’s the same as funding the opposition.

The USA Today piece makes broader points about the effect of the loss of faith in civil servants as apolitical technocrats; read the whole thing.

Via the TaxProf.

Andrew Lundeen at Tax Policy Blog has two new posts on tax reform.  In Tax Reform Should Simplify the Code and Grow the Economy, he says:

We need to eliminate the biases in the code against savings and investment, so individuals have the incentive to add back to the economy, and businesses have the capital to buy new machines, structures, and equipment – all the things that give workers the ability to be more productive and earn higher wages. And we need a tax code that is simple and understandable, so taxpayers know exactly what they pay and why. 

Max Baucus

Max Baucus

We’ve been going the wrong way now for 27 years.  In Responses to Senator Baucus’s Staff Discussion Drafts, he curbs his enthusiasm for the tax reform options offered by outgoing Senate Finance Committee Chairman Baucus:

Generally speaking, we found that the tax reform proposals in these drafts go in the wrong direction. Our modeling shows that they damage economic growth, hurt investment, and, in many instances, violate the principles of sound tax policy: simplicity, transparency, neutrality, and stability.

The post links to a point-by-point examination of the Baucus proposals.

 

 

TaxProf, Martin Luther King, Jr. and the IRS:

This past year, much ado was made about the so-called “IRS-Gate” and concerns that the Obama administration may have used the agency to target Tea Party and other right wing groups. … [W]hat often is not stated during the Martin Luther King Holiday weekend is that King, early in his leadership of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), was routinely subjected to IRS audits of his individual accounts, SCLC accounts as well as accounts of his lawyers, first starting during the administration of President Dwight Eisenhower and continuing through the Kennedy administration.

If you audit me, I shall become more powerful than you can possibly imagine…

Kay Bell, IRS abuse of power, now and in MLK’s day. “Overall, the IRS is paying for its operational indiscretions by receiving less money and more restrictions on how it does spend what funds it has.”

 

Paul Neiffer, Section 179 Update (or Not):

 Here are my official updated odds on when we might know what the actual 2014 Section 179 amounts will be:

By Memorial Day 10 Billion to 1

By Labor Day 10 Million to 1

By the November Mid-Term elections 500 to 1

Between the November Mid-Term Elections and December 15, 2014 25 to 1

After December 15, 2014 and before January 1, 2015 1 to 1

After December 31, 2014 5 to 1

I give about 5 to 1 odds in favor of the current Sec. 179 deduction being extended to $500,000 for 2014, and I think that Paul is right that it is most likely to occur during the lame-duck session.  I think odds are about 50-50 on an extension of 50% bonus depreciation. It’s too bad the Feds have closed Intrade, as this would be a betting market I would like to follow.

 

HelmsleyTaxTrials, Leona Helmsley, Angry Employees Strike Back:

Their mistreatment of employees and squabbles over bills are the stuff of legend and left prosecutors rife with eager witnesses when it came time for trial.

Helmsley was just as arrogant about her taxes, famously telling her housekeeper: “We don’t pay taxes, only the little people pay taxes.”  Helmsley participated in several schemes to avoid paying millions of dollar in income and sales taxes.  

Sometimes that sort of thing comes back and bites you; read the post to see how it bit Helmsley.

 

William Perez on an important topic: Tips for Securely Sending Tax Documents To Your Accountant.  First, don’t send anything with your Social Security Number in an unencrypted email.  Like many firms, Roth & Company offers a secure upload platform to send sensitive information.  If your tax firm has one, use it.  They are the safest way to transmit confidential information and files.

 

Phil Hodgen wonders whether there is a Delay in approving renunciations at State Department?  It’s harder to shoot jaywalkers when they are running away.

Missouri Tax Guy goes back to basics with An Introduction to the Double-Entry Bookkeeping System.  Just remember, Debits are on the door side.

Andrew Mitchel has posted a New Resource Page: 2013 Developments in U.S. International Tax

 

Kay Bell, $4 billion more tax breaks for Boeing from Washington State. Taxing you to give money to folks with good lobbyists.

Jim Maule is appropriately annoyed by the use of the term “IRS Code.”  It’s the Internal Revenue Code, and it’s written by Congress, not the IRS.  Remember that when you vote.

Keith Fogg, Qualified Offers – Is it meaningless to offer what you think a case is worth? (Procedurally Taxing)

Jack Townsend, The New Provision for Tax Restitution and Ex Post Facto

 

The Critical Question: Is Kent Hovind A Tax Protester?  It doesn’t seem like a more promising career path for him than his forays into evolutionary biology.

TaxGrrrl, Hot Tub Tax Machine: News Anchor Takes Plea In Scandal.

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/17/14: Envy as a principle of tax policy. And: my maybe webinar!

Friday, January 17th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

taxanalystslogoJoseph Thorndike, the tax historian at Tax Analysts, asks: What if the Income Tax Is All About Envy? Would That Be So Bad?.

The short answer: yes, it would.  The primary purpose of a tax is to fund the operations of the government.  Asking the tax to do anything else makes it worse at its main job, while imposing wealth-destroying distortions on the economy.  Also, as we noted the other day, increasing taxes on “the rich” has coincided with an increase in inequality.  It’s not clear at all that taxes at any non-catastrophic level can “help” inequality.

But its a slow news day, so let’s spend a little time on a longer answer.  Joseph thinks that inequality on its own is bad, even when “the poor” are well-off in real, but not relative, terms:

In other words, even if a rising tide lifts all boats, the relative size of everybody’s boat still matters. If some boats are much bigger than others, then a society is vulnerable to political instability.

Now, you can object that all the people with little boats are just feeling envious. But that doesn’t make the envy disappear; moral indignation may be satisfying, but it’s not a particularly effective means of keeping the peace. What’s needed, if you’re trying to fend off revolution, is some sort of actual policy response to feelings of relative deprivation.

I think Joseph greatly overstates the risk of well-fed people rising up against their neighbors just because they have nicer cars and houses.  People with something to lose tend to be risk-averse, and few things are riskier than revolution.   Still, that’s not something I can empirically demonstrate.

Equality in action in the Soviet Union on the Belomor Canal

Equality in action in the Soviet Union on the Belomor Canal

One thing that is indisputable is that catastrophe happens when a government makes “equality” its driving principle.  It was tried extensively in the 20th century, and tens of millions became equally dead as a result.  Given that history, equality as an end in itself has no moral force.

In our current politics, inequality is the cynical rallying cry of a President who lives in a mansion and plays golf at exclusive resorts pretty much every week.  He presides over a listless economy, enormous deficits,  and a health reform plan that is a debacle.  He’s out of ideas, so he’s reduced to saying it’s the rich guy’s fault.  Given the approval ratings he’s getting out of it, revolution seems a long way off.

 

Scott Hodge and Andrew Lundeen, High Income Taxpayers Earn the Majority of All Pass-Through Business Income (Tax Policy Blog).  They make a point that can’t be repeated too often:

It is often said that raising top tax rates will have little effect on business activity because only 2 percent of taxpayers with business income will be impacted. However, the more economically meaningful statistic is how much overall business income will be taxed at the highest rates. In 2011, the vast majority (70 percent) of pass-through business income was reported by taxpayers earning more than $200,000. Millionaire tax returns earned 34 percent of all private business income while taxpayers with incomes below $100,000 earned just 14 percent.

20140117-3

Indulging in envy-driven rate increases on “the rich” means weakening businesses and their ability to hire and grow — reducing opportunities for their would-be employees in the name of “equality.”

 

Perspective.  The brilliant Arnold Kling quotes Laurence Kotlicoff on the U.S. Budget:

In a podcast with Russ Roberts, he says,

I think we are probably in worse fiscal shape and any developed country. The reason, Russ, is we’ve been piling up debts for over 6 decades; and when I say ‘we’ I’m referring to Republican and Democratic administrations and Congresses. And we’ve been hiding them. We’ve been keeping them off the books and using economic labels, words, to pretend that they are not real liabilities of the government…we have all these obligations to something like 30-40 million current retirees and close to 80 million baby boomers who are about to start collecting Social Security benefits if they haven’t already. All those obligations are not reported as part of the government’s debt, so we are missing those off-the-book obligations.

But the real economic emergency is inequality. Or austerity. Or something.

Of course, that “something” is probably those  Tea Party extremists who actually want the government to live within its means.  How dare they.

 

Kay Bell, Filing patience can prevent a big tax mistake.  Hurrying your refund by taking out a refund anticipation loan can be an expensive mistake.

Russ Fox, We Will Soon be Able to Efile Past Due Individual Tax Returns.  Good news.  While everybody should file on time, not everybody does, and anything that helps non-filers come in from the cold is a good thing.

 

20130114-1Programming Note:  I am scheduled to participate in a Tax Update Webinar Monday sponsored by the Iowa Bar Association from noon to 1:45 pm.  Registration information is here – $40 to get a great start on your 2014 CPE/CLE.  Other speakers are Roger McEowen of the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation, and Kristy Maitre, Iowa’s IRS Stakeholder Liason.

While I hope to be there, I can’t guarantee it.  I am on federal jury standby this month, and I won’t know until after 5 p.m. tonight whether I will be hanging out in the jury room at the Des Moines Federal Courthouse instead of at the webinar.  They haven’t needed me these first two weeks, but I suppose past performance is no guarantee of future results here.  If I am on jury duty, the Tax Update may go quiet for awhile.

Update, 1/18: not called for a jury next week, so I will be on!

 

TaxGrrrl, IRS Free File To Open January 17, Two Weeks Before Tax Season Officially Opens 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 253.  He quotes an op-ed by an attorney for the Tea Party outfits, who says: “Let’s all be very clear: The FBI did not conduct an “investigation” into the IRS scandal.”  Of course.  Lookouts don’t investigate.

Robert D. Flach brings the Friday Buzz!

 

News from the Profession.  Life at Deloitte May or May Not Involve Time Spent on Your Knees (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/8/2014: Instructions for the Net Investment Income Tax! And new foreign account reporting rules.

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140108-1Almost four years after the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the IRS has issued draft instructions for the act’s “Net Investment Income Tax” form, Form 8960 — which itself has only been issued as a draft so far.  With work already underway on many returns subject to this tax, especially trust returns, the timing is lame.  But this is one aspect of Obamacare that isn’t going to get punted, so we will have to go to war with the forms we have.

The draft instructions provide worksheets for some of the more baroque computations that will be needed to complete the form, including the net loss computation and the allocation of itemized deductions to net investment income.  Still, much of the work will have to be done off-the-forms on preparer worksheets applying the regulations.  Tony Nitti says:

That is my big takeaway from the instructions – there’s no faking it. When we saw that this new, complex area of the law would ultimately be computed on a one-page form, we anticipated that the meat of the computation would be done off-form in worksheets provided by the instructions. And that’s exactly what happened. But that shifts the onus back to us as tax advisors to make sure our inputs are correct, which means we must understand the nuances of the final regulations.

Based on my review of the instructions, it will be virtually impossible for a tax advisor to accurately compute, for example, the Net Gains and Losses worksheet without a solid understanding of the types of gains and losses the final regulations contemplate being included in and excluded from net investment income.

As with the rest of the ACA, what could possibly go wrong?

 

Russ Fox, FBAR Changes for 2014

First, Form TD F 90-22.1 is no more. The FBAR has a new form number, Form 114.

Second, as of last July the FBAR must be electronically filed. The good news is that as of last October, your tax accountant can file the form for you as long as you complete Form 114a.

Also, notes Russ, the filing requirement now kicks in when the balance of all foreign accounts together exceeds $10,000.  It used to be account-by-account.

 

William Perez offers Resources for Preparing Form 1099-MISC for Small Businesses

Kay Bell says it’s Time to get organized for your 2014 tax filing tasks

Paul Neiffer advises us to Decant a Trust – Not Wine.

 

David Brunori on the unwisdom of subjecting business inputs to sales tax:

Indeed, virtually every state tax commission that has studied this issue has concluded that business inputs should be exempt from tax. Why? When you tax business purchases, the tax becomes part of the cost of doing business, and companies try very hard to pass those costs on to consumers. Two bad things then happen. First, consumers unwittingly pay the tax in the form of higher prices. It is a hidden tax and a most cynical way of financing government. Second, consumers often pay sales tax on the tax embedded in the retail price of the goods they purchase. So we are actually taxing a tax. This “cascading” amounts to awful tax policy.

But, as David points out, that doesn’t stop the demagogues:

Several years ago, I had the opportunity to talk to a group of legislators about sales tax policy. I was asked if I had any ideas for reform. I mentioned the common ideas of broadening the base by taxing services and remote sales, and lowering rates. I also said that states should exempt business purchases from the sales tax. One legislator looked at me like I had three heads and asked, “Do you mean letting corporations off the hook for sales taxes?” He asked where the justice was in a system that would make poor working families pay sales tax but let multinational companies go free.

Not all that different from the Iowa Senate’s approach to income taxes.

 

Andrew Lundeen, The Top 1 Percent Pays More in Taxes than the Bottom 90 Percent (Tax Policy Blog):

An interesting piece of information from the chart below is that after the 01/03 Bush tax cuts, often claimed to be a tax cut for the rich, the tax burden of the top 1 percent actually increased significantly.

Top 1 pays more than bottom 90

No matter how much you jack up taxes on the “top 1%,” the same people always will say “the rich” aren’t paying “their fair share” and need to indulge in some “shared sacrifice.”

 

Howard Gleckman, Taxing Bitcoin (TaxVox)

What if bitcoin is a currency for tax purposes, the same as, say a euro? In that case, profits from sales would be taxed as ordinary income, with a top rate of 39.6 percent, though all losses could offset other income.

Either way, the mere act of buying something [with Bitcoins] would likely be a taxable event.

Tax Justice Blog, GE Just Lost a Tax Break – and Congress Will Probably Fix That.  That’s what fixers do.

Jack Townsend, Prosecuting the Banks: Does the U.S. Prefer Foreign Banks to U.S. Banks?

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 244

Programming note: I will be doing a tax update program sponsored by the Institute for Management Accountants over the Iowa Cable Network tomorrow evening at 6:00 p.m.  It’s a chance to get your continuing education for 2014 off to a roaring start.  I figure on talking about an hour, with an emphasis on the new Net Investment Income regulations and other 2013 changes we will see this filing season.  I’ll also cover some of the more interesting cases and rulings of the last year.

In case you were wondering, our friends at Going Concern explain How To Tell if Your Accounting Firm is Really a Car Wash

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Tax Roundup, 11/22/13: Baucus proposes end of depreciation as we know it; also targets LIFO, cash-method farming.

Friday, November 22nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan
Max Baucus

Max Baucus

Baucus aims at LIFO, depreciation.  Senator Max Baucus has issued a tax reform proposal that slows depreciation and eliminates LIFO.  While it is a long way from becoming law — and certainly won’t become law in its current form — it will help shape the next round of tax reform.  Some key points:

-Depreciation for non-real estate assets would be computed not asset by assets, but in “pools,” with a set percentage of the amount of assets in each pool deducted during the year.  If the pool goes negative with dispositions, income is recognized.  There would be four “pools” with varying recovery percentages.

- Buildings would be depreciated under current rules, but over 43 years.

- The annual Section 179 limit would be $1 million, but with a phaseout starting at $2 million of assets placed in service.

- Research expenses would be capitalized and amortized over five years.

- LIFO would be repealed.

- Advertising costs would only be half deductible currently with the rest amortized over 5 years.

- Farmers would lose their exemption from accrual-basis accounting.

I think this goes the wrong way, adding complexity and lengthening lives.  I would prefer more immediate expensing.  LIFO repeal, and maybe the farm rule,  are the only proposals that seem to actually simplify anything.  The rest seem like high-toned revenue grabs.  If the revenue all goes to reduce rates, that wouldn’t be so bad, but I doubt that’s the idea.

 

Victor Fleischer, Tax Proposal for an Economy No Longer Rooted in Manufacturing:

The Baucus proposal aims to make the tax system match economic reality, removing the tax distortions from the equation. It would group tangible assets into just four different pools, with a fixed percentage of cost recovery applied to the tax basis of each pool each year, ranging from 38 percent for short-lived assets to 5 percent for certain long-lived assets.

It would be hard to make the case for giving the priority to tangible assets, and yet that is precisely what current law does by allowing rapid depreciation. At a minimum, the tax depreciation system should strive for neutrality and not discourage investment in intangibles and human capital.

That’s true.  Yet it’s hard to see how the Baucus proposal to require R&D costs to be amortized over five years, or the proposal to require 20-year amortization of intangibles instead of the current 15 years, encourages investments in intangibles and human capital.

Via Lynnley Browning’s Twitter feed.

The TaxProf has a roundup of the plan:  Senate Finance Committee Releases Depreciation and Accounting Tax Reform Plan 

William Perez, Draft Tax Reform Proposals from the Senate Finance Committee

Paul Neiffer, MAJOR Farm Tax Law Changes Proposed by Senate

Leslie Book, Senator Baucus Releases Proposals to Reform Administration of Tax Laws (Procedurally Taxing.

 

St. Louis loses another preparer.  From a Department of Justice Press Release:

A federal district judge in St. Louis has permanently barred defendants Joseph Burns, Joseph Thomas and International Tax Service Inc. from preparing federal tax returns for others, the Justice Department announced today…

According to the complaint, the defendants repeatedly fabricated expenses and deductions on customers’ returns and falsely claimed head of household status for customers who were married in order to illegally understate their customers’ federal tax liabilities and to obtain fraudulent tax refunds. The complaint also alleged that the defendants falsely claimed that some of their customers earned income from businesses that the defendants fabricated or increased the amount of business income their customers earned in order to illegally claim the maximum earned income tax credit on customers’ returns.

The IRS has certainly given their clients’ returns a good going over.  That’s the risk of going with a preparer whose results are too good to be true.

 

Scott Hodge, Andrew Lundeen, America Has Become a Nation of Dual-Income Working Couples (Tax Policy Blog)

20131122-1

Though its a brave man who tells the stay-at-home she’s not “working” after a day spent between taking care of an elderly parent and little kids.

 

Jason Dinesen,  Life After DOMA: What if You Amend One Year But Not the Next?

TaxGrrrl, When Mom and Dad Move In: The ‘Granny-Flat Tax Exemption’ For the Sandwich Generation 

Jana Luttenegger, Electronic Signatures, What’s Next? (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).  E-filing of wills?

Phil Hodgen, U.S. brokerage accounts after you expatriate

Russ Fox, It’s All Greek to Me. Don’t gamble in Greece, seems to be the point.

 

20121120-2Kay Bell, Ways & Means’ tax plays in GOP anti-Obamacare game plan

Howard Gleckman,  How Washington May Turn June Into Fiscal February (TaxVox).  Yes they’ll be running out of our money again soon.

Christopher Bergin, The End of the Era of Multinationals (Tax Analysts Blog)

Tax Justice Blog, Scott Walker’s Tax Record Will Be on the Wisconsin Ballot Next Year.  Shockingly, TJB doesn’t like Walker.

Tony Nitti, International Tax Reform For Dummies 

Visit Robert D. Flach for fresh Friday Buzz!

 

News from the Profession: New Audit Associate Looking For Prank Ideas, Possibly a New Job in Near Future (Going Concern)

Oh, one more thing: Magnus!

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Tax Roundup, 11/21/13: Would you trust a state legislator to spend your $54?

Thursday, November 21st, 2013 by Joe Kristan

I’m on the road today, so we’ll make this quick.

Sen. Bolkcom

Sen. Bolkcom

I can spend your $54 better than you can.  The Des Moines Register reports Iowans can get $54 tax credit; some want it used for roads,  The “some” definitely include politicians:

Many Iowans will be eligible for a new $54 tax credit when they file 2013 taxes, according to a calculation from the Department of Revenue, but a key Democratic senator says the money would be better spent fixing crumbling roads and bridges.

State Sen. Joe Bolkcom, D-Iowa City, chairman of the Iowa Senate’s tax-writing Ways and Means Committee, said Wednesday that Republican Gov. Terry Branstad has failed to provide leadership to establish new sources of critically needed road construction revenue.

“Critically needed?”  Maybe not.  I doubt if the Grand Avenue Bridge to Eternity would have been done faster if they had just spent more money on it.  In any case, the politicians’ need for cash is elastic and infinite, no matter how much they have to start with.  It bugs them when they already have your money, like the $54, and they have to give it back.

 

Andrew Lundeen, Kyle Pomerleau, The U.S. Ranks Poorly on Cost Recovery (Tax Policy Blog):

 It is common knowledge that the United States has the highest corporate income tax rate in the industrialized world, but it is less well known that our cost recovery system ranks poorly as well.

Currently, the U.S. tax code only allows businesses to recover an average of 62.4% of a capital investment (investments in machinery, industrial buildings, intangibles, etc.). This is lower than the average capital allowance of 66.5% across the OECD…

Ideally, businesses should be able to recovery 100 percent of their investment costs. We could achieve this by shifting to a system of full expensing (which allows complete write off of capital expenses in the first year) or introducing a system of Neutral Cost Recovery (which indexes the investment write-offs for inflation and a real discount rate).

 20131121-1

I’d be happy if they’d just stop changing the rules every year.

 

Going Concern,  Baucus Proposal Would Give ‘Legal Authority’ to Regulate Tax Preparers.  Buried in with a bunch of other stuff, as expected.  If Sen. Baucus would look in the mirror, he’d see where the real problem with  the tax system is.  Maybe that’s why he wants to regulate preparers instead.

Cara Griffith, Hitting the Jackpot (Tax Analysts Blog)

Tax Justice Blog, Why Everyone Is Unhappy with Senator Baucus’s Proposal for Taxing Multinational Corporations

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 196

Jack Townsend, Fourth Circuit Reverse Tax Obstruction Conviction Because of Bad Instruction and Affirms Denial of Good Faith Instruction for False Claim Conviction.  Even tax protesters are entitled to good jury instructions.

Kay Bell, Mo’ Money tax franchisee gets 20 months in jail for tax fraud.

 

Best spam commenter name ever: “2011 Energy Tax Credits Day Diet Plan When Weight Loss” posted a spam to my spam box this morning.  I look forward to learning more about that plan. 

 

And the muskrats are furious.  Sentenced to 6 months, Beavers still swaggering (Chicago Tribune)

More tomorrow!

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/13/13: Is more IRS money what we need? And why I’m hoping against hope!

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013 by Joe Kristan
Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

Is more money the answer to “pitiful” IRS service?   That’s what Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson believes, based on a story by Tax Analysts ($link):

National Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson in a November 9 speech decried as pitiful the level of IRS customer service given to taxpayers, which she attributed to inadequate funding that has forced the Service to automate many of the most important tax administration functions and skimp on training employees on taxpayer rights.

Everything else being equal, you can do more with more money.  Yet we all face limits to our resources, so we prioritize.  The IRS — at the urging of Nina Olson — has directed resources unwisely to its misguided attempt to boss the tax prep industry.  It has been a debacle so far, and it appears headed to oblivion in the courts.

The IRS has another administrative problem that the Taxpayer Advocate has pointed out.  The tax law is too complicated to effectively administer even with a much larger budget.  The tax law is seen as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy, and like a knife with too many gadgets, it becomes hard to work as a knife.  This chart from Chris Edwards at the Cato Institute illustrates the problem:

irs budget cato 20131113

 

Chris Edwards explains:

The chart shows that the IRS has become a huge social welfare agency in recent decades. Handouts have soared from $4.4 billion in 1990 to an estimated $91.1 billion in 2013 (red line). Handouts are down a bit in recent years because some of the refundable credits from “stimulus” legislation have expired. IRS administration costs have grown from $7.7 billion in 1990 to an estimated $15.3 billion in 2013 (blue line). 

How should we reform the IRS budget? First, we should terminate the handout programs. That would save taxpayers more than $90 billion annually and cut the IRS budget by 86 percent. 

The largest IRS handout is the refundable part of the EITC, which is expected to cost $55 billion in 2013.

So true.  Considering that over $10 billion of the $55 billion is stolen or otherwise issued improperly, the EITC is a nightmare.  There would be plenty of funding available for tax administration if EITC could go away.

But the chart also shows something else: if the tax law was no more complicated than it was in 1990 — and believe me, it was plenty complicated — the IRS administrative budget would be adequate.  But with the IRS transformed into a monster multi-portfolio agency charged with healthcare administration, welfare, industrial policy, environmental enforcement, etc., etc., its budget is hopeless.

 

This will work out well:

This article examines the tax collection process to see how the IRS might enforce the individual mandate under the healthcare reform law. It concludes that resistant taxpayers can generally be forced to pay the tax penalty only if they are entitled to receive refundable tax credits that exceed their net federal tax liability. 

From Jordan BerryThe Not-So-Mandatory Individual Mandate, via the TaxProf.

 

Don’t trust the Tax Foundation?  Maybe you’ll trust the Congressional Budget Office.  A commenter yesterday took issue with a chart I reproduced showing not only the tax burden at different income levels, but the amount of government spending benefiting different income levels:

It’s not “the first chart for any tax policy debate,” it’s the last chart you should want to find on your side of the debate if you want to have any credibility.

If that doesn’t work for you, maybe this one from the CBO will be less objectionable:

cbo table

This chart is more focused on direct transfers, but it says pretty much the same thing.  It also covers 2006, and the tax law has hit the high end harder since then. (Via Greg Mankiw).

 

Scott Hodge, Andrew Lundeen,  54 Million Federal Tax Returns Had No Income Tax Liability in 2011 (Tax Policy Blog)

 

Paul Neiffer,  Sale of CRP Land – Is it Subject to the 3.8% Tax?  It depends a lot on whether an appeals court upholds the Tax Court Morehouse decision imposing self-employment tax on CRP income.  “And if the Morehouse case is overturned on appeal and the CRP is treated as rents, the land sale will also be subject to the 3.8% tax.”

 

Kay Bell, Tax tips for newlyweds saying “I do” on 11-12-13 or any day

Jack Townsend,  U.S. Banks File Long-Shot Litigation to Block FATCA Reciprocal Requirements

Leslie Book,  Disclosure and the 6-Year Statute of Limitation: S Corp Issues (Procedurally Taxing)

Jason Dinesen,  EAs are Partly to Blame for Our Obscurity  “Yes, we are treated as the red-headed stepchild of the tax world. But a big reason for this is that we ALLOW people to treat us this way.”

Russ Fox, Dan Walters with Another Example of California Dreamin’

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 188

 

Hope lives! 

It’s Time to Give Up on Tax Reform” – Joseph Thorndike, October 29, 2013

When Tax Reform Rises From the Dead, What Will It Look Like?Joseph Thorndike, November 12, 2013.

I should note that his vision of resurrected tax reform is hideous.  If that’s what hope for tax reform comes to, I’ll hope against his hope.

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/12/13: Mason City is cold edition. But: a reprieve!

Tuesday, November 12th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

The ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School makes its Mason City stop today.  7 degrees and sunny.

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But we have a sold-out house today to keep us warm!  We are also sold out for Thursday in Ottumwa.  Meanwhile Paul Neiffer helps with the second day of the show today in Sheldon and tomorrow here.  Seats are going fast for our remaining sessions in Waterloo, Red Oak, Denison and Ames, so register today!  And if you come to one of the shows, please come up and say hi!

 

The first chart for any tax policy debate is in this post from Andrew Lundeen at the Tax Policy Blog,  Government at All Levels Redistributed $2 Trillion in 2012

 givers and takers

 From the study referenced in the post:

As Chart 1 illustrates, the typical family in the lowest 20 percent in 2012 (with market incomes between $0 and $17,104) pays an average of $6,331 in total taxes and receives $33,402 in spending from all levels of government. Thus, the average amount of redistribution to a typical family in the bottom quintile is estimated to be $27,071. The vast majority of this net benefit, a total of $21,158, comes as a result of federal policies.

Before considering any more taxes on “the rich,” it’s worth stopping to understand what is already happening, and to consider that if this isn’t solving the problem, maybe more of the same isn’t the answer.

 

You don’t get a “reprieve” from something you should look forward to: “Iowa gets Obamacare reprieve.”  Coming from Press-citizen.com, the party newspaper of the People’s Republic of Iowa City, that’s probably not the sort of headline to cheer up the administration.

 

train-wreck Megan McArdle, Hope Is All Obamacare Has Left :

When the tech geeks raised concerns about their ability to deliver the website on time, they are reported to have been told “Failure is not an option.” Unfortunately, this is what happens when you say “failure is not an option”: You don’t develop backup plans, which means that your failure may turn into a disaster.

Great idea!

 

Peter Suderman, Time to Start Considering Obamacare’s Worst Case Scenarios (Reason.com):

But it’s time to start considering the worst-case scenarios: that the exchanges continue to malfunction, that plan cancellations go into effect, that insurers see the political winds shifting and stop playing nice with the administration, and that significant numbers of people are left stranded without coverage as a result. Rather than reforming the individual market, which was flawed but did work for some people, Obamacare will have destroyed it and left only dysfunction and chaos in its wake. 

None of this makes me optimistic for a repeal of the inane 3.8% net investment income tax enacted to finance the debacle.  Cleaning up the disaster will be costly, and they’ll need the money for it.

 

Trish McIntire, The New January 21st.  “Despite the delay in the start of the tax season, taxpayers won’t get extra time to file their returns.”

 

Check out Robert D. Flach’s Tuesday Buzz!

Jack Townsend,  IRS Authority to Settle After Referral to DOJ Tax, a discussion of Ron Isley’s tax troubles.

Brian Mahany,  IRS Makes Important Changes For FBAR Appeals – FBAR Lawyer Blog

Fiduciary Income Tax Blog, Valuation of Indirect Ownership Through a Trust

Norton Francis, Narrow Tax Hikes Win Support in Several States (TaxVox)

 

All the news that’s fit to print.  NY Times: Estate Planning for Sex Toys (TaxProf)

News from the Profession.  Someone With Lots of Spare Time Has Doodled Big 4 Stereotypes (Going Concern).

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/5/13: IRS makes audits even more fun. And: the 400!.

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

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It’s not the same people every year.  High Income, Low Taxes and Never a Bad Year (James B. Stewart, New York Times, via the TaxProf.  A New York Times columnist comes through with all of the cliches about “the rich” in one column.

 Plenty of people did get hit in 2009, including people at the very top. But all things are relative. The fortunate 400 people with the highest adjusted gross incomes still made, on average, $202 million each in 2009, according to Internal Revenue Service data. And this doesn’t even count income that doesn’t show up as adjusted gross income, such as tax-exempt interest.

Yet the top 400 paid an average federal income tax rate of less than 20 percent, far lower than the top rate of 35 percent then in effect.

They also paid a lower rate than the top 1 percent, which were people with adjusted gross incomes in 2009 of at least $344,000. These affluent but hardly superrich taxpayers paid on average just over 24 percent of their adjusted gross income in federal income tax. Even the top 0.01 percent, people earning at least $1.4 million, paid 24 percent.        

You’d get the impression that this is the same top 400 every year, paying low taxes as they go.  That’s a wrong impression.

Most people who have spectacular incomes do so only once, usually because they sell their business or take it public.  That normally is how you hit that top 400.  Yet the “never a bad year” line implies that they have this kind of income year after year.

That income is capital gains, which are taxed at a lower rate.  That’s no mystery or conspiracy, that’s just math.

Furthermore, those capital gains are often one of two taxes on the income.  C corporation income is taxed twice — first on the corporation tax return, and again when retained earnings are distributed as dividends or recovered as capital gains.  And to the extent the capital gains reflect inflation, they are aren’t a tax on income at all; they are a confiscation of principal.

Mr. Stewart is rehashing numbers from 2009, when the top federal rate on capital gains was 15%.  It was increased for 2013 to 23.8%, nearly a 60% increase.   Yet because ordinary income rates went up too, the Famous 400 will always have lower rates, and Mr. Stewart will be able to write the same lame column five years from now.

Of course, many economists think that capital gain rates were too high even before the rate increase.  But maybe that’s true only unless it really matters.


20130419-1The IRS has figured out a way to make audits even more fun!  Tax Analysts reports ($link) “The IRS Large Business and International Division on November 4 released mandatory, stringent new procedures for enforcing information document requests (IDRs) and issuing summonses, allowing examiners almost no discretion even at the manager level.”

The new procedure requires the IRS to issue a summons on a tight deadline when an “information document request” (IDR) isn’t promptly met:

If the IDR response remains incomplete by the delinquency notice deadline, the examiner is required — again without exception — to issue a pre-summons letter within 14 calendar days of the delinquency notice deadline. The pre-summons letter sets another new deadline, which can’t be more than 10 calendar days away unless the director of field operations grants approval.

Former IRS official Larry Langdon warns:

Taxpayers who may have trouble meeting proposed deadlines in a draft IDR “need to immediately escalate that draft IDR before it goes final, because in effect if it goes final, they’re stuck with those dates,” Langdon said. At that point, he added, no amount of negotiation will stop the new enforcement process from proceeding.

Lovely.  Of course the IRS won’t stop conducting audits during busy season, or during client reporting deadline periods, but that’s just too bad, apparently.

Link: LB&I-04-1113-009.

 

Paul Neiffer,  Everything You Want to Know About Net Investment Income Tax (or Not)

If you have 1,000 acres of good farmland, it only takes $250 per acre cash rent to put you over the threshold.  Then, after a few years of cash renting, the farmer elects to sell his farmland.  In this case, almost all of the gain will be both subject to the 3.8% net investment income tax and the 20% maximum federal tax plus state income taxes.

But that year the farmer will be “rich,” so he’s fair game, right?

 

Jason Dinesen, Nebraska Tax Guidance for Same-Sex Married Couples   

William Perez, Estate and Gift Tax Figures for 2014

 

Russ Fox, The Wrong Kind of Education Leads to ClubFed

 A California tax preparer decided he wanted to increase refunds for his clients. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with that–I want my clients to get the maximum possible refund allowed under the law. It appears that Kenyon Williams forgot those last three words; he was found guilty of two counts of wire fraud and two counts of aggravated identity theft earlier today.

That “under the law” thing gets in the way of so many great ideas…

 

TaxGrrrl, Saying ‘I Do’ To Tax Planning   What the tax-savvy bride is wearing, and when.

Andrew Lundeen, Scott Hodge, Individuals Receive 91 Percent of Tax Expenditures (Tax Policy Blog):

20131105-1

 

Tax Justice Blog, More Illinois Companies Trying to Extort Tax Breaks.  Given Illinois’ newly-increased taxes, it’s partly self-defense, but you can bet they’re shaking down Iowa too.

Donald Marron, Time to Fix the Budget Process (TaxVox)

 

tack shelterJeremy Scott, What the Daugerdas Verdict Means for Tax Shelter Promotion (Tax Analysts Blog):

While it might have secured a few convictions, and even jail time, in the KPMG and Daugerdas cases, it also lost face, along with time and resources, for its relatively modest success. Instead of spending many years to secure partial convictions on a few practitioners, perhaps the government’s time would be better spent attacking tax shelter transactions on the front end, at the exam and regulatory drafting levels.

If tax planning and compliance get you prosecuted, you’ll have a hard time getting people to perform tax planning and compliance.

 

Phil Hodgen’s Exit Tax Book: Chapter 6 – Taxation of Specified Tax-Deferred Accounts

Jack Townsend,  India Signs OECD Multilateral Convention on Mutual Administrative Assistance in Tax Matters.  Bank secrecy isn’t.

 

Peter Reilly,  SPLC Calls Family Research Council Hate Group – Should IRS Take Action?  I think SPLC has done quite enough for the FRC already, thank you.  Peter wisely notes “The IRS teaming up with the FBI to identify hate groups does not sound like a confidence inspiring plan to me.”

Carnival Time at Kay Bell’s Place!  Tax Carnival #122: Return to Standard Tax Time

 

Things you didn’t learn in Geography Class: Ireland Is a Bagel (Martin Sullivan, Tax Analysts Blog)

 

News From the Profession: Guess Which Big 4 Firm Allegedly Just Punked Its Rejectees (Going Concern).  When I was interviewing out of school, I knew one visit went badly when they sent me a bill for my hotel room.

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/31/13: A scary Iowa tax proposal, just in time for Halloween!

Thursday, October 31st, 2013 by Joe Kristan

 

hatchJack Hatch’s income tax plan would raise taxes on all but very small businesses.  

It’s all in the spin.  My headline is just as accurate as the headline in the Des Moines Register on the tax plan announced by Senator Jack Hatch, a Democratic candidate for Iowa Governor.  The Register’s article, though, spins the way the candidate would like: “Jack Hatch’s income tax plan would give break to all but most wealthy Iowans.”  From the article:

Hatch’s plan would get rid of federal deductibility, which allows taxpayers to deduct federal taxes from their state return. His plan would also raise filing thresholds. It would raise the per-child tax credit from $40 to $500. Married couples who are both employed would get a new $1,000 a year tax credit.

And Iowa’s eight rates and brackets, which range from 0.36 percent to 8.98 percent, would be reduced to four.

The top rate would fall slightly to 8.8 percent, although the income at which that rate begins would be raised by 26 percent, according to an analysis of Hatch’s plan by the nonpartisan Legislative Services Agency. The lowest rate would be 3 percent.

Taxes would go up for Iowans who make an adjusted gross income above $200,000, the Legislative Services Agency analysis says. The wealthiest taxpayers would see a small drop in the highest marginal tax rate, but their taxes would go up because they’d lose federal deductibility.

There are two things I hate about this plan and the way it is covered.  First, it makes no mention that a tax on “the wealthy” is really a tax on business.  Most business income is now reported on individual returns:

Source: The Tax Foundation

Source: The Tax Foundation

 

And 72% of that is reported by taxpayers with AGI over $200,000:

20131031-2

Cutting through the soak-the-rich stuff, what he’s really proposing is a great big tax increase on business.  How that helps Iowa’s economy isn’t explained — I suppose because it doesn’t.

The other part I hate is the whole idea that hurting “the rich” on behalf of “the middle class” is presumed to be just fine.   Heck, let’s go shoplifting at Wal-Mart, they have plenty of money — and it’s for the middle class!

 

I suppose I couldn’t expect Sen. Hatch to embrace the Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.  I suspect it makes too much sense for any politician to embrace it.

 

This would be a good thing for Iowa: The Benefits of Independent Tax Tribunals (Cara Griffith, Tax Analysts Blog):

States are increasingly turning to independent tax tribunals. Most states now have either a judicial-branch tax court or an administrative-level tax tribunal that is independent of the state’s tax authority. Taxpayers and practitioners have pressed states for independent decision-making bodies for several reasons, including that the judges or administrative law judges who write decisions are impartial and knowledgeable in tax issues and that the opinions should more consistently and transparently apply the tax law because they will be published. 

Iowa, unfortunately, has only administrative tribunals and regular courts.  The judges know little about taxes, especially income taxes, and tend to defer to the State, even when it tortures law and logic.

 

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

TaxProf, NY Times: The Marginal Tax Rate Mess.  Even the New York Times is noticing the high implicit marginal tax rates on means-tested welfare programs, like the earned income tax credit:

As a result of losing eligibility for means-tested benefits, low-income and middle-income families sometimes experience much higher marginal effective tax rates (sometimes exceeding 90 percent) than those at the top of the income distribution. Phase-outs for any one program may not be large, but participation in several programs creates a cumulative effect. 

They “help the poor,” as long as they stay that way.

 

 

 

 

59pdhyef59pdhyefJoseph Henchman, Remembering the Deceased Iowa Pumpkin Tax You Helped End (Tax Policy Blog).

59pdhyefTaxGrrrl,  Social Security Benefits Will Not Keep Pace With Tax Contributions In 2014 

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Jana Luttenegger, Social Security Benefits to Increase in 2014 (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Robert D. Flach,  HAPPY HALLOWEEN – SOME TREATS FROM THE SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

Phil Hodgen, Chapter 3 – Paperwork for Expatriates and Covered Expatriates

Kay Bell, Colorado taxpayer group files lawsuit to overturn candy tax

Me, IRA is to startup funding as dynamite is to kindling.  My new post at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record Business Professionals Blog.

 

Christopher Bergin, What’s a UDITPA? (Tax Analysts Blog)

Andrew Lundeen, Scott Hodge,  The Income Tax Code Is More Progressive than It Was 20 Years Ago (Tax policy Blog).  “The top 1 percent of taxpayers pay a greater share of the income tax burden than the bottom 90 percent combined, which totals more than 120 million taxpayers. In 2010, the top 1 percent of taxpayers—which totals roughly 1.4 million taxpayers—paid about 37 percent of all income taxes.”

Tax Justice Blog, Bruce Bartlett Is Wrong: New Conclusions on the Corporate Income Tax Change Nothing.  Nothing ever changes at TJB!

Government officials defend increased funding for their agencies.  Iowa police chiefs defend traffic cameras (KWWL.com)

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/30/2013: Beggars night day edition! And why IRAs are scary as start-up investors.

Wednesday, October 30th, 2013 by Joe Kristan
MST3K-2 lantern

Stop by for treats tonight. You can find us by Son’s MST3K-themed pumpkin.

The Des Moines area has an unusual tradition for trick-or-treating on October 30, rather than October 31.   On our “Beggars Night,” it’s customary for the little monsters to tell a joke.  A perennial favorite:

What’s a pirate’s favorite restaurant?

Aaaarghh-bys!

So drive carefully tonight!

 

Speaking of scary, think of having your IRA disqualified and taxed currently, with penalties, for engaging in a prohibited transaction.  That’s what happened to a Missouri man in Tax Court yesterday.

The taxpayer, a Mr. Ellis, rolled $320,000 out of his 401(k) and put it into a self-directed IRA.  The IRA than bought 98% of a corporation (an LLC that elected to be taxed as a corporation) to open a used-car lot, where he began working as the general manager.  It went badly.  From the Tax Court opinion:

In essence, Mr. Ellis formulated a plan in which he would use his retirement savings as startup capital for a used car business. Mr. Ellis would operate this business and use it as his primary source of income by paying himself compensation for his role in its day-to-day operation. Mr. Ellis effected this plan by establishing the used car business as an investment of his IRA, attempting to preserve the integrity of the IRA as a qualified retirement plan. However, this is precisely the kind of self-dealing that section 4975 was enacted to prevent.

The result? $163,000 of taxes and penalties on the $320,000 invested in the used car lot — which, of course, may well not be very liquid, seeing that it’s all invested in a closely-held corporation.

This case has an interesting twist to those of us who follow tax cases too closely.  The IRA plan was apparently the work of  a Kansas City law firm whose attempt to make their practice income largely tax-exempt by funneling it through an ESOP-owned S corporation was shot down in Tax Court in 2011.  I’m just guessing here, but the IRS may have taken a look at that firm’s clients after seeing how aggressive the firm was in using retirement plans to shelter business income.

It’s tempting to have your IRA invest directly to avoid the current tax and 10% penalty that can apply to an early withdrawal.  The results, though, can be a lot scarier than any trick-or-treater.

Cite: Ellis, T.C. Memo 2013-245.

 

59pdhyefMore scary.  Econoblogger Arnold Kling has thoughts on whether Healthcare.gov might be saved:

My opinion of the distribution of likely outcomes is that it is bimodal. There is a high probability that the exchanges will be working at the end of November. I think that there is an even higher probability that they will be working never.

The public pledge where the new savior of the site impresses Mr. Kling, but he thinks the design issues might be intractable.

Andrew Lundeen, Scott Hodge,  The Income Tax Burden Is Very Progressive (Tax Policy Blog):

About half of the nation’s income is reported by taxpayers who make less than $100,000, and half is reported by taxpayers who make more. However, taxpayers who make less than $100,000 collectively pay just 18 percent of all income taxes while those who make more pay over 80 percent of all income taxes.

They have a chart, of course:

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Howard Gleckman, Who Benefits from Muni Bonds? It’s More Complicated Than You Think (TaxVox) “…while most of the benefit of the tax-exemption goes to high-income investors, lower-income households who hold taxable bonds in their 401(k)s also receive some advantage.”

 

But they’re ready to regulate preparers! TIGTA: IRS Cannot Account for 23% of its IT Assets (TaxProf).

 

Jason Dinesen asks Is There a Way to Protect Yourself from Tax Return Identity Theft?   Use common sense — but if someone in your family dies, ID thieves may be able to get government-published information enabling them to steal the deceased’s identity no matter what you do.

TaxGrrrl, Somebody’s Watching Me: IRS Criminal Investigations Ramp Up Efforts To Thwart Tax ID Thefts   

 

David Brunori offers Tax Advice for State Legislators of All Parties (Tax Analysts Blog).  There’s a lot there, including this:

Both parties should also give serious thought to greater reliance on the property tax. Yes, I know people hate that tax. I also know that politicians find it advantageous to attack it. But the property tax revolts of the late 1970s and the 1980s have badly damaged the fiscal structure of state and local governments.

Don’t expect either party to heed the advice.

 

William Perez,  47% of Individual Taxpayers Earn Under $30,000

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 174

High-fiber diet.  Tax identity thief who ate debit card evidence is convicted (Kay Bell)

From Phil Hodgen’s series on expat taxes: Chapter 2 – Are You An Expatriate?

Carlton Smith, Byers v Comm’r – CDP Venue In Courts Of Appeals May Be Upended (Procedurally Taxing)

 

Joseph Thorndike, It’s Time to Give Up on Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog):

Tax reform? Don’t bet on it. Not this year, and probably not next year either. Tax reform, like everything else in Washington, is on hold pending the resolution of a broader, highly polarized debate about the role of government in American society.

 

Robert D. Flach has his Tuesday Buzz on Wednesday this week.

 

 

20131025-237-yard month penalty for former Eagle Mitchell.  The sentence was handed down yesterday in a Florida federal courtroom, reports the Orlando Sentinel.

The former NFL wide-receiver blamed brain injuries suffered on the field after pleading guilty to a plot where he helped convince Milwaukee Bucks player to use a Florida preparer to file a refund claim, which would be split between the NBA player, Mr. Mitchell, and the preparer.  The claim was fraudulent, and the NBA player wasn’t charged.  Mr. Mitchell also allegedly used an LLC to conceal other fraudulent tax claims.  Brain injuries are funny things.

 

News from the Profession: Dancing Accountant Nearly Thrown Out of a Bank For Dancing To “Money, Money, Money”  (Going Concern)

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/29/13: The case against the research credit. And no tax break for bike-shares.

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013 by Joe Kristan
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Flickr image courtesy Windy_ under Creative Commons license

Martin Sullivan, ‘Extortion’ and the Research Credit (Tax Analysts Blog) is the first prominent tax commentator I’ve seen who sees the research credit the much the way I do (my emphasis):

The problem is not with the theory of the credit but with its execution. I have been around a while and have researched the research credit since its inception in 1981. My take is that the essential problem of the credit has only grown worse: It is impossible to find a practical definition of subsidy-worthy research in the 21st century. It is less clear than ever where corporate research ends and other innovation-inducing functions like design and software development, begin. There is little empirical work regarding why, in this modern economy in which investment spending defies categorization, some business-building activity should be subsidized and others not. This inability to target incentives to where they should go means scarce resources are inappropriately and arbitrarily assigned to certain activities, certain businesses, and certain industries while others are left in the cold. What was intended as an incentive for productive activity by clever scientists and engineers turns out to be an incentive for totally unproductive activity by clever lawyers, accountants and lobbyists.

So true — though the accountants do use clever engineers to help turn stuff businesses do anyway into “research.”  I’m convinced that the credit is almost entirely harvested by businesses doing what they would do anyway.

Repeal of the research credit could fund a reduction of approximately 1 percentage point in the corporate tax rate. The benefits of the credit as it works in practice are questionable. In contrast, a reduction in the corporate rate would undoubtedly be a big plus for America’s competitiveness.

That’s right.  The IRS is institutionally incapable of distinguishing between worthwhile “research” and other spending.  If the IRS can’t competently police a tax spiff, get rid of the spiff and lower the rates for everyone.

 

Andrew Lundeen, Scott Hodge,  About Half of Tax Returns Report Less than $30,000 (Tax Policy Blog)

The median taxpayer earns roughly $33,000. This means that half of the 145 million tax filers (about 72 million or so) earn less than $33,000 and half earn more. While only about 14 percent of taxpayers earn more than $100,000, they pay the vast majority of all income taxes in America today.

 20131029-1

Compare that with who pays:

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In other words, The bottom half of the distribution’s income tax burden is actually negative.

 

TaxGrrrl,  10 Things You Need To Know About Getting Married & Taxes

Kay Bell, A clearer look at maximizing medical tax deductions

Paul Neiffer,  Setup Your Deferred Payment Contracts Now:

The election is on a contract by contract basis so it is important to have at least a couple contracts in the $20-30,000 range to allow for the correct amount of adjustments to income.  If you have only one contract for $150,000, that may not give you the best flexibility.   

It’s one of those sweet tax planning tools that would be bizarre and subject to penalties for most of us, but is just Tuesday for farmers.

 

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Flickr image courtesy Galpalval under Creative Commons license

Robert W. Wood, Bike Share Programs Are Not Tax-Free, Says The IRS  (Via the TaxProf).  The IRS says bikes borrowed from rent-a-bike stands, like those in downtown Des Moines, can’t be a reimbursed as a “qualified transportation fringe benefit.”  In contrast, expenses of personally-owned bikes qualify.

 

Phil Hodgen is running a series on the tax effects of expatriating.  He’s gotten ahead of me, so I’ll start at the beginning and add a link every day, starting with  Chapter 1 – A Quick Overview of the Exit Tax.

Jack Townsend, Does Our Criminal Justice System Find Truth Well And What is the Tolerance for Error?  “The question is whether our traditional criminal justice system for finding truth by triers of fact — usually juries but sometimes judges — really do it well and how much confidence can we have that they do it well.”

 

Jeremy Scott, Revenue Divide Will Likely Derail Conference Committee (Tax Analysts Blog)

TaxProf,  The IRS Scandal, Day 173

Tax Justice Blog, PricewaterhouseCoopers Report Quietly Confirms Low Effective Tax Rates for Corporations But Directs Attention to Irrelevant Figures

Linda Beale,  Carried Interest — a tax privilege for the rich whose end time has come.  Except it’s not just for “the rich,” and it would do more harm than good.

 

Keith Fogg, Vince Fumo: IRS Finding of Jeopardy (Procedurally Taxing)  “As mentioned in a previous post, the Service recently invoked the rarely used jeopardy assessment procedure against former state Senator Vince Fumo in connection with the activities leading to his criminal conviction.”

Robert D. Flach says it’s TIME FOR YEAR-END PLANNING.

 

News from the Profession:  “Is the CFO’s quitting time after 3 pm?” Coming to an Auditor’s Questionnaire Near You (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/25/13: No production deduction for direct-mailer. And: the brain-damage excuse.

Friday, October 25th, 2013 by Joe Kristan


199
Direct mail operator fails to qualify for “Domestic Production Activity Deduction.”  
One of the sillier parts of the tax law is the 9% deduction for nothing given to “producers” of manufactured, constructed, raised or mined property.  If all you do is manufacture, you get 9% off the top of your taxable income under Section 199.

In a modern interconnected economy, distinguishing between “manufacturing” and other activities is silly.  The law is made more silly because it has special interest provisions allowing some architects and engineers to take the deduction.  Sure you need them for a construction project, but just try getting a building up without lawyers and accountants, too.

The law’s unwise distinction between “production” activities and other activities encourages taxpayers to try to qualify, and forces the courts to try to draw distinctions.  That happened yesterday when the Tax Court looked at a direct mail operator’s Section 199 deduction.  From the Tax Court opinion:

 During 2005, 2006, and 2007, ADVO distributed direct mail advertising in the United States. Direct mail advertisers such as ADVO distribute advertising material through the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) to residential recipients, who are the targeted potential customers for the products and services sold by ADVO’s clients, the advertisers. The advertising material can be either “solo direct mail” or “cooperative direct mail”. For solo direct mail, the printed advertising material of a single advertiser is delivered in a stand-alone envelope or as a postcard to a residential recipient. For cooperative direct mail, also known as a shared mail package, the printed advertising material for several different advertisers is consolidated into a single delivery mechanism (such as an envelope or sleeve) and delivered as a single unit to residential recipients.

The court had to go through an elaborate analysis of whether ADVO was a “manufacturer.”  Judge Wherry concluded:

After careful review of all of the aforementioned factors in the light of the specific facts and circumstances of this case, we find that ADVO did not have the benefits and burdens of ownership while the advertising material was printed.

This implies ADVO was a “contract manufacturer,” and that its customers might have qualified.  It also implies that if ADVO had structured its paperwork differently, it might have won.  If this deduction is repealed in return for lower rates for everyone, we’ll all win.

Cite: ADVO, Inc. and Subsidiaries, 141 T.C. No. 9

Related: TREASURY ISSUES ‘PRODUCTION DEDUCTION’ PROPOSED REGULATIONS and LINK TO SECTION 199 POWERPOINT SLIDES

 

Iowa announces business property credit applications open.  From a Department of Revenue Press Release:

Applications for credit against 2013 property tax assessments must be received by the county or city assessor by January 15, 2014.  The actual amount of credit each property unit will receive depends in part upon the total value of all property units and the average consolidated rates in each unit.  The credit calculation is designed to spend ninety-eight percent of the amount appropriated by the Legislature to the Business Property Tax Credit Fund.  For the first year of the credit $50 million was appropriated to the Fund.  The Legislative Services Agency has estimated that the maximum first year credit amount will be approximately $523.

It applies to “certain commercial, industrial, and railroad properties.  More information here.

 

Careful fiscal stewardship.  A judge awarded $7 million in attorney fees for the legal team that forced Des Moines to refund $40 million in illegally-collected taxes.  The city fought the refund to the supreme court, so they incurred hefty legal fees on top of those they are paying for the plaintiffs.   Well done, Des Moines!  It could have been worse, as the attorneys requested twice the amount — and some attorneys in the story linked above think they may get it on appeal.

It will be interesting to see whether this is an issue in next month’s city elections.

 

Andrew Lundeen,  Income Taxes Account for the Largest Share of Federal Revenue (Tax Policy Blog):

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Paul Neiffer, 180 Months Means 180 Months!:

In Estate of Helen Trombetta vs. Commissioner, the Tax Court essentially ruled creating a grantor trust with retained interests having a term of 180 months, you better make sure you live for at least 181 months if you want to save on estate taxes.

Hang in there, in other words.

 

Jason Dinesen, Insolvency and Canceled Debt: Make Sure You Can Prove It!  You really have to be tapped out to exclude debt-cancellation income from taxes.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 169

Christopher Bergin, Loving You Is Easy (Is It?) (Tax Analysts Blog).  He unwisely thinks IRS regulation of tax preparers will do more good than harm.

Oh, boy.  New Comprehensive Tax Reform Plan from Citizens for Tax Justice (Tax Justice Blog)

Jana Luttenegger, Estate Planning Awareness Week, Oct 20-26 (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Kay Bell, Obamacare to blame for the 2014 tax filing season delay?

Jack Townsend, Switzerland as Club Fed for Swiss Enablers of U.S. Tax Crimes  Given the alternatives, confinement to Switzerland isn’t the worst thing that could happen.

 

Quotable.  David Henderson:

By preventing insurance companies from pricing for pre-existing conditions, Obama has almost destroyed the market for individual insurance. He has taken one of the few parts of the health care that worked pretty well–the market for individual insurance–and badly wounded it. Unless this part of ObamaCare is repealed, we will still have a mess on our hands.    

Sadly, that magical thinking provision will be the hardest to undo.

 

Catch your Friday Buzz from Robert D. Flach!

 

TaxGrrrl,  Vatican Suspends ‘Bishop Of Bling’ Over $40 Million Home Renovation.  How?  “In Germany, churches are largely funded by taxes – there is no direct prohibition between mixing Church and State as there is in the United States.”

 

News from the Profession: McGladrey Tax Associate Opts for Pedantry in His Farewell Email (Going Concern)

 

20131025-2My brain made me do it.  Former football star says brain injury spurred tax evasion.  WFTV.com reports:

That former football star, Freddie Mitchell, hoped an Orlando federal judge would show him mercy Tuesday.

Mitchell, a retired Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver, was convicted in an elaborate tax fraud scheme in which he cheated the government out of millions of dollars.

AccountingWeb.com reports that Mr. Mitchell pleaded guilty to help recruit an NBA player for whom a co-conspirator claimed false refunds, which Mr. Mitchell claimed a share.  He allegedly claimed over $2 million in other false refunds through an LLC.

So the brain was damaged enough to commit crime, but not so much that it kept him from a drawn-out plan to defraud people and to use an LLC to do it.  It’s funny how nobody ever blames brain injuries for, say, giving their life savings to charity.

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/23/2013: The Earned income tax credit thief subsidy feature. And: tax season delayed!

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Some smart people are big fans of the Earned Income Tax Credit. Some see it as a way to help the working poor, and some see it as a less destructive way to achieve the goals of minimum wages.

Yesterday the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration reported that from 21% to 25% of the earned income credit was paid improperly for the most recent fiscal year, and that $110 to $130 billion has been “paid improperly” over the past decade. That’s a nice way of saying “stolen.”

 

EITC error chart

Just because there is a lot of theft doesn’t by itself make a program bad — though that kind of loss rate would bankrupt anybody in the private sector.   Most people would send food to starving people in a war zone knowing that local warlords will be plundering some of it. But a program that comes at the cost of sending $11 billion annually to thieves needs to otherwise be a very good thing.   That’s not so clear with the EITC.

The credit does help the working poor — as long as they stay poor. As they work their way out of poverty, it becomes a trap. The phase-out of the credit imposes a punishing unstated, but very real, marginal tax rate.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The EITC is only one program that does this; all “means-tested” welfare programs do this to some degree. It’s not uncommon for this implicit tax rate to exceed 100% at some income levels.

I don’t know what the right answer is (Arnold Kling has some ideas), but increasing the EITC, like Iowa did this year, isn’t it.

 

Oh, Goody. 2014 Tax Season to Start Later Following Government Closure; IRS Sees Heavy Demand As Operations Resume (IRS Press Release)

The IRS is exploring options to shorten the expected delay and will announce a final decision on the start of the 2014 filing season in December, Acting IRS Commissioner Danny Werfel said. The original start date of the 2014 filing season was Jan. 21, and with a one- to two-week delay, the IRS would start accepting and processing 2013 individual tax returns no earlier than Jan. 28 and no later than Feb. 4. 

20131023-1It’s funny how programming IRS computers isn’t “essential,” but barricading open-air monuments is.

Other coverage:

William Perez, IRS Expects to Delay the Start of the 2014 Filing Season

Kay Bell, IRS won’t accept 2013 tax returns until Jan. 28, 2014

Russ Fox, Sigh: 2014 Tax Season to be Delayed up to Two Weeks

TaxGrrrl, IRS Announces Delayed Start To 2014 Tax Season   

 

Robert D. Flach, HOW TO DEAL WITH THE IRS AND LIVE TO FIGHT ANOTHER DAY

Paul Neiffer,  Taxpayers Want Their Cake, Frosting and Candles! Live by the low estate-tax value, die by the low estate-tax value.

Jack Townsend, Has the U.S. Aided International Tax Evasion?

Russ Fox,  Coming Attractions: When the IRS Writes New Law When They’re Not Allowed To.  A federal judge has allowed a suit challenging the IRS unilaterally extending the tax credit for insurance purchased on state-sponsored exchanges to policies sold on federally-run exchanges.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 167

 

President Reagan signs PL 99-514, the Tax Reform Act of 1986.The Tax Policy Blog takes us on a nostalgia tour in  8 Technological Changes Since the 1986 Tax Reform.  Take a trip back to the days of “car phones.”

 

Clint Stretch, Whom Do Tax Reformers Want to Help? (Tax Analysts Blog):

When congressional leaders start talking about tax reform as if it will benefit everyone, someone should be asking: Whom are you trying to help? The answer may be Americans earning more than around $75,000 who have fewer itemized deductions, fewer kids, fewer healthcare benefits, and lower retirement savings than most.

I’m not convinced that’s the right way to look at it.  Getting rid of complexity and lowering rates helps everybody by eliminating dead weight loss and redirecting resources from tax planning and compliance to more useful pursuits.

Andrew Lundeen, A Lot Has Changed in the 27 Years Since the Last Major Tax Reform (Tax Policy Blog).  “The amount of credits, loopholes, and deductions has increase by 44 percent, from $844 billion (2013 dollars), to over $1.2 trillion (2013 dollars), with much of that growth coming from the expansion of refundable tax credits.”

 

Howard Gleckman, Congress Shouldn’t Forget About Tax Entitlements In Its Search for Deficit Reduction (TaxVox)

 

Tax Justice Blog,  Governor Scott Walker Appropriates State Budget Surplus for Campaign Season Tax Cut.  In Tax Justice World, returning money taken by force of law to the taxpayers is “appropriating” it.

 

David Brunori, Eliminating the Sales Tax Is a Very Good Idea (Tax Analysts Blog) “But ending a tax that preys on the poor and is increasingly difficult to collect may provide the economic boost Rhode Island needs.”

Brian Strahle, BLAMING THE PLAYERS FOR THE RULES.  “Regardless, most taxpayers are simply trying to comply with the maze and complexity of non-uniform multistate tax laws”

Joseph Thorndike, The Gas Tax Doesn’t Work Because Politicians Broke It (Tax Analysts Blog).  By not raising it, apparently.

 

The Critical Question:  JD Salinger – Was January 27 2010 A Good Day To Die ?  (Peter Reilly)

Career Corner.  First Round Interview Tips for This Fall’s Accounting Recruits (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Update, 10/8/13: One week left! What to do if the K-1 never comes. And: money for Harold Hill!

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130311-1Extended 1040s are due one week from today.  There is no second extension available.

I know, the timing might not be good.  But if it hasn’t been good enough to get your tax information together since January, it will probably never be good.   If you don’t scrape up every loss at the slots or every item you dropped off at Goodwill, it doesn’t matter.

You probably aren’t waiting on K-1s anymore.  Tax returns for partnerships, S corporations and Trusts with income reportable on 1040s  were due September 16.  You should have all of your information in hand, and it’s just a matter of spending an hour or two getting it together and to your waiting preparer.  If you are still “working on it,” you’re either overdoing it or not really working on it.

If you don’t have all of your information — if, for example, you are still missing a K-1 — get ready to file as best you can without it.  If it’s a small K-1, you probably can just ignore it.  If it’s a big one, then talk to your preparer.  If it will only generate a passive loss that you can’t use, just go ahead and file without it by October 15, as it won’t affect the amount of your 2012 tax.  If you believe the K-1 will show taxable income when it is finally released, you should talk it over with your preparer.  Use any information you have to take a shot at what the tax will be.

Big or small, income or loss, be sure to file Form 8082 with your return to tell the IRS that you are filing using numbers that aren’t on a K-1.  It helps protect you from penalties.

In any case, don’t ignore the K-1, or pretend it will be zero when you know better.  That doesn’t work.  File by the extended due date.  You’ll get much better results by filing on time and amending if necessary than by filing late.  The penalties for late payment if you owe on an amended return — if any — won’t exceed 1/2% of the underpayment per month.  The penalties on a late-filed return run to 5% per month.

 

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Harold Hill gets a check.  The Iowa Film Tax Credit is repealed, but it is still stimulating the economy for Iowa attorneys and small-time filmmakers.  The Des Moines Register reports that the state has agreed to pay $225,000 to a Rhode Island man miffed that Iowa stopped the film credit gravy train:

The settlement is with financers of the movie “2001 Maniacs: Field of Screams,” which is available on Netflix.

The settlement will partially resolve a lawsuit brought by Anthony Gudas of Providence, R.I., who said his company, Tax Credit Finance, invested money in four film projects based on contracts with the state where tax credits were never paid.

The lawsuit for the three other film projects continues.

The film credit program caused a brief frenzy of production activity before it collapsed following revelations of taxpayer funds buying luxury cars for filmmakers.  A state audit showed that about 80% of the $36 million in credits issued by the program were improper and that oversight was almost non-existent.  Seven film figures ultimately copped pleas or were convicted at trial for cheating on the program, with two filmmakers earning 10-year prison terms.

And the three remaining lawsuits?  From the Register story:

Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Thompson in December said for three of the films, producers had not submitted documentation the state needed for the projects to qualify for the credits.  And, in the fourth, state officials said the producer, Harel Goldstein of California, had created false invoices. Goldstein later pled guilty to felony fraud and forgery charges in connection to the invoices.

So the program was looted; “But some benefits can’t just be measured on a dollar-for-dollar basis.” Don’t you wish we were giving more money to Hollywood?

 

Grover’s coming to town.   Tax opponent Grover Norquist to speak in Iowa Wednesday.  (Des Moines Register). I won’t be able to attend, but it should be interesting.

 

Wikipedia image courtesy Tallent Show under Creative Commons license

Wikipedia image courtesy Tallent Show under Creative Commons license

TaxGrrrl, The View From The Trenches: What The Shutdown Has Meant So Far For Taxpayers:

My advice to taxpayers: pretend things are normal. Yes, that feels nearly impossible. But to the extent possible, file as usual and make payments as usual. But don’t get too complacent: all of those meetings, calls and audits will be rescheduled eventually: it’s a delay, not a complete reprieve.

Sound advice.

William Perez, IRS Shut Down, Week 2

 

Jason Dinesen, Glossary of Tax Terms: Medical Dependent 

 

Kay Bell, Tax Carnival #121: TaxtoberFest 2013.  Looks delicious!

 

20131003-1Andrew Lundeen,  Obamacare Raises Marginal Tax Rates above 50 Percent.  Not just for “the rich,” either.

Megan McArdle,  Republicans Didn’t Sabotage Health Exchanges, Obama Did.  “In short, the administration passed a law with an unrealistically aggressive implementation schedule. And because of the way it passed it, it had no way to finesse that deadline.”  But it would be horrible blackmail for Congress to delay it for a year.

 

 

 

Clint Stretch, Tax Reform Is on Furlough (Tax Analysts Blog).   “As long as Congress is fighting over a continuing resolution and the debt limit, there is no oxygen in the room for other initiatives. Members will be stuck on their talking points, and constituents won’t be thinking about tax reform.”

Robert W. Wood, Bitcoin Is Biggest Loser In Silk Road Meltdown—IRS Wins Big

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 152

Jeremy Scott, It Isn’t Time to Bury the Income Tax Just Yet (Tax Analysts Blog)

Tax Justice Blog,  State News Quick Hits: Brownback Under Fire, and More

 

The Critical Question: Should Small Business Have Veto Power Over Corporate Tax Reform? (Martin Sullivan, Tax Analysts Blog)

Robert D. Flach has his Tuesday Buzz on!

 

Note: There will be no Tax Roundup tomorrow.  See you Thursday!

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