Posts Tagged ‘Bill Dix’

Tax Roundup, 1/25/2013: Only a few days left for IRA distribution mulligan. And: A $750 check for each Iowa household?

Friday, January 25th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

A proposal to refund part of the state budget surplus.  The Des Moines Register reports:

Iowa House and Senate Republican leaders today proposed to give a flat $750 to every Iowa household in an effort to return to taxpayers the state’s $800 million budget surplus.

The money would be returned to taxpayers in the form of a tax credit, said Senate Republican Leader Bill Dix, R-Shell Rock, and House Speaker Kraig Paulsen, R-Hiawatha.

20120504-1That seems pretty straightforward.  Better still to give it back as part of simplifying the tax code, but better that than just spending it.  Yet just spending it has its advocates:

Senate Democrats who control their chamber said that since it’s early in  the session they are open to talking about the Republicans’ proposal, but they have other ideas.

Sen. Joe Bolkcom, D-Iowa City, who chairs the tax-writing Iowa Senate Ways and Means Committee, said Democrats are interested in providing earned income tax credits for lower-income Iowa families and raising the threshold for filing state income taxes. He added that Iowa needs to invest more tax money to clean up dirty rivers and streams, repair crumbling roads and bridges, upgrade the state’s education system and make other improvements.

The earned income credit is a welfare program run through tax returns, with a tremendous rate of fraud.  It’s also a poverty trap.  The phase-out of benefits with rising income serves as a stiff tax on improving your income.  And spending doesn’t become something else just because you call it “investing.”

Elaine Maag,  Earned Income Tax Awareness Day (TaxVox)

 

Kay Bell reminds us that taxpayers who failed to make a 2012 required minimum distribution from the IRA have a January 31 mulligan.   The tax law imposes a stiff penalty on taxpayers who have reached age 70 1/2 who fail to take a minimum amount out by year end.  Taxpayers who failed to take their 2012 withdrawal last year can roll the RMD amount to charity by January 31 and avoid the 50% penalty.

Taxpayers who took an IRA distribution in December can also roll that into a charity by January 31 and avoid having the distribution included in 2012 income.

These provisions were part of the Fiscal Cliff tax bill, which extended the tax-free status of IRA rollovers to charity along with a bunch of other expired provisions.

 

Just because your bank is a country bank doesn’t make the banker a bumpkin.  Four Nebraskans have been charged with “structuring” — breaking deposits into chunks under $10,000 to avoid federal cash reporting requirements.  Federal law requires banks to report cash transactions over $10,000.  Folks who don’t want the government to know about their cash sometimes attempt to use multiple smaller transactions to fly under the radar; that’s illegal.    Theindependent.com reports:

 Randy L. Evans, 59, of Grand Island is charged in a 15-count indictment.  In the first 14 counts, it is alleged that between March 29, 2010, and Dec. 27, 2011, Evans structured financial transactions to evade reporting requirements when he made deposits in the amount of $210,381 at Five Points Bank. Count 15 charges him with structuring financial
transactions to evade reporting requirements when he made 449 transactions between Jan. 4, 2010, and Feb. 28 at Five Points Bank in the amount of $2,030,322.

Bankers are required to report suspicious transactions, and if you make yourself a regular, they’ll notice — especially in a small-town bank.

 

Regrettably, yes.  Libertarian writer Sheldon Richman breaks the bad news: just because the income tax is a bad thing doesn’t make it unconstitutional:

Where does this leave liberty’s advocates? First, we have to face the facts. Like it or not, the U.S. Constitution empowers the Congress to levy any tax it wants. Anyone is free to come up with a contrary interpretation, but the constitutionally endowed courts have spoken. Reading one’s libertarian values into the Constitution is futile. For better or worse, the Constitution means what the occupants of the relevant constitutional offices say it means.

In other words, it doesn’t matter if you think the income tax is unconstitutional if the IRS, the federal judge, the Marshals Service and the Bureau of Prisons think otherwise.  Fighting the income tax by not filing ruins your finances without hurting the Leviathan one little bit.

 

Luring and subsidizing your competitors with your tax money.  Left-side advocacy group Good Jobs First has released a report slamming “incentive” tax breaks like those used for two fertilizer companies in Iowa last year.  The report doesn’t mention Iowa’s programs, but it provides a depressing list of corporate bribery in other states, including subsidies to lure employers from Kansas City, Kansas across the river to Kansas City, Missouri, and vice-versa.  Their press release gets it right:

Interstate job piracy is not a fruitful strategy for economic growth, [report author Greg] LeRoy noted: “The costs are high and the benefits are low, since a tiny number of companies get huge subsidies for moving what amounts to an insignificant number of jobs.” LeRoy added: “The flip side is job blackmail: the availability of relocation subsidies makes it possible for companies that have no intention of moving to extract payoffs from their home states to stay put.”

For all the abuse, the organization’s recommendations are modest.  I would eliminate all such subsidies and replace them with a simple low-rate tax system for everyone.  The Tax Update Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform would be a great start here.

 

TaxProf,  House Ways & Means Chair Proposes Mark-to-Market Tax on Financial Derivatives

IRS Asks Judge To Suspend Injunction Barring It From Regulating Tax Preparers

Jim Maule,  A Tax Question: So What Do You Do With Your Time?. A good discussion of the “material participation” rules that take on extra importance under the new Obamacare Net Investment Income Tax.

Anthony Nitti,  The Tax Impact of Obamacare On The Passthrough Income of Small Business Owners

Patrick Temple-West,  Firms keep stockpiles of ‘foreign’ cash in U.S., and more (Tax Break)

Joseph Henchman,  Tax Foundation and CBPP Agree: States Need Strong Rainy Day Funds (Tax Policy Blog)

Jamaal Solomon, Tax Organizer for Entertainers.  Independent entertainers who cross state lines can find their taxes complicated, so good recordkeeping is essential.

Robert W. Wood, Shhh, Home Office and other IRS Audit Trigger Secrets

David Cay Johnston, Missing Half the Cash (Tax.com)

Start your weekend early with a Friday Buzz from Robert D. Flach!

News you can use:  Stuff Creepy Accountants Like (Going Concern).  Wisconsin!

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Tax Roundup, 1/14/2013: Big webcast today! Meanwhile, outlook bleak for Iowa income tax policy.

Monday, January 14th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130114-1New law webcast today!  I will be participating in a webcast today on the new Fiscal Cliff law and other recent tax developments.  The webcast, sponsored by the Iowa Bar Association, will start at noon.  I will join Roger McEowen of the ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation, and IRS Taxpayer Liason Christy Maitre.   Cost:  $35 for IBA tax school attendees and attendees of any 2012 CALT Farm and Urban Tax School; $35; $75 otherwise.  Agenda here, registration page here.  2 hours of timely CPE and Tax Update fun!

 

No good will come of this.  The 2013 session of the 85th Iowa General Assembly begins today, and the outlook for improvement in Iowa’s tax system is bleak.  Iowa business groups have firmly embraced a state tax incentive policy based on taking money from all of us to bribe well-connected businesses to do things they would do anyway.  From the Sioux City Journal:

Business groups like the Iowa Chamber Alliance, a non-partisan coalition representing 16 chambers of commerce and economic development organizations, are supporting a variety of tax credits to retain, grow and attract investments in the state. Those credits include restoring the $185 million cap on economic development tax credits that currently stands at $125 million for fiscal 2013.

Jason Hutcheson, chief executive officer of the Greater Burlington Partnership, said tax credits are a highly effective tool that deliver a high return on investment and are essential to retain, expand and recruit businesses and to attract technology and research. ICA members also are lobbying legislators to spend at least $25 million for business development incentives after the line item was shrunk to $15 million for the current fiscal year.

The politicians shed crocodile tears about just being forced to go along with a system based on them granting special favors:

Senate GOP Leader Bill Dix of Shell Rock said there is opposition to government choosing winners and losers with taxpayer-funded incentives, but he added, “There’s no question in my mind that an incentive policy is the world we live in. I don’t appreciate that and wish it wasn’t the case, but we do need a policy that includes incentives.”

You know what would be a real incentive to grow a business in Iowa?  A much simpler tax system with lower rates, one eliminating the corporate income tax altogether.  Something like The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.

Instead, Iowa has a horrible system built around complexity and high rates, made less painful — even lucrative — for those with the connections and lobbyists to score targeted tax credits.  The legislators hear from those people — not from the more numerous businesses  who quietly set up shop in South Dakota or other more friendly tax climates.

20130114-2

The Iowa Research Credit is refundable, so Iowa writes a check when the credit exceeds the computed tax. The $45.2 million in corporate research credits claimed in 2010 resulted in $43 million in refunds.

The best we can hope for from the legislature is prompt action on “coupling” legislation to conform Iowa’s 2012 tax law to the federal changes passed earlier this month.  The 2012 filing of many Iowa returns is on hold until they do so.  We’ll see if they can even accomplish that much.

 

What does the Worst IRS Commissioner Ever do for an encore?  He becomes a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution, which may never recover (TaxProf)

Scott Drenkard, Governor Jindal’s Bold New Tax Plan  (TaxPolicy Blog).  Could you live with a higher state sales tax if the income tax goes away?  Even if it taxes accounting services?  Tempting.

Paul Neiffer, Good News – Certain Credits Offset AMT

Jack Townsend, The Big Boys Get Better Treatment in Our Tax System Than Do Minnows

Joseph Thorndike, Peggy Noonan and the Beleaguered 1 Percent

TaxGrrrl, Ask the taxgirl: Filing Your Tax Return Early

News you can use: States to seniors: Good times may be ending, and more (Patrick Temple-West, Tax Break)

The Critical Question: Your Money Or Your Life – Which Can You Deduct ? (Peter Reilly)

That’s what they say, anyway.  White House says no to Death Star.  (Kay Bell)

At least she knows her constitution.  Miss Iowa takes fifth! (TheBeanwalker.com)  UPDATE!!!  Miss America Contestant Says Marijuana Should Only Be Legal For “Recreational Use and Health Care” (Mike Riggs, Reason.com).  So don’t smoke at the office.

 

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