Posts Tagged ‘Brian Gongol’

Tax Roundup, 10/13/14: Appeals Court holds CRP payments not Self-employment income to non-farmers. And: Extended due date looms!

Monday, October 13th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

binNot farming isn’t farming. That is one way to look at Friday’s decision by the Eighth Circuit in Morehouse that Conservation Reserve Program payments to non-farmers are not self-employment income. Overturning a Tax Court decision, a split three-judge panel rejected the IRS assessment of self-employment tax on landowners who enrolled in the CRP when they were not engaged in the trade or business of farming. The appeals panel said the CRP payments to hold erodable land out of production are instead rental payments with respect to non-farmers; real estate rental income is not subject to self-employment tax.

Roger McEowen, who worked on the case from the taxpayer’s side, has a detailed analysis of the case and its history. He summarizes the state of CRP law:

 Now, the Eighth Circuit’s reversal of the Tax Court means that non-farmers do not have to pay self-employment tax on CRP payments. That’s the case at least within the Eighth Circuit.  Active Farmers still have to pay on CRP payments unless the 2008 Farm Bill provision applies to them. But, non-farmers and non-materially participating farm landlords are given relief within the Eighth Circuit. For CRP rents paid after 2007, the question is whether the recipient is a materially-participating farmer.

The “2008 Farm Bill provision” holds that CRP payments are not self-employment income for recipients receiving Social Security payments.

In Iowa, taxpayers might want to think twice before taking their CRP payments out of self-employment income. Iowa has a special exclusion of capital gain income for taxpayers who have held land for ten years and who have also “materially participated” in a business with the land for ten years. The Iowa Department or Revenue in a recently-released decision said that it would consider a taxpayer to be “materially participating” in CRP ground if self-employment tax were paid. Given how much appreciation there has been on farm ground in recent years, paying a little self-employment tax might be worth it to avoid Iowa tax on a big farm sale gain.

Cite: Morehouse, CA-8, No. 13-3110.

Paul Neiffer has more: Morehouse Appeal is Released – Taxpayer Victory

 

20140513-1Making crashes more likely, for your safety The Chicago Tribune reports that Chicago shortened yellow light times to increase red-light camera revenues.  As Brian Gongol notes, this demolishes the argument that the cameras are for safety, rather than revenue: “It’s quite simple: If you want to cut down on red-light running and consequent crashes, you lengthen yellow lights and increase the gap between the red in one direction and the onset of green in the other.

Our local politicians never seemed very concerned about dangerous intersections until they found a way to make money off of them. Nor did they experiment with non-revenue safety options, like longer yellow cycles and a delay between the red one way and the green light the other, before turning on the revenue cameras.

 

Russ Fox, You Filed That Extension, And Only Now Are Realizing the Deadline is Wednesday… “First, in most cases tax professionals say it’s better to extend than amend. But extending is now out [1], so it’s better to get a reasonable return in.”

Peter Reilly, Paper Filing 1040 On October 15th? Go To The Post Office! Use Certified Mail:

 It is almost October 15th.  October 15 is the extended due date of your federal individual tax return.  If, like me, you still have not filed it and you are planning, unlike me, to paper file, use certified mail and save the return card when it comes back – especially if you owe money.

I e-file, myself, but if you are filing to claim a refund on a 2010 extended return, paper filing may be your only option — and then you absolutely should go certified mail, return receipt requested.

If you are an American abroad, Phil Hodgen explains how to obtain an Income Tax Return Extension Until December 15, 2014

TaxGrrrl, Trying To Reach IRS? Hold On Until Tuesday. Columbus Day, plus they shut down their computers for the weekend.

Tony Nitti, A Tale Of Two Activities: How To Beat The Hobby Loss Rules 

Jack Townsend, Bitcoins Update

Jason Dinesen, Glossary: Filing Status

20141013-1

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 522

William McBride, EPI Perpetuates Myth of Low Corporate Taxes. (Tax Policy Blog). A lesson on the dangers of ignoring the ascendance of pass-through entities.

Daniel Shaviro, Frontiers of quasi-tax fraud. “Because (a) partnership tax rules are so complex that only a handful of people really understand them – perhaps a thousand across the entire country? – and (b) people at the IRS generally don’t understand them, and (c) the audit rate for partnership tax returns is below 1%, compliance with partnership tax rules that are meant to block abusive tax planning that contradicts the actual tenor of the rules has pretty much completely collapsed.”

Renu Zaretsky, Cheap Talk, Scoring, and Promises, No, it’s not another night at the singles bar; today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers developments in the medical device tax repeal effort, loophole closers, and talk (just talk) of tax reform.

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown 10/10: Lottery Bust, Music Credits on the Table (Tax Justice Blog). New York considers expanding corporate welfare to record companies, of all things.

 

Unlike the politicians, they at least give you what you pay for. A summary of tax cases involving prostitutes in the wake of the Cartagena Hooker scandal from Robert Wood.

News from the Profession. Which Accounting Firm Fired an Employee for His Dispute with Comcast? A: PwC (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern). And they fired me when I didn’t even have cable.

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/6/14: Nine more days, folks. And: four hours of ethics to rule them all!

Monday, October 6th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

4868It’s October 6. That means extended 1040s are due in nine days, no further extension allowed.

I spent part of my weekend finishing up my own 1040, so I can’t be too self-righteous about procrastinators. Still, my return was 95% done on April 15. This was really just going through the information I had put together for my extension and making sure I hadn’t missed anything. I had gotten all of my information to the preparer (me) months ago.

Meanwhile, I have clients who have gotten me nothing, or maybe just their W-2. These taxpayers often are making the perfect the enemy of the adequate. They want to go through their checkbooks to identify every possible charitable deduction. And that last deduction is rarely worth the wait.

Just get the stuff you have to your preparer now. If you later find a deduction that matters, we have three years to amend the return. But you only have nine days left to file on time.

 

get-outEthics time. I am trying to find four hours of “ethics” courses to take before year-end, because the Iowa Board of Accountancy requires it for license renewal. Robert D. Flach sums up my feelings:

The powers that be seem to feel that unless tax preparers are forced to sit through at least 2 hours of redundant ethics preaching each and every year they will suddenly begin to create large fictional employee business expense deductions for clients, or add erroneous dependents, and false EIC claims, to client 1040s.

I have been preparing 1040s for over 40 years. If I ain’t “ethical” by now, having 2 hours of preaching thrust upon me isn’t going to miraculously make me honest.

In real life, “ethics” courses really seem to be CYA seminars — how to document your file and prepare engagement letters to help ward off frivolous lawsuits. That can be useful, but I’m not sure “ethics” is the right name for it.

 

20140805-2Tony Nitti, Artists Rejoice! Tax Court Concludes Painter’s Activity Isn’t A ‘Hobby’. Tony covers a Tax Court case last week where the IRS improbably went after an art professor’s Schedule C art business on hobby loss grounds.  She won the hobby loss issues, but Tony thinks she will lose other parts of her case, in which the IRS says she deducted personal expenses on her business filing.

Peter Reilly, TIGTA Must Disclose More About Investigation Of Possible IRS Release Of Koch Industries Return Information. Peter looks into whether Koch Industries is an S corporation and learns that some highly political people are humor-impaired and comically challenged.

Russ Fox, Legaspi Gets 21 Months:

Francisco Legaspi didn’t want to go to jail. Back in November 1992, he pleaded guilty to tax evasion. Instead of showing up for his sentencing in January 1993, he headed to Mexico and then Canada to avoid prison. That worked for 20 years. In 2012, the State Department found him when the Bureau of Diplomatic Security found his Facebook page. (A helpful hint to any fugitives out there: Avoid posting anything on the Internet. Law enforcement reads the Internet, too.) They forwarded his information to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police who arrested him; the Mounties always get their man.

Now he’ll serve that 21 months.

 

20141006-1Kay Bell, Estate gets $14 million tax refund on value of art. Kay’s a little giddy about her Baltimore Orioles sweeping Detroit. Now they have to face the Royals, managed by the Magic 8-ball.

Jim Maule, Do Squatters Have Gross Income? A woman moves into an abandoned house. Nobody kicks her out or demands rent. Prof. Maule ponders the implications.

Janet Novack, IRS: We Made A Mistake Valuing Michael Jackson’s Estate. They want more.

Annette Nellen, California to study alternative to current gas tax. Most gas taxes aren’t indexed, and technology is reducing gas consumption. This makes paying for roadwork more complicated.

TaxGrrrl is hosting a bunch of guest posters, including Josh Hoxie, When Income Tax Cuts Masquerade As Estate Tax RepealRebecca McElroy, Making Changes To The Tax Code Starting With The Medical Expense Deduction; and Elaine Kamarck, On The Tax Code, Time for America to Have it Our Way.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 515

 

Quotable:

There’s nothing wrong with being nostalgic unless you’re trying to do it on someone else’s dime.

-Brian Gongol, on the denial of “landmark” status for Des Moines’ dilapidated riverfront YMCA.

 

News from the Profession. Why are People in Public Accounting So Ridiculously Good Looking? (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern). If you think we’re hot, you haven’t seen the actuaries.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/26/2013: Tax loss harvest time! And: people like you to give them money.

Thursday, December 26th, 2013 by Joe Kristan


harvest
Harvest those tax losses.  
Just as millions of disappointed gift recipients rush the retailers to improve on Santa today, investors can get busy over the next few days trying to make the best of their own disappointments.  They can cash out losses on disappointing investments to shelter their 2013 gains.  Some tips to make sure you do it right:

You have to take the loss in a taxable account. A loss in an IRA or 401(k) plan doesn’t help you.

Normally the “trade date” is the effective date for tax purposes, so you can sell a stock as late as December 31 this year and still deduct the loss on your 2009 1040.

If you have a loss on a short sale, the tax law treats it as closing on the settlement date, not the trade date, so you can’t wait to the last minute to close a short sale to get a deduction.

You don’t need to overdo it.  You can deduct your capital losses only to the extent of your capital gains, plus $3000.  But if you do overdo it, individual capital losses carry forward indefinitely.

Harvesting losses helps taxpayers subject to the Obamacare/ACA Net Investment Income Tax to the extent it helps for regular taxes.

- Watch out for the wash sale rules. If you buy the same stock within the 30 days preceding or following the sale of a loss stock, your loss is disallowed. This is true even if you sell from a taxable account and buy in an IRA, according to the IRS.

Come back tomorrow for another 2013 year-end tax tip!

 

Paul Neiffer offers Some Quick Year-End Tax Tips

 

20120906-1Give away money and folks will line up.State tax credit program hits a big bump: It’s out of money, and that’s a good sign,”  reports the Des Moines Business Record:

Economic development officials in Des Moines and other Iowa cities have been told to stop sending requests for a state economic development tax credit. The reason: The fund is tapped out.

Greater Des Moines developers were told during a meeting last week with officials from the Iowa Economic Development Authority and the city of Des Moines that a tax credit program used to provide gap financing for multimillion-dollar developments has reached its $3 million annual cap on the ability to transfer the credits, a key element in financing the projects.

“Transferable” tax credits are actually subsidies. It is economically identical to giving the developers a license to factor the state’s receivables at a small discount.

Local developers, the Greater Des Moines Partnership, and state officials will press the Iowa Legislature to at least raise the $3 million cap and make adjustments that could eliminate the ranking system.

So people who want the state to give them more of our money and the state officials that give away our money want the legislature to make it easier to give away our money. What could go wrong?

 

Speaking of the people giving away our money,  State-owned Honey Creek Resort near Moravia continues to struggle financially.  (thegazette.com, via Gongol) What madness led the government to open a resort?  Maybe the same madness that makes people think the government should be allocating investment capital.

 

tf logoJoseph Henchman, Tax Foundation Wins State Tax Notes Honor, Third Year Running:

For three years running now, we have been honored as most influential in state tax policy by State Tax Notes (subscription req’d). This year, they present it as an unranked list of ten recipients. The list is five state officials, three lawyers, one legislator, and us…

Given the response of the Iowa legislature to my suggestions, I am sure that I rank among the ten least influential in state tax policy.  I wonder if there’s a prize for that?

 

Howard Gleckman,  TheTaxVox 2013 Lump of Coal Award: Wait ‘Til Next Year Edition.  He doesn’t think the Tea Party scandal was more than “merely bungling the job on a bipartisan basis.”  Given the overwhelming attention paid to the right, that’s an unsupported statement.   Mr. Gleckman is a man of the center-left; when it’s your opponents being targeted, it’s easier to conclude that it’s all fair.

 

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: When Structuring The Sale Of Your Business Goes Wrong   Tony addresses the related-party debacle of Fish v. Commissioner, where a Kansas City taxpayer generated $9 million in ordinary income when he thought he was going to have capital gains, because a partial cash-out of his business worked out to be a sale of goodwill to a related party.

Margaret Van Houten,  Do My Estate Planning Documents Need to Have Special Language to Deal with My Digital Assets?  (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Russ Fox, Nominations Due for 2013 Tax Offender of the Year.  Sadly, Russ will have plenty of worthy candidates.

 

TreeTreetreetreetreePeter Reilly offers Kind Christmas Wishes To Those Behind Bars And The Tax Collectors Too  “So when you think treeabout it, you realize that one of the reasons that Jesus was born in Bethlehem was that Joseph and Mary were tax compliant.”

Kay Bell, The Christmas tax story

Jason Dinesen, Greatest Hits: Deducting Mileage from a Home Office   

TaxProf, World Giving Index 2013: U.S. Is #1

Me, What’s new in year-end tax planning, my new post at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record’s Business Professionals’ Blog.

Career Corner. How to Choose Between Two Big 4 Offers When You Have No Clue What Either Involves (Going Concern)

 

TaxGrrrl, The True Cost Of Christmas: Santa’s Tax Bill:

Compensation is taxed to the elves as income – but Santa has taxes to pay on their behalf. Payroll taxes – at the employer contribution rate of 7.65% – for the elves work out to $1,890,927.

Santa doesn’t pay income taxes on compensation paid to the elves but he does have to manage their withholding according to any forms W-4 provided to him. Fortunately for Santa, there is no withholding requirement for state taxes in Alaska. 

I would argue the residency issue.  Technically, the North Pole is in the middle of the ocean, and I don’t believe there are territorial claims though.  Of course, with his fearsome legendary powers of retaliation, no IRS agent wanting to be on the “nice” list would mess with him.

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/4/2013: How many seconds of federal spending do you cover? And more debris from the bottom of the Fiscal Cliff.

Friday, January 4th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130104-1Spending, by the numbers.  Local radio guy Brian Gongol asks, Why do we baffle ourselves with huge numbers instead of talking about budgets in per-person terms?  Why, indeed?  You could ask 100 people on the street how much money the government spends and how big the deficit is, and you would be lucky to get the size of the budget within a trillion dollars.  The numbers are hard to comprehend.

The ability of the politicians to get away with talk about “millionaires and billionaires” proves this — a billion is 1,000 million, and while there are likely people on your street with a net worth of $1 million, you probably haven’t met anybody worth $1 billion.  They aren’t remotely the same thing.

In doing year-end tax projections for a client with a once-in-a-lifetime gain from a business sale and a huge resulting tax liability, I wondered how long his enormous (to me) liability would keep the government running.  Dividing the 2012 fiscal year spending of $3.796 trillion by the 31,536,000 seconds in a 365-day year, I figure that the federal blob spends $120,370.37 per second.  The biggest tax liability I’ve ever seen comes well short of funding 2 minutes of government operations.  I probably will never cover a second.  Where do you fit?

 

Fiscal Cliff Webinar!   I will be appearing with Roger McEowen on the “Tax Notes From the Fiscal Cliff” webinar at Noon January 14.  We will be covering the new legislation and the proposed 3.8% “Net Investment Income Tax” regulations.  Register today!

 

The IRS has published new withholding tables for the Fiscal Cliff Legislation (Accounting today)

 

Fiscal Cliff Notes:

Wall Street Journal:  Cliff Fix Hits Small Business; Many Small Entities or Firms May Face Higher Taxes This Year After the Deal

David Henderson, Pssst:  Someone tell the Republicans they won:

So here’s the big news: the anti-tax side won.  Sure, Obama would love
to raise taxes even more, especially on people making between $200K and $450K.  But now he has almost zero leverage to do that. 

I think that’s about right.  And now the President has lost his ability to distract attention from the ongoing fiscal calamity with arm-waving about “millionaires and billionaires.”

Derek Thompson, Sorry, Middle Class: In a Few Years, Your Taxes Will Have to Go Up, Too (via Going Concern).  You know, we could try spending less.  In any case, the rich guy isn’t buying.

Tim Carney: How corporate tax credits got in the ‘cliff’ deal

Katrina Trinko, Hollywood, Electric Scooters Benefit From Tax Breaks in Fiscal Cliff Bill (The Corner)

Brad Plumer, From NASCAR to rum, the 10 weirdest parts of the ‘fiscal cliff’ bill (Wonkblog, via Tyler Cowen).

Chris James, Fiscal Cliff Deal Adjust Capital Gain Rates and Qualified Dividend Rates (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Paul Neiffer, Some More Goodies Buried in the Fine Print

Kay Bell, Redefining ‘wealthy’ for tax purposes

Tax Trials, Fiscal Cliff Legislation – American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012

Patrick Temple-West, Cliff fix hits small business, and more

Nick Kasprak, 2013 Tax Brackets (Tax Policy Blog)

Roberton Williams, TPC Tax Calculator Shows What Avoiding Fiscal Cliff Means for Taxpayers (TaxV0x)

Howard Gleckman,  What the Fiscal Cliff Deal Really Means for Taxes and Spending

TaxProf,  More Fiscal Cliff Tax Commentary

 

In other news…

Jack Townsend, Wegelin & Co. Pleads Guity to Conspiracy

Lynnley Browning, Swiss bank Wegelin to close after guilty plea.  They opened in 1741.

Jason Dinesen, Tax Predictions for 2013

Trish McIntire, Disclosing Prisoner Returns

Taxdood, Intrastate iGaming: Federal Reporting and Withholding Tax Obligations

Robert D. Flach, WTF IS THIS AMT EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT?

News you can use: “Have Fun and Don’t Be Bored” (Brian Strahle)

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10,400 congresscritters?

Wednesday, December 29th, 2010 by Joe Kristan

Considering how much damage the existing 435 members of the House of Representatives cause, would we like there to be maybe 10,000 of them?
In his only speech to the Constitutional Convention, over which he presided, George Washington asked that the initial Congress add seats; he thought that 40,000-resident districts were too big, and he thought 30,000 residents per congresscritter was a better number.
The average congressional district after the new census will have about 710,000 residents. Under George’s rule, there would be around 10,400 representatives. Would we be better off with that?
Brian Gongol argues that we would. Arnold Kling argues that the failure to increase the size of the House since 1911 “is one of the factors that I argue has made the United States structurally less democratic in recent decades.”
Having fewer congresscritters means more power for those that remain. That power, and the large staffs and perks that flow from it, makes it very hard to dislodge them.

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