Posts Tagged ‘Brian Strahle’

Tax Roundup, 6/11/14: IRS Bill of Rights: just words? And: when your state got its income tax.

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

billofrightsTalk is cheap.  The North Korean constitution has a whole bunch of rights,  per Wikisource.  For example:

Article 70. Citizens have the right to work. All able-bodied citizens choose occupations in accordance with their wishes and skills and are provided with stable jobs and working conditions. Citizens work according to their abilities and are paid in accordance with the quantity and quality of their work.

Article 75. Citizens have freedom of residence and travel.

Article 78. Marriage and the family shall be protected by the State. The State pays great attention to consolidating the family, the basic unit of social life.

 

So written declaration of rights are just empty words when there is nothing behind them. That’s why I can’t get too excited about the big Taxpayer Bill of Rights announced by IRS Commissioner Koskinen and Taxpayer Advocate Olson yesterday.

Nothing to disagree with on the list, but what will the IRS do to make it more than empty words?  Going down the list:

The Right to Be Informed.  The IRS is infamously secretive.  Will they no longer require Tax Analysts to sue them to make public their positions and procedures?  Will the required compensation for S corproation employee- shareholders be only known to the whim of the examining agent?

The Right to Quality Service.  The IRS continues to get worse at answering taxpayer questions.  It seems like they are worse than ever at dealing with correspondence.  It has become nearly impossible to reach IRS personnel in D.C. by phone to ask technical questions. Is the Commissioner going to change any of this?

The Right to Pay No More than the Correct Amount of Tax.  The nearly-automatic assertion of penalties for every asserted deficiency will have to end for this to mean anything.

The Right to Challenge the IRS’s Position and Be Heard.  The consolidation of appeals offices and their seeming loss of independence will have to be reversed for this to mean something.

The Right to Appeal an IRS Decision in an Independent Forum.  See you in Tax Court…

The Right to Finality.  Does this mean IRS will enable offshore FBAR foot-faulters to come into compliance without facing financial ruin?

The Right to Privacy and The Right to Confidentiality. These are a big ones, and the IRS hasn’t been doing so well at them lately.

The Right to Retain Representation.  Yet the IRS wants to choose who gets to do this for you. When the IRS can shut down your representative, he may not be a really zealous advocate.

The Right to a Fair and Just Tax System.  This is something that the IRS can’t ultimately reach on its own — Congress designs the system — but it could sure do a lot better.  When the IRS routinely assesses $10,000 penalties for filing Form 5271 one day late, when they effectively loot foreign pension accounts of expats for inconsequential paperwork violations, it’s hard to see the fairness and justice.

Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

Other coverage:

TaxProf has a roundup.

Kay Bell, Would the newly adopted Taxpayer Bill of Rights have prevented the IRS Tea Party scandal?

Robert W. Wood, IRS Reveals Taxpayer Bill Of Rights

Joseph Henchman, IRS Approves List of Taxpayer Rights (Tax Policy Blog).  “My own addition is that much as requiring police to know and inform arrestees of “Miranda” warnings has increased awareness of those rights, so too will this.”

TaxGrrrl,  IRS Releases Much Anticipated ‘Taxpayer Bill Of Rights’  “With the wrap up of filing season, the IRS is now in its peak correspondence mailing season. This was, according to Koskinen and Olson, the perfect time to introduce the rights since they will be mailed out together with those correspondences.”

Russ Fox, IRS Adopts “Taxpayer Bill of Rights;” Will Anything Change?  “Until the IRS comes clean on the IRS scandal, what was released today makes a great sound bite but is otherwise nothing new. The IRS appears to have violated six of the ten rights, and is still stonewalling Congress on the scandal. The IRS’s budget won’t be increased because of today’s press release.”

 

Scott Drenkard, Richard Borean, When Did Your State Adopt Its Income Tax? (Tax Policy Blog):

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No, they haven’t been around forever, it just feels that way.  Wisconsin was first.

 

Jason Dinesen, Same-Sex Marriage and Amending Prior-Year Returns.  “A broader way of asking the question is: if someone who’s in a same-sex marriage amends a prior-year return that they had previously filed as a single person due to the Defense of Marriage Act, must that amended return show a filing status of married?”

Tony Nitti, District Court: Lone Sale Of Undeveloped Land Generates Ordinary Income, Jeopardizing Land Banking Transactions   

William Perez, Home Office Deduction

Keith Fogg, Government Drops Appeal in Rand Case (Procedurally Taxing).  This is the case where the Tax Court ruled that a recovery of refundable credits in excess of income tax was not a “deficiency” for computing penalties.

Jack Townsend, Reminder: Category 2 Banks Will Serve Up Their U.S. Depositors .  Consider banking secrecy dead.

Brian Strahle provides a list of state and local tax blog resources. 

 

20140611-2Alan Cole, Japan’s Tax Reforms and its Blockbuster GDP Growth (Tax Policy Blog):

Paired together, theory would predict that these two tax changes create a structural shift in the Japanese economy; the more favorable corporate tax climate would encourage investment, and some income would be spent on that new investment instead of immediate consumption. Over the long term, this will boost Japanese wealth and productivity, and eventually allow for a higher standard of living than before.

The data fit this theory so far; private nonresidential investment grew at a “blockbuster” rate of 7.6% in the first quarter of 2014. 

 

David Brunori, A Coke and a Smile and a Tax (Tax Analysts Blog). ” It would tax a can of Coke, but if you went to Starbucks and dumped five teaspoons of sugar into your latte, there would be no additional tax.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 398

Going Concern, Ex-BDO Vice Chairman Given 16 Months to Think About His Choices. He will retire to a Bureau of Prisons meditation facility.

He was ashen after the sentence was announced.  Gray man sentenced to 18 months for tax evasion

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/30/14: Gas tax increase advances. And: IRS starts to accept 1040s, but not issuing refunds yet.

Thursday, January 30th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

 

Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

They’re still trying to increase Iowa’s gas tax, reports William Petroski of the Des Moines Register:

An Iowa House subcommittee voted 5-0 today to approve a 10-cent increase in the state’s gasoline tax, although the proposal still faces steep odds of winning final approval this session.

The bill, managed by Rep. Josh Byrnes, R-Osage, would raise the fuel tax by three cents the first year, an additional three cents and following year, and four cents the third year. When fully implemented, the tax increase would generate $230 million annually for city, county and state roads.

It’s always hard to increase taxes in an election year.  There is a good argument that gas taxes are the way to pay for roads, and that Iowa’s tax needs updating, but so far Iowa’s road spending is in line with most other states, and the talk of a “crisis” isn’t convincing everyone.

 

Iowa Farmer Today, Little action expected on taxes in Legislature.  It quotes my co-presenter at the Farm and Urban Tax Schools, Roger McEowen:

McEowen, head of the Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation (CALT) at Iowa State University, says it is always possible the state might do something to clean up its tax code, but it appears unlikely this year.

“Frankly, I don’t think anything important is going to happen on taxes, not in this legislative session,” he says.

It is a sentiment echoed by many other legislative observers.

Like me.

 

 

20130419-1TaxGrrrl, IRS Accepting Returns As Part Of Test Program, Not Issuing Refunds Early

Trish McIntire, Yes, You Have to Wait.  If you haven’t received your W-2, you can’t file using your last 2013 pay stub.

Jason Dinesen, Iowa Firefighter/EMS Tax Credit.  A $50 spiff to volunteer firefighters and EMS people. One more feel-good provision that clutters up the tax law but is too small to enforce.

Brian Strahle, SALT PRACTICES: WHAT PEOPLE THINK, BUT DO NOT SAY.  “SALT” is “State And Local Taxes.”

Paul Neiffer looks at the predictably expensive and absurd farm bill: How To Make an Extra $100 Per Acre!  It brings to mind the old joke:  “How did the farmer double his income?  He bought a second mailbox.”

Related: Billionaires Received Millions From Taxpayer Farm Subsidies: Analysis (Huffington Post)

William Perez, Earned Income Credit Recipients by State

 

 

Phil Hodgen, How Many Appointments in Buenos Aires to Expatriate?  The State Department doesn’t always make it easy to shed U.S. citizenship.

Brian Strahle, FATCA and Unintended Consequences.  A story of an American in Switzerland who is losing the ability to commit personal finance because of this anti-“fatcat” legislation.

 

taxanalystslogoDavid Brunori, A Sales Tax Conundrum (Tax Analysts Blog):

The sales tax has been a blessing and a curse. One of its great virtues is that it is collected by the vendor, which then remits it to the state. Neither the taxpayer nor the tax agency has much to do except pay and collect. The vendor does the work. The success of the sales tax for the last 90 years is largely attributable to vendor collection. But if the vendor doesn’t collect and remit the appropriate tax, it is liable for the amounts. The vendor will have to pay the unremitted tax and could face severe penalties and even criminal charges.

So if a vendor is unsure about the status of an item it’s selling, it will collect the tax. Better to collect and remit tax not owed than to face the consequences of a mistake.

David notes that online vendors will have to deal with many states, with very confusing rules, and that over-collection of sales taxes is the inevitable result.  Not that the states mind.

Cara Griffith wonders, Are State Tax Authorities Hiding the Ball? (Tax Analysts Blog).  “I’ve noticed an emerging trend in some state departments of revenue – a move toward secret law. In a time when transparency has become a buzzword, some revenue departments are doing what they can to avoid transparency.”

 

William McBride, State of the Union: Corporations Continue to Flee (Tax Policy Blog)

Tax Justice Blog, Why the Business Tax Reform Proposal in Obama’s SOTU Is Not as Great as It Sounds

Kay Bell, Taxes touched on lightly in State of Union via EITC, MyRA

Joseph Thorndike, The War on Wealth Is Not New.  (Tax Analysts Blog).  True.  And it has always been dishonest, disgraceful, corrupt, and impoverishing.

 

The Critical Question.  What Happens When You Mix a Seedy Strip Club, an Unsophisticated Taxpayer and the Tax Court? (Going Concern).  I’m sure if it was one of those real elegant and distinguished strip clubs, there wouldn’t have been a problem…

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/6/2013: Fools Gold Edition. And: corporations can have their identity stolen too!

Friday, December 6th, 2013 by Joe Kristan


20131206-1
We’ve all had narrow misses with bad ideas.  For example, the general manager of the Yankees and Red Sox owner went out drinking and negotiated a trade of Ted Williams for Joe DiMaggio, only to call it off in the light of day.  Think of the time you almost went into business with your brother-in-law.  Fortunately, we usually think better of it in time to avoid disaster.

Not Robert Kahre.  He got this great idea to pay employees in gold and silver coins, which are worth far more than their original face value, while reporting the income and paying taxes at the face value.

Kahre met John Nelson (Nelson), who authored books and taught classes about the IRS and the monetary system, and Nelson’s ideas influenced Kahre to develop the payment system at issue.

According to Kahre, he developed his gold payroll system because the United States government had debauched the national currency and utilized inflation to confiscate the wealth of U.S. citizens. Kahre relied on court cases and the Gold Bullion Coin Act of 1985 that approved gold coins as legal tender. Kahre devised the independent contractor agreements to reflect that the IRS was a foreign agent for the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). In Kahre’s view, by collecting taxes for the IRS, employers illegally served as foreign agents for the World Bank and IMF. Kahre relied on several federal statutes, regulations, and “Presidential Documents” in the process of developing his payroll system to avoid the collection of taxes on behalf of foreign agents.

How do you suppose that worked out?  Well, the above description comes from a federal appeals court decision upholding a 190-month prison sentence for Mr. Kahre, if that’s any indication.   More from the decision:

Appellants contend that the district court erred in denying their motions to dismiss the indictments because they did not know that their use of gold and silver coins for payroll payments was illegal under the tax laws. Appellants specifically maintain that the district court’s tax valuation predicated on the fair market value of the gold and silver coins unfairly imputed criminal intent to their unknowing actions.

A footnote helps show why the court wasn’t persuaded (citations omitted, emphasis added.):

Appellants contend that gold and silver coins are statutorily valued at face value. However, this appeal does not really concern the statutory value of gold and silver coins when utilized as legal tender. Instead, this appeal addresses Appellants’ payment of wages in gold and silver coins in a scheme to avoid payroll taxes, as evidenced by the facts that Kahre’s employees were required to immediately return the coins for cash and, that if an employee retained the coins, his wages were reduced by the fair market value of the coins.

Oops.

The moral?  The tax law isn’t required to believe every ridiculous thing you read, and there is no Tax Fairy.

Cite: Kahre, CA-9, NO. 09-10471

 

TIGTAIt’s not just individual identity theft.  TIGTA: IRS Issues $2.3 Billion/Year in Fraudulent Tax Refunds Based on Phony Employer Identification Numbers. (TaxProf). Considering this, and the identity theft epidemic, and their worsening taxpayer service, their wish to devote resources to regulating preparers is hard to take.

 

Now there’s a shocker.  Democrats, liberals pan Gov. Terry Branstad’s flat tax idea (Jason Noble).  If you can’t get the cooperation you need to pass even a half-way plan, you can at least change the terms of the debate by going bold.

 

Jason Dinesen, Stock Losses and Taxes:

Beware of “wash sales.”  A wash sale occurs when you sell stock at a loss and then buy the same stock within 30 days before or after the sale.  (Example:  you sell Stock A at a loss on August 1 and then re-purchase Stock A on August 15.  This is a wash sale and the August 1 loss is not currently deductible but instead adjusts the basis of the stock you purchased on August 15.)

Year-end loss sales are a common tax planning move, but you need to be willing to do without the shares for 30 days.

 

Kay Bell,  Low corporate tax rates don’t guarantee more jobs.  No, but you won’t convince anybody that high corporate taxes help.’

Kyle Pomerleau, New Report on Corporate Income Taxes and Employment Doesn’t Come Close (Tax Policy Blog).  “Their conclusion is akin to blindly picking two jellybeans from a bag of 1,000, getting two red ones, and then concluding that the rest of the jellybeans in the bag must be red.”

 

Dueling cronyism.  Missouri Lawmakers to Washington: We’ll See Your $8.7 Billion, And… (Tax Justice Blog)

William Perez,  Year End Deduction Strategies for the Self Employed

 Andrew Mitchel,  New Resource Page: Monetary Penalties for Failure to File Common U.S. International Tax Forms.  They’re quite ugly.

 

Elaine Maag,  Analyzing Taxes and Transfers Together (TaxVox)

Keith Fogg,  What is a return – the long slow fight in the bankruptcy courts (Procedurally Taxing)

Jack Townsend,  Economic Substance Uncertainty in Civil Cases

Tax Trials, Supreme Court Adopts IRS Position on Jurisdiction and Application of Partnership Penalties

 

Courtesy Gateway Pundit.

Courtesy Gateway Pundit.

Fiduciary Income Tax Blog,  Valuation of Indirect Ownership Through a Trust

Brian Strahle,  UDITPA REWRITE NECESSARY, BUT WILL STATES LISTEN?

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 211

 

Robert D. Flach has a meaty Friday Buzz!

TaxGrrrl,  Flushing Out The Toilet Paper Tax Exemption   

News from the Profession.  Former CPA and Procrastinator Ordered By the State to Get Around to Removing “CPA” From All Her Stuff (Going Concern)

 

Happy St. Nicholas Day!

 

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/26/13: If they can spend your money better than you, by all means write them a check. And more!

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1I really wasn’t baiting anybody when I asked Would you trust a state legislator to spend your $54?   but Des Moines Register columnist Rekha Basu bit anyway with $54 refund would do us more good if state kept it.  This is classic (my emphasis):

Your 54 bucks might get you a dinner out, a pair of jeans, a couple of sideline tickets to a Hawkeyes football game, or some fancy bottles of wine. But consider what it could have done for the state.  The budget for fixing roads and bridges falls $215 million short of need every year. That especially riles state Sen. Joe Bolkcom, who chairs the Senate’s Ways and Means Committee. Not only could our little refunds take care of critical infrastructure repairs, but they’d create jobs in the process, points out the Iowa City senator.

You don’t matter; the state does. You’d just squander your money, but the all-wise state would unerringly direct your money to where it is most needed for the greatest good.  Just like Joe Bolkcom did when he voted for the Iowa Film Tax Credit Program, which gave tens of millions of taxpayer dollars to grifters and Hollywood sharpies before it collapsed in scandal and disgrace — but not before Rekha Basu could sing its praises:

But some benefits can’t just be measured on a dollar-for-dollar basis. The movies provide employment to local actors, construction crews, artists, caterers, drivers and a host of others. They expose non-Iowans to what the state has to offer. More intangible is the benefit of interactions in a state that can be cut off from the trends and centers of power. Not to mention the excitement factor. We’ve relied on caucuses every four years to bring action and celebrities to town. Now, sightings are anytime, any place.

 Saturday, “The Experiment” had a wrap party downtown. Brody and Whitaker were there, mingling and posing for pictures. Frank Meeink was there. The Iowan who may have inspired the 1998 “American History X” has an acting role. Deb Cosgrove, the nurse, was there. She’s been tending to the medical needs of the film’s luminaries. Casey Gradischnig, local multi-media designer, was there. He’s been working for Whitaker.

Yes, this is the sort of critical infrastructure that we should be trusting our wise leaders to fund on our behalf, so we don’t blow it on football games or bottles of wine, or groceries or medicine — all of which “creates jobs” just as much as money given by politicians to well-connected contractors or filmmakers.

Ms. Basu says she is “tempted” to return her $54.  Talk is cheap.  If she really thinks the state can spend her money better than she can, she can write a check to “Treasurer, State of Iowa,”  mark it as a donation to the state, and send it to the Department of Revenue, Attn: Courtney Kay-Decker, 1305 E. Walnut, Des Moines IA 50319.   Otherwise, she reveals that she doesn’t really trust the state to spend “her” money;  only other peoples’ money.

 

William Perez,  Strategies for Reducing the Net Investment Income Tax.  “Planning strategies for the NIIT focuses on managing adjusted gross income, managing investment income or managing both.”

I would add that many strategies that might otherwise be unwise because of Alternative Minimum Tax, like prepaying state income taxes on big capital gains, become helpful in dealing with the net investment income tax.

 

I’ve seen niftier.  Nifty Scheme Lands Five at ClubFed (Russ Fox)

 

nfl logoJeremy Scott, The NFL Is Tax-Exempt? Yes, But . . . . (Tax Analysts Blog):

Removing the league’s tax exemption would be a largely symbolic move that would raise little revenue and wouldn’t change much about how the league does business. Far more significant would be increased debate and transparency over publicly financed stadium construction and the tax favors that are doled out to keep teams from moving…

The teams themselves are taxed, and that’s where the real money is.

 

Brian Strahle, MARKET-BASED SOURCING GOES INCOGNITO:

The trend toward market-based sourcing of revenue from services has been increasing over the past several years. Some states have adopted market-based sourcing by enacting legislation, and others have imposed it by interpreting their statutes and regulations to allow it.

Legislators looove taxing non-voters.

 

Stephen Olson, Summary Opinions for 11/22/2013 (Procedurally Taxing).

TaxGrrrl, Chrysler Slows But Doesn’t Put Brakes On IPO Amid Questions Over Taxes 

Peter Reilly, Decision On Clergy Housing Tax Break Evokes Memory Of JFK .  Not a connection I would have made.

Kay Bell, Religious housing tax break deemed unconstitutional

 

Elizabeth Malm, Richard Borean, Monday Map: Adjustment of State Income Tax Brackets for Inflation (Tax Policy Blog)

20131126-1

 

Clint Stretch, Max Baucus and the Stamp Tax (Tax Analysts Blog).  I don’t think Sen. Baucus was around for the Stamp Act of 1765, but I’m not so sure about Sen. Grassley.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 201

 

Tuesday is Buzz-day at Robert D. Flach’s place!

One of these things is not like the others?  Tax Simplification, Male Prostitution, and Mormon Thrift Stores (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/8/13: Kyle Orton gets the bad news about the Tax Fairy. And: how many Lithuanians can you fit into a mailbox?

Friday, November 8th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

tax fairyKyle Orton’s old lawyer fails to find the Tax Fairy, departs the tax business.  From a Department of Justice press release:

A federal court has permanently barred Gary J. Stern from promoting tax fraud schemes and from preparing related tax returns, the Justice Department announced today.  The civil injunction order, to which Stern consented without admitting the allegations against him, was entered by Judge Robert Gettleman of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.  The order permanently bars Stern from preparing various types of tax returns for individuals, estates and trusts, partnerships or corporations (IRS Forms 1040, 1041, 1065, and 1120), among others. 

According to the complaint, Stern designed at least three tax-fraud schemes that helped hundreds of customers falsely claim over $16 million in improper tax credits and avoid paying income tax on at least $3.4 million.  Stern allegedly promoted the schemes to customers, colleagues, and business associates.  The complaint alleges that his customers included lawyers, entrepreneurs and professional football players, and some of the latter, including NFL quarterback Kyle Orton, have sued Stern in connection with the tax scheme, alleging fraud, breach of fiduciary duty and professional malpractice. 

Mr. Stern seems to have led his clients on a merry chase after the Tax Fairy, the legendary sprite who can wave her wand and make your taxes disappear.  Kyle Orton is a graduate of Southeast Polk High School near Des Moines, where the truth about the Tax Fairy apparently was not in the syllabus.

Related: Jack Townsend, Chicago Lawyer Enjoined From Promoting Fraudulent Tax Schemes 

 

20131108-1Maybe Lithuanian apartments are crowded?  USA Today reports:

The Internal Revenue Service sent 655 tax refunds to a single address in Kaunas, Lithuania — failing to recognize that the refunds were likely part of an identity theft scheme. Another 343 tax refunds went to a single address in Shanghai, China.

Thousands more potentially fraudulent refunds — totaling millions of dollars — went to places in Bulgaria, Ireland and Canada in 2011.

In all, a report from the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration today found 1.5 million potentially fraudulent tax returns that went undetected by the IRS, costing taxpayers $3.2 billion.

When your controls don’t notice something like that, you have a lot more urgent problems than regulating preparers.   Yet Congress and the Administration think the IRS is ready to take on overseeing your health insurance purchases.  What could go wrong?

Tony Nitti is moved to offer the IRS a proposition:

MR. IRS,

REQUEST FOR URGENT BUSINESS RELATIONSHIP

FIRST, I MUST SOLICIT YOUR STRICTEST CONFIDENCE IN THIS TRANSACTION. THIS IS BY VIRTUE OF ITS NATURE AS BEING UTTERLY CONFIDENTIAL AND ‘TOP SECRET’.

Heh.

 

 

S-SidewalkCosting taxpayers by not taking their money.  Tax Analysts reports ($link):

Democrats seeking to raise revenue in ongoing budget talks have circulated a list of tax preferences they would like to see eliminated, including a provision that allows some wealthy individuals to avoid large payroll taxes, the carried interest preference, and the tax break for expenses businesses incur when moving operations overseas. 

The “provision that allows some wealthy individuals to avoid large payroll taxes” is called Subchapter S.  Form 1120-S K-1 income has never been subject to payroll or self-employment tax.  This bothers the congresscritters (my emphasis):

Commonly known as the “Newt Gingrich/John Edwards” loophole, it is most often used by owners of Subchapter S corporations to avoid the 3.9% Medicare tax on earnings, which costs taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars every year.  Many S corporation shareholders receive both wages from the S corporation and a share of the S corporation’s profits, but they pay payroll tax only on their wages.

“Costs” taxpayers?  From my point of view, and from that of my S corporation clients, it saves taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars every year — but keeps it out of the hands of grasping politicians, so it’s perceived as a bad thing, by grasping politicians.

The versions of this “loophole closer” proposed in the past have been lame.  When all they have to offer on tax policy is warmed over lameness like these, they aren’t serious.

 

 

TaxProf, Brunson: Preventing IRS Abuse of the Tax System.  The TaxProf quotes a new article by Samuel D. Brunson:

The IRS can act in ways that violate both the letter and the intent of the tax law. Where such violations either provide benefits to select groups of taxpayers without directly harming others, or where the harm to taxpayers is de minimis, nobody has the ability or incentive to challenge the IRS and require it to enforce the tax law as written.

Congress could control the IRS’s abuse of the tax law. Using insights from the literature of administrative oversight, this Article proposes that Congress provide standing on third parties to challenge IRS actions. If properly designed and implemented, such “fire-alarm oversight” would permit oversight at a significantly lower cost than creating another oversight board. At the same time, it would be more effective at finding and responding to IRS abuse of the tax system and would generally preserve the IRS’s administrative discretion in deciding how to enforce the tax law.

Right now the IRS — and by extension the administration in power — can pick and choose what parts of the law it wants to apply.  For example, the current administration has chosen to allow tax credits for participants in federal insurance exchanges, which the law does not authorize, while unilaterally delaying the employer insurance mandate but not the individual mandate.  Somebody should be able to challenge this sort of fiat government.

 

More on the shutdown of Instant Tax Service, a story we covered yesterday:Irwin

Department of Justice press release: Federal Court in Ohio Shuts Down Nation’s Fourth-Largest Tax-Preparation Firm and Bars CEO from Tax-Preparation Business

 

Irwinirwin.jpgPeter Reilly, Ninth Circuit Rules Against Irwin Schiff Sentence Appeal:

Irwin Schiff is probably one of the more famous alternate tax thinkers.  His seminal work “How Anyone Can Stop Paying Income Taxes” is available in hardcover on Amazon for one cent.

Mr. Schiff appealed his sentence on tax crimes on the basis that his attorney failed to raise a “bipolar disorder” defense and what an attorney I know calls the “good faith fraud” defense — the Cheek argument that you really thought the wacky stuff you were saying is true.  Peter wisely notes:

The problem with the Cheek defense is that you have to be smart to raise it, but if you show that you are too smart, then it does not work.

Its a fine line — smart enough to spend “thousands of hours” researching the tax law, but not smart enough to avoid a massive misunderstanding of it.

 

Jana Luttenegger,  IRS Change to Use-Or-Lose Rule for FSA Accounts (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog): “New IRS rules permit employers to allow participants in a health Flexible Spending Arrangement (FSA) to carry over unused amounts up to $500 from one plan year to the next.”

 

Paul Neiffer, Trusts Get Hit with New 3.8% Tax too. And hard.

Kay Bell, It could be time to harvest capital gains and future tax savings

Rush Nigut,  Careful Planning Necessary When Using Retirement Monies to Fund Startup Business

Brian Strahle, IGNORANCE MAY NOT BE BLISS WHEN IT COMES TO ‘ZAPPERS’  These are software apps designed to hide point-of-sale receipts from the taxman.

Phil Hodgen’s Exit Tax Book: Chapter 9 – Estate and Gift Tax for the Covered Expatriate

Catch your Friday Buzz with Robert D. Flach!

TaxGrrrl,  Former NFL Star Cites Concussions, Receives Prison Sentence For Role In Tax Fraud 

Leslie Book,  TIGTA Report on VITA Errors (Procedurally Taxing)

 

Howard Gleckman,  Can Expiring Tax Provisions Save the Budget Talks? (TaxVox).  “Sadly, it is hard to see how.”

 

Not strictly tax-related, but good reading anyway:  How to Put the Brakes on Consumers’ Debt(Megan McArdle).  Megan points out the wisdom of spending less than you take in, in preference to trying to get the government to cover your shortfalls.

 

News you can use: 3 ways to screw up your next website (Josh Larson at IowaBiz.com)

News from the Profession: Failed PwC Auditor Finds Success in Burning Bridges With This Ridiculous Farewell Email (Going Concern)

 

Quick thinking.  From The Des Moines Register:

A Des Moines man awoke to find a stranger in his living room Thursday afternoon, police said. When the victim confronted the burglar, the suspect reportedly offered to mow the victim’s lawn for $5.

Guy needs to work on his pricing model.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/23/2013: The Earned income tax credit thief subsidy feature. And: tax season delayed!

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Some smart people are big fans of the Earned Income Tax Credit. Some see it as a way to help the working poor, and some see it as a less destructive way to achieve the goals of minimum wages.

Yesterday the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration reported that from 21% to 25% of the earned income credit was paid improperly for the most recent fiscal year, and that $110 to $130 billion has been “paid improperly” over the past decade. That’s a nice way of saying “stolen.”

 

EITC error chart

Just because there is a lot of theft doesn’t by itself make a program bad — though that kind of loss rate would bankrupt anybody in the private sector.   Most people would send food to starving people in a war zone knowing that local warlords will be plundering some of it. But a program that comes at the cost of sending $11 billion annually to thieves needs to otherwise be a very good thing.   That’s not so clear with the EITC.

The credit does help the working poor — as long as they stay poor. As they work their way out of poverty, it becomes a trap. The phase-out of the credit imposes a punishing unstated, but very real, marginal tax rate.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The EITC is only one program that does this; all “means-tested” welfare programs do this to some degree. It’s not uncommon for this implicit tax rate to exceed 100% at some income levels.

I don’t know what the right answer is (Arnold Kling has some ideas), but increasing the EITC, like Iowa did this year, isn’t it.

 

Oh, Goody. 2014 Tax Season to Start Later Following Government Closure; IRS Sees Heavy Demand As Operations Resume (IRS Press Release)

The IRS is exploring options to shorten the expected delay and will announce a final decision on the start of the 2014 filing season in December, Acting IRS Commissioner Danny Werfel said. The original start date of the 2014 filing season was Jan. 21, and with a one- to two-week delay, the IRS would start accepting and processing 2013 individual tax returns no earlier than Jan. 28 and no later than Feb. 4. 

20131023-1It’s funny how programming IRS computers isn’t “essential,” but barricading open-air monuments is.

Other coverage:

William Perez, IRS Expects to Delay the Start of the 2014 Filing Season

Kay Bell, IRS won’t accept 2013 tax returns until Jan. 28, 2014

Russ Fox, Sigh: 2014 Tax Season to be Delayed up to Two Weeks

TaxGrrrl, IRS Announces Delayed Start To 2014 Tax Season   

 

Robert D. Flach, HOW TO DEAL WITH THE IRS AND LIVE TO FIGHT ANOTHER DAY

Paul Neiffer,  Taxpayers Want Their Cake, Frosting and Candles! Live by the low estate-tax value, die by the low estate-tax value.

Jack Townsend, Has the U.S. Aided International Tax Evasion?

Russ Fox,  Coming Attractions: When the IRS Writes New Law When They’re Not Allowed To.  A federal judge has allowed a suit challenging the IRS unilaterally extending the tax credit for insurance purchased on state-sponsored exchanges to policies sold on federally-run exchanges.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 167

 

President Reagan signs PL 99-514, the Tax Reform Act of 1986.The Tax Policy Blog takes us on a nostalgia tour in  8 Technological Changes Since the 1986 Tax Reform.  Take a trip back to the days of “car phones.”

 

Clint Stretch, Whom Do Tax Reformers Want to Help? (Tax Analysts Blog):

When congressional leaders start talking about tax reform as if it will benefit everyone, someone should be asking: Whom are you trying to help? The answer may be Americans earning more than around $75,000 who have fewer itemized deductions, fewer kids, fewer healthcare benefits, and lower retirement savings than most.

I’m not convinced that’s the right way to look at it.  Getting rid of complexity and lowering rates helps everybody by eliminating dead weight loss and redirecting resources from tax planning and compliance to more useful pursuits.

Andrew Lundeen, A Lot Has Changed in the 27 Years Since the Last Major Tax Reform (Tax Policy Blog).  “The amount of credits, loopholes, and deductions has increase by 44 percent, from $844 billion (2013 dollars), to over $1.2 trillion (2013 dollars), with much of that growth coming from the expansion of refundable tax credits.”

 

Howard Gleckman, Congress Shouldn’t Forget About Tax Entitlements In Its Search for Deficit Reduction (TaxVox)

 

Tax Justice Blog,  Governor Scott Walker Appropriates State Budget Surplus for Campaign Season Tax Cut.  In Tax Justice World, returning money taken by force of law to the taxpayers is “appropriating” it.

 

David Brunori, Eliminating the Sales Tax Is a Very Good Idea (Tax Analysts Blog) “But ending a tax that preys on the poor and is increasingly difficult to collect may provide the economic boost Rhode Island needs.”

Brian Strahle, BLAMING THE PLAYERS FOR THE RULES.  “Regardless, most taxpayers are simply trying to comply with the maze and complexity of non-uniform multistate tax laws”

Joseph Thorndike, The Gas Tax Doesn’t Work Because Politicians Broke It (Tax Analysts Blog).  By not raising it, apparently.

 

The Critical Question:  JD Salinger – Was January 27 2010 A Good Day To Die ?  (Peter Reilly)

Career Corner.  First Round Interview Tips for This Fall’s Accounting Recruits (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 8/22/2013: Is your passport worth your business? And a prodigal mom!

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan


passport
A great post by Phil Hodgen, Why people renounce U.S. citizenship for estate tax reasons.  It’s an issue often overlooked in cheap talk of “tax cheats,” but not by those who face a tremendous hit to their family businesses from the  U.S. Estate tax:

The senior members of these families are pressuring the younger generation give up U.S. citizenship to protect against these problems. I have heard the ultimatum from the father to the son: “The business or your U.S. passport. You choose.”

I want to emphasize that I do not hear political rants from my clients, or from the other family members who must deal with having a U.S. citizen shareholder thrust upon them. Everyone I talk to is eager to travel to the United States, enjoys meeting Americans, and bears no ill will to anyone.

But faced with the prospect of destroying the family business or giving up the U.S. passport, it is no contest. The passport has to go.

40% of the value of your business, as second-guessed by the IRS, can be a high price for a passport.

 

Sorry, “Mom.”  The Tax Court yesterday found a problem with a claim for a dependent exemption:

Petitioner has failed to show that she is entitled to the dependency exemption deduction for Mr. Salako. Petitioner claimed on her 2008 return that Mr. Salako was her son. Mr. Salako was born on January 12, 1961, and was thus 47 years old at the close of 2008. Petitioner, born in 1959, is only two years older than Mr. Salako. Thus, he cannot be her biological son, and we do not find credible petitioner’s unsubstantiated testimony that Mr. Salako is her adopted son.

Decision for IRS, not surprisingly.

Cite: Golit, T.C. Memo 2013-191.

 

Scott Hodge,  Why Shouldn’t the Tax Foundation Pay Taxes?  (Tax Policy Blog):

Just 3 percent (or 6,508) of all non-profits have assets of $50 million or more. However, these organizations took in 73 percent of all non-profit revenues and commanded 81 percent of all assets held by non-profits.  

Inequality!

 

TaxGrrrl, Michael Jackson’s Estate To IRS: Beat It.  Prompting a whole generation to ask, “who’s Michael Jackson?”

 

Cara Griffith, Textbooks with Borders (Tax Analysts Blog):

Most of us have heard of doctors without borders, but has anyone heard of textbooks with borders? It’s a reality for those using Amazon’s textbook rental service. The reason for this is very likely related to Amazon’s recurring sales tax issues.

Taxes often explain seemingly bizarre behavior.

 

Kay Bell, Maryland Rep. Van Hollen sues IRS over its application of 501(c)(4) political nonprofit rules.  Good luck with that.

 

TaxProf, TIGTA: IRS May Be Violating Copyright Law on 89% of its Software.  I don’t suppose copyright violations will invalidate an assessment.

 

Missouri Tax Guy,  DOMAs Death, There Are Questions

Trish McIntire,  Rant- Keep Your Return Safe.  Certainly never send it as an unencrypted pdf attachment to an email.

Peter Reilly,  Group Claiming To Teach True Meaning Of Islam Denied Exempt Status. 

TaxProf,  The IRS Scandal, Day 105

 

The Critical Question:  WHAT DO HERNIAS AND STATE TAXES HAVE IN COMMON? (Brian Strahle)

Personal advice section: Someone Who Has Never Dated an Accountant Came Up With 15 Reasons to Date an Accountant (Going Concern)  Someone who has dated one might come up with fewer.

 

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Tax Roundup, 8/12/2013: Good intentions edition. And the mysteriously-lucrative profession of German toilet attendant.

Monday, August 12th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Good intentions don’t always mean good results.  That’s one of the lessons in Michael Schuyler’s post  Evaluating the Growth Effect of the Earned Income Credit at the Tax Policy Blog:

The Tax Foundation study concluded that while the EIC raises the incomes f low-income workers, its net result is to reduce both national output and total hours worked.  This result may seem surprising because the credit creates a strong incentive for workers with very low incomes who are within the EIC’s phase-in range to work more since each extra dollar of earnings brings a larger credit.  Unfortunately, for the larger number of low-to-middle income workers who are within the EIC’s phase-out zone, the loss of benefits with rising earnings generates a powerful deterrent against additional work effort.

 That “deterrent effect” results from the high hidden marginal tax rate on income in the EIC phaseout range:
The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The credit was invented with the worthy intention of encouraging those with the lowest incomes to find work, but it has the unintended, though predictable, effect of discouraging those who already have jobs from moving up.  It does, however, have a fine stimulative effect on grifters, as up to 25% of the credit is issued improperly (examples here and here).

 

IRS, Disclosure Authorization and Electronic Account Resolution retirement delayed three weeks.  It’s nice of them to delay making it harder for tax pros to resolve client problems.

  

Richard Doak, Salesman in Chief: Governors today focus on handing out tax ‘incentives’:

In the early days of the Republic, many states got burned by canal-building schemes and other enterprises that well-connected corporations talked state governments into financing.

By the time the Iowa constitutions were written, in 1846 and 1857, people had become wary of states getting involved with corporations. Hence the restrictions such as those in the Iowa Constitution.

Today, the restrictions are easily gotten around, and the spirit of state-corporate separation expressed in the Constitution is ignored as government rushes into entanglements.

Politicians will sell their souls for a mess of ribbon cuttings and press releases.

 

Megan McArdle, Fixing the Mandate From Hell:

I’m kind of surprised to hear a lot of liberals agree that the 30-hour rule is bad policy, and even more surprised to hear that it would be easy to repeal or reform. In fact, while I opposed the law, I find it easy to see why they designed an employer mandate for all employers who worked more than 30 hours, and difficult to imagine how it could be reformed.

Welcome to the brave new world of 29-hour per week jobs.

 

Brian Strahle,  FEAR AND UNCERTAINTY:  ARE YOU PLAYING THE “WAIT AND SEE” GAME?  “In the world of state taxes, companies are faced with vast amounts of
‘uncertainty’ when applying multiple state rules that lack conformity to  their company’s situation.”  I don’t think you need to qualify the uncertainty with scare quotes.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 95

Kay Bell, New York cop pleads guilty to identity theft, tax refund fraud

Jack Townsend, Is It the Defendant’s Burden to Prove Good Faith As a Defense to Willfulness?

Peter Reilly,  Windsor As A Precedent – Much More Than Taxes

TaxGrrrl, IRS Releases List Of Americans Hoping To Expatriate, Number Tops 1,000

Russ Fox, Once Again, Registration of a Tax Preparer Doesn’t Stop Him from Bad Behavior.   Tax preparer regulation just gives the bad ones a government seal of approval.

 

Look on the bright side! AICPA to CPA Exam Candidates: Hey, at Least You Don’t Have Kidney Stones! (Going Concern)

Flushing out tax crime.   Toilet attendant who kept £35,000 in loose change she made from tips faces tax evasion charges in Germany after investigators discover 1.4 tonne pile of coins in her garage (London Daily Mail).

It sounds like she was some sort of bathroom boss:

The website reported how the woman would drive to a number of toilets across the country in her Mercedes collecting the money.

Police started investigating the woman after she fell out with an employee.

Officers were called to one of the toilets after the pair started fighting but they later opened investigations into how the company was run after suspicions were raised.

It’s the price they pay, apparently, for not having savage unsupervised bathrooms like we deal with here.
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Tax Roundup, 8/7/2013: Tax credits! That’s the ticket! And: would low-income workers be better off without the earned income credit?

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013 by Joe Kristan
Tax Credits! - The Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

Tax Credits! – The Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

Whatever the question, some folks answer “tax credits!”   From The Des Moines Register:

A former state lawmaker says he will try to rally school, city and county associations to support legislation that would provide tax credits to those who buy empty or abandoned public buildings and create jobs.

Clarence Hoffman, a Denison Republican who served in the Iowa House from 1998 to 2008, said a Des Moines Register Reader’s Watchdog column that raised the question of what to do with abandoned schools across Iowa was the catalyst for his renewed interest in seeking the legislation.

Tax credits!  Problem solved!  Except for the new ones, like:

– Once more the tax law is more complicated, and tax enforcement resources have to be spread even thinner to keep this new credit from being a fraud magnet, like so many others.

– The price of neighboring buildings owned by private owners will be depressed by subsidies offered for the competing public property.  The credit will “solve” the problem of hard-to sell public property by taking money out of the pockets of other property owners.  Maybe Mr. Hoffman can offer still another tax credit to solve that problem.

 

Would low income taxpayers be better off with no earned income tax credit and lower tax rates?  That intriguing possibility is raised in a new Tax Foundation study of the economic effects of repealing the fraud-ridden EITCRichard Morrison discusses the study in the Tax Policy Blog (my emphasis):

The credit does help workers with very low incomes. For workers with higher earnings, the credit continues to raise incomes until it is fully phased out. The phase-out, however, does discourage workers from accepting more hours worked by reducing the amount of additional pay they would otherwise receive. As a result, our research suggests that the negative impact of the phase-out depresses the labor supply by more than the phase-in bolsters it. 

The EITC serves as a poverty trap by imposing a high hidden marginal tax rate because of the way increasing income reduces the credit.  Iowa makes the problem worse by pairing its EITC with the federal credit, leading to marginal tax rates as high as those of the highest income earners:

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

 

More from Mr. Morrison:

It is possible that tax reformers in Congress could alter the Earned Income Tax Credit in any number of ways rather than eliminating it, but in the spirit of our Economics of the Blank Slate analysis series, we modeled a scenario in which it was dropped from the code entirely. It’s important to remember, though, that our analysis also found that pairing an EITC repeal with an across-the-board tax cut would increase GDP by $125 billion per year and add 783,000 full-time jobs. Those additional opportunities would also be good for low-income workers.

But what about the poor grifters who siphon off 25% or so of the EITC?  How can we help them?

 

Jason Dinesen,  Iowa Tuition and Textbook Credit and Back-to-School Shopping

William Perez, Anspach on the Benefits of Roth IRA Conversions

Missouri Tax Guy,  Tax Planning for Freelancers: Are You Prepared?  “One of the most common mistakes that freelancers make is that they don’t properly budget for taxes.”

Peter Reilly,  Internet Password Protocol Not A Charitable Activity

 

Quotable:

With the possible exception of Uncle Sam’s continual – and often horrendous – misuse of its military prowess, no government policy in America is as uncivilized – as offensive to common decency – as destructive of property rights – as arbitrary in its justification and in its applicationas incompatible with freedom – as conducive to corruption – as downright sickening and maddening as is civil forfeiture.

Donald Beaudreax

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 90.

David Brunori, Lotteries are Winners, Except for the People (Tax Analysts Blog):

You see the lottery system is a big fat scam. It takes money from poor people. Am I the only person who finds it bizarre that the government would raise money from a regressive lottery and then celebrate by giving the money back to the poor and dispossessed in the form of scholarships?

It’s like so many government “benefits” — they take your money, and then they tell you how wonderful it is when they give some of it back.  That’s just as true for “economic development” tax credits.

 

Howard Gleckman, A Summer Update on Tax Reform (TaxVox)

Anthony Nitti, The Problem With Corporate-Only Tax Reform

TaxGrrrl, NC Lawmakers Reckon With The Three Rs: Reading, Writing & (Tax) Reform

Tax Justice Blog,  State News Quick Hits: Irresponsible Tax Promises in Gubernatorial Campaigns – and More

 

Is it really wise to smoke them?  Treating Twinkies Like Crack (Joseph Thorndike, Tax Analysts Blog)

The Critical Question:  NORTH CAROLINA TAX REFORM:  GOOD OR BAD??  (Brian Strahle)

Kay Bell, ‘Racist’ tanning tax assailed by GOP Representative. Racist?  How about plain old stupid?

 

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Tax Roundup, 7/29/2013: If the embezzler had used the money for figurines, would they sue Precious Moments?

Monday, July 29th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130729-1Blame the casino for the thief?  A Nebraska business may be taking an oddly-forgiving view towards employee theft.  The Associated Press reports that the Colombo Candy and Tobacco Wholesale Company (now there’s a product combo for everyone) declined to press charges against a former employee for allegedly stealing $4.1 million.  Instead they are suing a Casino for leading her unto temptation.

But the Nebraska Department of Revenue is less willing to let bygones be bygones, reports KETV.com:

The Nebraska Department of Revenue and the Sarpy County attorney have decided to pursue criminal charges against 54-year-old Caroline Richardson of Gretna.

Sarpy County Attorney Lee Polikov said this is a case he doesn’t see every day.

“I think it’s interesting for people to know that stolen money is considered income and has to be reported on your income tax,” Polikov said.  “If you don’t report it and don’t pay it, you’ll be prosecuted for it.”

In a civil filing where Richardson is identified as “Jane Doe,” Colombo Candy argued the blame should be less on Richardson and more on an Iowa Casino.

A more cynical view would be that the candy company knows that the accused thief has no money, so it’s going for the deep pockets.

 

Paul Neiffer, Help Prevent SE tax on CRP Rents!  Paul wants CRP recipients to help fund an appeal of the recent Tax Court Morehouse case, holding CRP income to be self-employment income.

The Morehouse case needs be appealed because the case sets a bad precedent for all owners of CRP across the country. Anyone who fails to treat CRP as self-employment income is subject to penalty for underpayment of Federal tax.

However, appeals cost money, and the dollars at risk for Morehouse personally (only $6,000) just aren’t enough for him to justify paying for the appeal. It is important enough that I want to spread the word, and request my readers who have ground in CRP to share in the cost.

If you have CRP ground and want to help the cause, Paul tells you how.

 

TaxGrrrl, Bolt Strikes At Diamond League Games, Says UK Races Hinge On Tax Laws 

Usain Bolt said he wouldn’t race in the U.K. after the Olympics unless they changed their tax laws… and they did, extending the laws in place for the Olympics for the Diamond Games.

Tough luck if you aren’t famous, I guess.

 

Phil Hodgen is launching Web-Based Seminar: U.S. Tax Solutions for Non-Filers Abroad.  It looks like a great resource for the innocents abroad caught up in the FBAR fiasco.

 

Jack Townsend,  Must a Defendant Prove Innocence of Uncharged Crime to Reverse Wrongful Conviction?  That’s insane.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 81.  They’ll keep calling it a “phoney” scandal, but the Inspector General still says otherwise.  So did the President, until it became awkward.

Instapundit:

JACK LEW:  There’s No IRS Scandal, But I Won’t Say Whether I Talked To Wilkins About Targeting.

Those who keep saying there’s no scandal here need to acknowledge that the IRS admitted targeting conservative groups months ago.

 

Kay Bell, Scholarships and grants get better grades than borrowing and tax breaks as ways to pay college costs

William Perez, IRS Update for July 26, 2013

 

Joseph Henchman, Massachusetts to Have Second Highest Cigarette Tax, Rare Tax on Computer Services, Higher Gas Tax (Tax Policy Blog)

Brian Strahle, RECENT CALIFORNIA LLC FEE ISSUES AND WARNING FOR NONFILERS:  HERE COMES THE NOTICE!!  California is looking for nickels under your sofa cushions.

 

Christopher Bergin, Our Secretive Senate. (Tax Analysts Blog).  Not a fan of the 50-year memory hole for tax reform ideas.

Peter Reilly, Why Tax Reform Is Impossible

 

Jim Maule, Tax Law and National Defense: Hush Now!

Linda Beale, Proposals for Cutting the IRS Budget.

 

Janet Novack, U.S. Seeks PNC, Wells Fargo, JP Morgan Records To Find Tax Cheats–From Norway   Look out, Decorah.

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