Posts Tagged ‘Caffeinated Thoughts’

Tax Roundup, 3/2/16: It’s your fault. You trusted us! And: don’t get phished.

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016 by Joe Kristan

coupling20160213Insults always convince the insulted. Those dumb small businesses, thinking Congress and the legislature would do what they have been doing every year. That’s apparently the take of Iowa Senator Robb Hogg, reports the Caffeinated Thoughts blog:

State Senator Robb Hogg (D-Cedar Rapids) was very critical of small business owners and farmers who have contacted their legislators urging their support on coupling with federal tax changes which encourage growth in Iowa’s economy. Even worse, Senator Hogg shifted the blame from the inaction of Senate Democrats to Congress.

“I understand there are a lot of big crocodile tears being shed over this issue,” Hogg said. “Congress is to blame.”

“Those investment decisions have been made and maybe people had this belief that it might or would happen, but that doesn’t justify their claim that they were counting on it.”

Congress has renewed the higher Section 179 limit every year since 2009, and Iowa has coupled with the $500,000 limit since 2010. There was no indication that Iowa would do anything different until the Governor said otherwise in January. Either way, it’s still a big tax increase just as the ag economy is sagging.

I’ll also add that Sen. Hogg misuses the term “crocodile tears.” Per phrases.org.uk:

Meaning

To weep crocodile tears is to put on an insincere show of sorrow.

Origin

The allusion is to the ancient notion that crocodiles weep while devouring their prey. Crocodiles do indeed have lachrymal glands and produce tears to lubricate the eyes as humans do. They don’t cry with emotion though. Whatever experience they have when devouring prey we can be certain it isn’t remorse.

There’s nothing insincere about the sorrow of finding your taxes increased. The term is better reserved for someone who says, gee, too bad we need to take more of your money, but we sure do need to spend it.

Still, the tactic of criticizing your constituents is an interesting approach. It does seems to work on a national level lately.

 

Kay Bell, March arrives not as lion or lamb, but as a fish phish:

In this latest phishing ploy, one of several the IRS has seen surging this tax-filing season, the faux corporate execs are asking for payroll data, including W-2 forms that contain Social Security numbers and other personally identifiable information.

“This is a new twist on an old scheme using the cover of the tax season and W-2 filings to try tricking people into sharing personal data. Now the criminals are focusing their schemes on company payroll departments,” warns IRS Commissioner John Koskinen.

“If your CEO appears to be emailing you for a list of company employees, check it out before you respond,” adds Koskinen. “Everyone has a responsibility to remain diligent about confirming the identity of people requesting personal information about employees.

Just this morning I got an email from someone I never heard of with a heading: “W2 Information EIN: 13-2655998.” Don’t click on this sort of thing. It’s bad news.

 

Kristine Tidgren, A New Farm Year Begins: Pay Taxes and Perfect Landlord’s Lien! (AgDocket)

Hank Stern, Aetna joins the parade (InsureBlog):

Aetna, and its Coventry affiliate, becomes the next major player to cry “no mas” on new business. In email this morning:

We will not pay commissions for sales with coverage effective dates after March 1, 2016, and continuing through December 31, 2016 effective dates.  This applies to on- and off-exchange business.”

If an insurance company doesn’t pay commissions, it’s a safe bet that they aren’t making money on the product.

Robert Wood, To Fight IRS Tax Bills, Go Step By Step

 

William Perez, Tax Advice for Cannabis Entrepreneurs. Interestingly juxtaposed with another post:

20160302-1 copy

It’s certainly conceivable that someone could find both posts useful.

 

Jason Dinesen, Sometimes I Wish I Could Just Prepare 1040-EZs.

 

 

Scott Drenkard, Celebrating 75 Years of Facts & Figures (Tax Policy Blog):

Today we released the 2016 edition of Facts & Figures, our pocket- and purse-sized booklet on quick tax facts. This publication has a long history—it dates back to 1941, when our think tank (which was just four years old at the time) published a booklet that was both a source of otherwise hard-to-find government data, and also a treasure trove of infographics to illuminate that information.

The Tax Foundation continues to be a valuable source of tax data and analysis, even though some folks don’t like the math.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1028

Renu Zaretsky, What comes after a big night for Clinton and Trump? The TaxVox headline roundup covers the Super Tuesday results and other tax news.

News from the Profession. FLASH: Sales, Accounting Personnel Face Pressure to Meet Revenue Goals (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

xx

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