Posts Tagged ‘corporate welfare’

Tax Roundup, 10/29/14: Iowa Business Tax Climate worsens. And: Ex-IRS man does a Reddit AMA.

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

41st out of 50. Iowa reclaimed its bottom-10 standing among the states in the 2015 Tax Foundation Business Tax Climate Index released yesterday. Iowa’s standing fell one spot from 2014.

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The Tax Foundation report mentions Iowa’s highest-in-the-nation corporation tax rate, its high individual rates, and its complicated tax system.  Iowa was rated as having the second-worst corporation tax system.

The Tax Foundation explains how the worst states got that way:

The states in the bottom ten suffer from the same afflictions: complex, non-neutral taxes with comparatively high rates. New Jersey, for example, suffers from some of the highest property tax burdens in the country, is one of just two states to levy both an inheritance and an estate tax, and maintains some of the worst structured individual income taxes in the country.

Even though Iowa’s complex and dysfunctional income tax is a long-standing embarrassment, it has been a non-issue in the current race for Governor. While he has occasionally said Iowa needs a better tax code, Governor Branstad’s administration has more avid about handing out tax credits to buy ribbon-cuttings than about fixing a tax law that burdens businesses lacking the pull to swing special deals. The tax law as it is seems to suit the Governor’s needs well enough now.

His opponent, Senator Hatch, is a big beneficiary of tax credits in his development business. As he makes a good living out of the tax law, he is an unlikely candidate for tax reform.

The report does hold out hope. North Carolina’s ranking jumped from 44th to 16th as a result of reforms enacted this year. If they can do it, maybe Iowa can too. The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan, which would eliminate the corporation tax and drastically reduce individual rates by getting rid of Iowa’s rats nest of politically-convenient deductions and credits, would be a great place to start.

Other coverage:

TaxProf, 2015 Business Tax Climate: Chilliest in Blue States

Russ Fox, The 2015 State Business Tax Climate Index: Not Much Has Changed

 

20120906-1David Brunori, Yes, More Problems with Tax Incentives (Tax Analysts Blog):

People who have studied tax incentives know everything that’s wrong with them: They don’t work (companies choose where to locate for other reasons); they’re unfair (some companies get them, others don’t, and their benefits inure to the haves rather than the have-nots); they’re inefficient (government bureaucrats can’t make decisions better than the market). There are many more.

We also know why politicians support incentives, despite the mountains of criticism from people who know of what they say. Traditionally, it comes down to fear and greed. No politician wants to lose a company on his watch. Similarly, every politician wants to cut the ribbon opening a new plant. Then there is just cowardice. Taking a stand on principle is a rare commodity.

Indeed.

 

Iowa saved from giving away $30 million in corporate welfare. Iowa loses $1.4 billion fertilizer plant to Illinois (Des Moines Register) “Previous news reports have said both Iowa and Illinois offered Cronus tax incentives of about $30 million.”

 

William Perez, How Saving for Retirement Can Reduce Your Taxes

Robert D. Flach reports on THE SAVER’S CREDIT NUMBERS FOR 2015. This is an underused credit that rewards frugality by lower-income taxpayers.

Jason Dinesen, IRS Oops on E-Services E-mail. “That’s quite a mistake to “inadvertently” send an e-mail to practitioners, implying that online services were available again when they really aren’t. Especially since the IRS doesn’t intend to send a follow-up retraction to all of us who got the original e-mail.”

Jim Maule, How Not to File a Tax Court Petition “First, stand in line and get that hand-stamped postmark. Second, avoid the need to learn the first lesson by treating the petition as due EIGHTY days after it is mailed. That provides a cushion of time, an allowance for unforeseen circumstances, and contingency insurance.”

Jack Townsend, IRS CI Modifies Its Policy Regarding Forfeitures for Structuring on Bank Deposits for Legal Source Deposits.

TaxGrrrl, IRS Announces PTIN Renewals, Registration For Voluntary Certification

Peter Reilly, There Is An Accountant Art Expert – Who Knew?

Kay Bell, Desert island bipartisanship, sort of, on new reality TV show. Apparently a reality show left two Senators stranded on a desert island for six days. A good start.

 

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Howard Gleckman, Is There Any Chance Congress Will Pass Business Tax Reform Next Year? (TaxVox). “The chances are not zero. But the odds are very long.”

William McBride, White House Claims U.S. Effective Corporate Tax Rate is Competitive (Tax Policy Blog). Yes, the way the Giants were competitive last night in Kansas City.

 

News from the Profession. Things You Should NOT Say to a Brand New CPA (Leona May, Going Concern).

 

Recently-retired IRS agent Michael Gregory did an “ask me anything” on Reddit. It apparently didn’t impress everyone, if this report is to be believed:

Gregory accused Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA), who has been leading the investigation of IRS misdoings, of playing politics with IRS funding, which led one Reddit user to offer a “summary” of Gregory’s comments:

From what I’ve seen so far

Lerner did nothing wrong
Darrel Issa is the devil
Throw more money at the IRS
Lack of criminal charges proves everything was just peachy and not politically driven
It’s all congress’ fault
Patriots pay taxes
The flat tax will let evil millionaires kill and eat babies

The IRS couldn’t ask for a better ‘leaker’

Other Reddit users agreed, with one complaining, “[Gregory] might as well have titled this AMA ‘having left the IRS, I am free now to reveal the IRS would be perfect if Congress just paid us more.’ I get that the IRS may be underfunded but this leaker might as well be an IRS lobbyist.”

The IRS seems to have taken the funding issue into its own hands.

 

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Tax Roundup, 8/25/14: Tax Credits for not killing a puppy. Well, another puppy. And: mind your spelling!

Monday, August 25th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Flickr Image courtisy Llima under Creative Commons license

Flickr Image courtesy Llima under Creative Commons license

Wisconsin finds a new frontier in incentive tax credits.  From madison.com:

The board overseeing the state’s flagship job-creation agency has quietly approved a $6 million tax credit for Ashley Furniture Industries with a condition allowing the company to eliminate half of its state workforce.

As approved by the Wisconsin Economic Development Corp. board, the award would allow the Arcadia-based global furniture maker to move ahead with a $35 million expansion of its headquarters and keep 1,924 jobs in the state.

Stop me with tax incentives, or I’ll fire some more people!

Of course, all of these tax credits are paid for by people who, by definition, aren’t getting their taxes wiped out with special tax breaks that allow politicians to show up for a ribbon cutting.  Politicians know that they’ll get attaboys for “creating jobs,” and nobody will call then out for the jobs they cost by taxing people to give money to their special friends.

Thanks to an alert reader for the tip.

Related: IF TRUTH IN ADVERTISING APPLIED TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCIES

 

Peter Reilly reports on tax pro who thinks a case we discussed last week may have been wrongly decided.  I think the court probably got it right, but it’s a good read.  If the taxpayer wins on appeal, it will be very helpful for tax planning.

 

Does that make this a tax shelter?

Does that make this a tax shelter?

Audit the Pope, then?  New Tax Head Says She Knows Why Italians Don’t Pay Taxes: They’re Catholic (TaxGrrrl)

Kay Bell, Coverdell Education Savings Account’s pre-college options.

Jason Dinesen, Bridging the Gap Between What Clients Want … And What They’ll Pay For. “Sure, people “want” a proactive approach. But it seems to me like few are actually willing to PAY for the service.”

Russ Fox, Tax Preparers Behaving Badly, “There’s a common thread among these tax professionals: You’ll be getting a refund. That sounds good until you realize that you really shouldn’t have, and that you will likely get in trouble later.”

Robert D. Flach,  OOPS! THEY DID IT AGAIN.  “The State wants taxpayers, and preparers, to submit income tax returns electronically – but when they do the returns and payments therefor are not properly processed.”

Jack Townsend, Criminal Justice Article of U.S. Global Tax Enforcement

Tony Nitti, Your Complete Guide To Every Tax Reference In ‘The Simpsons’ Marathon 

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 473

Ajay Gupta, Carbon Taxes and the White Man’s Burden (Tax Analysts  Blog):

 China, which surpassed the United States as the world’s largest emitter of CO2 in 2006, has made it clear that it has no intention of agreeing to any reduction quotas “because this country is still at an early stage of development.” India, which now ranks third, behind China and the United States in total CO2 emissions, has similarly rejected the notion of subjecting itself to binding reductions.

Yet the carbon tax lobby in the West remains unfazed in the face of this repudiation of responsibility by the developing world. Among the grounds advanced for pressing ahead with unilateral action is one that relies on the residence time of CO2. For several decades, the West pumped much more CO2 into the earth’s atmosphere than China, India, or any other developing county. Unilateralists argue that those historical emissions and their persisting warming effects ensure that the West will remain the largest contributor to climate change for years to come.

That argument has more than a whiff of reparations.

Frack away.

 

2140731-3Matt Gardiner, Kinder Morgan Doesn’t Want to Be a Limited Partnership Anymore–But They’re One of the Few (Tax Justice Blog).  Paying one tax is better than paying two, other things being equal.

William McBride, More Jobs versus More Children:

I, like most humans, think that children are blessing. I am also one to think we as a society should have more kids. I also think that in the very long run, say decades, demographics are destiny, i.e. we cannot expect to be a large, flourishing economy a generation from now if our birth rate continues to be at or below the replacement rate.

However, boosting the birth rate is not as simple as boosting the child credit. 

Not every problem can be solved with a tax credit.

 

Howard Gleckman, How Much Would An Individual Tax Rate Cut Add to the Deficit, and Who Would Benefit? (TaxVox).  “A one percentage point across-the-board reduction in tax rates would add $662 billion to the budget deficit over 10 years—about $40 billion in 2015 rising to more than $85 billion by 2024.”

 

Donald Boudreax is not a happy taxpayer:

 I pay what I “owe” in taxes not because I have a “responsibility” to do so but, instead, only because government threatens to use violence against me if I don’t pay what it demands.  I stand in the same relation to the tax-gatherer as I stand in relation to any common thug who points a gun, knife, or fist at me demanding my money.  [I actually prefer the common thug, for he neither insults my intelligence by telling me that his predation is for my own good nor spends the money he takes from me to fund schemes to further interfere in my life.] 

I suppose that illusion-free approach probably applies to most of us, if you think about it.

 

Career Corner.  Use All Your Vacation Days, Even If It Means Making Less Money (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

dictionarySpelling is important.  Even for identity theives.  From Dispatch.com:

A $3.5 million bogus tax-refund scheme that unraveled because the conspirators couldn’t spell the names of well-known cities has resulted in a federal-prison sentence of more than eight years for the scam’s mastermind.

Sims and Towns misspelled the names of several cities when they listed return addresses, including “Louieville” and “Pittsburg.” That caught the attention of Internal Revenue Service investigators.

I love how they call somebody who committed a stupid crime in a stupid way — and showed up for a sentencing hearing drunk, apparently —  a “mastermind.”

 

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Tax Roundup, 6/12/14: Tax Credits run for governor. And: bad day for IRS in CRP tax case?

Thursday, June 12th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120906-1Crony tax credits have become an issue in Iowa’s race for Governor, reports The Des Moines Register:

The Republican Governors Association is out today with another TV ad attacking Jack Hatch.

The new ad accuses Hatch of sponsoring legislation to increase the availability of development tax credit while applying for tax credits for a real-estate project in Des Moines.

“Jack, isn’t that a conflict of interest?” the narrator asks.

It’s true that Mr. Hatch has been a successful player in the tax credit game.  It may be the merest coincidence that an awful lot of tax credits go to political insiders like Mr. Hatch and the spouse of Governor Branstad’s opponent in his first election.  But that’s not the way to bet.

While I’m all for anything that spotlights the inherent corruption of targeted tax credits, the Republican Governors Association may be inadvertently bringing friendly fire uncomfortably close to its own man.  For starters, the Governor is a five-term incumbent. If the system is set up to be played by political insiders, the Governor has had plenty of time to do something about it.

More importantly, political insiders can benefit richly from crony tax credits without claiming them on their own tax returns.  They benefit by claiming credit for the “jobs” generated by well-connected businesses that play the system to get the tax credits.  The Governor has played this game tirelessly.  Just off the top of my head

The $80 million+ in tax breaks for fertilizer companies.

The sales tax giveaway to the NASCAR track in Newton.

The rich tax breaks for data centers.

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Governor Branstad, pre-mustache

In deals like this, the politicians claim credit for the jobs “created,” with no regard whether the lucky recipients of the breaks would have behaved differently without them, or for the jobs lost by other companies who compete with the winners for resources and customers, or for the jobs that would have been created had the funds been left with taxpayers to use without direction from politicians.

So yes, Governor, by all means call down the artillery on crony tax credits.  Just be sure to keep your helmet on.

Related:

The joys of cronyism

LOCAL CPA FIRM VOWS TO SWALLOW PRIDE, ACCEPT $28 MILLION

Governor’s press conference praises construction of newest great pyramids

 

20130114-1Roger McEowen, Eighth Circuit Hears Arguments in CRP Self-Employment Tax Case. “It would appear that the oral argument went well for the taxpayer.” 

Jana Luttenegger,  IRS Releases Taxpayer Bill of Rights.  “ These rights have always existed, but now the IRS has put the rights together in a clear, understandable list to be distributed to taxpayers.”  If they’ve always existed, they sure haven’t always been respected.

Peter Reilly, Your Son The Lawyer Should Not Be Your Exchange Facilitator.  Peter talks about the case I mentioned earlier this week, including another issue I left out.

 

Tax Justice Blog, Reid-Paul “Transportation Funding Plan” is No Plan at All:

Instead of taking the obvious step of fixing the federal gas tax, Reid and Paul propose a repatriation tax holiday, which would give multinational corporations an extremely low tax rate on offshore profits they repatriate (profits they officially bring back to the United States). The idea is that corporations would bring to the United States offshore profits they otherwise would leave abroad, and the federal government could tax those profits (albeit at an extremely low rate) and put the revenue toward the transportation fund.

Yeah, not a real fix.

Scott Hodge, Likely “Solutions” to Highway Trust Fund Shortfall Violate Sound Tax Policy and User-Pays Principle (Tax Policy Blog)

 

No Walnut STAndrew Lundeen, Higher Marginal Tax Rates Won’t Improve the World (Tax Policy Blog). “The Upshot and Dave Chappelle may be right that for someone with a $100 million that next dollar might not means as much as the first dollar. But that money doesn’t sit collecting dust. It is invested in the broader economy.”

Howard Gleckman, Did Multinationals Use a Foreign Earnings Tax Holiday To Burnish Their Financials Rather Than Reduce Taxes? (TaxVox)

Keith Fogg, Supreme Court’s Decision on Monday in Arkison Could Impact Kuretski Case and Constitutionality of the Removal Clause for Tax Court Judges (Procedurally Taxing)

Jack Townsend, BDO Seidman Personnel Sentenced for B******t Tax Shelter Promotion 

Kay Bell, NBA beats NHL in this year’s jock tax championship 

 

TaxGrrrl, Waffle House Refuses To Allow Waitress To Keep $1,000 Tip   

 

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Tax Roundup, 6/10/14: When doing a like-kind exchange, keep the kids away. And: Iowa biofuel credit claw-backs?

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120511-2Keep your friends close, and your relatives far away.  The tax law often assumes that any financial transaction between relatives is untrustworthy.  Many transactions that work just fine with a stranger become tax disasters when family is involved.  A New York man got a hard education in this yesterday in Tax Court.

The man was selling property at a $1.5 million gain, and he wanted to use the Section 1031 “like-kind exchange” rules to defer the gain by using the proceeds to acquire new property.  The tax regulations let you do so under the right facts as long as you follow rules on escrowing funds or using a “qualified intermediary,” and you meet deadlines for identifying and closing on the new “replacement property.”

For example (a very simplified example), if you sell an investment property and the proceeds are held by a “qualified intermediary,” and you identify the property within 30 days and close on it within 180 days, using the funds held by the intermediary in the purchase, the gain on the original property is transferred to the new property, to be only recognized if and when that property is sold.  But the IRS insists you go by the book.

These deals only work if you use a “qualified” intermediary.  The taxpayer in this case used his son.  Game over, said the Tax Court:

Petitioner acknowledges that there was no direct exchange of like-kind property; property A was sold and property B was purchased with proceeds from the sale of property A. Petitioner also acknowledges that the intermediary used in the transaction was his son. However, petitioner asserts that he meets the requirements of the regulation’s safe harbor because (1) his son is an attorney; (2) the funds from property A were held in an attorney trust account; and (3) the real estate documents refer to the transaction as a section 1031 exchange. We do not accept petitioner’s argument. The regulation is explicit: A lineal descendant is a disqualified person, and the regulation makes no exception based on his/her profession. Consequently, petitioner’s disposition of property A and subsequent acquisition of property B is not a deferred exchange within the purview of section 1031, and he must recognize income on the gain from the sale of property A.

There are a number of reputable firms that specialize in serving as intermediaries and escrow agents in like-kind exchanges.   They can make a potentially complicated deal go much more smoothly.  And they are probably not your son. Yes, they charge for their services, but when a $1,512,000 taxable gain is at stake, as it was here, it can be a real bargain.

Cite: Blangiardo, T.C. Memo 2014-110.

 

In other legal news, the Supreme Court declined to hear Wells-Fargo’s appeal of a 2013 decision striking down a lease tax shelter designed to generate a $423 million capital loss.

 

20120906-1Iowa wants some tax credits back.  Agweek reports:

 The Iowa Department of Revenue has warned at least one investor who owns shares in Energae LP of Clear Lake, Iowa, that tax credits for the company’s green energy production couldn’t be verified for 2012, and the credits must be paid back.

In a letter dated May 20, 2014, David Keenan, a revenue examiner for the compliance division of the Iowa Department of Revenue, told an unidentified taxpayer from Iowa to pay back $1,131.73. Victoria Daniels, public information officer for the agency, declined to comment on what might have disqualified the credits, or whether the denial affects only 2012. She also declined to comment on whether the department’s decision was focused on just one audited person or whether it will be extended to others who used the credits.

The Department has clawed back credits in cases where ethanol producers have failed or otherwise not met the requirements for the credits.

The article shows that the state subsidies encourage careless investing.  An attorney in a lawsuit on the matter is quoted:

“They offered a dollar-for-dollar tax credit, so people thought, ‘How can you lose?’ They may find out. I hope things come to a head soon because it seems to me there’s a lot of confusion and misinformation in the investing public. I think there needs to be some clarity.”

While this is only one side of the story, it’s easy to see where an investor might overlook due diligence when a “dollar-for-dollar tax credit” makes the deal seem like a free play.

 

The Onion is a satirical publication, but it’s hard to tell sometimes:   States Now Offering Millions In Tax Breaks To Any Person Who Says ‘High-Tech Jobs’

ST. PAUL, MN—In an effort to spur their local economies, many state governments are now offering tens of millions of dollars in tax breaks to any person who simply says the words “high-tech jobs,” according to a survey by the Pew Research Center published Monday. “We must do what it takes to draw potential innovators to the great state of Minnesota, which means granting lucrative tax credits and loan guarantees to any individual—whoever they may be—who utters the phrase ‘high-tech jobs’ in any context whatsoever,” said Minnesota governor Mark Dayton, whose office has reportedly joined numerous other states in doling out tax exclusions, low-interest municipal loans, full income tax exemption for 10 years or more, and other valuable incentives to thousands of people who have spoken such phrases as “biotech,” “innovation center,” “high-skilled workers,” and “tomorrow’s economy.”

If the story were written about Iowa, the magic words would include “renewables,” “wind-energy,” and “fertilizer.”

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 397.  The stories today mostly cover a huge illegal transfer of confidential 501(c)(4) taxpayer data to the FBI.  The House committee investigating the Tea Party scandal revealed  communications between Lois Lerner and FBI representatives arranging the illegal transfer.  This is a big deal, making it clear that the activities involving Ms. Lerner weren’t accidental, and were far more sinister than the “phony scandal” crowd would have you believe.

Russ Fox, Perhaps This Is Why Lois Lerner Is Taking the Fifth.  “Based on what I just read, if anyone is expecting the IRS’s budget to increase this year, well, that has as much chance as it snowing here in Las Vegas tomorrow. (The high is expected to reach just 105 F.)”

Leslie Book, Exploding Packages and IRS Disclosure of Confidential Tax Return Information (Procedurally Taxing)

 

Robert D. Flach brings your fresh Tuesday Buzz!

Kay Bell, Lowest U.S. property tax bill? Probably $2 in coastal Georgia

 

Jack Townsend, Court Holds Online Poker Accounts are FBAR Reportable:

The two issues were:  (1) whether the accounts with the three entities were “bank, securities or other financial account[s]” that must be reported on an FBAR; and (2) whether each of the three accounts was in a foreign country  The Court answered both questions yes.

A potentially expensive result for a lot of folks, if it holds up.

 

Gerald Prante, Deductions for Executive Pay Is Not a Subsidy. (Tax Policy Blog)  “Essentially, IPS and ATF are starting from a baseline that assumes all executive pay should be capped at $1 million and any deviation from this is a subsidy.”

 

taxanalystslogoJeremy Scott, Whistleblower Highlights Undue Influence at the IRS (Tax Analysts Blog)  “He claimed that granting credits for the use of black liquor was opposed by most of chief counsel, but that a few senior managers changed the policy, allowing paper manufacturers to take advantage of a true tax loophole.”

But we are supposed to trust them to regulate preparers without fear or favor.

 

Tax Justice Blog, State News Quick Hits: Keeping Score? Real Tax Reform 0. Tax Cuts 2

Martin A. Sullivan, How Not to Tax the Rich (Tax Analysts Blog).  “The liberal case for corporate taxation has been severely weakened by capital mobility.”

Renu Zaretsky, Repatriation, Havens, and Tax Reform Abroad.  The TaxVox daily headline roundup talks about extenders, tax havens and the costs of repatriation tax holidays.

 

Peter Reilly, Confidence Games – How The Most Prestigious Accounting Firms Raided The Treasury: 

 Now thanks to Tanina Rostain and Milton C. Regan, Jr. you can read all about it in “Confidence Games – Lawyers, Accountants, and the Tax Shelter Industry”. It is a sad story with no heroes and only one villain, who is colorful enough to be engaging – Paul Dauugerdas, who is still awaiting sentencing on his second conviction (He got a do-over on his trial due to juror misconduct).  The book is a must read for all tax professionals and others may enjoy it too.  

Sounds like a buy to me.

 

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Tax Roundup, 6/3/14: The joys of cronyism. And why Warren’s math is off.

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

 

20120906-1When states “target” tax breaks, the little guy gets caught in the crossfire.  That’s the conclusion of a terrific new study on why special tax favors to special friends of the government hurt state economies and corrode good government.  The paper, by the free-market think-tank Mercatus Institute, is the best distillation of the case against luring businesses with special tax favors.

The study describes how big companies skillfully play state politicians for subsidies.  It shows how Wal-Mart has received at least 260 special tax breaks worth over $1 billion.  It describes the $370 million in North Carolina subsidies to Apple to create a whopping 50 jobs — $7.4 million each.  These come at the expense of small companies who pay full-ride on their tax bill as they lack the lobbyists and clout to play the system.

It discusses how the only way states can make a case for their special breaks is to ignore opportunity costs.  States assume that money spent to lure a well-connected company would otherwise be buried or something, generating no economic activity.  As the study says, “Labor and capital are scarce resources and they are rarely left idle.”  It’s a point Tax Update readers may be familiar with.

The study notes how the subsidies hurt the companies who don’t get the benefits, even if they are not direct competitors of the corporate welfare recipients: “When new companies receive extra money to invest, they raise the price of capital and drive up wages, which imposes an additional cost on unsubsidized companies in the state.”  This refutes the fallacy that “Smith’s tax credit doesn’t cost Jones a cent.”

microsoft-apple

They also point out how targeted tax breaks create a crony culture in statehouses.  The study cites the example of Texas (citations omitted, emphasis added):

As companies direct more of their resources to securing special benefits, they need more people who can lobby or who have other rent-seeking skills.  There is already a whole industry of “location consultants,” some of whom demand a commission of up to 30 percent on the subsidies that they can negotiate with local governments.  Consultant G. Brint Ryan in Texas is a good representative of this industry.  Texas allocates corporate benefits exceeding $19 billion per year, more than any other state.  Ryan realized the profit opportunity in serving as a consultant to companies seeking to obtain these benefits.  He has since secured benefits for ExxonMobil, Samsung, and Wal-Mart, among others.  Ryan also illustrates the importance of having political networks for securing targeted benefits.  In 2012, the Texas legislature set up a commission to evaluate the impact of state investments in development projects.  Ryan, who donated more than $150,000 to the campaign of the state’s lieutenant governor, was appointed to the commission by the lieutenant governor.

The same dynamic is playing out in Iowa, as the economic development bureaucracy has spawned a cottage industry of attorneys and consultants to tap into taxpayer funds.

What should states do?  The report says:

Four policy implications for state governments follow from our analysis:

- Allow for current targeted benefits to expire, and abolish state programs that grant them on a regular basis.

- Make sure that targeted benefits cannot be granted by individual policymakers on an ad hoc or informal basis

- Broadly lower tax rates to encourage company investments and obtain a more efficient allocation of resources.

- Cooperate with other states to form an agreement about dismantling targeted benefits.

Sounds a lot like The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.

Other coverage:

Joe Carter, How Enterprise Zones Lead to Cronyism

Kenric Ward, Study: Cronyism Increasingly Lucrative for Politicians and Businesses

Related:  Governor’s press conference praises construction of newest great pyramids.

 

20140603-1Tax Justice Blog, State News Quick Hits: Gas Taxes, NJ Budget Woes, Madison Square Gardens’ Sizable Tax Break

 

Jason Dinesen has Yet Another Post About Regulation of Tax Preparers.  “Preparer regulation is a bad idea. ”

Kay Bell, Tax moves to make in June 2014

Robert D. Flach has your fresh Tuesday Buzz!

 

Andrew Lundeen, The Common Misconception about the Lower Rate on Capital Gains and Dividends (Tax Policy Blog):

What is not easily seen is that the $100 that Mr. Buffett earns in dividends has already been taxed at the corporate level. In fact, Mr. Buffett’s $100 didn’t start at $100, it started as $153.85.

To receive his $100 dividend payment, Mr. Buffett must own shares in a corporation, which we will call Company A. Company A earned $153.85 in profits on Mr. Buffett’s behalf. This $153.85 is then subject to the federal corporate tax of 35 percent, or $53.85.

The corporation pays the $53.85 to the federal government on behalf of Mr. Buffett and then passes the remaining $100 to him in the form of a dividend. This is the $100 we discussed earlier, on which, Mr. Buffett pays $23.80 in dividend taxes.

Warren Buffett knows this.  But raising individual rates helps keep down those small guys whose businesses report their taxes on the owner 1040s — and, incidentally, makes it easier for Warren’s insurance business to sell tax-advantaged products.

 

Jeremy Scott, Camp Waves the White Flag (Tax Analysts Blog). “Camp tried to reform the tax system — and failed.”

Martin Sullivan, Corporate Expatriations: More Deals Are Likely (Tax Analysts Blog).  ” It is unlikely that any known or yet-to-be-made-public deals will be slowed by Democrats’ efforts.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 390

 

TaxGrrrl, John Daly Relied On Tax Records To Figure $90 Million Gambling Losses.  “Despite tens of millions of dollars in gambling losses, Daly doesn’t seem to regret his behavior, saying, ‘I had a lot of fun doing it.'”

 

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Tax Roundup, 5/14/14: Earned income credits, still busted. And: extenders advance.

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

Nope.  Still busted.  From WashingtonExaminer.com comes an update on what some call America’s most successful anti-poverty program:

The Treasury Department has released its latest report  on the fight against widespread fraud in the Earned Income Tax Credit program. The problem is, fraud is still winning. And there’s not even much of a fight.

“The Internal Revenue Service continues to make little progress in reducing improper payments of Earned Income Tax Credits,” a press release from Treasury’s inspector general for Tax Administration says. “The IRS estimates that 22 to 26 percent of EITC payments were issued improperly in Fiscal Year 2013. The dollar value of these improper payments was estimated to be between $13.3 billion and $15.6 billion.”

Wait.  Didn’t the President sign a bill in 2010 to fix all this?

The new report found that the IRS is simply ignoring the requirements of a law called the Improper Payments Elimination and Recovery Act, signed by President Obama in 2010, which requires the IRS to set fraud-control targets and keep improper payments below ten percent of all Earned Income Tax Credit payouts.

Whatever the EITC does to help the working poor, it is a boon to the Grifter-American community.  Fraudulent EITC claims are a staple of ID theft fraud and low-tech tax cheating in general.

It’s worth noting that the high rate of improper EITC payouts has not gone down in spite of the ever-increasing IRS requirements for preparers who issue returns claiming the credits.  This should give pause to folks who think IRS preparer regulations will stop fraud, though it won’t.

It’s also notable that Iowa recently increased its piggyback EITC to 15% of the federal credit — increasing the annual cost of the credit by an estimated $35 million.  Assuming Iowans are just as honest as other Americans, that means about $8 million of additional stimulus to the Iowa grifter economy.

Finally, the phase-out of the EITC functions as a hidden high marginal tax rate on the program’s intended beneficiaries, the working poor.  The effective marginal rate in Iowa exceeds 50% at some income levels.  Combined with other income-based phase-outs, the EITC becomes a poverty trap.

 

Related: Arnold Kling,  SNEP and the EITC. “My priors, which I think are supported by the research cited by Salam, is that trying to use a program like the EITC for social engineering is a mug’s game.”

 

 

Extenders advance in Senate.  Tax Analysts reports ($link)

Legislation that would extend for two years nearly all the tax provisions that expired at the end of 2013 cleared a procedural hurdle in the Senate May 13.

Senators voted 96 to 3 to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to H.R. 3474, a bill to exempt from the Affordable Care Act’s employer mandate employees with healthcare coverage through the Veterans Benefits Administration or through the military healthcare program TRICARE.

The bill is the legislative vehicle for the tax extenders. It will be amended to include the text of the Expiring Provisions Improvement Reform and Efficiency (EXPIRE) Act of 2014 (S. 2260) and likely that of the Tax Technical Corrections Act of 2014 (S. 2261), both of which the Senate Finance Committee passed April 3 via voice vote.

The bill that passes will probably look much like the Senate bill.  The House has advanced bills to make some of the perpetually-expiring provisions permanent, but the President, pretending that they won’t get passed every year anyway, says permanent extension is fiscally irresponsible.

Among the provisions to be extended yet again, mostly through 2015, are the research credit, new markets credits, wind and biofuel credits, bonus depreciation, and increased Sec. 179 deductions.  The five-year built-in gain tax recognition period is also extended through 2015.

Related: TaxGrrrl, Senate Moves Forward To Extend Tax Breaks For 2014

 

20120906-1O. Kay HendersonKnoxville Raceway ceremony for state tax break of up to $2 million:

Governor Terry Branstad went to Knoxville today to sign a bill into law that gives the Knoxville Raceway a state tax break to help finance improvements at the track.

“This is a great facility,” Branstad told Radio Iowa during a telephone interview right after the event. “Last year, in 2013, they attracted 211,000 visitors, so it’s a big tourism attraction and it’s a good investment and it’s great for the state to partner with the community for a project of this magnitude.”

Here’s how that partnership works: the racetrack will charge sales tax to its customers, and keep the money.  Only two other businesses are special enough to get this sweet deal.  Tough luck for the rest of us who don’t have the good connections and lobbyists.

 

Walnut st flowersJana Luttenegger, Updated E-Filing Requirements for Tax Preparers (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).  “The handbook is not exactly clear.

Jason Dinesen, Things Tax Preparers Say: S-Corporation Compensation.  “But too many business owners — and their accountants — treat S-corps like a magic wand that can just make taxes disappear completely.”

Kay Bell, IRS fight to regulate tax preparers officially over…for now

Peter Reilly, Can Somebody Explain Tax Shelters To Thomas Piketty?  In the unlikely event that the Piketty recommendations are ever enacted, Peter notes that “there will be a renaissance of shelter activity.”  Peter provides a “Cliff Notes” summary of this year’s big forgettable book I’ll never read, which I appreciate.  Also: Peter uses the tax-law-as-Swiss Army Knife analogy that I am so fond of.

Robert D. Flach, STILL MORE CLIENTS SCREWED BY THE TAX CODE.  “The list of taxpayers screwed by our current Tax Code is not a short one.  Today I add taxpayers with gambling winnings.”

 

20130110-2Howard Gleckman, How “Dead Men” Fiscal Policy Is Paralyzing Government (TaxVox).  He reviews a new book, Dead Men Ruling, by Gene Steurle:

“We are left with a budget for a declining nation,” Gene writes, “that invests ever-less in our future…and a broken government that presides over archaic, inefficient, and inequitable spending and tax programs.”

All this has happened due to a confluence of two unhappy trends: The first is what the late conservative writer Jude Wanniski memorably described almost four decades ago as the “Two-Santa Theory.”

The Santas are the two parties, each of whom pick our pockets to fill our stockings.

 

Alan Cole, The Simple Case for Tax Neutrality (Tax Policy Blog).  “When states give preferential rates of sales tax to certain goods, the most visible result is the legal bonanza that follows from trying to re-categorize goods into the preferred groupings. ”

David Brunori, Repealing the Property Tax Is an Asinine Idea (Tax Analysts Blog). “Public finance experts are almost unanimous in their belief that the property tax is the ideal way to fund local government services… Most importantly, the property tax ensures local political control.”

William McBride, What is Investment and How Do We Get More of It? (Tax Policy Blog).  “Full expensing for all investment, according to our analysis, would increase the capital stock by 16 percent and grow GDP by more than 5 percent.”

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 370

News from the Profession.  AICPA Tackling the Important Issue of Male CPAs Wanting It All (Going Concern). 

 

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Tax Roundup, 5/5/14: The Iowa Legislature’s tax grade: D minus, again.

Monday, May 5th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

The Iowa Legislature has gone home to get re-elected.  As usual, they left the Iowa tax law a little worse than they found it.  They did pass a few new special breaks for their friends and for politics, but they did nothing to simplify Iowa’s high-rate, high-complexity system full of hidden treats for the well-lobbied.

The bills passed include:

A refundable $2,500 adoption credit (HF 2468).  Refundable credits are always a bad idea.  There was apparently no discussion over whether the credit is really needed, or a better use of money than alternate programs, but because a legislator had an expensive adoption, it became a priority.

Sales tax rebates for the Newton racetrack (SF 2341and the Knoxville Raceway (HF 2464).  The bills let each track keep sales taxes they collect — a sweet deal, and an advantage for two taxpayers over every other taxpayer.

Biodiesel tax credits.  SF 2344 gives biodiesel producers two cents per gallon of taxpayer money, in the form of refundable credits, through 2017.  The credit was to expire at the end of 2014.  This is necessary to keep taxpayer dollars flowing to producers until the next time the credit is set to expire, when they will extend it again, just one more time, I promise.

20120906-1HF 2448 passed, providing for easier qualification for the “High Quality Jobs Program” tax credit and a new “Workforce Housing Tax Incentives Program,” which will provide tax credits to housing developers meeting certain conditions designed, no doubt, by one of their lobbyists.  This will do away with the hobo camps that have not sprung up around job sites around the state.

The only really useful thing they passed was the “code conformity bill (HF 2435) to conform Iowa income tax law to include federal tax law changes made in 2014.  In some years they have failed to do so until the end of the session, leaving taxpayers and preparers guessing at the tax law for most of the filing season.

Of course, it could have been worse.  Not every special interest bill passed.

The most prominent failure was that of HF 2472, a bill to provide tax credits for expanding broadband service.  This was a priority of Governor Branstad, killed by a coalition of Democrats who say they wanted bigger credits — but who may have just wanted to hand the Governor a defeat — and Republicans who thought the bill was badly designed.  S.F. 2043, which would have provided a special tax exemption to employee-held stock gains, failed to move.  A proposal to provide a tax credit for student loan payments went nowhere.  A crazy proposal  (H.F. 2270) to pay doctors with tax credits for “volunteering” — at their average hourly rate! — died.

Not everything that died was awful.  HF 2129, which would have expanded the Iowa “Ten and Ten” capital gains break to sales of business interests, never made it out of committee.  Nor did SF 2222, which would have repealed the Iowa inheritance tax.

 

They also failed to pass SSB 3216, the bill to update the Iowa tax appeals system and to remove the Director of the Department of Revenue from the process.  Maybe they can do better next time by also enacting an Iowa tax court.  It seems reasonable to have, say, three district judges from around the state convene as a tax court.  They could give taxpayers a shot at a judicial forum where the judges will have actually heard an income tax case before.

Most importantly, they didn’t even try to address Iowa’s highest-in-the-nation corporate tax rate, its high individual tax rate, or the baroque complexity of Iowa’s income tax for everyone -- other than by making it a little worse with a few new special breaks for special friends.  That means the legislature gets another D-, in my report card, with only the timely passage of the code conformity bill saving them from an F.

But who knows? Elections coming this fall could bring in a few more legislators less intent on taking your money and giving it to friends with lobbyists, to build on the tiny signs of progress seen this session.  Who knows, maybe someday a real tax reform, like the Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan, will actually get a hearing.

 

20140505-1The Iowa legislative summary took too long, so only a few quick links this morning — I’ll try to catch up tomorrow:

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 361

Russ Fox, Yes, Mom, I Need to See Your ID.  This one I will spend more time on — the IRS, without consultation, plans to make e-filing much more difficult and expensive for everyone, to punish us for their failure to stop ID-theft fraud.

Philip Panitz, Welcome to America, Now Give Us Your Money! (A guest post on Janet Novack’s Forbes blog).  An excellent summary of how the tax law clobbers immigrants, and one I should spend more time on.

Kay Bell, Representatives want to prevent Los Angeles Clippers’ owner Donald Sterling from deducting his $2.5 million NBA fine.  Not every problem is a tax problem, guys.

TaxGrrrl, Union: Privatizing The Sale Of Alcohol Will Kill Children, Lower Tax Revenue.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 5/2/14: Film credit trial remake edition. And: Senator Otter, taxwriter.

Friday, May 2nd, 2014 by Joe Kristan


harold
An Iowa appeals court this week threw out the conviction of TV-show producer Dennis Brouse
on charges arising out of the Iowa film tax credit scandal.  The court ruled 2-1 that unclear jury instructions rendered the guilty verdict untenable.  From the decision:

After examining the jury instruction and finding it so confusing, we conclude that it was not possible for the jury to find sufficient evidence to convict pursuant to a general verdict that implicated the joint criminal conduct instruction. 

The case was remanded to the trial court.  I believe the state can appeal this decision to the Iowa Supreme Court.  I am not sure whether the state can retry Mr. Brouse if the ruling stands.  The reversal would leave Wendy Weiner-Runge as the only person hit with serious prison time in the scandal.

In any case, the real offenders in this case will go free.  No charges will be filed against the legislators who voted overwhelmingly to create a cash-filled pinata for out-of-state filmmakers.  The Governor who was to oversee the program will never have to answer for appointing a former drugstore film clerk to run it.  The clerk’s immediate supervisor faces no charges for letting the clerk run wild, committing taxpayer dollars by the millions virtually without documentation or control.

The real crime is that the 150 legislative supergeniuses feel competent to take money from taxpayers and give it to people who convince them they will use it better.

Other coverage: KCCI.com

Cite: State v. Brouse, No. 12-1076  [3-1192]

 

 

 

Andrew Mitchel, 2014 First Quarter Published Expatriates – Second Highest Ever:

 

Chart by Andrew Mitchel LLC

Chart by Andrew Mitchel LLC

Considering how poorly the U.S. tax system treats Americans abroad, it’s no surprise.

 

Jason Dinesen, On Tax Refunds and “Not Owing Tax,” Part 1  “Just because you got a refund it doesn’t necessarily mean you didn’t owe taxes.”

Kay Bell, Tax moves to make in May 2014

Peter Reilly, IRS Chief Counsel Checks 1986 Committee Reports To Give Break On Foreclosed Real Estate   

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 358

Russ Fox, Once Again, Bring Me the Usual Suspects: 2014 Small Business Tax Index.  Iowa does poorly.

Robert D. Flach brings your Friday Buzz!

 

Kyle Pomerleau, It Takes 175 hours for a U.S. Business to Comply with U.S. Taxes (Tax Policy Blog).  For bigger businesses, that’s way low.

Howard Gleckman, The Tax Extenders: Yes, Virginia, They Really Are Tax Cuts (TaxVox).

 

 

Not Senator Wyden

Not Senator Wyden

 Senator Wyden, meet Animal House.

Otter: ” But you can’t hold a whole fraternity responsible for the behavior of a few, sick twisted individuals. For if you do, then shouldn’t we blame the whole fraternity system? And if the whole fraternity system is guilty, then isn’t this an indictment of our educational institutions in general? I put it to you, Greg – isn’t this an indictment of our entire American society? Well, you can do whatever you want to us, but we’re not going to sit here and listen to you badmouth the United States of America.”

Senator Ron Wyden:At the same time, the potential misconduct of a small group of IRS employees should not tarnish the overwhelming majority of hard working agency employees who do play by the rules.”

 

I did not have tax with that state, New York.  Bill Clinton: ‘I Thank God Every Day That Hillary and I Live in NY and Pay the Highest Aggregate Tax Rate in America’  (TaxProf)

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/28/14: No connection found for Iowa broadband credit. And: it can take a long time to recover from tax season.

Monday, April 28th, 2014 by Joe Kristan


20120906-1
Truly we live in the age of wonders.  
A new set of economic development tax credits made it to the floor of the Iowa House on a Friday — and failed.  It’s a wonder that they actually showed up on a Friday — and to reject corporate welfare, to boot.

Before we get excited, it would be wrong to believe that the Iowa General Assembly has suddenly come to its senses about tax incentives.  It appears that many of the “no” votes on HF 2472 were from people who felt it wasn’t a big enough giveaway, reports the Des Moines Register:

Democratic leader Mark Smith, D-Marshalltown, said his members voted against the bill because they felt it didn’t go far enough in incentivizing and stimulating the expansion of high-speed Internet service.

Governer Branstad was unhappy:

“Rather than coming together to pass common sense legislation to increase broadband access in rural Iowa, Iowa House Democrats have turned their backs on rural Iowans and those who are under served,” Branstad said. “Today, the Iowa House Democrats played the worst of political cards; the Washington, D.C., hand of ignoring what is in the best interest of the taxpayers for political purposes.”

But nine Republicans also voted no in the 44-51 vote against the bill: Heartsill (Marion), Mawell (Poweshiek), Pettengill (Benson), Salmon (Black Hawk), Shaw (Pocahontas), Sheetas (Appanoose), Upmeyer (Cerro Gordo), Vander Linden (Mahaska), and Watts (Dallas).  If four of them had voted with the Governor, the bill would have passed.   The Des Moines Register didn’t bother to ask the Republicans why they voted no, but O. Kay Henderson did:

Representative Guy Vander Linden of Oskaloosa was among the nine Republicans who voted no.

“The ‘Connect Iowa’ bill, in my mind, doesn’t connect any Iowan, let alone every Iowan,” Vander Linden said.

Vander Linden faulted the bill for the way it handed out tax breaks to companies.

“We don’t say they need to meet any requirements in terms of our capacity, speed — anything. All we say is: “If you will put broadband infrastructure in place in any unserved or underserved area…we’ll give you all these benefits,” Vander Linden said. “That, to me, sounds like a blank check that I’m not willing to sign up to.”

Lack of standards and accountability hasn’t stopped tax credit giveaways before.  And they actually worked on a Friday, too. Yes, it truly is an age of wonders.

 

20140307-1Jason Dinesen, I Get Very Sad When a Client Gets Involved in Multi-Level Marketing.:

The reason I get sad nothing to do with taxes or fears that the client will be over-aggressive with deductions.

The reason I get sad is: so few of them actually make money.

 

Russ Fox, Your Dependents do have to be Your Dependents…

Kay Bell, Storm season 2014 arrives with a vengeance. Disaster victims should seek tax recovery help after the skies clear

TaxGrrrl, Now That Tax Day Has Passed, How Long Should You Keep Those Tax & Financial Records? 

Paul Neiffer, Are You Still Running Windows XP?! I finally upgraded to Windows 8.1 at home this weekend — a virtual machine on an iMac running Parallels Desktop.  It was the smoothest Windows installation I’ve ever done — it actually went without a hitch the first time through.

 

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 354

Renu Zaretsky, Tax Shelters, Tax Fights, and One Way to Reform a Zombie.  The TaxVox headline roundup includes an update on House taxwriter plans to work on an “extenders” bill this week.

Tax Justice Blog, Lawmakers Will Move Tuesday to Approve Hundreds of Billions in Business Tax Breaks — and Still No Help for the Unemployed.

William McBride, Corporate Exits Accelerating, Taking Jobs with Them (Tax Policy Bl0g).  Rates matter.

 

IMG_2493U.S. residents must pay U.S. tax, regardless of celestial citizenship.  A Minnesota couple hasn’t gotten the message, according to PioneerPress.com:

Living in the “Kingdom of Heaven” will not get you out of paying taxes, according to federal prosecutors.

On Tuesday, Tami Mae May, 55, was indicted in U.S. District Court in Minneapolis on 15 counts of filing fraudulent tax returns and a single count of obstruction of due administration of internal revenue laws, according to the U.S. attorney’s office.

Through 2013, she claimed “zero income,” signed under altered certifications, said both she and her husband were not citizens of the United States but were instead permanent residents of the “Kingdom of Heaven,” and reported false withholdings in an attempt to claim “hundreds of thousands of dollars in fraudulent … refunds,” the U.S. attorney’s office said. 

I need to research where the Bible says you can recover cash from the IRS as a result of a divine passport.

 

20140330-1Practitioners everywhere are putting their lives together after another tax season.  Yes, it’s rough, but it’s unlikely you will still be sorting out this tax season two years from now, like an Iowa woman who is just getting her 2012 tax season put to bed.

Here’s what this North Liberty tax practitioner faced in 2012:

The co-owner of a local tax service has been accused of using more than $22,000 from the business’s savings account to cover her credit card bills and her husband was arrested for allegedly causing a drunken disturbance at a local elementary school.

According to an Iowa City police criminal complaint, an investigator met with a co-owner of C & M Tax Service. The other co-owner is 31-year-old Melissa M. Frost of North Liberty.

But it was worse than that:

Police said Frost’s husband, 33-year-old Cory A. Frost was also arrested on Friday. Cory Frost went to North Bend Elementary in North Liberty at 2:45 p.m. to confront an employee there concerning a “situation with his wife,” according to North Liberty police Lt. Diane Venega. It is unclear if that situation is related to Melissa Frost’s arrest.

[…]

When police found Frost, he smelled of alcohol and appeared to be intoxicated. Police said Frost had a blood-alcohol content of .204 percent. He was previously convicted of public intoxication.

KCRG provides an update:

A North Liberty woman accused of stealing money from her own business entered an Alford plea as part of a plea deal with prosecutors.

Melissa Frost, 34, entered the pleas on two separate counts of tampering with records last week, according to online court records. Under the Alford Plea, Frost admits no guilt but acknowledges there is likely enough evidence to convict her.

As part of the deal, Frost received a sentence of probation and deferred judgement, which means she could have the conviction expunged from her record if she fulfills the terms of her probation.

So however bad your tax season was, this is a reminder that somebody, somewhere, probably had it worse.

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/8/14: So what do I do with the K-1? And: they also serve who go away!

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

So the K-1 finally showed up from my partnership or S corporation investment.  Now what?

Remember that the K-1 represents your share of the income and expenses of the partnership/S corporation/trust (henceforth “thing”) that issued it.  Different pieces of income and expense are treated differently on your tax return, and the K-1 tells you where your pieces go.  Sort of.  Before you get started plugging in your numbers, you should answer some questions for yourself.

- Do I “materially participate” in this thing? Your level of participation determines the forms you start with in preparing your returns, whether you can deduct losses, and whether your income from the thing is is subject to the Obamacare 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax.  If you spent more than 500 hours working in the thing, that usually means you materially participate; a more complete discussion of material participation is found here.

- Did the thing lose money?  If it lost money, then you have to clear three hurdles to deduct the losses:

1. You have to have basis.  This starts with your investment in the thing.  If you loaned money directly to the thing, you will get basis for the loan.  If you have a partnership, you will get basis for your share of the partnership debt, shown in part L of your K-1.  S corporation shareholders don’t get basis for their share of the corporation’s debt, even if it is guaranteed by hte shareholder.  Your basis is increased for your share of the thing’s income, and it is reduced for losses and distributions.  If you have no basis, you can’t take losses.

2. Your basis has to be “at-risk.”  This normally means that you are out-of-pocket for the investment.  If your basis comes from borrowed funds, you have to be personally on the hook for the debt — but if you borrowed from somebody with an interest in your thing, you might not be “at-risk” even if you will have to pay up if thing defaults.

If your basis comes from a share of the partnership debt, you are normally considered “at-risk” for debt shown on the “Recourse” and “Qualified Nonrecourse financing” lines on part K of your partnership K-1.  Your at-risk amount is computed on Form 6198,

3. You have to materially participate (see above), or have “passive” income from other activities.  If you don’t materially participate, you need to go to Form 8582 to figure how much, if any, of your loss is deductible this year.

 Got that?  Tomorrow we’ll look at what you have to do after you answer these questions.  Come back every day through April 15 for more !

 

Senator Hubert Houser

Senator Hubert Houser

Legislator of the Century.  Yes, the century is young, but it will be hard to beat the accomplishment of Iowa state senator Hubert Houser.  He went home.  From The Des Moines Register:

At issue is the fact that Houser, a Republican from Carson in southwest Iowa, hasn’t resigned. He has simply stopped coming to the Statehouse, saying he isn’t needed as a minority caucus member and doesn’t have a role in any legislation. He says it’s more important for him to spend time on his family’s farm, where he is expanding the livestock facilities.

Houser was not present in the Senate chamber again on Monday.

Secretary of the Senate Michael Marshall said Monday that Houser is still receiving his annual salary of $25,000.

The coverage implies that Sen. Houser is doing a bad thing.  Considering the dubious accomplishments of the ones that do show up, I can’t agree.  We’d be better off if they all went home.  The legislators should get all of their pay on Day 1 of the session, and they should get docked if it goes past a month.

 

Of course they do.  Iowa House panel OKs $2 million tax break for Knoxville Raceway.  (Des Moines Register)

 

RashiaQueen of IRS tax fraud needs a break.  Rashia Wilson, who famously held up big wads of cash on her Facebook page and taunted the feds to come and get her, is less liquid nowadays, according to a report by tampabay.com:

Busted down to a federal prison in Aliceville, Ala., she earns just $5.25 a month, she declares in newly filed court papers. That’s a problem because Wilson, 28, was ordered to pay a token $25 per calendar quarter toward the $3.1 million in restitution that she owes the IRS for filing false tax returns using stolen identities. She needs money to buy vitamins and hygiene items, too, she says. So she’s asking U.S. District Judge James S. Moody Jr. to suspend restitution payments until after her release date: Jan. 5, 2031. 

Then she’ll really get after it, I’m sure.

 

Peter ReillyNo Money For April 15 1040 Balance Due? Don’t Panic!

Tony Nitti, Where Is Your Tax Home When You Work In A Foreign Land?   

Jason Dinesen, Tax Court Case Involving Radio DJ Strikes Close to Home for Me.  “I used to work in radio. I was the news director at KNOD radio station in Harlan, over in the western part of Iowa.”

I had a brief stint as an unpaid intern for KHAK, a country station in Cedar Rapids, in 1980.  I learned that I have a face for radio and a voice for print.

 

Roger McEowen and Kristine Tidgren, Understand That Easement Agreement Before You Sign It

 

Locust Street, Des Moines

Locust Street, Des Moines

TaxGrrrl, New IRS Commissioner Talks Tax, Scandal and Congress.  She gives him more credit than I do.

Andrew Lundeen, Kyle Pomerleau, Americans Pay More in Taxes than on Food, Clothing, and Housing Combined (Tax Policy Blog)

Renu Zaretsky, Ethics and Fairness, Growth and the Environment, Retirement and Tax Shelters.  The TaxVox headline roundup ponders, among other things, whether we should subsidize wind turbines forever.

Kay Bell, Energy efficient home improvement tax break might be back

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 334

News you can use. How to Cheat on Your Taxes. (David Cay Johnston, via The Taxprof)

News from the Profession.  According to Research, You Are Fat Because Busy Season (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/4/14: Your Honor, nobody follows that law! And: extenders advance.

Friday, April 4th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120801-2Maybe that wasn’t the best argument, under the circumstances.  Things went badly for a California man yesterday who tried to tell the Tax Court how things work in the real world.

The man had claimed $5,309 in vehicle expenses for his real estate sales business.  Vehicle and travel expenses are subject to the special rules of Section 274, which requires corroborating records of the amount, time, place and business purpose of travel expenses.  The judge found the taxpayer’s evidence wanting (my emphasis):

Petitioner provided his 2009 Mileage Chart and Itemized Categories documents, which appear to be reconstructions asserting the places he traveled to for business and the vehicle expenses he incurred in 2009. Petitioner, however, failed to provide any corroborating receipts or other records that substantiated the statements made in these two documents. Moreover, neither document identifies a business purpose for each trip, and both fail to show mileage. (While the Itemized Categories does have a handwritten note of “mileage for 2009 11,135″, this note alone does not substantiate the mileage of each trip or show how the mileage was allocated between business and personal use.) Additionally, the 2009 Mileage Chart provides a log for only three weeks for 2009 and fails to show the amount of each trip expense. Because petitioners failed to substantiate the claimed expenses as required by section 274(d), the vehicle expense deduction must be disallowed.

The IRS asserted negligence penalties for claiming an undocumented deduction.  The taxpayer tried to tell the judge that nobody does that stuff:

Petitioner did not argue reasonable cause or good faith. Instead, petitioner argued at trial that no one keeps records in accordance with the “IRS code”.

Well, OK, then, screw Section 274!  Well, no:

That argument is unpersuasive, and the section 6662(a) penalty will be sustained.

The IRS is serious about documenting business miles.  If you have them, keep a log, a calendar, or use a smart-phone app to record the time, place, cost and business purposes of your travels as you go.  If “no one keeps records in accordance with the ‘IRS code,'” no one is going to be happy with the results when they get audited.

Cite: Chapin, T.C. Summ Op. 2014-31

 

20130113-3Tax Extenders Legislation Advances in Senate (Accounting today):

 The Senate Finance Committee voted to revive almost all of the 55 tax breaks that expired Dec. 31, providing benefits for wind energy, U.S.-based multinational corporations and motor sports track owners.

Motor sports track owners have lots of friends in high places.

It’s not just motor sports lobbyists who did will in the Finance Committee.  Almost all
“expired” provisions of this lobbyist right-to-work vehicle were renewed, including the renewable fuel credits.  The only expiring provisions that actually expire are the credit for energy-efficient appliances and a provison for oil refinery property, so there remains some lobbying to do.

But wait, there’s more!  Tax Analysts reports ($link) that this Christmas in April bill includes a provision to “expand the research credit to allow passthroughs with no income tax liability to apply the credit, up to $250,000, to their payroll tax liability.”  It also would renew the reduction of the S corporation built-in gain tax “recognition period” at five years through 2015.

While the House still hasn’t acted on any of this, the passage of all of this stuff on a bipartisan basis would seem to indicate that something like this is likely to pass.  Still, Kay Bell thinks the House tax leadership may be reluctant to follow the Senate’s lead.

The reason Congress pretends these provisions are “temporary” is that under their rules, Congress can pretend that they will only cost as much as they will cost before they are renewed again, regardless of the probability that they will be renewed forever.  It’s the kind of accounting that would get us thrown in jail if we tried it with the IRS or SEC, but it’s just another Thursday in Congress.

Link: “Summary of Modified Chairman’s Mark.”

 

20091010-2.JPGKristy Maitre, E-Filed Return Rejected at Deadline? Don’t Panic

Paul Neiffer, Patronage Dividend Notices Can Be Sent by Email or Posted to a Website

Jason Dinesen, Accounting for the Work Opportunity Credit on an Iowa Tax Return 

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): T Is For Tip Income   

Leslie Book, ACA and Victims of Domestic Abuse (Procedurally Taxing)

Russ Fox, Yes, Online Poker Players Must Pay Taxes

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 330

William Perez, State and Local Tax Burdens as a Percentage of Income for 2011

Lyman Stone, Missouri Senate Passes Problematic Income Tax Cut Plan (Tax Policy Blog).  “Missouri’s state Senate this week passed a $621 million tax cut including a 0.5 percentage point income tax reduction and a special carveout to deduct up to 25 percent of business income.”

Howard Gleckman, Two Ways to Fix the Corporate Income Tax: Internationalize it or Kill It. (TaxVox).  I vote “kill.”

 

There’s a new Cavalcade of Risk up!  At Insurance Writer. Don’t miss Insureblog’s contribution about how those making health care policy don’t know what they’re talking about.

 

20120906-1Corporate Welfare Watch:

Iowa city prepares to give mystery company millions. (Foxnews.com)  “West Des Moines city officials have cued up $36 million in local and state tax incentives for a company, but won’t tell its citizens who that company is.”

Iowa senator calls BS on attempt to limit tax credits for fertilizer plant (Watchdog.org)

Iowa View: From wind to solar, clean power is good for Iowa (Joe Bolkcom, Mike Breitbach).  Green corporate welfare is still corporate welfare.

 

News from the Profession: Deloitte Declares Weekends Are Not For Working, Unless You Are Working (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/3/14: Iowa Tax Burden ranks 29th. And: Koskinen doesn’t seem to get it.

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

The Tax Foundation yesterday released its annual ranking of “State-Local Tax Burdens.”  Iowa came in at 29th highest.

20140403-1

The Tax Foundation explains:

For each state, we compute this measure of tax burden by totaling the amount of state and local taxes paid by state residents to both their own and other governments and then divide these totals by each state’s total income. We not only make this calculation for the most recent year, but also for earlier years due to the fact that income and tax revenue data are periodically revised by government agencies.

In this annual study, our goal is to move the focus from the tax collector (how much revenue is collected) to the taxpayer (how much income is foregone). 

This ranking differs from the Tax Foundation’s State Business Climate Index, where Iowa ranks a dismal 40th in business tax congeniality.  While the two sets of rankings have different purposes, together they tell us that Iowa’s tax system is very poorly designed.  It collects a middling amount of revenue with a system of very high rates, a boatload of preferences for the well-connected, and baroque complexity.  You could collect the same revenue with a much simpler system with lower rates, and without the inherent corruption of special breaks for special friends of the politicians.  That’s the approach of The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.

 

Corporate welfare watch:

Senator fumes at idea to cancel tax credit (Des Moines Register)

IOWA SPEEDWAY: Governor Signs NASCAR Tax Break Bill (WHOtv.com)

 

This Koskinen isn't the IRS commissioner

This Koskinen isn’t the IRS commissioner

Koskinen bemoans IRS funding, but doesn’t commit to taking the obvious step to restore it.  IRS Commissioner John Koskinen gave a little speech yesterday at the National Press Club.  He pointed out how the IRS is being given massive new responsibilities for running Obamacare and implementing FATCA, but faces funding cuts.  What he didn’t point out was that the GOP-controlled house isn’t likely to change that as long as it thinks the IRS is acting as an arm of the other party.  He defended the plodding IRS response to Congressional investigators in the Tea Party matter, and he offered what looks to me like a defense of the new Section 501(c)(4) rules proposed by the prior Commisioner:

While I was not involved in the issuance of this draft proposal, because it happened before I was confirmed as Commissioner, I believe it is extremely important to make this area of regulation as clear as possible. Not only does that help the IRS properly enforce the law, but clearer regulations will also give a better roadmap to applicants, and will help those that already have 501(c)(4) status properly administer their organizations without unnecessary fears of losing their tax-exempt status.

That’s too cute.  The provisions of the proposal mirror the rules overturned by the Supreme Court in Citizens United, including a rule preventing any political activity in the run-up to an election.  These items show that the current rules are an attempt to get around the Supreme Court to restrict political speech.   That’s why they are poison to the Tea Party set.

Either he doesn’t get it, or he pretends not to.  If the Commissioner wants to restore trust, the minimum he needs to do is to withdraw the proposed rules and start over, and to stop slow walking the investigation.  Until he does, it’s futile to expect the GOP-controlled House to give him more funding.  He’s quickly running out of time to do so.

Update: Washington Post gives Koskinen 3 Pinoccios: IRS chief: No ‘targeting’ of tea party groups, just ‘inappropriate criteria’     (Via Instapundit)

 

20140321-3TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): S Is For Student Loans 

Kay Bell, 7 tax tasks to take care of by April 15

Annette Nellen, Filing season and rental activities

William Perez, Tax Reform Act of 2014, Part 3, Deductions

Stephen Olsen, Summary Opinions for 03/28/14, a roundup of tax procedure news, with a much-appreciated mention of the Tax Update post on the recent case on trusts and material participation.

Jim Maule, Tax Court and Eleventh Circuit Disagree on Interpretation of Section 36 Language.  I think the couple got a raw deal, but I’m sure glad the first-time homebuyer credit has gone away.

 

taxanalystslogoCara Griffith, Proceeding Cautiously With a Taxpayer Bill of Rights (Tax Analysts Blog):

The IRS is already struggling with administering our tax system. Perhaps issues of funding and employee training should be addressed before delving into a taxpayer bill of rights.

I disagree.  Rights come before enforcement.  We can start by a sauce-for-the-gander rule that requires the IRS to pay penalties it asserts to taxpayers if the taxpayers win on the contested issue.

 

Renu Zaretsky, Expirations, Compliance and Corporations.  The TaxVox headline roundup talks about Commissioner Koskinen’s speech and the status of the expiring provisions.

 

Russ Fox, Bozo Tax Tip #8: Nevada Corporations.  “Now, if you’re planning on moving to Nevada incorporating in the Silver State can be a very good idea (as I know). But thinking you’re going to avoid California taxes just because you’re a Nevada corporation is, well, bozo.”

News from the Profession.  Sweatshop Saturdays: Rethinking Where We Work (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/27/14: NASCAR subsidy heads to Governor. And lots more!

Thursday, March 27th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120906-1Don’t worry, our subsidies are carefully crafted to only help Iowans, and only for a limited time.  Until it’s slightly inconvenient.

When they built the big new racetrack in Newton, they had a unique deal: the track got to keep the sales tax it collected.  The deal was crafted to require the track be partly owned by Iowans, and that it would expire at the end of 2015.

Then NASCAR bought the track.  NASCAR is controlled by a wealthy North Carolina family , with nary an Iowan.  No problem!  The Iowa House sent a bill to the Governor yesterday (SF 2341) repealing the Iowa ownership rule and extending the subsidy through 2025.

The stories in Radio Iowa and the Des Moines Register only quoted the giveaway’s supporters.  For example:

Representative Tom Sands, a Republican from Wapello, said it’s a “performance based” tax break because NASCAR won’t get the rebate unless there are on-site sales.

“One of the questions might be: ‘What kind of return do we, taxpayers, get in the state of Iowa?’ And I drive on Interstate 80 twice every week like many of you do coming to Des Moines and have seen the construction that has happened around that Speedway just since it’s been there,” Sands said, “and we’ve got probably lots more of that we can expect into the future.”

The answer to that is: what makes this private business more worthy to keep its sales taxes than anyone else?  It’s a special deal that every other Iowa business competing for leisure dollars doesn’t get.  It’s the government allocating capital, and if anybody thinks the state is good at that, I’d like my Mercedes, please.

While this corporate welfare passed, at least some legislators are starting to wonder about this sort of thing.  14 representatives joined 9 state senators in opposing the bill.  When the Iowa Film Tax Credit passed, there were only three lonely opponents.  The 14 representatives who stood up for the rest of us: Baudler (R, Adair), Fisher (R, Tama), Heddens (D, Story), Highfill (R, Polk), Hunter (D, Polk), Jorgensen (R, Woodbury), Klein (R, Washington), Olson (D, Polk), Pettengill (R, Benton), Rayhons (R, Hancock), Salmon (R, Black Hawk), Schultz (R, Crawford), Shaw (R, Pocahontas) and Wessel-Kroeschell (D, Story).  Maybe we have the makings of a bi-partisan anti-giveaway coalition.

 

20120702-2Jason Dinesen, Iowa Tax Treatment of an Installment Sale of Farmland By a Non-Resident.  “The capital gain is recognized in the year of the sale and is taxable in Iowa. But what about the yearly interest income the taxpayer receives on the contract going forward?”

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): N Is For Name Change   

Paul Neiffer, Painful Form 8879 Process is on its Way.  The IRS, which has forced us to go to e-filing, now plans to make it a time-consuming nightmare for practitioners and clients because of the IRS failure to prevent identity theft.

Tax Trials, U.S. Supreme Court Reverses Sixth Circuit on FICA Withholding for Severance Payments

Margaret Van Houten, Digital Assets Development: IRS Characterizes Bitcoin as Property, Not Currency

William Perez, Tax Reform Act of 2014, Part 2, Income

 

Illinois sealLiz MalmHow much business income would be impacted by Illinois House Speaker Madigan’s Millionaire Tax?

These data indicate that:

  • 54 percent of total partnership and S corporation taxable income in Illinois would be impacted by Speaker’s Madigan’s millionaire surcharge. That’s almost $10 billion of business income.

  • 6 percent of sole proprietorships AGI would be impacted. Important to note here is that not all sole proprietorships earn small amounts of income. Over three thousand would be hit by the millionaire tax, impacting $674 million of income.

  • Taken together, this indicates that 36 percent of pass-through business income is earned at firms with AGI with $1 million or more.

I don’t think this will end well for Illinois.  When you soak “the rich,” you soak employers.  When states do this, it’s easy to escape.

 

Christopher Bergin, Good Grief! Tax Analysts v. Internal Revenue Service (Tax Analysts Blogs)

I have been involved in two Tax Analysts FOIA lawsuits against the IRS. Neither one of them should have gone to federal judges. But the IRS’s secrecy, paranoia, and belief that it has the absolute right to hide information drives it in this area. This lawsuit was a waste of time and money – against an agency that argues that it doesn’t have enough of either — over documents that should have been public from the beginning.

I’m left to quote Charlie Brown: Good grief! What an agency.

Commissioner Koskinen’s pokey response to Congressional document requests needs to be considered in this context.  The IRS has not earned the benefit of the doubt.

Kay Bell, IRS chief Koskinen spars with House Oversight panel

 

Greg Mankiw, Not Class Warfare, Optimal Taxation:

Today’s column by Paul Krugman is classic Paul: It takes a policy favored by the right, attributes the most vile motives to those who advance the policy, and ignores all the reasonable arguments in favor of it.

In this case, the issue is the reduction in capital taxes during the George W. Bush administration. Paul says that the goal here was “defending the oligarchy’s interests.”

Note that when Barack Obama ran for President in 2008, he campaigned on only a small increase in the tax rate on dividends and capital gains. He did not suggest raising the rate on this income to the rate on ordinary income. Is this because Barack Obama also favors the oligarchy, or is it because his advisers also understood the case against high capital taxation?

Oligarchists everywhere.

 

20140327-1Leigh Osofsky, When Can Concentrating Enforcement Resources Increase Compliance? (Procedurally Taxing)

Cara Griffith, Taxing Streaming Video (Tax Analysts Blog)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 322

Renu Zaretsky, Friendly or Penalty? Taxes on Married Couples, Businesses, and the Uninsured (TaxV0x).  Rounding up the tax headlines.

Jack Townsend, Scope and Limitations of this Blog: It Is a Tax Crimes Blog, not a Tax Crimes Policy Blog.  “I conceive my blog as a forum to discuss the law as it is, including how it develops.  It is not a tax policy blog addressing issues of what the law ought to be.”

 

Russ Fox, Bozo Tax Tip #9: 300 Million Witnesses Can’t be Right.  Richard Hatch is not widely considered a tax role model.

News from the Profession.  Frustrated EY Employee Vandalizes Office Breakroom in Protest Over March Madness Blocking (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/25/14: Shaky foundations can be costly. And: monitors!

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140325-1Not a firm foundation.  A U.S. District Court case out of Texas last week shows why using a tax-exempt entity can be hazardous to your health.  A Mr. Ziegenhals was “manager, director, trustee, and registered agent” of The Le Tulle Foundation, which was “formed in 1991 as a testamentary trust with the stated purpose of operating ‘exclusively for charitable purposes for the benefit of the citizens of Matagorda County, Texas [and] for no other purposes.'”

The court said an IRS audit found that Mr. Ziegnhals “used funds from the Foundation to obtain personal benefits and pay his expenses unrelated to the purported charitable purposes.”  That triggered a revocation of charitable status and taxes on “self-dealing,”  The total amount of “self-dealing” is alleged as $46,266.21.

What did that cost the alleged self-dealer?  From the decision (my emphasis):

The amount allegedly owed by Ziegenhals – $461,125.44 as of November 29, 2013 — is based on the IRS’s calculations of penalties, statutory additions, and interest that have accrued from his unpaid private foundation excise taxes in 2003 and his unpaid federal income taxes in 2007. See Docket Entry Nos. 42-13, 42-14, 42-15. The current amount owed is much larger than the original unpaid taxes of $46,266.21 from 2003 and $6,829.98 from 2007 because the IRS assessed several statutory taxes and penalties on Ziegenhals as both a self-dealer and foundation manager for each year until he was issued the notice of deficiency in 2009 -- an example of what can happen when someone fails to pay his taxes in the first place and then also does not cooperate in repaying the delinquencies in a timely manner.

For example, the IRS imposed a first tier tax of 5 percent for each act of self-dealing, see 26 U.S.C. § 4941(a)(1), a second tier tax of 200 percent of the amount involved for each act of self-dealing that was not corrected within the taxable period, see § 4941(b)(1), a first tier tax of 2.5 percent against Ziegenhals as the foundation manager, see § 4945(a)(2), and a second tier tax of 50 percent of the amount involved for refusing to agree to corrections, see § 4945(b)(2). In addition, the IRS determined that Ziegenhals’ actions constituted willful and flagrant conduct, and thus imposed a penalty equal to the amount of the private foundation excise taxes pursuant to § 6684. 

I don’t recommend private foundations for taxpayers who lack a huge amount of money.  While it can seem attractive to have something named for you that will outlive you, you need a lot of money to make it worth the hassle.  You have to file very detailed and complicated annual reports with the IRS, with $100 daily penalties for late filing.  Those filings are open to the public.  And if you or your heirs get careless in managing the foundation, the taxes and penalties can explode, as the gentleman from Texas now knows.

It’s much easier to use a donor-advised fund run by a competent charity, like The Community Foundation of Greater Des Moines.  They take care of the filings and hassles, and you get at least as good of a tax benefit as you get from having your own foundation.

Cite: Zeigenhals (USDC SD-TX, 3:11-cv-00464)

 

20120906-1Special interest break approaches the checkered flag.  The bill to extend the special sales tax spiff for the Newton racetrack passed the Iowa Senate yesterday.   The bill lets the track keep sales tax it collects from customers, up to a 5% rate.

The break was first passed when the track opened, with requirement that 25% of the ownership be from Iowa and with a 2016 expiration.  When NASCAR bought the track, that ended the deal.  SF 2341 extends the deal through 2025 and lets NASCAR, owned by a wealthy out-of-state family, keep this special deal that is unavailable for any other tourist and entertainment facilities competing for Iowa dollars (though an athletic facility under construction in Dyersville will have a similar break).  I’m sure they have a good story why they needed to pass this, but I don’t buy it; the track isn’t going anywhere, and NASCAR bought it knowing they didn’t qualify.

Like much bad legislation, it had bipartisan support, passing 36-9.  There is a glimmer of good news.  The total of nine “no” votes is the most I’ve seen for an “economic development” giveaway.  Hats off to Senators Behn (R, Boone), Bowman (D, Jackson), Chapman (R, Dallas), Chelgren (R, Wappelo), Guth (R, Hancock) , Quirmbach (D, Story), Schneider (R, Dallas), Smith (R, Scott) and Whitver (R, Polk).

 

Time for Project Oblivion!  The Des Moines Register reports West Des Moines data center project gets $18 million in incentives:

Iowa’s next major data center prospect seeking state-incentive money is headed to the Iowa Economic Development Authority with a stamp of approval from the West Des Moines City Council.

The council on Monday endorsed “Project Alluvion” as a consent agenda item without any discussion, offering up to $18 million in local incentives to land the major project.

Council documents show Project Alluvion would create at least 84 jobs and a minimum of $255 million in taxable valuation.

“People might say, ‘Geez, giving $18 million for only 84 jobs.’ The jobs are important, but it’s more than the jobs,” Councilman Russ Trimble said after Monday’s meeting. “It’s going to help us build the tax base and keep property taxes down.”

That’s 214,285.71 per “job.”   So, if we were to move our firm to West Des Moines, that would qualify us for about $7.5 million.  Hey, we use computers — we’re high-tech!  We’d even call it a cool name, like Project Oblivion!  Or Des Moines can pay us to stay, whatever.

Related:  LOCAL CPA FIRM VOWS TO SWALLOW PRIDE, ACCEPT $28 MILLION

 

Joseph Henchman, Wisconsin Approves Income Tax Reduction, Business Tax Reforms (Tax Policy Blog).

 

Kris20140321-3ty Maitre, Changes Coming for IRA Rollovers in 2015. (ISU-CALT)  ” So going forward, advise your client to make only one IRA rollover per tax year, or to be on the safe side one rollover every 366 days.”

Peter Reilly, No Margin For Error When Using IRA Rollover As Bridge Loan   

Kay Bell, IRS offers an easier way to deduct your home office 

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): M Is For Medicare Payments   

Paul Neiffer, One More Reason Why Tax Reform is Going After Cash Method:

 I ran across a posting on the net farm income and loss reported by Schedule F farmers for 2011 and 2012.  During each of these years, the USDA estimated that farmers had net farm income in excess of $120 billion.

However, on schedule Fs reported by individual farmers, they showed a net loss in 2011 of about $7.11 billion and for 2012 a net loss of $5.06 billion. 

Yeah, “simplification” is really why farmers need accrual accounting.  Not paying tax is a lot simpler.

 

Jeremy Scott, Portman’s Disappointing Tax Reform Plan (Tax Analysts Blog).

Len Burman, Profiles in Courage at the IRS (Really) (TaxVox).  It’s a good post, once you get past the manifestly false statement that the current scandals are “fake.”  And you’ll notice that Doug Shulman, unlike the hero of the Burman post, left on his own terms.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 320

 

 

Going ConcernThe Debate Heats Up Over How Many Computer Monitors You Should Have.  The good folks at GC quote some loser who says nobody needs more than one monitor.  Here’s how I feel about the issue:

monitors

Now if the one monitor was, oh, 3′ x 5′, I’d reconsider.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/24/14: Iowa corporate tax, $409 million; Iowa tax credits, $337 million. And: Bozo no-nos!

Monday, March 24th, 2014 by Joe Kristan


20120906-1
How about a trade: Corporate Income Tax for Corporate Welfare.
  Interesting numbers from The Des Moines Register:

The state awarded $278.5 million in tax credits during the 2013 fiscal year, down 9.3 percent from the year before, according to a new revenue report.

The department estimates that Iowa will have to pay a maximum of $436.9 million for fiscal 2014, and $487.9 million in fiscal 2015. Those numbers are considered the state’s “contingent liabilities.” However, the department expects claims on the awards will be less.

The department expects the state will pay about $337.9 million in fiscal 2014, and $366.8 million for fiscal 2015.

The entire net revenue from Iowa’s corporation income tax for 2013 was $403.6 million, with an estimate for fiscal 2014 of about $409 million.  So the entire Iowa corporate tax system takes about $400 million from corporations and then hands over 75-85% of it to other businesses.   Let’s consider the difference to be a fee for administering this system of taking from the productive and giving to the well-connected.  It’s about a wash.

From the outside, the answer seems obvious: no tax credits, no corporation tax.  Iowa would go from having one of the very worst corporation income taxes — and the one with the highest stated rate — to one of the very best.  The downside is that it would displace a little industry of tax credit middlemen and fixers idle economic development officials.   If that’s a downside…

Related: The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.

Chelsea Keenan, Are tax incentives an effective economic development tool? (Cedar Rapids Gazette). “But an October 2013 study published in the Journal of Regional Science that examined the possible benefits to states that offer manufacturers tax incentives receive, and determined there is no measurable gain.”

Lyman Stone, Illinois Speaker Madigan Proposes 3 Percent High-Earner Tax (Tax Policy Good).  Illinois is doing its best to make Iowa look good.

 

20121120-2Jonathan Adler, Was Delaying the Employer Mandate Legal? Did the IRS Even Check? (Volokh Conspiracyvia the TaxProf):

The legal justification for the employer mandate delay offered by the Treasury Department has been exceedingly weak.  Perhaps this is because the Treasury Department never considered whether it had legal authority to delay the employer mandate until after it made the decision to delay it.

More of the results-driven regulation we’ve been talking about.

 

roses in the snowPeter Reilly, Do Some Looking And Thinking Before Signing Form 1040 .  “I’d like to suggest that you take a deep breath and actually look at your return before you take that final step.”  Excellent advice.

Kay Bell, 4 tax breaks for older filers

William Perez: What to Do if You Get a Call from the IRS Asking for Money.  If they haven’t contacted you by mail, hang up.   It’s a scam.

Kristy Maitre, recently of IRS and now with the ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation, tells how to go about Requesting the Transfer an of IRS Audit.  “Do not simply say that you want to transfer the audit. That will result, in nearly all cases, with a non-transfer.   You must state your case.”

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): L Is For Lost Property

Jack Townsend, Another UBS Depositor Indicted; the Russian Connection

Keith Fogg, What is the scope of a tax lien discharge versus the remaining tax lien (Procedurally Taxing)

 

haroldJoseph Henchman, Kevin Spacey at Annapolis Bar Tonight to Lobby Legislators for Subsidies (Tax Policy Blog):

Kevin Spacey is my favorite actor—I spent my entire recent vacation flight watching his movies—so it’s hard for me to say bad things about him. But he’s also a celebrity with an alleged net worth of $80 million lobbying for tax subsidies from Maryland taxpayers.

Sure, asking folks to subsidize Hollywood millionaires may seem odd, but as an Iowan said during the height of our starry-eyed film credit debacle:

But some benefits can’t just be measured on a dollar-for-dollar basis. The movies provide employment to local actors, construction crews, artists, caterers, drivers and a host of others. They expose non-Iowans to what the state has to offer. More intangible is the benefit of interactions in a state that can be cut off from the trends and centers of power. Not to mention the excitement factor. We’ve relied on caucuses every four years to bring action and celebrities to town. Now, sightings are anytime, any place.

So pay up, peasants!  You might see a star!

 

Renu Zaretsky, Tax Talk in the District, the Midwest, and Abroad.  It’s the TaxVox news roundup.

Tax Justice Blog, Big News in Ohio: Governor’s Unfair Tax Cut Plan Unveiled.  

Annette Nellen,Book recommendation – Geezer Rap

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 319

News from the Profession.  PwC Competing Against Shaving, Toys and Delicious Food for Guinness World Record Award (Going Concern).

 

Sometimes bad examples are the best teachers.  Blogger  Russ Fox provides some with his “Bozo Tax Tips” series for this year, beginning with Bozo Tax Tip #10: Email Your Social Security Number.  Don’t do it!  “As I tell my clients, email is fast but it’s not secure.”

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/13/14: Looming Payday Edition. And: incentives galore!

Thursday, March 13th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20130104-1Deduction day looms.   March 15 is the deadline for calendar-year corporate return filings and payments.  It’s also an important deadline for accrual-basis taxpayers for another reason:  compensation accrued at year-end by a calendar-year accrual-basis taxpayer has to be paid by March 15 of the following year to be deductible in the year accrued.

As every first-year accounting student learns, accrual accounting tries to match expenses with the period in which the income is earned.  If a bonus is based on calendar-year sales or profits, it normally can’t be paid until after year-end, when the numbers are sorted out; still, the bonus is related to those sales, so accrual accounting counts the expense against that year’s income.

The tax law has many limits on accrual accounting.  For example, accrued expenses to “related parties,” typically owners and their families, can’t be deducted until the expenses are actually paid.  The tax law gives accrual businesses 2 1/2 months after year-end to pay accrued compensation to non-related employees.  Otherwise, the deduction is deferred until the year in which the employee is paid.

Does the compensation have to be paid by Saturday, or can I wait until Monday?  The tax law provides that when tax returns are due on a weekend, the deadline is extended to the following monday.  That’s why 2013 calendar-year corporation returns  are due March 17, 2014 – March 15 is on Saturday this year.

But the IRS says that doesn’t work for compensation.  Rev. Rul. 83-116 holds that it only applies to “acts required to be performed in connection with the determination, collection, or refund of taxes”  — things like filing returns.  So, according to IRS, the March 15 deadline still stands for payment 0f 2013 accrued compensation.  It’s not clear that the IRS would win in court on this — they have lost on a similar issue — but you don’t want to be the test case.  If you want to deduct 2013 accrued compensation on your 2013 return, pay it by Saturday.

 

 

haroldIncentives!  Coralville Likely on the Hook for Large Chunk of Von Maur Taxes.  Coralville marches to the beat of its own drummer, who apparently is heavily medicated.

Hey, let’s pay $34 million to build a Des Moines Convention Hotel!  Brian Gongol reports “The city financed the hotel to help spur convention business…but now it’s in danger of losing money.”  You don’t say.

Tax Justice Blog, Film Tax Credit Arms Race Continues: “Saying “no” to Hollywood can be a difficult thing for states, but here are a few examples of lawmakers and other stakeholders questioning the dubious merits of these credits within the last few weeks”.

Good.  Iowa doesn’t seem to have been badly hurt since it turned from subsidizing filmmakers to jailing them.

Related: Robert Wood, Film Taxes Ensnares Beckhams, Bob Geldof, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Annie Lennox & More

 

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): F Is For Foreign Tax Credit.  “For many taxpayers, it’s more advantageous to claim income taxes you paid or accrued during the year to a foreign country or U.S. possession as a credit than as a deduction.”

William Perez, Chart: Total Refundable Credits from 1990 to 2011.  There are more of them now.

Peter Reilly, Hedge Fund, TEFRA And Community Property Give Woman Tax Nightmare

Russ Fox, The IRS Needs Volunteers for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

 

Cara Griffith, States’ Perspectives on Federal Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog)

Joseph Henchman, Nebraska Legislators Approve Inflation Indexing But Drop Major Tax Overhaul (Tax Policy Blog)

Howard Gleckman, Mike Lee’s Tax Plan: An Intriguing Idea That Would Add $2.4 Trillion to the Deficit (TaxVox)

Kay Bell, House panel finally looking at Internet sales tax legislation

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 308

News from the Profession.  Tweeting a Lot About Audit Stuff Can Get You a Job at Deloitte.  (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/12/14: Hundreds of Panthers fear ID-theft. And: more smidgens!

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

uni-logoID Theft may affect 200 University of Northern Iowa employees.  KWWL.com reports:

In February, when the issue was first discovered, about 50 people had reported issues filing their federal income taxes. Now, University officials say 200 employees have come forward, and but not all of those are fraud. Still, that has psychology department secretary Jan Cornelius concerned. She said her social security number was stolen.

The problem was identified by taxpayers whose returns were rejected because somebody else had already filed under their numbers.  You need to be careful with your Social Security Number, and you should never transmit tax documents as unencrypted email attachments.  Use a secure file transfer portal, like Roth & Company’s Filedrop, to send tax files electronically.

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

More Smidgens.  The House Oversight Committee investigating the Tea Party Scandal issued a report yesterday blasting the idea that the IRS stall on right-side 501(c)(4) groups was just a non-political coincidence involving bumblers in Cincinnati.  Using IRS documents and e-mails, the report paints a picture of an effort driven by a highly-political bureaucrat to “do something” through IRS regulation to administratively reverse the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision.  From the report’s conclusion:

Evidence indicates Lerner and her Exempt Organizations unit took a three pronged approach to “do something about it” to “fix the problem”of nonprofit political speech:

1) Scrutiny of new applicants for tax – exempt status (which began as Tea Party targeting);

2) Plans to scrutinize organizations, like those supported by the “Koch Brothers,” that were already acting as 501(c)(4) organizations; and

3)“[O]ff plan” efforts to write new rules cracking down on political activity to replace those that had been in place since 1959. Even without her full testimony, and despite the fact that the IRS has still not turned over many of her e-mails, a political agenda to crack down on tax-exempt organizations comes into focus. Lerner believed the political participation of tax-exempt organizations harmed Democratic candidates, she believed something needed to be done, and she directed action from her unit at the IRS. Compounding the egregiousness of the inappropriate actions, Lerner’s own e-mails showed recognition that she would need to be “cautious” so it would not be a “per se political project.”

Committee Democrats continue to insist that there is no “political motivation,” and no evidence of White House involvement.  To deny that targeting “Tea Party” and “Koch-funded” organizations is political is to insult our intelligence.  As far as White House involvement, the Chicago Way isn’t for the Boss to pick up the phone and call the Cincinnati service center.  The President’s public in-your-face criticism of the Supreme Court for Citizens United at a State-of-the-Union address gave his supporters in the bureaucracy all the guidance they needed.

The TaxProf has a roundup.

 

roses in the snowWilliam Perez, Deductions for Self-Employed Persons.  “Deductions that go on Schedule C reduce both the self-employment tax and the federal income tax.”

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): E Is For EE Bonds   

Russ Fox, The Moral Climate may have Changed but the Law Hasn’t. “Thus, until Congress changes the law a professional gambler cannot deduct gambling losses in excess of wins.”

Kay Bell, Beware tax break bait and switch.  “Yes, gifts to your favorite charity can be deducted, but only if you itemize on Schedule A.”

Paul Neiffer, Permanent Means Permanent:

North Dakota law regarding easements is unique.  It appears to be the only state in the country that limits easements to 99 years by law.  Since the Tax Code requires that the conservation easement be of a permanent nature, the Tax Court ruled in favor of the IRS and disallowed all of the easement charitable donations.

Oops.  Still, I think anything “permanent” should be looked at skeptically.  Nobody knows whether it will seem wise to lock up a parcel 100 years from now.

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Tackling The Dreaded Section 754 Adjustment   

 

20120906-1David Brunori, Where Is the Outrage? (Tax Analysts Blog):

According to Good Jobs First, there are 514 economic development programs in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. More than 245,000 awards have been granted under those programs. I ask again, where is the outrage? The system is antithetical to the idea of free markets. A quarter of a million times, state governments decided what is best for producers and consumers. That should make us cringe. First, the government is inefficient at providing public goods, and it is terrible at manipulating the markets for private goods. But more importantly, those 514 economic development programs are almost all the result of insidious cronyism. Narrow business interests manipulate government policymakers, and those interests prosper to the detriment of everyone else. Free markets be damned.

And while I’m looking for outrage, where are the liberals? The 965 companies in the report received over $110 billion of public money. Berkshire Hathaway, a company with $485 billion in assets and $20 billion in profits, received over $1 billion of that money. Its chair, William Buffett, is worth about $58 billion. Buffet, by the way, is still a darling of the left. He has some nerve to call for higher taxes. The billion dollars his companies took would pay for a lot of teachers, healthcare, and other public goods. 

They take just a little bit at a time from all of us so we don’t notice, and they give it in big chunks to their well-connected friends, who certainly do notice.   The report David refers to is here.

 

Joseph Henchman, State Sales Tax Jurisdictions Approach 10,000 (Tax Policy Blog).  Small wonder online sellers don’t want to collect everyone’s sales tax.

Elaine Maag, The Many Moving Parts of Camp’s Tax Reform for Low-Income Families (TaxVox)

 

Joseph Thorndike, The Last Time Everyone Gave Up on Tax Reform, It Actually Happened (Tax Analysts Blog).  But not this time:

Ultimately, Reagan agreed to make tax reform a priority. And his support was crucial. No lawmaker, no matter how exalted, well intentioned, or energetic, can move the ball like a president.

Which is one very important reason why 2014 is different from 1984. President Obama has no discernible interest in fundamental tax reform. So conventional wisdom is right: The Camp tax plan is going nowhere fast.

I think that’s right.

 

All it needs is a little pasta and fresh lemon.  Argentina: Authorities investigate tax evasion via garlic exports through shell companies

Career Corner.  It Is Almost Certain You Will One Day Be Replaced by Machines (Going Concern).  

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/11/14: The Taxpayer Hotel Edition. And: private-sector Kristy!

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Des Moines public officials think a fancy new convention center hotel is just what we need to hang with the cool kids, reports KCCI.com:

A plan to build a four-star hotel next to Hy-Vee Hall and Wells Fargo Arena won’t happen unless Des Moines city leaders can convince the state’s economic development authority to fork over millions in tax incentives for the project.

Des Moines Assistant City Manager Matthew Anderson said this week is a prime example that proves why a hotel is needed next to the Iowa Events Center.

Fans from across the state are coming to downtown Des Moines in droves to cheer on their favorite teams at the boy’s state basketball tournament.

Cindy Curran said there’s something missing. “Accommodations to stay overnight,” said Curran. “A nice hotel with restaurants in there, amenities to go with that.”

wells fargo arena

A casual reader could be forgiven for thinking that there are no hotels within a few blocks of Wells Fargo Arena.  They might think that the Des Moines Marriot Downtown, with its own nice restaurant and bar, had suddenly vanished.  They might think the historic Renaissance Savery Hotel, home of Bos Restaurant, had closed down.  They might think the new Hyatt Place in the Liberty Building had already failed.  And has the historic Hotel Fort Des Moines and its Django Restaurant disappeared after all these years?

Nope, they’re all going strong, and all still connected to Wells Fargo Arena by an enclosed all-weather skywalk system.  In fact, Downtown Des Moines has more restaurants and places to stay than ever.  They need a new competitor, apparently, but one that can’t happen  without $34 million in subsidies tax incentives.

If a business can’t happen without taxpayer subsidies, that’s a sure sign that it shouldn’t happen in the first place.  Convention centers have been a money pit for governments around the country, as the think tank Heartland Institute reports:

As convention planners seek to have large new hotels and related facilities built for their events, taxpayers are often stuck footing the bill for what could be a building that sits empty much of the year.

It’s always easier to support a new business when you invest somebody else’s money.

Related: The Convention Center Shell Game.

 

KristyMaitreIowa’s IRS stakeholder liaison privatizes herself.   From the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation:

CALT is pleased to announce that Kristy Maitre, the former IRS Senior Stakeholder Liaison for the State of Iowa, has joined our staff. Kristy brings 27 years of IRS experience to her role as CALT’s new tax specialist.

Practitioners who have attended our seminars are already familiar with Kristy and her vast breadth of practical knowledge of tax and estate planning. Kristy has taught hundreds of continuing education classes to tax practitioners around the country. At CALT, she will continue to offer training through live seminars, but will expand her reach with frequent webinars and other educational offerings through the CALT website. Stay tuned as CALT will soon unveil more exciting changes enabling us to better serve the tax practitioner community.

Great news for Kristy and ISU-CALT, bad news for IRS service.

 

William Perez, Free Tax Software Available Through IRS Free File

Russ Fox, Regulating Tax Preparers Always Prevents Tax Preparer Fraud (Not True, of Course)

potleafTaxGrrrl, It’s No Toke: Colorado Pulls In Millions In Marijuana Tax Revenue.  I think popular support for pot prohibition, with its attendant violence, prison crowding, and other social costs, will continue to decline.  At some point the lure of revenue will overcome the reflexive instinct of politicians to preserve control over things.

Jason DinesenWhat’s So Bad About More People Preparing Their Own Taxes?  “My goal is to have clients who actually need a professional preparer, or at the very least, people who could prepare their own taxes but who like the comfort provided by having a professional take care of it for them.”

One of these is not like the others  Filing season 2014: Death, taxes, root canals and refunds.  (Kay Bell)

 

Carlton Smith, Tax Court dodges CDP record rule ruling (Procedurally Taxing)

Jim Maule, Cracking the Tax Protest Movement.  “The unfortunate thing about the tax protest movement is that most of the people in it are vulnerable folks who fall for the siren song of the ringleaders, just as those who support special tax breaks, even without benefitting from them, have fallen for the siren songs of those who procure special tax breaks for themselves and their clients.”

 

Joseph Henchman,  Idaho Considering Complicated and Gimmicky Job Creation Tax Credit.  (Tax Policy Blog) The best tax incentive is a simple, low-rate tax system without gimmicky incentives.

taxanalystslogoMartin Sullivan, If the Camp Tax Reform Bill Won’t Pass, Why Is It So Important? (Tax Analysts Blog):

The Camp discussion draft has changed the tax policy landscape like no other single document in the last three decades, for two reasons. First, it has burst the bubble of all the feel-good tax reformers who have been wasting our time promoting unrealistic tax plans. The Camp plan is the ultimate reality check on tax reform. It is far more complicated and painful than marketers of tax reform have told the public to expect. It is unlikely that any realistic tax reform would be any shorter or sweeter than the Camp draft.

The second reason the Camp reform is monumentally important is the extensive and detailed workmanship that went into it.   

I’m not convinced — I think the initial draft of a tax reform plan should be a lot more idealistic.  The cynical, politically-necessary modifications will arrive soon enough on their own, and conceding so many of them up front only invites more.

 

Jeremy Scott, Camp Hits Popular Deductions Hard (Tax Analysts Blog).  “The elimination of the state and local tax deduction is one of the larger revenue raisers in Camp’s plan.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 306

 

Quotable:

When the law interferes with people’s pursuit of their own values, they will try to find a way around. They will evade the law, they will break the law, or they will leave the country. Few of us believe in a moral code that justifies forcing people to give up much of what they produce to finance payments to persons they do not know for purposes they may not approve of. When the law contradicts what most people regard as moral and proper, they will break the law–whether the law is enacted in the name of a noble ideal such as equality or in the naked interest of one group at the expense of another. Only fear of punishment, not a sense of justice and morality, will lead people to obey the law.

Milton Friedman, via David Henderson.

 

News from the Profession: The Profession is Really Reaching For the “I Still Let My Mom Pick Out My Outfits” Demographic (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/17/14: Big tax subsidy edition. And: the $70 million doggie treat!

Monday, February 17th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120906-1Do you think the legislature would approve an $12 million annual subsidy to support the operations of a publicly-traded corporation?  Trick question!  They already have.

The Department of Revenue last week released its listing of claims for the Iowa research credit over $500,000 for 2013.  Unlike the federal credit, the Iowa credit is “refundable” — if the company claiming the credit has less tax due than its credit, the state writes the company a check for the difference.  Of the $58.2 million in credits claimed, about 65% of them exceeded taxes due and were granted as refunds, according to the report.

Two John Deere entities combined to claim over $18 million in credits in 2013; assuming the 65% figure applies to them, that means the got a net $12 million subsidy from Iowa taxpayers.

The Des Moines Register reports:

Twelve of Iowa’s major employers accounted for more than 86 percent of tax credit money awarded for research and development last year, according to a new Revenue Department report.

Companies claimed a total of $53.3 million in credits for research and development in 2013, with 12 companies claiming $46.2 million of that amount. Including individuals who claimed credits, the total rises to $58.2 million.

While recipients of the credits will always argue passionately for their virtues, it’s impossible to justify cash operating subsidies from the state for a dozen well-connected corporations.  The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan would benefit all taxpayers, not just those who hire tax credit harvest consultants to get cash for what they would do anyway.

 

Liz Malm, Richard Borean, Lyman Stone, Map, Spirits Excise Tax Rates by State, 2014 (Tax Policy Blog)

20140217-1

It looks like Iowa hits the sauce pretty hard.

 

Annette Nellen, State income tax filing post-Windsor.

Jason Dinesen, Glossary of Tax Terms: Enrolled Agent   

Kay Bell, IRS’ first batch of 2014 tax refund checks averages $3,317

 

Russ Fox, Tax on the Run Owners Run to ClubFed:

Here’s a scheme for you: The government has set up this new tax credit worth thousands of dollars. What if we find some impoverished individuals, have them fill out tax returns claiming this credit, and we pocket all that cash? We’ll just phony up some other parts of the return to make it look real. They’ll never catch us!

As an aside, this sort of thing happens with all refundable tax credits. It’s one of the reasons why they attract fraudsters like moths are drawn to bright lights.

Yes, this really happened…except for the part about never being caught.

But even if you catch them, that money is gone.

 

taxanalystslogoChristopher Bergin, To Fix the IRS, You Have to Fund It (Tax Analysts Blog)

This agency is so mismanaged that there may very well be corruption. But I have no proof of that. I do, however, agree with those who are calling for a special prosecutor. Because the way House Democrats are behaving – ignoring that there is any problem at all – is almost scandalous, and what the Obama administration is doing is useless.

And that brings me to the House Republicans. They think it’s a good idea to punish the IRS by cutting its budget. That won’t fix the problem, and it’s the classic cutting-off-your-nose-to-spite-your-face move.

We tax practitioners deal with the degrading IRS service levels every day, and it’s clear the IRS should be better funded.  It won’t happen, though, unless the IRS finds a way convince Republican appropriators that it isn’t a political arm of the other party.  Dropping the proposed 501(c)(4) regulations is probably a necessary, though not sufficient, first step.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 284

Tax Justice Blog, Congress Is About to Shower More Tax Breaks on Corporations After Telling the Unemployed to Drop Dead.  Apparently the “extenders” bill is showing some life.

Jack Townsend, Government Files Protective Appeal in Ty Warner Sentencing 

 

Via Wikipedia.

Via Wikipedia.

The $70 million doggie treat.  The greyhound industry is a legacy of the early days of gambling in Iowa, but as opportunities to lose money recreationally have expanded, gamblers have lost interest in the doggies.   Yet state law still requires two casinos to retain their dog tracks.  Now the Des Moines Register reports that the casinos are willing to buy out the dogs for $70 million:

Combined betting on greyhound races in Dubuque and Council Bluffs has dropped from $186 million in 1986 to $5.9 million in 2012, a 97 percent decline. Both dog tracks typically have only a scattering of fans in grandstands that once held thousands of patrons.

The proposed legislation envisions a payment of $10 million annually for seven years for Iowa’s greyhound industry. This would include a total of about $55 million from Horseshoe Casino in Council Bluffs and about $15 million from the smaller Mystique Casino in Dubuque.

The casinos say they are losing $14 million annually on the dogs.   I would guess that horse racing in Iowa has a similarly hopeless economic model.

Somewhat related: Tyler Cowen, Triply stupid policies.

 

News from the Profession: Just What Every Accountant Wants for Valentine’s, Another Calculator (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/14/14: Dallas county leads Iowa AGI. And: will you all be my valentines?

Friday, February 14th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

iowa countiesDallas County leads Iowa’s counties in AGI race; Decatur brings up the rear. The IRS this week released its individual tax return statistics by county and zip code this week.  I can’t resist wading into the data — I could wallow in it all day, but I won’t get paid for that this time of year.  I can get away with a few observations, though.

  • Iowans filed 1,420,569 1040s in 2011, reporting a total adjusted gross income of a little over $54 billion — an average of $53,033 per return.
  • Dallas County had the best 2011, reporting an average AGI of $78,169.  Dallas County is a fast-growing suburban county west of Des Moines.
  • Decatur County, a rural county on the Missouri border, was 99th and last, with average AGI of $35,323.
  • Polk County, Iowa’s most populous county, had average AGI of $59,570.
  •   $54 billion of Iowa’s $75 billion in AGI was wages.  $1.1 billion was interest and $1.2 billion was dividends.
  • Iowans reported $2.093 billion in AGI “business or profession net income.”  When politicians want to increase tax rates on “the rich,” they are taxing Iowa employers, whether or not they realize it.

 

20120906-1Iowa Senate extends NASCAR sales tax break.  When the Iowa Speedway opened in Newton, the Iowa General Assembly gave them a unique gift: they let the track keep sales tax it collects for 10 years.  One of the conditions for the gift was continued 25% ownership by Iowans, which inconveniently went away when NASCAR bought the track last year.

No problem!  The Des Moines Register reports that the Senate is moving swiftly to enact new legislation not only allowing the out-of-state owners to keep the sales tax they collect, but they are extending the deal, which was to expire in 2016, for an additional 10 years.

I’m sure the NASCAR people are fine folks, but so are the people who run every entertainment venue in Iowa that competes for Iowa’s leisure dollars.  Only NASCAR gets this special break.  NASCAR is also the beneficiary of a special federal break for “qualified motor sports entertainment facilities.”   NASCAR is controlled by a single wealthy North Carolina family.  It’s strange how the bipartisan leadership in the legislature gives them special treatment.

 

Wikipedia image

Wikipedia image

Beaned.  The Justice Department has filed a notice of appeal of the extraordinarily lenient tax evasion sentence — community service and no jail time — to the inventor of the Beanie Baby.   (Chicago Tribune)

 

William Perez, What Goes Where on the 2013 Form 1040

Paul Neiffer, John Deere Expects Increase (Hopes For) in Section 179 and Bonus Depreciation.  It’s good for equipment sales.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 281

Jamie Andree, Celebrating Valentine’s Day with Comments on the Innocent Spouse Regulations.  (Procedurally Taxing).  Nothing says “I love you” like claiming innocent spouse relief.

 Tax Trials, Court of Appeals Rules that IRS Cannot Regulate Return Preparers

 

Scott Hodge, How Much More Redistribution is Needed to Make Every Family “Equal”? (Tax Policy Blog).   It will never be enough for some people.

Howard Gleckman, Why is the U.S. Olympic Committee Tax Exempt? (TaxVox).  Probably for much the same reason NASCAR gets special federal and Iowa tax breaks.

 

The Critical Question. Could a flatulence tax on cows slow climate change? (Kay Bell)

News from the Profession.  Turns Out Your Non-Diverse Wardrobe Probably Makes You a Better CPA (Going Concern)

Happy Valentine’s Day!  Infanti: Big (Gay) Love: Has the IRS Legalized Polygamy? (Going Concern).  Will you be my Valentine?  And you, and you…

 

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