Posts Tagged ‘Cronyism’

Tax Roundup, 3/29/16: How you figure S corporation stock basis. And: Cronyism!

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

capitol burning 10904Cronyism 95, Taxpayers 1. The bill to provide a refundable tax credit — that is, a subsidy run through tax returns — for “bio-renewable chemical production” flew through the Iowa House of Representatives yesterday. Only Bruce Hunter (D-Des Moines) voted against SF 2300 in the house. He joins three Senate Democrats (Bolkcom, Quirmbach and Dearden) as the only opposition in the General Assembly to a classic bit of central planning through the tax law.

Iowa already has 24 economic development credits, budgeted to cost taxpayers $277 million in the coming fiscal year. Apparently we needed one more.

Rep. Hunter and Sen. Quirmbach cast two of the three votes against the disastrous Film Tax Credit Program. With a $10 million cap, at least this mistake will cost less than the film fiasco.

Other coverage:

O. Kay Henderson, Biochemical tax credit gains legislative approval, headed to governor

Erin Murphy, Renewable chemical tax credit in Iowa advances closer to final approval

 

S-SidewalkBasis: the first hurdle for determining your deductible S corporation lossYesterday we outlined the unholy trinity of rules restricting losses from pass-through activities: Basis, the at-risk rules, and the passive loss rules. Today we’ll talk a little bit more about S corporation stock basis. Tomorrow will talk about how you can use loans to your S corporation to get basis for deductions, and Thursday we will talk about how the rules are a little different for partnerships.

S corporation basis changes every year.

–It starts with your initial investment in your S corporation stock.

-It is increased by your share of taxable income and deductible expenses, as reported in lines 1-12 of the 1120-S K-1.

-It is increased by tax-exempt income (like municipal bond income) and reduced bypermanently non-deductible expenses (like the 50% non-deductible portion of meals and entertainment expenses); these are reported on line 16 of the 1120S K-1.  If you have a business that generates depletion deductions, factor your “excess depletion” from 1120S K-1 line 15c.

– It is increased by capital contributions, which appear nowhere on the 1120S K-1.

– It is reduced by distributions, which are on line 16 of the 1120-S K-1.

If your losses exceed your basis, your losses are limited to your basis.   If you have multiple deduction items, you have to prorate them to fit your basis.

For example, Assume you started 2015 with $3,000 in basis in your S corporation shares.  You have a K-1 line 1 loss of 9,000, line 4 interest income of $2,000, and a charitable contribution passing through on line 12 (code A) of $1,000.

You have $5,000 in basis to deduct your $10,000 in in expenses – the opening $3,000 in basis plus the positive $2,000 interest income.  You pro-rate the $10,000 expenses — you can (potentially) deduct $4,500 of line 1 loss and $500 of charitable contributions.  The remaining deductions carry forward until you increase your basis via contributions, loans, or future income. I say “potentially” because you still have to clear the “at-risk” and “passive loss” hurdles.

Many S corporation tax prep programs generate helpful basis and deductible loss schedules. Not all preparers do this, though, and even when they do, they are only as good as their starting information.  If the preparer doesn’t know what you paid for your stock, the schedules can’t be correct. Ultimately, it’s up to taxpayers to track their own S corporation stock basis.

This is another of our irregular series of 2016 filing season tips, running through the April 18 filing deadline.

For more information on loss limitations from pass-throughs, check out Peter Reilly’s 2014 post Through The Hoops.

 

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TaxGrrrl, Walmart Gets Big Win Over Puerto Rico: No More ‘Walmart Tax’. Puerto Rico’s desperate revenue grabs are a preview of what states like California and Illinois will soon face.

Robert Wood, IRS Admits Audit Chance Is Small — And Dropping Like A Rock. They’re busy with other things.

Stuart Bassin, Sixth Circuit Requires IRS to Disclose Return Information of Non-Parties in Tea Party Exempt Organization Litigation (Procedurally Taxing). “The Government can continue fighting, but that seems to be an uphill battle and a battle which may produce further precedent that the Service will not like.”

Peter Reilly, Estate Denied Discounts For Marketable Security Family Limited Partnership. “This decision makes me nervous about getting discounts for any family limited partnership that consists solely of marketable securities.”

 

Jack TownsendGuest Blog: IRS FOIA Request Unveils Previously Undisclosed Estate Tax National Policy for Offshore Disclosures

Kay Bell, Which 2016 presidential candidate will cut your tax bill?

 

Scott Drenkard, A Very Short Primer on Tax Nexus, Apportionment, and Throwback Rule (Tax Policy Blog). “The best run down of these concepts can be found in our 2015 edition of Location Matters: The State Tax Costs of Doing Business.”

Stuart Gibson, Information Exchange: Bonanza for Tax Administrators, Temptation for Hackers (Tax Analysts Blog). “While many countries outside the U.S. first reacted negatively to this massive information grab, some soon began to realize the value of coordinated information exchange. They realized, as the old saying goes, ‘if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.'”

Renu Zaretsky, Tax Day is around the corner, and the IRS can take your call! Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers the eternal IRS complaints of underfunding, the DOA Obama budget tax proposals, and the subsidies Michigan paid for “Batman v. Superman,” because Michigan has solved all of its problems.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1055.

News from the Profession. AICPA and CIMA Putting This New Thing to Members for a Vote (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 6/12/14: Tax Credits run for governor. And: bad day for IRS in CRP tax case?

Thursday, June 12th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120906-1Crony tax credits have become an issue in Iowa’s race for Governor, reports The Des Moines Register:

The Republican Governors Association is out today with another TV ad attacking Jack Hatch.

The new ad accuses Hatch of sponsoring legislation to increase the availability of development tax credit while applying for tax credits for a real-estate project in Des Moines.

“Jack, isn’t that a conflict of interest?” the narrator asks.

It’s true that Mr. Hatch has been a successful player in the tax credit game.  It may be the merest coincidence that an awful lot of tax credits go to political insiders like Mr. Hatch and the spouse of Governor Branstad’s opponent in his first election.  But that’s not the way to bet.

While I’m all for anything that spotlights the inherent corruption of targeted tax credits, the Republican Governors Association may be inadvertently bringing friendly fire uncomfortably close to its own man.  For starters, the Governor is a five-term incumbent. If the system is set up to be played by political insiders, the Governor has had plenty of time to do something about it.

More importantly, political insiders can benefit richly from crony tax credits without claiming them on their own tax returns.  They benefit by claiming credit for the “jobs” generated by well-connected businesses that play the system to get the tax credits.  The Governor has played this game tirelessly.  Just off the top of my head

The $80 million+ in tax breaks for fertilizer companies.

The sales tax giveaway to the NASCAR track in Newton.

The rich tax breaks for data centers.

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Governor Branstad, pre-mustache

In deals like this, the politicians claim credit for the jobs “created,” with no regard whether the lucky recipients of the breaks would have behaved differently without them, or for the jobs lost by other companies who compete with the winners for resources and customers, or for the jobs that would have been created had the funds been left with taxpayers to use without direction from politicians.

So yes, Governor, by all means call down the artillery on crony tax credits.  Just be sure to keep your helmet on.

Related:

The joys of cronyism

LOCAL CPA FIRM VOWS TO SWALLOW PRIDE, ACCEPT $28 MILLION

Governor’s press conference praises construction of newest great pyramids

 

20130114-1Roger McEowen, Eighth Circuit Hears Arguments in CRP Self-Employment Tax Case. “It would appear that the oral argument went well for the taxpayer.” 

Jana Luttenegger,  IRS Releases Taxpayer Bill of Rights.  “ These rights have always existed, but now the IRS has put the rights together in a clear, understandable list to be distributed to taxpayers.”  If they’ve always existed, they sure haven’t always been respected.

Peter Reilly, Your Son The Lawyer Should Not Be Your Exchange Facilitator.  Peter talks about the case I mentioned earlier this week, including another issue I left out.

 

Tax Justice Blog, Reid-Paul “Transportation Funding Plan” is No Plan at All:

Instead of taking the obvious step of fixing the federal gas tax, Reid and Paul propose a repatriation tax holiday, which would give multinational corporations an extremely low tax rate on offshore profits they repatriate (profits they officially bring back to the United States). The idea is that corporations would bring to the United States offshore profits they otherwise would leave abroad, and the federal government could tax those profits (albeit at an extremely low rate) and put the revenue toward the transportation fund.

Yeah, not a real fix.

Scott Hodge, Likely “Solutions” to Highway Trust Fund Shortfall Violate Sound Tax Policy and User-Pays Principle (Tax Policy Blog)

 

No Walnut STAndrew Lundeen, Higher Marginal Tax Rates Won’t Improve the World (Tax Policy Blog). “The Upshot and Dave Chappelle may be right that for someone with a $100 million that next dollar might not means as much as the first dollar. But that money doesn’t sit collecting dust. It is invested in the broader economy.”

Howard Gleckman, Did Multinationals Use a Foreign Earnings Tax Holiday To Burnish Their Financials Rather Than Reduce Taxes? (TaxVox)

Keith Fogg, Supreme Court’s Decision on Monday in Arkison Could Impact Kuretski Case and Constitutionality of the Removal Clause for Tax Court Judges (Procedurally Taxing)

Jack Townsend, BDO Seidman Personnel Sentenced for B******t Tax Shelter Promotion 

Kay Bell, NBA beats NHL in this year’s jock tax championship 

 

TaxGrrrl, Waffle House Refuses To Allow Waitress To Keep $1,000 Tip   

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/14/14: Dallas county leads Iowa AGI. And: will you all be my valentines?

Friday, February 14th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

iowa countiesDallas County leads Iowa’s counties in AGI race; Decatur brings up the rear. The IRS this week released its individual tax return statistics by county and zip code this week.  I can’t resist wading into the data — I could wallow in it all day, but I won’t get paid for that this time of year.  I can get away with a few observations, though.

  • Iowans filed 1,420,569 1040s in 2011, reporting a total adjusted gross income of a little over $54 billion — an average of $53,033 per return.
  • Dallas County had the best 2011, reporting an average AGI of $78,169.  Dallas County is a fast-growing suburban county west of Des Moines.
  • Decatur County, a rural county on the Missouri border, was 99th and last, with average AGI of $35,323.
  • Polk County, Iowa’s most populous county, had average AGI of $59,570.
  •   $54 billion of Iowa’s $75 billion in AGI was wages.  $1.1 billion was interest and $1.2 billion was dividends.
  • Iowans reported $2.093 billion in AGI “business or profession net income.”  When politicians want to increase tax rates on “the rich,” they are taxing Iowa employers, whether or not they realize it.

 

20120906-1Iowa Senate extends NASCAR sales tax break.  When the Iowa Speedway opened in Newton, the Iowa General Assembly gave them a unique gift: they let the track keep sales tax it collects for 10 years.  One of the conditions for the gift was continued 25% ownership by Iowans, which inconveniently went away when NASCAR bought the track last year.

No problem!  The Des Moines Register reports that the Senate is moving swiftly to enact new legislation not only allowing the out-of-state owners to keep the sales tax they collect, but they are extending the deal, which was to expire in 2016, for an additional 10 years.

I’m sure the NASCAR people are fine folks, but so are the people who run every entertainment venue in Iowa that competes for Iowa’s leisure dollars.  Only NASCAR gets this special break.  NASCAR is also the beneficiary of a special federal break for “qualified motor sports entertainment facilities.”   NASCAR is controlled by a single wealthy North Carolina family.  It’s strange how the bipartisan leadership in the legislature gives them special treatment.

 

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Beaned.  The Justice Department has filed a notice of appeal of the extraordinarily lenient tax evasion sentence — community service and no jail time — to the inventor of the Beanie Baby.   (Chicago Tribune)

 

William Perez, What Goes Where on the 2013 Form 1040

Paul Neiffer, John Deere Expects Increase (Hopes For) in Section 179 and Bonus Depreciation.  It’s good for equipment sales.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 281

Jamie Andree, Celebrating Valentine’s Day with Comments on the Innocent Spouse Regulations.  (Procedurally Taxing).  Nothing says “I love you” like claiming innocent spouse relief.

 Tax Trials, Court of Appeals Rules that IRS Cannot Regulate Return Preparers

 

Scott Hodge, How Much More Redistribution is Needed to Make Every Family “Equal”? (Tax Policy Blog).   It will never be enough for some people.

Howard Gleckman, Why is the U.S. Olympic Committee Tax Exempt? (TaxVox).  Probably for much the same reason NASCAR gets special federal and Iowa tax breaks.

 

The Critical Question. Could a flatulence tax on cows slow climate change? (Kay Bell)

News from the Profession.  Turns Out Your Non-Diverse Wardrobe Probably Makes You a Better CPA (Going Concern)

Happy Valentine’s Day!  Infanti: Big (Gay) Love: Has the IRS Legalized Polygamy? (Going Concern).  Will you be my Valentine?  And you, and you…

 

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