Posts Tagged ‘Dan Alban’

Preparer regulation loses again; DC Circuit upholds Loving decision.

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20130121-2The Shulman-era IRS preparer regulation program is dead.  The Appeals Court for the DC Circuit today upheld the DC District decision in Loving, a decision holding that the IRS had no authority to enact its elaborate “Registered Tax Return Preparer” regime.  The winning attorneys at the Institute for Justice issued a press release:

Today, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the IRS had no legal authority to impose a nationwide licensing scheme on tax-return preparers. The decision affirms a January 2013 ruling by U.S. District Court Judge James E. Boasberg, which struck down the IRS’s new regulations as unlawful. Both courts rejected the agency’s shocking claim that tax-preparer licensure was authorized by an obscure 1884 statute governing the representatives of Civil War soldiers seeking compensation for dead horses.

“This is a major victory for tax preparers—and taxpayers—nationwide,” said Dan Alban of the Institute for Justice, the lead attorney for the three independent tax preparers who filed the suit. “The court found that Congress never gave the IRS the power to license tax preparers, and the IRS cannot give itself that authority.”

It’s great news for taxpayers, who will not have their return prep costs artificially increased by a regulatory scheme written by a former H&R Block CEO.  It’s good news for preparers, who will not have to waste time and effort in futile paperwork that will do nothing to solve the real problems of the tax system — baroque complexity and internal controls so weak that petty grifters steal billions through refund fraud annually.

The court was blunt in dismissing IRS arguments that a Reconstruction-era statute on Civil War claims gave them the authority to invent an elaborate preparer regulation scheme out of thin air:

In our view, at least six considerations foreclose the IRS’s interpretation of the statute.

Put simply, tax-return preparers are not agents. They do not possess legal authority to act on the taxpayer’s behalf. They cannot legally bind the taxpayer by acting on the taxpayer’s behalf. The IRS cites no law suggesting that tax-return preparers have legal authority to act on behalf of taxpayers. Indeed, a tax-return preparer who tried to act on the taxpayer’s behalf would run into trouble with the IRS…

The IRS may not unilaterally expand its authority through such an expansive, atextual, and ahistorical reading of Section 330.

Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how big is legacy is.

Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how big is legacy is.

It’s bad news for the already battered legacy of The Worst Commissioner Ever, who let identity theft balloon while he wasted his time on this pointless exercise.

Congratulations to Dan Alban and the Institute For Justice for their winning work in this case.  I’m glad to have played a small role as an early agitator against preparer regulation and as a participant in an Amicus brief to the D.C. Circuit opposing the rules.

Cite:  Loving, CA-DC No. 13-5061

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/6/2014: Start this year’s year-end planning now! And lots more.

Monday, January 6th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140106-1I’m back.  It was good to take a little time off after year-end planning season and before the 2013 return season starts.  But now that it’s 12 below with howling winds, I might as well be at the office.

It was sort of a busman’s holiday, though, as I got an early start on my 2014 year-end tax planning.   While December year-end planning is important, it’s asking a lot of one month to do the work of all 12.  You can do some important tax planning in January that will pay off all year long.  For example:

- You can fund your 2014 Individual Retirement Account right now.  If you are married, you can also fund your spousal IRA.  The maximum contribution is $5,500, or $6,500 if you will reach at least age 50 by December 31, 2014.

- You can fund your 2014 Health Savings Account today too.  The HSA limit for taxpayers with a high-deductible plan and family coverage is $6,550 this year; for a single plan, the limit is $3,300.  You need to have a qualifying high-deductible insurance policy, but if you do, you can deduct your contribution and withdraw funds for tax-deductible expenses tax-free.  If you leave the funds in, they accumulate tax-free and can be withdrawn tax-free later for qualifying health costs.  If you stay too healthy to use the funds on medical care, withdrawals are taxed much like IRA withdrawals.

Using spousal IRAs and an HSA, a 50-year old with family coverage can tuck away a combined $19,550 right now and have it earn interest or dividends tax free right away — 15 1/2 months sooner than if you wait until April 15, 2015, the last day you can make these contributions.  And by saving it now, you won’t be tempted to spend it later in the year.

A few other things that you can do right away to get some of your 2014 year-end planning out of the way:

- If you care about estate planning, nothing keeps you from making the $14,000 maximum 2014 exempt gift to your preferred family donees right now.

- Make sure you’ve maxed out your 2014 401(k) deferral with your HR people — or at the very least, be sure you are deferring as much as you can get your employer to match.

- If you are an Iowan with kids, you can make a 2014 College Savings Iowa contribution that you can deduct on your 2014 Iowa 1040.  The maximum deductible contribution is $3,098 per donor, per beneficiary, so a married couple with two kids can put away $12,392 right now.  The Iowa tax benefit works like an 8.98% bonus to you for putting money in your college savings pocket.

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 242: Lois Lerner Is 2013 Tax Person of the Year.  The TaxProf provides access to a Tax Analysts piece that says:

     While many of the Service’s problems were not necessarily its own fault, the exempt organization scandal was an almost entirely self-inflicted wound. No one personifies that scandal more than Lois Lerner.

Lerner ignited a political and media firestorm when she confessed in May that the exempt organizations unit of the IRS Tax-Exempt and Government Entities Division inappropriately handled many Tea Party groups’ exemption applications.

The now former exempt organizations director’s admission and subsequent refusal to testify before Congress contributed to her becoming the public face of the scandal. Although Lerner does not bear sole responsibility for the IRS’s missteps in processing conservative groups’ exemption applications, the publicity of her role in one of the year’s biggest news stories earns her the distinction of being Tax Notes’ 2013 Person of the Year. 

And in spite of much wishful thinking, it is a scandal.

It’s worth noting that Tax Analysts gives an honorable mention to Dan Alban, the Institute for Justice attorney behind the District Court defeat for the IRS preparer regulation power grab.

 

1040 2013William Perez, How Soon Can a Person File Their 2013 Tax Return?: “The Internal Revenue Service plans to begin processing personal tax returns on Friday, January 31, 2014, for the tax year 2013 (IR-2013-100).”  But don’t even try to get it done until you have your W-2s and 1099s all in hand.

Jana Luttenegger, Reinstating Tax-Exempt Organizations  (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). She explains new IRS procedures for organizations that have lost their exemption by failing to file annual reports with the IRS.

Kay BellSocial Security taxable earnings cap in 2014 is $117,000. Thousands have already hit that tax limit.

Jason Dinesen, Small Business Planning: Got Your Financial Statements and Budget Done Yet?

Paul Neiffer, Remember Your Simplified Home Office Deduction

TaxGrrrl, What You Need To Know About Taxes In 2014: Expired Tax Breaks, Obamacare Penalties & More.

Russ Fox, 1099 Time.  A look at who has to issue information returns, and who gets them.

 

Robert D. Flach poses AN ETHICAL, AND PERHAPS LEGAL, DILEMMA:

Beginning with the 2014 Form 1040, am I legally, or ethically, required to assess my client a penalty for not having health insurance coverage?  Or can I, as I do with the penalty for underpayment of estimated tax, ignore the issue and leave it to the IRS to determine if a penalty is appropriate?  Will I face a potential preparer penalty if I ignore the issue?

It’s a good question.  I suspect they plan to make us ask the question, under the same sort of rules that make preparers unpaid social workers for the earned income tax credit.  I don’t expect to ever have to ask the question, though, as I think this dilemma will resolve itself by an indefinite delay, and eventual repeal, of the individual mandate as Obamacare falls apart.

 

David Brunori, State Tax Reform Advice for 2014 – Think About Spending (Tax Analysts Blog). Sometimes I think that’s all they think about.  But hear David out:

But in thinking about tax reform efforts in the past year, I am more convinced than ever that our refusal to rethink the size of government makes fixing problems with the tax code impossible. Here is what we know. Cutting government programs is difficult because each program has a constituency that will fight like a gladiator to protect its access to public money. So when the topic of tax reform comes up, conservatives and liberals vow to find a fix that will neither raise nor decrease spending. But we also know that politicians – the majority anyway – generally hate raising taxes. This reflects the fact that most of their constituents hate the idea of paying more taxes. But the costs of government continue to increase. And that leads to worse tax policy as states look to gimmicks, excises, gambling, and other junk ways of collecting revenue. It also ensures that some horrible tax policies are never fixed.

If the government dialed back spending to population-and-inflation adjusted 1990 numbers, I don’t think mass famines would result.

Scott Hodge, Despite Rising Inequality, Tax Code is at Most Progressive in Decades (Tax Policy Blog). I’m not sure “despite” is the right word here.

Annette Nellen, Continued bonus depreciation or tax reform?

Cara Griffith, Cyclists: The Next Great Source of Tax Revenue? (Tax Analysts Blog):

 While I strongly believe taxes should not be used to encourage or discourage behavior, the effect of requiring cyclists to register their bikes is not the big problem with these types of proposals. The real problem is that they don’t raise any revenue. Dowell’s suggestion that a bike registration fee would raise some $10 million for the city of Chicago is a pipe dream. Almost every cent would be used simply to administer the program.

From the interests of the bureaucrats proposing the program, just funding new patronage jobs is a perfectly acceptable result.

Howard Gleckman, Time To Park The Commuter Tax Subsidy (TaxVox)

Peter Reilly, Are IRS Property Seizures The Stuff Of Reality TV?   Now there’s some grim viewing.

The ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation has a shiny new look at its website.

Tony Nitti, Yes Virginia, There Is A Tax Extender Bill In Congress.

The Critical Question: If You Won the Lottery Tomorrow, Would You Still Go to Work? (Going Concern).  Only to clean out my desk, and laugh.

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/23/2013: PTIN Paralysis! And: pay Iowa taxes with a cell phone?

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130121-2The IRS has turned off its preparer registration initiative following the federal court decision enjoining the program.  The Service issued this statement yesterday:

As of Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, the United States District Court for the District of Columbia has enjoined the Internal Revenue Service from enforcing the regulatory requirements for registered tax return preparers. In accordance with this order, tax return preparers covered by this program are not currently required to register with the IRS, to complete competency testing or secure continuing education. The ruling does not affect the regulatory practice requirements for CPAs, attorneys, enrolled agents, enrolled retirement plan agents or enrolled actuaries.

The Internal Revenue Service, working with the Department of Justice, continues to have confidence in the scope of its authority to administer this program. It is considering how best to address the court’s order and will take further action shortly. Please continue to check this site as additional information becomes available.

The second paragraph is the most interesting. While the IRS doesn’t admit that it overreached, this is far short of a vow to fight to the last appeals brief.  One can only hope they will reconsider the whole misbegotten regulatory scheme.

Meanwhile, Accounting Today confirms reports the IRS has shut down the PTIN registration system and the Registered Tax Return Preparer testing program.  They report the PTIN system is expected to come online again after the RTRP registration system is removed from it.  Meanwhile, the Return Preparer Office has apparently turned off its phones.

All of this makes me believe that the IRS is not seeking any emergency stay of Friday’s decision and is planning to do without the RTRP rules for this season, anyway.

 

TaxGrrrl posts a great interview with the winning attorney in the preparer regulation decision, Dan Alban.  She encounters a new perspective on whether regulation actually does more good than harm (my emphasis?:

Finally, with all of the legal niceties out of the way, I asked Alban the really tough questions: What about all of those folks who say that regulation is a good thing? What does this ruling mean for taxpayers? And why would you embrace a scheme that wouldn’t require – at a very basic level – some semblance of regulation to ensure that preparers are competent?

Alban didn’t hesitate. Intent, he says, is key. The intent of any kind of licensing scheme should be to protect the consumer. But Alban, who focuses on a occupational licensing in his practice, noted that frequently, these kinds of laws instead protect established interests from competition. That is, he says, not in the best interest of the consumer.

And with that, I paused. You see, in all of the years that I’ve been writing this blog, I’ve only received a phone call from IRS complaining about a post once. And it was for this one. The IRS wanted to assure me that the exemptions had nothing to do with any special interests. None. Not a whit. Interestingly, many preparers at smaller firms thought differently. I received a number of supportive emails and “off the record” comments about how the new rules felt discriminatory.

Bingo. Regulation always favors the big.  It’s no big deal for H&R Block headquarters staff to deal with regulations for all of its franchises.   It’s a different story for small operators like Sabina Loving, the solo preparer in a low-income South Side Chicago neighborhood who was lead plaintiff in last week’s decision.

It would appear that attorneys benefited disproportionately from the regulations; as a point of context, the American Bar Association (ABA) has encouraged the regulation of “other” preparers for years. Why is that? Is there maybe something to Alban’s idea that these kinds of laws protect established interests from competition?

And then Alban said something else that struck me:  about fifty years ago, only 1 in 20 workers in the U.S. needed government permission (in the way of regulations) to earn a living. Today, that number is 1 in 3. That, he said, is troubling. We are increasingly relying on the government to decide who is qualified to perform services for us. Is that something we want? Does regulation really make someone competent? Or honest?

No, it just gives them one more way to control things.

Russ Fox: Alphabet Soup

Trish McIntire, Voluntary Licensing?

 

Paying taxes with cell phone money?  The Iowa Department of Revenue yesterday announced a venture with Dwolla to enable taxpayers to pay taxes with Dwolla’s mobile device online payment technology.  The Des Moines Register Reports:

 Dwolla is a cash-based payment network that provides real-time, low-cost, online and mobile payments, officials said. Instead of charging a floating percentage and fixed fee per transaction for goods and services or dealing with administrative issues of checks, Dwolla’s network costs a flat 25-cent fee on any payment over $10, and it’s free for transactions under $10.

Iowa Department of Revenue Director Courtney Decker said the state’s first use of Dwolla will allow businesses that already pay more than $100 million in cigarette stamp taxes the option of using the Dwolla network. She added, “This is just the tip of the iceberg” in terms of Dwolla’s potential in state government.

Dwolla’s service is cheaper and safer than mailing and processing a paper check, Decker said, and it will allow participating businesses to receive their tax stamps more quickly. She added that 89 percent of Iowa individual income taxes are  filed electronically, but the percentage of people paying taxes electronically to her department is far lower.

Paying online now requires a slow application process and analog mail delivery to receive permission to make electronic payments.  The Dwolla system will be a big improvement if the Department enables it for individual income taxes.

 

IRS wins another demutualization case.  The IRS continues to fight the to tax proceeds on the demutualization of insurance companies.  They famously lost the Fisherdecision, which held that taxpayers could treat their payments for insurance premiums as basis when they received shares of stock in an insurance company changing from mutual ownership to a stock company.  But earlier this month the IRS won a Federal District Court Decision in California rejecting the Fisher“open transaction” scheme.  If the IRS wins on appeal, this will likely end up settled by the Supreme Court.  This is the second IRS victory since the Fisher decision.

Cite:  Reuben, DC CACD, CV 11-09448

 

Roger McEowen, Two Important Tax  Developments:

On January 18, two key tax developments occurred.  First, a federal district court wiped out the  IRS preparer regulations.  Later, IRS  announced that farmers aren’t stuck with the March 1 deadline and can file  timely by April 15.

 

David Brunori, Jindal’s Bold Move (Tax.com):

Republican Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal has made the most provocative tax reform recommendation in many years. Jindal said he was going to overhaul the tax law. If he has his way, he will revolutionize it.

Pay attention, Governor Branstad.

 

Donald Marron,  Five Key Facts about the House Debt Limit Bill (Tax Vox)

Howard Gleckman,  How Obama’s Inaugural Address Frames the Policy Debate for the Next Decade (TaxVox).  I don’t think so.

Kay Bell,  Tax Carnival #111: Countdown to Filing.  It’s Kay’s roundup of tax tax-related posts from all over.

Jack Townsend,  Steps in OVDI/P Processing and Opting Out.  Dealing with the IRS when you have an undisclosed offshore account.

Jason Dinesen,  Home Office Deduction: IRS Offers a Simplified Calculation Option, But the Qualifying Rules Haven’t Changed

Patrick Temple-West,  Private equity tax breaks in jeopardy, and more (Tax Break)

William McBride,  Phil Mickelson’s Tax Rate

Robert D. Flach is Buzzing!  He also has posted What to Give Your Tax Preparer at Mainstreet.com.

Jim Maule, Tax Ignorance and Its Siblings.  “Tax ignorance, of course, is but one part of political ignorance, as I explored in When Tax Ignorance Meets Political Ignorance.”  Yet the good professor insists that 50% + 1 voting by ignorant voters works better than trusting individual decisions in the marketplace.

 

News you can use: Life After Big 4: What You May Miss and Won’t Miss At All (Going Concern).  I don’t miss it one tiny bit.

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Tax Roundup, 1/21/2013: Preparer regs struck down. What’s next?

Monday, January 21st, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130121-2After most of us stopped paying attention Friday afternoon, a federal judge in Washington D.C. stunned the tax world by striking down the IRS effort to regulate tax preparers.  U.S. District Court Judge James Boasburg ruled that the IRS lacks the legal authority to impose the RTRP program.

So now what?

I expect the IRS to appeal the ruling to the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, but that would take months.  It seems unlikely that Judge Boasburg would stay his own ruling in the meantime, and I doubt that an appeals court will either.

Dan Alban of the Institute for Justice, the legal team behind the suit, told Accounting Today:

“Anything that’s part of the RTRP regulations is struck down by this decision today,” Alban explained. “The PTIN is a separate regulation and it’s done under separate statutory authority. It’s a ‘shall issue’ type of permit. If you pay the fee, if you pay that amount of about $65, you’ll get a PTIN. The IRS was going to make the PTINs conditional on having the RTRP credentials, but now they’re not allowed to do that. It will go back to how it was last year, when you had to get a PTIN, but anyone could get one and you didn’t have to pass an exam or complete any continuing education.”

So no PTIN refunds, but no testing or CPE requirements, and, presumably, no more RTRP designation.  This would seem to end the need to get IRS approval for CPE programs, a requirement that has shut down many local CPE programs, like those offered by the organization of Iowa Enrolled Agents.

As of this writing, the IRS has yet to comment.

So who wins?  Small unenrolled preparers are big winners.  They are now free of the brain-dead RTRP bureaucracy.  Enrolled Agents are also big winners.  The RTRP designation threatened to kill the EA brand by confusing taxpayers about the difference between enrolled agents, with their much stricter testing and CPE requirements, and Registered Tax Return Preparers.  But the biggest winners are taxpayers, who will not have their costs increased by an IRS-imposed guild system that would reduce the availability of tax preparers while doing nothing to increase their quality.

The losers?  The IRS, which loses its ability to bully preparers with the extrajudicial discipline system of the new regulations.  The big national preparers, who were instrumental in drafting the rules because they promised to weaken their competitors.  And, retrospectively, Doug Shulman, the former IRS commissioner who masterminded the requirements.

 

When at first you get enjoined, try, try again.  In 2010 a Kansas City-area man was enjoined from setting up a bunch of tax shelter plans, finding that the man “Deliberately Advised His Clients to Break the Law, and Helped Them Go About Doing so.”  Apparently he dusted himself off and went right back to work.  From a Department of Justice Press release:

The Justice Department announced today that a federal court has permanently barred Cash Management Systems, a Virginia corporation, from promoting two tax schemes that allegedly involve disguising wages as tool-reimbursement or tool-rental payments. Also subject to the civil injunction order were Cash Mangement’s marketing arm, Xell Enterprises, incorporated in Kansas; its principals, Bruce Lemay and Richard Herson Mills; and Allen Davison, of Overland Park, Kan. According to the government complaint, Davison provided legal opinion letters regarding the schemes and served on Cash Management’s board of directors.

 Judge Eric F. Melgren of the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas entered the permanent injunction, which the defendants consented to without admitting to the allegations against them. Davison was enjoined from promoting other tax schemes in 2010.

No, you can’t give a tax free “tool allowance” to employees.  And just because somebody was enjoined from promoting other tax schemes doesn’t mean this one works.

 

In case you were wondering: Iowa explains sales tax treatment of Groupons.

Gongol, The people who pay a tax aren’t always the people who give the money to the government:

Companies that make medical devices are paying a 2.3%  excise tax to help fund the Federal health-care program. A lot of people undoubtedly think that means the 2.3% will come straight out of the company’s profits (and this in turn can lead to strongly populist instincts about sticking it to the people making a profit in health care). But the people who pay for a tax aren’t always the ones who cut the checks to the IRS.

So true.

Paul Neiffer, IRS Announces April 15 Farmer Deadline

Russ Fox, Farmers & Fishermen Get Relief From Catch-22 Situation

Jack Townsend,  Tax Court Applies Willful Blindness to Find Civil Fraud by Clear and Convincing Evidence.  A discussion of the Fiore case, which I discussed last week.

TaxGrrrl, Why Justice Matters, Revisited

Richard Morrison,  Louisiana Tax Reform: Sizing up the Jindal Plan (Tax Po0licy Blog)

Roberton Williams,  How the New Tax Act Affects the Alternative Minimum Tax (TaxVox): “One curiosity that won’t please high-income taxpayers: the new Obamacare taxes on investment income don’t count in determining whether you owe  AMT.”

Robert D. Flach,  RULES FOR DEDUCTING NON-CASH CONTRIBUTIONS

Jana Luttenegger, IRS Offers Options if You Can’t Pay Your Taxes (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Kay Bell, Tax filing preparation checklist

Brian Strahle,  Is Your Company Paying Too Much Virginia BPOL?

Dan Meyer, Identity Theft: When a Rogue Tax Preparer Could Cost You More than a Filing Fee

 

OK, taking bribes is bad, but not putting them on your 1040 is really beyond the pale.  C. Ray Nagin, Former New Orleans Mayor, Indicted on Federal Bribery, Honest Services Wire Fraud, Money Laundering, Conspiracy, and Tax Charges.  

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Tax Roundup, 12/18/2012: Fiscal cliff rumors — higher threshold for rate hikes; deduction benefit limits.

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

20121116-1iabizThe “Fiscal Cliff” negotiations seem to be heating up.  The inane haggling over the final version of the inevitably awful tax law that we will have for this year and next year seems to have heated up a bit yesterday.  Details are cloudy and could change, but here’s what it looks to me like they are talking about for taxes:

  • An increase of the top ordinary income tax rate to 39.6%, but at a level of $400,000 or higher; the President had been holding out for a $250,000 threshold.
  • Some stupid restriction in the tax benefits of itemized deductions — perhaps capping the value of the deductions at 28%.
  • An AMT patch retroactive to last year and extension of all of the “expiring provisions.”

The President’s most recent offer includes some surprisingly good tax policy in the midst of the general awfulness of the tax increase plans.  From the Wall Street Journal:

On the tax side, the administration’s biggest proposal would permanently
extend relief from the alternative minimum tax. That’s a provision
designed decades ago to target the wealthiest Americans that now hits
tens of millions of middle-class households, in part because it wasn’t
indexed for inflation.

That would be great news.  The politicians play with fire by temporarily increasing the AMT exemption every year or two as a cheap ploy to pretend they will receive additional AMT revenue after the temporary “patch” expires — allowing them to appear slightly less irresponsible.

Also:

The administration’s new proposal also would permanently extend a raft
of temporary tax breaks that Congress has passed over the years,
benefiting businesses as well as individuals. Notable examples include
the research and experimentation credit for businesses, as well as the
deduction for state and local sales tax for individuals.

While I would prefer just letting these expiring provisions expire, I’d rather they be made permanent than going through the charade of re-enacting them every year or two just to play stupid budget games.

Fiscal Cliff Notes:

Nick Gillespie & Veronique de Rugy,  Obama and Boehner, Both Reckless Spenders

New York Times,  Obama’s New Offer on Fiscal Crisis Could Lead to Deal

Russ Fox,  Fiscal Cliff Deal Near?

Kay Bell,  Boehner offers Obama a $1 million top income tax bracket in fiscal cliff talks

Ashlea Ebeling,  Millionaires Are Doing Roth Conversions Before The Fiscal Cliff Hits, Should You Too? (Forbes)

Jason Dinesen,  An Example of What Could Happen if an AMT Patch Isn’t Passed

 

IRS extends employee – independent contractor settlement program.  The IRS yesterday announced (Announcement 2012-46) that it is extending its program to resolve the classification of workers as employees or independent contractors.

 

Rudy Penner,  How Eisenhower and Congressional Democrats Balanced a Budget (TaxVox).  They spent a lot less, that’s for sure.

Dan Alban,  IRS Rule Threatens Tax-Preparing Entrepreneurs

Jeremy Scott,   Democrats Should View Japan as a Warning (Tax.com)

Joseph Henchman,  IRS Reverses Course, Will Continue Providing Migration Data (Tax Policy Blog)

Paul Neiffer,  What Does Unified Credit Mean?

Robert D. Flach,  WHAT’S NEW FOR NEW YORK STATE INCOME TAXES FOR 2012

TaxGrrrl,  Actor Called Out As Unpatriotic For Move Over Taxes Fires Back.  So patriotism means letting them pick your pocket?

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