Posts Tagged ‘David Henderson’

Tax Roundup, 3/28/16: Can I deduct that K-1 loss now, later, or never?

Monday, March 28th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20161120s k-1 cornerBasis, At-Risk, Passive. The Schedule K-1 forms issued to owners of S corporations and partnerships might be the most confusing of the information returns we use to compute our 1040s. That’s because they can embody a lot of obscure tax law that goes into determining how partnership and S corporation income is taxed.

Partnerships and S corporations are “pass-through entities.” That means they normally don’t pay tax on their income. I instead “passes through” to the tax returns of their owners, the partners and shareholders. The owners report the income — and they also deduct the losses. But when they deduct the losses can be very confusing.

Search engine queries related to K-1 losses are one of the Tax Update’s biggest traffic sources, so it seems wise to give the Googlers what they want. Today we will give an overview of the three hurdles taxpayers must clear before they can deduct a K-1 loss. In the coming days we will spend a little more time on each hurdle, and I will update this post with links to those posts, but today we’ll stick to the big picture.

Start with your basis. The tax law first requires you to have enough “basis” in your partnership interest or S corporation stock (or debt, sometimes) to deduct the loss. If you start the year with $1,000 in basis, you have the potential to deduct $1,000 of losses — if you clear the next two hurdles. But if you don’t have basis, you go no further with your loss.

“Basis” can be complicated, but in most cases, it starts with your investment in the pass-through entity. It is increased by income and further investments, and decreased by losses and distributions.

Is your basis “at-risk”? The at-risk rules sometimes seem like a historical curiosity, like gas lines or 8-track tapes. They were enacted in the Ford Administration to attack that era’s mass-marketed tax shelters. But while obscure, they still count.

They add an additional requirement to the rules that require you to have basis to take a loss. They add a rule requiring that basis to be “at-risk.” While some of the rules can be obscure and arbitrary, the basic idea is that if you can’t really lose your own money on the deal, you shouldn’t be allowed a loss, except to the extent the deal generates income in the future. It also treats loans from some related parties or others with interests in the deal as not “at-risk.”

Is your loss “passive?” If you clear the first two hurdles, you still have to contend with the “passive loss” rules. These were enacted to fight the tax shelters of the 1980s by deferring “passive” losses until the taxpayer has “passive” income, or until the “passive activity” (still my favorite tax oxymoron) is sold. Whether an activity is “passive” is usually determined based on how much time you spend during the year working in it. Rental activities are automatically passive for taxpayers other than “real estate” professionals.

Updates in the series:

3/29/16: How you figure S corporation stock basis

How loans to your S corporation can give you basis.

This is another of our irregular series of 2016 filing season tips. We’ll be doing these right up through the April 18 deadline. 

20160328-2

 

 

Andrew Mitchel, Section 911 Housing Cost Amounts Updated for 2016:

Code §911(a) allows a qualified individual to elect to exclude from gross income an “Exclusion Amount” related to foreign earned income and a “Housing Cost Amount.” The Exclusion Amount for 2016 is $101,300.

Mr. Mitchel goes on to explain the more complicated housing cost amount.

Kay Bell, Problems with prepaid card tax refunds. “But there’s one big problem with these cards. Tax crooks absolutely love them”

Jason Dinesen, Glossary: Iowa Tuition & Textbook Credit. “Almost any expense counts toward the credit.”

Kyle Pomerleau, Why We Should Care About More Than Just Distributional Tables. “Growth, distribution, and revenue are all important aspects of tax policy. If we only focus on one, we miss important policy nuances.”

TaxGrrrl, IRS Commissioner Admits IRS Isn’t A Favorite, Talks Tax Refunds, Budget & Taxpayer Services:

Noting that “the IRS is not anyone’s favorite government institution, and we will not win any popularity contests, especially in an election year,” the Commissioner went on to share that a recent poll indicated that 12% of taxpayers liked Russia’s Vladimir Putin better than the IRS.

A Tax Notes story ($link) about Koskinen’s speech quotes him as saying, “But don’t look for a shot of me on CNN, without a shirt, riding a horse.” I don’t think anyone would actually look for such a thing.

 

half-mast

 

David Henderson, To Address the Top One Percent, Allow Competition (Econlog, quoting Jonathan Rockwell):

For lawyers, doctors, and dentists– three of the most over-represented occupations in the top 1 percent–state-level lobbying from professional associations has blocked efforts to expand the supply of qualified workers who could do many of the “professional” job tasks for less pay.

The IRS and its friends in the national tax prep franchise firms want to do the same thing with the tax prep business via their push for preparer regulation.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1052Day 1053Day 1054. The Day 1053 link is to It’s Been 513 Days Since Any Big 3 Network Has Touched the IRS Scandal. It’s been longer than that since I’ve watched a Big 3 network news show.

Peter Reilly, Sixth Circuit Looking To Protect Taxpayers From IRS Not IRS From Taxpayers. Peter still thinks the IRS is being picked on.

 

What are these “results” of which you speak? Results Only Work Environments (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 3/1/16: Iowa-only preparer regulation dies unmourned.

Tuesday, March 1st, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20151124-1Bwahahaha! Tax pros across Iowa can continue to pillage their poor unsuspecting clients, and there’s nothing you can do about it!

What? You aren’t being pillaged? You are free to hire and fire a tax preparer or consultant who is incompetent, or who charges more than you want to pay? Then maybe it’s not such a tragedy that a bill to license and regulate tax preparers in Iowa, SSB 3135, died in the Iowa legislature at the “funnel week” deadline. The bill, sponsored by the Chairperson of the Iowa Senate State Government committee, “requires the Iowa accountancy examining board to license all persons who wish to practice as tax consultants or tax preparers.” As Russ Fox and Jason Dinesen note, it would exempt attorneys and CPAs while covering enrolled agents.

The proposal has all of the bad features of the abortive federal tax practice regulation, plus the additional flaw of making tax preparation in Iowa more expensive than in other states.

Occupational licensing is a crony capitalist job killer, and observers across the spectrum, from The Des Moines Register to the Koch Brothers have figured this out. SSB 3135 dies unmourned.

 

Russ Fox, Frivolity Has a Price: $19,837.50. In case you’re wondering why your attorney won’t help you argue that you don’t have to pay taxes because the judge has gold fringe on his flag, Russ can help you.

TaxGrrrlFiguring Out Taxes, Pay And More On Leap Day: Are You Working For Free Today?

Peter Reilly, Colorado Can Force Vendors To Rat Out Residents On Use Tax. Oh, boy.

Keith Fogg, Judge Paige Marvel Will Become New Chief Judge of the Tax Court on June 1 (Procedurally Taxing).

Robert Wood, 9 IRS Audit Tips From The Trump Tax Flap. I’m not sure how universal these tips are.

Kay Bell, Cruz & Rubio release taxes, challenge Trump to do same

Jim Maule, Should Candidates Be Required to Release Tax Returns?  I think they should be required to prepare them by hand on a live webcast.

 

Scott GreenbergThe Most Popular Itemized Deductions (Tax Policy Blog):

20160301-1
“Out of the 44 million households that itemize deductions, almost 43 million deduct the taxes they pay to state and local governments.”

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1027

David Henderson, Henderson on the Case Against a VAT (Econlog).

Greg Mankiw, Misunderstanding Marco. “The Rubio plan is essentially the X-tax designed by the late Princeton economist David Bradford.  It is a progressive consumption tax.”

Tyler Cowen, The regulatory state and the importance of a non-vindictive President. That ship sailed seven years ago, and its return isn’t on the horizon, given the polls.

Renu Zaretsky, Disputes, Development, Filing, and FuelToday’s TaxVox roundup covers ground from Google’s international tax issues to lax security protocols from IRS “free file” providers.

 

Career Corner. Crackin’ Under Pressure: Making Mistakes During Busy Season (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern). “Regardless, mistakes are always mortifying to those who make them and, regardless of what you think, EVERYONE MAKES THEM.”

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 2/15/16: President’s Day. Bah. Humbug. And more Monday news!

Monday, February 15th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20160215-1Today is President’s Day. I don’t care to honor presidents, as a class. They range from remarkable to vile, and they are in the end, just men with a job and great responsibility, often exercised badly.

It seems as good a day as any to ponder a well-buried scandal of the current presidency, the Tea Party scandal. It came to light with a staged admission by Lois Lerner that Tea Party groups had been singled out for special treatment” by the IRS. The admission was intended to get in front of an Inspector General report exposing the partisan mistreatment.

Peter Reilly has followed it closely, from a viewpoint more sympathetic to the IRS than mine. He recently mused, in a post on Day 1000 of the scandal:

The narrative that seems most plausible to me is Lois Lerner as the Agent From Hell.  AFH is my term for a certain type of IRS agent that I have thankfully only encountered a couple of times in my career.  AFH is not that technically astute, but AFH is dogged.  And AFH is certain that your client is up to no good.  AFH just hasn’t quite figured out what that no good is.  That was Lois Lerner and the Tea Party applications, only she had to do her work through minions.  Lois Lerner was passionate about the dark money issue and nobody else seemed to care. So she tortured her line agents to get them to torture bewildered applicants who were already pumped up on conspiracy theories. A perfect storm of bureaucratic bumbling coming across as brilliantly subtle conspiracy.

Toby Miles, IRS.

Toby Miles, IRS.

It was never realistic to think the scandal would bring down the administration, considering how carefully the media cheerleaders avoided the subject. But the lack of presidential involvement only leads to a more disturbing conclusion, one I discussed way back when the scandal was only in single digits:

I doubt the White House left fingerprints on IRS efforts to harass political opponents (though it didn’t lift a finger to stop it).   That leads to an even more depressing possibility: that the IRS went out its way to beat up on the President’s opponents on its own.  Nobody blew the whistle.  That means IRS management is so corrupt and political that it would go after the administration’s political opponents with only a wink and a nudge.  And anybody who doesn’t think this was politically-motivated is kidding themselves.

James Taranto puts it well:

And the IRS scandal was a subversion of democracy on a massive scale. The most fearsome and coercive arm of the administrative state embarked on a systematic effort to suppress citizen dissent against the party in power. Thomas Friedman is famous for musing that he wishes America could  be China for a day. It turns out we’ve been China for a while.

The self-weaponization of the bureaucracy against its political opponents is hugely depressing. The government workforce is overwhelmingly on the side of the political party that favors an ever-larger state. There are plenty of Lois Lerners in the IRS and throughout the Leviathan. The Tea Party scandal, and the complete lack of accountability for its perpetrators, gives no reason to hope those who don’t share that worldview can expect a fair shake. That’s especially true when the sitting president shows no interest in discouraging such behavior.

 

20150215-2

 

Arnold Kling, David Brooks Sends a Valentine. “Brooks claims that the Obama Administration was scandal-free. I think it was more of a case that the mainstream press had his back. Could George Bush have survived the IRS scandal?”

David HendersonIs David Brooks Right about Obama? (Econlog):

But that’s not the worst. Among the worst is his administration’s use of the Internal Revenue Service to go after Tea Party groups. After claiming in May 2013 that any IRS targeting of political groups, if true, was outrageous and that he would hold the relevant people accountable, he has not. Lois Lerner has not been charged. That’s a scandal. It’s true that the scandal did not swallow years from Obama. Is the relevant criterion for a scandal whether it uses up a president’s years or whether the president’s employees use their discretionary power to go after political scandals? If the former, then a president can avoid a scandal by being evasive and shifting the topic, as Obama has done. That’s not integrity, by the way.

And it was true. Whether you believe the IRS was told to do it, or whether you believe the bureaucracy took it on itself to pursue ideological enemies, it was a dangerous ideological abuse of the tax agency that is going unpunished.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1010Day 1011Day 1012. Don’t recall major network coverage of the scandal? Day 1011 says that it’s not because you weren’t paying attention.

 

William Perez, Understanding Form W-2, the Annual Wage and Tax statement. “An overview of common problems with Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, plus a description of various items, codes and amounts shown on Form W-2.”

Annette Nellen, Video – What’s New for 2016 Filing Season

Jason Dinesen, When Are Purchases Made With a Credit Card Deductible?

Kay Bell, ‘Pharma bro’ Martin Shkreli facing $4.6 million tax lien

Jim Maule, Relying on Incorrect IRS Advice Spares Taxpayer Penalty. “The question of how to deal with incorrect advice from IRS employees has befuddled the tax practice community for decades.”

Robert Wood, Atkins Doctor Tax Evasion Conviction Upheld (How Not To Deal With IRS). Sometimes bad examples are the most useful ones.

Russ Fox, North Carolina Added to Bad States for Gamblers. “There’s no longer a deduction for gambling losses, so an amateur gambler residing in North Carolina who has $100,000 of wins and $100,000 of losses owes tax on the $100,000 of wins.”

TaxGrrrl, On Valentine’s Day: Getting A Tax Break After The Big Break-Up. “A Sarasota area Goodwill has your answer: make yourself feel better by donating your ex’s stuff to charity.” Well, compared to leaving it on the curb for the garbage man, it has its attractions.

20150215-3

Tyler Cowen, Do higher marginal tax rates reduce income mobility? Marginal Revolution). “The idea that taxes matter is making a comeback in economics, though I am not sure you would get that impression from most of the economics blogosphere.”

Joseph Henchman, Justice Scalia’s Legacy and What Happens Next (Tax Policy Blog).

Don Boudreaux, Evidence that Donald Trump Is As Ignorant of Economics As Is Bernie Sanders (Cafe Hayek). File under “longest books ever written.”

Scott Greenberg, Checking Bernie Sanders’s Math (Tax Policy Blog). “However, under the Sanders tax plan, households in the middle of the economy would also be subject to two new indirect taxes: a 6.2 percent payroll tax paid by employers (for healthcare) and a 0.2 percent payroll tax paid by employers (for family leave). Virtually all economists agree that, even though payroll taxes are remitted to the government by employers, the burden of the payroll tax is born entirely by wage earners.”

 

News from the Profession. The ‘Everyday Jeans’ Policy Backlash Has Begun (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 10/2/15: What your Health Savings Account can do that your IRA can’t. And: They don’t stay bought.

Friday, October 2nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150803-1Your IRA isn’t an HSA. Last week I was asked whether there was a penalty for taking money from an Individual Retirement Account to pay for surgery. I said there was no penalty, but that it was taxable income. The person who asked was surprised and confused, thinking that penalty and taxation are the same thing. They aren’t.

The Tax Court faced a similar question yesterday. A 47 year-old taxpayer took money from her IRA to pay medical expenses for her non-dependent son. The IRS noticed, presumably via a computer match, and assessed her a 10% early withdrawal penalty, as well as regular income tax. Judge Guy explains the issue:

Generally, if a taxpayer receives a distribution from a qualified retirement plan before attaining age 59-1/2, section 72(t) imposes an additional tax equal to 10% of the portion of the distribution which is includible in the taxpayer’s gross income. Sec. 72(t)(1) and (2). The additional tax is intended to discourage taxpayers from taking premature distributions from retirement plans — actions that frustrate public policy encouraging saving for retirement…

Section 72(t)(2)(B) provides an exception to the imposition of additional tax to the extent that retirement plan distributions “do not exceed the amount allowable as a deduction under section 213 to the employee for amounts paid during the taxable year for medical care (determined without regard to whether the employee itemizes deductions for such taxable year).” Section 213 in turn allows as a deduction “the expenses paid during the taxable year, not compensated for by insurance or otherwise, for medical care of the taxpayer, his spouse, or a dependent…

The “dependent” part was bad news:

The record reflects that petitioner did not claim her son as a dependent for the year in issue and fails to demonstrate that her son met the definition of a dependent provided in section 152. Consequently, we conclude that petitioner is not eligible for the exception under section 72(t)(2)(B) — even assuming that she used the funds in question to pay her son’s medical expenses.

But even if she did qualify to avoid the 10% tax (she didn’t), the withdrawal would still have been subject to income tax.

Health Savings Accounts look a lot like IRAs — they allow tax-free build-up, and they can be tapped penalty free like IRAs for retirement income. But HSA funds withdrawn for medical expenses are tax-free — not just penalty free. As with the IRA, though, the medical expenses have to be the taxpayers, the spouse’s, or a dependent’s. This extra flexibility makes HSAs a better savings vehicle than an IRA for those who qualify.

Not everybody qualifies. You need a “high deductible” health insurance policy to qualify for an HSA. For 2015 a “high deductible plan” is one with an annual deductible of at least $1,300 for single coverage and $2,600 for family coverage.  Annual out-of-pocket costs can’t exceed $6,450 for single coverage and $12,900 for family coverage. The 2015 contribution limits are $3,350 for single coverage and $6,650 for family coverage.

Unlike employer “flex-plan” arrangments, there is no “use it or lose it” feature in HSAs. You can accumulate contributions and save them for a year with large medical expenses, or for retirement. You don’t have to withdraw the funds in the same year as the medical expenses, either; if you had medical expenses in year 1, you can wait until year 2 to withdraw the amount and still have it tax-free.

Cite: Ireland, T.C. Summary Opinion 2015-60

Related Links:

IRS publication 969.

Kiplinger, FAQs about Health Savings Accounts.

 

20141003-2

 

Maria Koklanaris, ConAgra Foods, Winner of Largest-Ever Nebraska Incentive Package, Moving to Illinois (Tax Analysts, subscriber link):

ConAgra Foods Inc., recipient of the largest tax incentive package ever awarded in Nebraska, announced October 1 that it would move its corporate headquarters from Omaha to Chicago, cutting at least 1,500 jobs in the process.

As I’ve said before, incentive tax credits are like taking your wife’s purse to the bar to buy drinks for the girls. It cheats the person who’s paying, the girls aren’t impressed, and if you leave with one, she’s not the type to be faithful.

 

It’s Friday! It’s Buzz Day for Robert D. Flach. Trumpmania figures prominently.

Jason Dinesen, How to Protect a Deceased Person’s Identity. “Thankfully, Congress has now limited access to the Death Master File, which was the cause of much of the identity theft relating to deceased people.”

Paul Neiffer, Form 1099-G Does Not Always Require Schedule F Reporting. “The key thing to remember is just because USDA or a cooperative issues a Form 1099 does not mean the income has to be fully reported on Schedule F and subject to full self-employment tax.”

Jim Maule, Taxation of Prizes, Question Three. “The question, however, also referred to the local or state sales tax. The awarding of a prize is not a sale, so the sales tax ought not apply.”

Kay Bell, Hurricane Joaquin intensifies, threatens East Coast…maybe. Maybe you should dust off your disaster recovery plan once in awhile.

Leslie Book, Restitution Based Assessment and Tax Return Preparers: An Uneasy Mix (Procedurally Taxing). On the problems the IRS has in getting restitution from crooked preparers.

Robert Wood, Marijuana Goes Native American And Tax Free

 

20151002-1

 

David Henderson, via Don Boudreaux:

Herbert Hoover, in the midst of the Great Depression, more than doubled the top [income-tax] rate to 63 percent and increased the bottom rate by more than nine times to 4 percent.  He did this in spite of the fact that raising income tax rates during a depression lengthens the depression.  Franklin Roosevelt carried on Hoover’s policy throughout the 1930s and increased tax rates further.  By 1940, he had raised the top tax rate to 81.1 percent on incomes over $5 million.

Putting the “great” in the Great Depression.

 

Stephen Entin, Expensing: The Right Tax Treatment for All Investment Regardless of Financing Arrangements (Tax Policy Blog)

Howard Gleckman, How Investment Managers (And Maybe You) Would Benefit From Trump’s Tax Plan (TaxVox).

Cara Griffith, Idaho Legislators Shamed Into Good Behavior (Tax Analysts) Politicians, bureaucrats and cockroaches prefer darkness.

Carl Davis, Michigan Becomes the 26th State Where Online Retailers like Amazon Must Collect Sales Tax (Tax Justice Blog).

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 876. Lois Lerner and the Wisconsin witch hunt.

 

The Critical Question. Is Technology Making Accountants Dumb and Lazy? (Chris Hooper, Going Concern).

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 6/8/15: Hush money edition. And: IRA invests in IRA owner’s business, disaster ensues.

Monday, June 8th, 2015 by Joe Kristan
"Dennis Hastert 109th pictorial photo" by United States Congress - Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

“Dennis Hastert 109th pictorial photo” by United States Congress – Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

The TaxProf and I are cited in a New York Times article on the tax implications of former House Speaker Hastert’s hush money scandal: If Hastert Was Extorted, He Could Deduct Some Losses From His Taxes.

Mr. Hastert has been indicted on charges of “structuring” deposits to avoid reporting rules as part of a plan to pay for silence from “Individual A” for alleged sexual contact pre-Congress. From the article:

While extortion payments would be taxable for Individual A, they would actually be partly deductible for Mr. Hastert, said Paul Caron, a tax law professor at Pepperdine University. It’s right there in I.R.S. Publication 17, Chapter 25: You get to deduct losses because of theft, to the extent those losses exceed 10 percent of your adjusted gross income. Blackmail and extortion count as theft.

But to claim the deduction, Mr. Hastert would have to convince the I.R.S. or a court he had been extorted, which could be difficult.

”Sometimes judges will find a way to disallow deductions for what they find unsavory behavior,” said Joe Kristan, a tax accountant with the Roth C.P.A. firm. He noted a case in which a divided Ninth Circuit panel denied a tax deduction for extortion to a man who said he paid hush money to his mistress.

For the record, I have no personal experience in deducting extortion and hush money payments.

Related: Jack Townsend, Article on Structuring to Avoid Bank Currency Reporting Requirements, on the structuring charges of the Hastert case.

 

No Walnut STTaxpayer’s IRA-owned corporation leads to tax disaster. The Eighth Circuit appeals court has upheld horrendous tax penalties against a taxpayer who had an IRA capitalize his business as an investor.

A Mr. Ellis rolled his 401(k) plan into an IRA, which invested about $310,000 in CST, a C corporation. CST started an auto dealership and employed Mr. Ellis as General Manager. That led to unfortunate tax results. From the court opinion (my emphasis):

The tax court properly found that Mr. Ellis engaged in a prohibited transaction by directing CST to pay him a salary in 2005. The record establishes that Mr. Ellis caused his IRA to invest a substantial majority of its value in CST with the understanding that he would receive compensation for his services as general manager. By directing CST to pay him wages from funds that the company received almost exclusively from his IRA, Mr. Ellis engaged in the indirect transfer of the income and assets of the IRA for his own benefit and indirectly dealt with such income and assets for his own interest or his own account. See 26 U.S.C. § 4975(c)(1)(D), (E); 29 C.F.R. § 2509.75-2(c) (“[I]f a transaction between a party in interest and a plan would be a prohibited transaction, then such a transaction between a party in interest and such corporation . . . will ordinarily be a prohibited transaction if the plan may, by itself, require the corporation . . . to engage in such transaction.”)

While the investment itself wasn’t ruled a prohibited transaction, things got messy once the IRA-owned corporation started paying Mr. Ellis a salary — an “indirect transfer” occurred.

The consequences? The prohibited transaction terminated the IRA. That means the whole value of the IRA became taxable income, with no cash made available to cover the taxes. With penalties, the bill will exceed $160,000.

The Moral? Direct business investments from IRAs are dynamite. If you must use retirement plan funds for a business start-up, it may be wiser to take a taxable withdrawal and use the after-tax funds to make the investment. If there is any way to fund it without retirement plan funds, that would be wiser still.

Cite: Ellis, CA-8, No. 14-1310 

Prior coverage here.

 

20150528-1Margaret Van Houten, Legislature Passes Bill Affecting Iowa Trusts and Estates (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).  “Beginning on July 1, 2016, a step grandchild will no longer be subject to Iowa Inheritance Tax.  Currently, direct ancestors and descendants, including stepchildren, were exempt from the tax, while step grandchildren were grouped with other individuals, such as siblings, nieces and nephews and unrelated individuals and were subject to the tax.”

TaxGrrrl, The Not So Skinny On National Doughnut Day. That’s every day!

Jason Dinesen, Breakeven Analysis for Small Businesses — Service Providers and Not-for-Profits

Annette Nellen, More on marijuana businesses and tax ethics. “Despite state actions, the production, sale and use of marijuana is a crime under federal law. Thus, for licensed practitioners, there is concern about ethical violations of helping someone commit a crime.”

Kay Bell, H&R Block explores virtual tax preparation.

Peter Reilly, A New York Day Is Like A New York Minute At Least For Taxes:

In the case of John and Janine Zanetti, the New York Supreme Court Appellate Division agreed with the Commissioner of Taxation and Finance that a New York day can be less than 24 hours.  The point of the decision was to determine whether the Zanettis had spent enough time in New York to be considered statutory residents for the year 2006.

Lovely.

Jim Maule asks Is the Federal Income Tax Progressive? He focuses on the “low” federal effective rate on the “Top .001%.” Of course, the reason people get to those rates is normally because of a one-time event, typically the sale of a corporation, that is taxed at long-term capital gain rates. Such taxpayers are normally at that income level only once in their life. Of course, Prof. Maule ignores the built-in double tax hidden in these figures.

Leslie Book, DC Circuit Criticizes Government in Case Alleging an Israel Special Policy for Tax Exemptions (Procedurally Taxing). “As IRS has increased responsibility beyond its paramount mission of collecting revenues, the historical reasons for the discretion IRS has exercised have lessened.”

Robert Wood, Are On Demand Workers Independent Contractors In Name Only?

Tony Nitti, Put It On The Card! Congressman Proposes To Make Credit Card Debt Forgiveness Tax Free

Russ Fox, Another Las Vegas Preparer Gets In Trouble Over the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion. “I’d say it was something in the water but Las Vegas is in a desert.”

 

20150608-1

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 758Day 759Day 760. The IRS treatment of the Tea Partiers is compared and contrasted with that of the Clinton Foundation.

 

Arnold Kling, Payroll Taxes in Europe. ” I find it hard to reconcile Germany’s relatively low unemployment rate with this high payroll tax rate.”

David Henderson responds:

I don’t find it hard to reconcile the two. The reason: Germany has had high payroll tax rates for a long time–for decades, actually. So real wages have had a long time to adjust.

I understand this as saying the total employment cost is about the same, but the employee gets less of it.

 

Kyle Pomerleau, CRS Outlines Four Important Aspects of the EITC. “The EITC enjoys bipartisan support among lawmakers. This is due to the fact it both reduces poverty among families with children and has a positive impact on the labor force for certain individuals. Yet, the EITC is not without its flaws. It’s benefit phase-out has a negative impact on the labor force and it suffers from high error rate and overpayment.”

Richard Auxier, Choose your tax system: progressive vs. regressive (TaxVox). A critique of the “Fair Tax” and other national sales tax proposals.

 

News from the Profession. Pope Figured The Lord’s Work Could Use a Good Auditor (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 4/8/15: It’s all due a week from today. The case for extensions.

Wednesday, April 8th, 2015 by Joe Kristan


4868 bigThe tax deadline is a week from today. An extension might be a great idea. 
It’s all real at your local tax pro’s office. Late nights, new information, complex returns, tight deadlines — all ingredients for something to go wrong. Is it really a good idea for you to want your tax filing to come out of that?

You tax return isn’t a trivial item. That’s why you are paying for it, or why you are spending hours slaving over it. The consequences of a seemingly minor mistake can be shockingly expensive. You own 10% of a Canadian partnership with some fishing buddies and you didn’t report it on the right form? That’s a $10,000 penalty for you!

That’s why it’s unwise to try to rush it through at the deadline, when you can easily get an extension and have it prepared by somebody who has had some sleep and nutrition.

Here are things I hear from people who don’t want to be extended:

This means I will get audited! No it doesn’t. I have seen zero evidence that extending a return increases the risk of audit. I have filed my own 1040 on extension every year since at least 1990, and have yet to be audited (*knocks wood*). A return with a mistake, on the other hand, definitely increases your risk of audit.

But this means they get an extra six months to look at my return! Yes it does. That doesn’t mean much. While I’m sure it’s happened, I have yet to see a case where a taxpayer had to pay an amount on audit on an extended return that wouldn’t have been caught had the return not been exended in 30 years of tax practice. I have seen cases where we were able to get refunds because we found an error on the return three years after the original due date, but before the extended filing date. It can work both ways.

I always file on time! Extended returns are still filed on time. It’s just a different time. This is usually more an assertion of the individual’s self-importance. It really means “you should drop everything else you are doing and finish my return.” It asserts ego over wisdom and practicality.

Now, the positive things about extending:

It gives you more time to make certain tax return elections. Automatic accounting method changes can be filed with extended returns. For many taxpayers, especially those with real estate investments on their 1040, an extension may give your preparer extra time to find new deductions that are “biblical” in scale under the new “repair” regulations. These aren’t available on amended returns.

It may give you more time to fund deductions. If you have a Keogh or SEP retirement plan, extending your 1040 gives you until October 15 to fund your 2014 deductible retirement plan contributions. Remember, though, that some deductions still have to be funded by April 15 even on extended returns, including IRA and HSA contributions.

20150326-3It may give you more time to find deductions. More than one taxpayer has found a charitable contribution receipt or tax payment that they missed when they sent their pre-extension information in.

Extensions may avoid an amended return. It’s not unknown for a taxpayer who is already filed a complex return to get a late K-1 or a 1099 from a new investment that they didn’t think would issue one. That means they have to file an amended return. The IRS does look at these. It’s always better to extend than amend. 

Extensions can turn a 5% per month non-filing penalty into a 1/2% per month late payment penalty. If you are caught short and can’t pay, it’s a lot cheaper to extend than to blow off the payment.

Finally, and most importantly, an extended return is likely to be more accurate. Workload compression is something tax preparers talk about with each other, if not so much in public. Tired people make more mistakes, and that includes preparers. If you really want to attract IRS attention, drop a digit from a six-figure 1099 or K-1 number.

If you extend, you still need to have 90% of your tax paid in when you file Form 4868 to avoid penalties. Many taxpayers extending 2014 returns will include the amount they would pay as their 2015 first-quarter estimate with the extension payment; that payment is due April 15 too, and it gives them a little cushion against surprises on the extended return.

This is another in our series of 2015 Filing Season Tips. Come back every day for a new one through April 15!

 

Russ Fox, Bozo Tax Tip #4: Procrastinate! “What happens if you wake up and it’s April 15, 2015, and you can’t file your tax? File an extension.”

Robert Wood, 9 Innocent Tax Return Mistakes That Trigger IRS Problems. Nine more good reasons to extend and get your return right.

TaxGrrrl, 13 Quirky Beer And Tax Facts On National Beer Day. They say that was yesterday, but any tax pro will tell you it’s really April 15.

Kay Bell, Chaffetz goes after tax-delinquent federal employees (again)

 

20150408-1

 

The Des Moines Register reports: Bill advances to exempt bees from sales tax

 The [Iowa] House Ways and Means Committee passed a bill Tuesday that would exclude the sale of honey bees from state sales tax laws.

Honey bees have been the subject of much concern in recent years as their numbers have mysteriously declined. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, total losses to managed honey bee colonies was 23.2 percent nationwide during the 2013-2014 winter.

Those honey bee losses – which have been occurring for the last decade – have been linked to many things, including the use of pesticides, disease and loss of habitat.

As far as I know, this is the first time the decline in bees has been linked to sales taxes.

I’m sympathetic to this, in a way, in that I think business inputs should not be subject to sales tax. Still, this is the wrong way to go about it. While I love bees, there’s nothing about apiculture that makes it different from, say, raising earthworms, from a tax policy viewpoint. A group with good lobbyists gets the ball rolling, and everyone else gets left behind.

 

20140805-2

 

TaxProf, Brown: The IRS Should Report on Tax Returns Filed by All 535 Members of Congress. I have a better idea: The President, every member of Congress, every cabinet member, and the IRS Commissioner should all have to prepare their 1040s by hand on a live webcast with a running comment bar. The webcasts should be archived on the Library of Congress website, along with the completed tax returns. I think tax simplification would follow in a hurry.

 

Andrew Lundeen, The Estate Tax Provides Less than One Percent of Federal Revenue (Tax Policy Blog). The rich guy isn’t buying.

Howard Gleckman, One Solution to California’s Drought: Tax Water. Oh, so close. How about markets?

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 699

 

Career Corner. #BusySeasonProblems: Inflatable Sharks; Late-night Checklists; Unexpected Taxable Income (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 3/9/15: The dark side is very powerful. And: conventional unwisdom, unwise candidacies.

Monday, March 9th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20130419-1Christopher Bergin asks Has the IRS Truly Moved to the Dark Side?

Anyone who reads my posts knows that I have always given the IRS the benefit of the doubt in its dealing with exemption applications from conservative political organizations (which is what they are in every way but technically). I have not accused the IRS of influencing the political process. I’ve argued that it simply screwed up, albeit in a bad way, noting that stupidity is not a crime.

But now “criminal activity” has been raised. And not in a casual way, but in an official way.

The IRS’s response to this latest accusation came in a lame statement issued February 27 that essentially says it’s the inspector general’s “responsibility” to look into all this. For those of us old enough to remember the TV show Hogan’s Heroes, that is the equivalent of Sergeant Shultz saying, “I know nothing.”

Except it’s not funny.

If you’ve lost Christopher Bergin, you’ve lost Middle Arlington. You’ve also lost the “no scandal here” argument.

 

20150120-1Conventional unwisdomThe Des Moines Register’s Joel Aschbrenner is doing some excellent work on the new convention center hotel that Polk County and the City of Des Moines are helping to fund.

Researchers: Convention hotels rarely fulfill promises: “‘In a great many cases his forecasts have proven to be off, in some cases wildly off,’ Sanders said.”

Who is at risk if hotel under-performs?

The city has offered a $5 million loan guarantee that will come into play three to five years after opening when the hotel refinances its mortgages, Assistant City Manager Matt Anderson said. Hotels often refinance after they build a customer base and stabilize their business, he said.

If the hotel is under-performing due to lower-than-expected occupancy levels or room rates, or if interest rates have spiked up, refinancing would be more expensive and the city would have to cover the difference.

East Village hotel plan loses one floor: “The developer of a hotel and apartment project that will cover an entire East Village block says the hotel is being scaled back in part because of competition from downtown’s proposed convention hotel.”

The City of Des Moines has been pleading poverty. It runs revenue cameras to pick the pockets of random travelers committing the crime of not quite stopping before turning right on red at an empty intersection. It has collected illegal taxes and fought against refunds all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Yet it thinks it has the resources to help finance a hotel. That has to be terrific news to all of the other hotels downtown.

This isn’t the first time Des Moines has put money in a private downtown business. That hasn’t gone entirely smoothly.

 

Peter Reilly, 1099-C From Out Of The Blue? Don’t Ignore It! Fight It! Peter reminds us that just because somebody issues a 1o99-C saying there was debt forgiveness income doesn’t make it so.

Russ Fox, You Have to Have an Unreimbursed Loss to Claim a Casualty Loss

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2015): C Is For Commuting Expenses and D Is For Disability Income.

Kay Bell, No day off for tax advice: March’s first weekly tip round-up

Jack Townsend, Certifying Non-Willflness for Streamlined – The Risk. More on the puzzle palace of IRS offshore account enforcement.

Patrick Thomas, Inability to Correctly Calculate CSED – Confusion Leads to Unlawful Results (Procedurally Taxing).

It is a basic concept of law that once a statute of limitation has passed, no action barred by the statute may take place. Yet, as noted in the National Taxpayer Advocate’s 2014 Annual Report, the IRS often engages in forced collection action after the Collection Statute Expiration Date (CSED) has passed.

I’ll just note that the IRS is pretty good about not issuing refunds when the statute has passed.

 

IMG_1387

 

David Henderson, Rubio-Lee Isn’t Great:

Co-blogger Scott Sumner, over at his TheMoneyIllusion blog, has a post titled “Rubio-Lee is great, so why not make it even greater?”

I don’t agree that Rubio-Lee is great. It has many good features and Scott has listed pretty much all of them, so I won’t repeat them here. It has a feature, that I’ll mention shortly, that is a major negative.

Unfortunately, Scott didn’t mention the worst aspect of Rubio-Lee: the huge tax credits.

 

Tony Nitti, Reviewing The Rubio-Lee Proposal For Tax Reform

 

Hank Stern, Another day, Another CoOp Snafu (Insureblog):

Thanks to a heads’ up from FoIB Josh Archambault, we have this little gem:“The Minuteman Health Inc. Co-op in Massachusetts got more than $156 million and covered only 1,822 people – over $86,000 per enrollee.”But wait, that’s not all!

“HealthyCT Inc. Co-op in Connecticut got more than $128 million and covered only 6,094 people – more than $21,000 per enrollee.”

If that doesn’t give you the warm fuzzies, I have no idea what will.

At least they haven’t gone belly-up, unlike Iowa’s CoOportunity Co-op.
Alan Cole, CRS Report: Medical Device Tax Burden Falls On Consumers (Tax Policy Blog). “Don’t worry, the consumers will ultimately be hit with the tax, and they’ll just have to deal with it because they need their pacemakers!”
Annette Nellen, Obamacare confusion – real and made up. “The current system is too complex, confusing, inequitable, expensive, – and, not providing health care commensurate with the costs.”

Accounting Today, Cover Charge: How the ACA Is Affecting Fees. Spoiler: it’s not lowering them.

 

IMG_1394

 

Robert Wood, First Win Lottery, Then Defend Suits By Ticket Sellers, Co-Workers, Relatives

Adrienne Gonzalez, To Whom It May Going Concern: My CPA Is Locked Up and They Won’t Let Her Out. (Going Concern). Sometimes imprisonment is a sign to reconsider your choice of preparer.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 669Day 668Day 667

Former IRS Commissioner Mark Everson is running for president. The Washington Post reports that he is running as a Republican on a platform of “bold tax reform.

After leaving the IRS, he took a job as CEO of The American Red Cross. That went badly: “The president and CEO of The American Red Cross (ARC) is out after less than six months – involved in an inappropriate relationship with a female subordinate.”

It seems like a long shot. Perhaps he looked at the scandals surrounding the presumptive Democratic nominee and her husband and concluded that was the path to an unopposed nomination.

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 2/23/15: 800,000 blown ACA reporting forms; tens of thousands of already-filed returns are wrong. And more!

Monday, February 23rd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
The Younkers Building ruins, morning, March 29, 2014.

Be calm. All is well.

Tax Season is Saved! 800,000 Taxpayers Received Wrong Tax Info from Health Insurance Marketplace (Accounting Today):

“About 20 percent of the tax filers who had Federally-facilitated Marketplace coverage in 2014 and used tax credits to lower their premium cost —about 800,000 (< 1% of total tax filers) —will soon receive an updated Form 1095-A because the original version they were issued listed an incorrect benchmark plan premium amount,” said a blog post on the Web site of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. “Based upon preliminary estimates, we understand that approximately 90-95% of these tax filers haven’t filed their tax return yet. We are advising them to wait until the first week of March when they receive their new form or go online for correct information before filing. For those who have filed their taxes—approximately 50,000 (< 0.05% of total tax filers) —the Treasury Department will provide additional information soon.”

It says something about how screwed up this tax season is that the IRS can issue:

– A blanket waiver for the $100 per-day penalty for health insurance reimbursement arrangements;

– A small business waiver the Form 3115 filing requirement for “repair reg” accounting method changes;

– A blanket waiver for late payment penalties for advanced Obamacare tax credit clawbacks;

And still have a filing season full of “mayhem.”

Related: 

Caleb Newquist, You Won’t Mind if Your Tax Refund Is a Little Late, Will You? (Going Concern)

Ellen Steele, The Affordable Care Act Tax Filing Season: A View From the Trenches (TaxVox). “Filing is not simple, even for our volunteers who all undergo rigorous training in tax law.”

Paul Neiffer, Perhaps 800,000 or More Form 1095-A Are Wrong

 

Tax Season is saved! Ripping off your refunds: One little number fuels South Florida’s tax-fraud explosion (MiamiHerald.com

Tax Season is saved! Wow! The IRS Will Pay Out This Much in Fraudulent Tax Refunds By 2016 (Motley Fool)


20130104-1
Iowa Public Radio, Administration Grants Tax Time Reprieve For Obamacare Procrastinators:

The Obama administration said Friday it will allow a special enrollment period from March 15 to April 30 for consumers who realize while filling out their taxes that they owe a fee for not signing up for coverage last year.The special enrollment period applies to people in the 37 states covered by the federal marketplace, though some state-run exchanges are also expected to follow suit.People will have to attest that they first became aware of the tax penalty for lack of coverage when they filled out their taxes.

Megan McArdle called it. So once again they bend the ACA rules because following the law as enacted would be unpalatable. It’s as if the entire legislation is optional. Here are other made-up-on-the-fly amendments to ACA decreed by the Administration that I can think of off the top of my head:

– Waiving the $100/day penalty for employer insurance reimbursement arrangements.

– Waiving tax penalties for failure to pay the premium credit clawbacks.

– Rolling back the employer mandate penalty by a whole year — two for smaller employers.

– Allowing premium tax credits in states using federal exchanges when the statute only allows them where there is an exchange “established by a state.”

You almost might conclude that they didn’t really think things through very well when they enacted ACA.

IMG_1282

William Perez, Social Security Benefits are Partially Taxable: How Much Depends on Your Other Income.

Roger McEowen, Primer on the Income Taxation of Trusts and Estates (ISU-CALT)

Peter Reilly, You And Your Shadow Do Not A Partnership Make. “I don’t think it is news that you can’t create a partnership with yourself and a disregarded entity, but it is a point that bears repeating.”

Russ Fox, Solely a Way to Go to ClubFed. “As always, the usual warning applies: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. If you use a corporation sole as a vehicle to avoid taxes, you’re heading down a road that leads to ClubFed.”

Jack Townsend, Another UBS Customer Pleads

Rashia says "thanks, Commissioner!"

Someday this may seem quaint.

TaxGrrrl, What If Tax Refund Theft Isn’t Really About Refund Theft?:

In the case of Anthem, the hack was massive. Potentially 80 million customers had their data compromised, prompting the state of Connecticut to warn taxpayers that it might be to their advantage to file their taxes early.

That, security experts say, isn’t the work of a small time hack. It’s not folks working out of a van with stolen laptops or a teenage kid in a basement. It’s bigger. It’s been suggested that the hack could be related to an international crime group or perhaps even an international government. I spoke with experts in tech and security arenas – who, like Jim, wished to remain anonymous – and they’ve suggested that they would not be surprised to find that the hacks were orchestrated by the Chinese government.

Have a nice day.

David Henderson, From 2007 to 2012-13, The Income Share of Top 1% Fell (EconLog).

Andrew Lundeen, A Cut in the Corporate Tax Rate Would Provide a Significant Boost to the Economy (Tax Policy Blog). “The corporate tax rate is, in effect, a tax on corporate investment; a high corporate tax rate discourages investment, whereas a low corporate tax rate encourages investment.”

20150223-1

David Brunori ($link): 

A California company that makes cans is demanding a 20-year, 100 percent property tax exemption in return for opening a plant in Iowa. The plant will employ 120 people. The company, Silgan Containers, makes metal cans (think the containers that hold vegetables and dog food). I’m sure it’s a great company. But why should it be relieved of paying its just share of taxes? And if its demand is met, what does the Iowa government say to the companies that are already in place and employing 120 or more people? There is nothing good about this.

“Economic development” is pretty much taking money from you and your employees to lure and subsidize your competitors.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 653The IRS Scandal, Day 654The IRS Scandal, Day 655

Kay Bell, All of 2015’s best picture Oscar nominees got tax break help. We would like to thank all of the chumps, er, taxpayers of the various states that help us buy these $168,000 swag bags. We wouldn’t want to do it without you.

 

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 2/9/15: New York questions its tax incentives. And: where’s the ‘no anthrax’ sign?

Monday, February 9th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

New York FlagNew York Comptroller: nobody tracks whether the state’s corporate welfare tax incentives do any good. Tax Analysts’ Jennifer DePaul reports ($link):

It’s unclear whether the $1.3 billion in incentives and credits doled out annually by New York is creating jobs, a February 5 report by State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli concluded.

The ESDC, which administers more than 50 economic development programs, provides little public information on taxpayer-funded investments in its initiatives, the report said.

“ESDC makes no public assessment of whether its disparate programs work effectively together, whether such initiatives have succeeded or failed at creating good jobs for New Yorkers, or whether its investments are reasonable in relation to jobs created and retained,” the report said.

Naturally the politicians disagree:

On February 5 Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) told reporters that he disagreed with the comptroller “fundamentally and on his concept of economic development” and said New York has lost its effectiveness to attract businesses over the past decade.

“We’ve come a long way in the past four years in terms of reversing that and bringing jobs back to New York,” Cuomo said. “To the extent that the comptroller thinks we should go back to the old way where we saw New York losing jobs, I couldn’t disagree more strongly.”

To politicians, the only job creation that matters is the kind that lets them hold issue press releases, hold press conferences, and cut ribbons.

For a brief shining moment in the Iowa’s Culver administration, the film tax credit fiasco made our politicians look at the Iowa’s tax credit programs. A panel of state officials issued a report finding no clear evidence that the tax credits do any good. So Iowa replaced them all and lowered individual and corporate tax rates with the savings.

Actually, no. They just continued enacting new credits. I can dream, though.

Link: The Comptroller Report.

 

dirtyThe Journal of Taxation has a summary of this year’s IRS “Dirty Dozen” tax scams. Number 1 with a bullet are phone call scams from people saying they are IRS agents. Just remember, if the caller claims to be from the IRS, he (or she) isn’t, unless you have been in touch with a specific agent by mail already.

 

Puzzling over the tangible property regulations and the 3115 requirements? The ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation wants to help solve the puzzles. They have scheduled a webinar on on the regs February 18Roger McEowen and Paul Neiffer will host. Registration info available here.

 

Russ Fox celebrates 10 — the tenth anniversary of his excellent Taxable Talk. Congratulations, Russ!

William Perez, How Is Interest Income Taxed and Reported?

Annette Nellen discusses the new IRS Directory of preparers and Annual Filing Season Program (AFSP). Another useless effort by the supposedly impoverished agency.

IMG_1271Leslie Book, Preparers and Due Diligence (Procedurally Taxing)

Kay Bell, Additions to the tax law name roll of [dis]honor? We at Roth & Company would like to claim rights to the name “Roth IRA,” but alas, we had nothing to do with it.

Jason Dinesen, I Like Mowing My Lawn and Shoveling Snow; Do You Like Preparing Your Tax Return?

I see no value in hiring someone else to mow my lawn or shovel my snow.

The same principle holds true for people who choose to prepare their own taxes. If they know what they’re doing and they enjoy doing it, then I encourage people to do it themselves because they won’t see value in the work of a tax professional.

I see no value in hiring someone else to do my lawn and driveway either. That’s what the teen-ager is for.

TaxGrrrl, Brady Passes On Super Bowl Prize As Butler Hauls In Truck & Tax Bill

Jim Maule, So Who Gets Taxed on the Super Bowl Truck?

Peter Reilly, Oil Rig Manager Does Not Qualify As Foreign Resident

Robert Wood, On-Demand Workers: It’s Tax Time, You’re Self-Employed, Audits Are Inevitable

Me, IRS issues 2015 vehicle depreciation limits, updates 2014 limits for Extension of Bonus depreciation

 

IMG_1273

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 641. Judicial Watch says it has received emails showing the IRS Office of Chief Counsel delayed the investigation into the Tea Party scandal.

The tax law is obese. So the supergenius behind Obamacare, Jonathan Gruber, has floated the idea of taxing folks based on body weightArnold Kling is comments wisely: ” I know that many of my progressive friends would be disgusted by the obesity, but that does not make it a public policy problem.”

That’s right, not every problem is a tax problem. Or even the government’s problem.

David Henderson has more: Jonathan Gruber on Sin Taxes (Econlog)

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Worldwide Taxation is Very Rare (Tax Policy Blog):

At the beginning of the 20th century, 33 countries had a worldwide tax system. That number slowly dropped to 24 countries by the 1980s. By the 2000s, the number of countries switching to territorial systems accelerated, with more than 10 countries switching in 10 short years. Nearly all developed countries have moved to the superior territorial tax system. Today there are only 6 countries that tax corporations on their worldwide income. The President’s proposal would double-down on the U.S.’s current system and push the United States further out of line with the rest of the developed world.

The U.S. is even more of an outlier on worldwide taxation of individual income, with only Eritrea joining us in taxing citizens abroad.

Tracy Gordon, Go Team: Score 1 for Obama on Ending Tax Subsidies for College Sports (TaxVox).

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown 2/5: State of the States (Tax Justice Blog).

IMG_1286

Career Corner. Let’s Discuss: The Worst of Eating in the Audit Room (Marty, Going Concern)

Brian Gongol says “You’re not allowed to carry a bag of anthrax spores through a mall.” My bad. It won’t happen again.

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 1/6/15: Why the snake oil guy doesn’t use his own stuff.

Tuesday, January 6th, 2015 by Joe Kristan
Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

When  the man selling the snake oil out of the patent medicine wagon takes a deep draught of his inventory, it tells you he believes it at least won’t hurt him. But if he then keels over and goes into convulsions, he’ll find sales tough to come by.

This explains why it might be harder for Peymon Mottahedeh to recruit additional “students” to his “Freedom Law School” after his visit to Tax Court last week. The gentleman is well-known in “tax honesty” circles — enough to have earned him a spot in the Quatloos “Hall of Shame.”

Mr. Mottahedeh’s law school has what the bar association might consider an unorthodox curriculum. Judge Morrison explains (footnotes omitted):

Since at least 1999, the Freedom Law School has organized conferences attended by hundreds of people. The Freedom Law School charged fees to the attendees. The Freedom Law School also sold books, tapes, CDs, and DVDs. It also sold packages of services, including:

-the “Simple Freedom Package” (for an initial fee of $4,000);

-the “Royal Freedom Package” (for an initial fee of $6,000).

The Freedom Law School also offered multilevel marketing arrangements, including:

-“Freedom Fighter in Training”;

-“Freedom Promoter”;

-“Freedom Leader”; and

-“Master Freedom Leader”.

You have to admit, not every law school gives you MLM opportunities.

 

FLS logoThrough its conferences, materials, and service packages, the Freedom Law School promoted various techniques for evading the payment of federal income taxes. The techniques included:

-Minimize financial records.

-Do not give information to the IRS.

-Do not file tax returns.

Mr. Mottahedeh apparently took his own advice, and that worked out about as well as you would expect. The Tax Court allowed the IRS to statistically estimate his spending, in the absence of bank and financial. The taxpayer objected, but the judge explains:

The Mottahedehs counter that in reconstructing their income the revenue agent should have considered only the income reflected in their bank and credit-union records. But the Mottahedehs tried to avoid the use of banks. Their bank records would not provide sufficient information about their income. Furthermore, even the bank records that the revenue agent obtained were incomplete. The revenue agent was unable to obtain records of all of the deposits to the Mottahedehs’ accounts. For these reasons, focusing exclusively on the income reflected in their bank records would underestimate the Mottahedehs’ income. The revenue agent had to find other methods of estimating their income. The revenue agent chose to use average spending statistics supplemented by estimates of actual spending amounts. The courts have permitted the IRS to rely on the use of average spending statistics when, as here, the taxpayer fails to cooperate with the IRS

The bottom line: $93,187 in tax, along with another $47,303 in penalties.

If the patent medicine man doesn’t die, expect him to just find another crowd and open up shop again.

Cite: Mottahedeh, T.C. Memo 2014-258

 

Seventh Avenue, Des Moines, this morning.

Pierre Lemieux“The Economics of Tax Dodging,” (via David Henderson):

From the vantage point of orthodox public finance, dodging taxes is naturally considered bad because the burden of financing essential public expenditures is transferred to compliant taxpayers. Bad taxpayers free ride on good ones, who become the suckers. In our public choice model, however, dodging taxes provides a built-in check on Leviathan. Tax dodgers are not free-riding on other taxpayers; on the contrary, taxpayers benefit from tax dodgers’ resistance. They benefit because potential tax resistance prevents Leviathan from increasing everybody’s tax burden even more.

I think both views are likely true.

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Report: 3.4 Million ACA Subsidy Recipients May have Reduced Refunds (Tax Policy Blog). I can’t wait to tell my affected clients…

William Perez reminds us of Critical Tax Deadlines in 2015

Robert D. Flach has the Buzz! Avoiding scams, New Year tax tips, and more.

Robert Wood, Big Winner Of 4,000% Tips For Jesus? IRS

 

Christopher Bergin, Would You Settle for Flowers in Place of Help From the IRS? (Tax Analysts Blog). Considering what they do to us, we should also insist on dinner and drinks.

Norton Francis, Oklahoma Pulls the Trigger on an Unaffordable Tax Cut (TaxVox): “The state triggered a major rate reduction by tying it to an essentially meaningless revenue target.”

Kay Bell, U.S. debate on Internet taxes looms in 2015, but new digital tax rules now in place for European Union electronic shoppers

20111109-1

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 607. Today’s issue quotes Robert Wood:

Even if it is, the second IRS scandal, the alleged release of confidential taxpayer data to the White House, is far more debilitating. It too isn’t just alleged. We know it happened. What we do not know is how much was released, whose tax records they were, or who over at the White House requested them.

Oh, I’m sure they just wanted to make sure Republicans got all of the refunds they deserved.

Peter Reilly, Report On IRS Targeting Of Conservatives – No Christmas Pony For Darrell Issa. Peter seems to think the real scandal is that we aren’t paying more attention to whether one of the unfairly-targeted organizations might actually guilty of something.

 

News from the Profession. Here Are the Things the Accounting Profession Will Continue to Give Lip Service to in 2015 (Going Concern)

 

Share