Posts Tagged ‘EIC’

Tax Roundup, 1/30/15: Earned Income Tax Credit Awareness Day Edition! And: judging your golf score

Friday, January 30th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

daydrinkersDid you know that today is “Earned Income Tax Credit Awareness Day“? Most of us don’t get the day off, but as it is Friday, we can celebrate after work into the wee hours.

What are we celebrating? Well, the EITC is a refundable tax credit designed for poor working families with children. A “refundable” credit generates a tax refund if there is no tax to offset, so the EITC works as a welfare payment for poor families with some earned income. It phases out as incomes increase.

Some economists praise the EITC as a useful anti-poverty program that doesn’t kill jobs the way minimum wage laws do. Others look at it as a way to achieve “tax justice” by redistributing taxes to the poor.

Still, if you really want to be fully aware of how the EITC works, you should know about a few things that aren’t on the IRS EITC Awareness Day web page.

For example, you should know that the EITC phase-outs make it a poverty trap. The effect of the phase-out of the credit as income rises is to impose a marginal rate on additional earnings of EITC recipients as high as that imposed on some of the top income earners. The Federal-Iowa combined rate, taking into account phaseouts and payroll taxes, can exceed 50%.

eic 2014

This is a serious disincentive for EITC recipients to improve their earnings. Combined with the loss of other benefits, it can make self-improvement an unrewarding pastime.


Up to 25% of the EITC goes to people who shouldn’t get it, according to TIGTA. Part of it is because taxes are complicated and math is hard. A significant part, running into the billions, goes to fraudsters. Even in a good cause, you have to question the value of a program that misdirects so much money.

EITC error chart

Like all refundable credits, the EITC is a fraud magnet. Any time the government will write a check just for the effort of filling out a form, fraud happens. Just a few random instances:

Waterloo, Iowa preparer get 30 months for earned income tax credit fraud. A preparer invented earnings to get Iowa clients EITC refunds.

Tax Preparer Sentenced For Fraud Scheme. “The fraudulent returns sought refunds of $354,000 based on bogus expense deductions and refundable credits, such as entitlement to the First Time Home Buyers Credit and the Earned Income Tax Credit when the filer had little, if any, taxes withheld from income in that year.”

Tax preparer who bilked IRS out of $4M for poor clients: Fraud a ‘spiritual calling’. “As it turned out, Reed was inflating the incomes of his clients – generally unemployed women with children – so that they could claim an earned income tax credit.”

So as you observe this festive day in your own way, you can ponder whether the guy celebrating at the next table is buying because he just got his fraudulent EITC refund.


20140826-1Get your Buzz now! Because Robert D. Flach has posted his final Buzz for this tax season, with a kind shout-out to the Tax Update Blog. Don’t miss his thoughts on choosing a tax pro.

Kay Bell, What would you pay for professional help in filing your taxes?

William Perez, Head of Household Filing Status, Explained

Accounting Today, Obamacare Penalty to Be Owed by as Many as 6 Million Taxpayers. That will make it popular.

Robert Wood, Senators Blast IRS Commissioner Over Waste, Bonuses, Bad Service, More. Well, shooting fish in a barrel can be fun.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 631. More government stonewalling. Well, it’s worked so far.


William McBride, Federal Government Lost Money from 2013 Tax Increases on Investors (Tax Policy Blog):

As President Obama prepares to roll out another tax increase proposal targeting capital gains and dividends, it’s instructive to look at what happened the last time he did that. Fortunately, the IRS just released preliminary data on tax year 2013, the year the top tax rate on capital gains and dividends went from 15 percent to 23.8 percent. The fiscal cliff deal raised the top rate to 20 percent and the Obamacare investment surtax added 3.8 percentage points.

From the IRS data, we can see that investors didn’t just sit there and pay the higher tax rate. Qualified dividend income dropped 25 percent, from $189 billion in 2012 to $141 billion in 2013. Capital gains dropped 12 percent, from $475 billion to $416 billion. Recall this was in the midst of a historic stock market boom.

Not all tax increases lose money, and not all tax cuts make money. This shows, thought that increases in capital gains rates can backfire. The realization of many capital gains is discretionary, and many taxpayers will discreetly hold on to gains, rather than cash them out, when rates rise.


Perhaps this might not have been the best way to impress the sentencing judge. The Denver Post reports Convicts in $100 billion tax fraud skipped sentencing to play golf

The three Colorado Springs defendants were arrested Thursday after they failed to appear for sentencing Wednesday. They were escorted into court Thursday afternoon in handcuffs, all wearing street clothes.

“We did go golfing. I shot a 49, which was pretty good for me,” Pawelski told the judge after she emphasized the seriousness of the felony charges he faced.

Judges always understand you skipping a court date if you have a tee time.

Arguello reset sentencing for all three tax fraud convicts for Feb. 10. The judge brought each offender into the courtroom separately. Brokaw and Pawelski each told the judge they are a “natural man.”

“I am a natural man, a legal person, a legal man; something I didn’t know before,” Pawelski said.

Good thing he figured that out. He’ll likely have plenty of time to ponder that starting about February 11.



Tax Roundup, 5/14/14: Earned income credits, still busted. And: extenders advance.

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

Nope.  Still busted.  From comes an update on what some call America’s most successful anti-poverty program:

The Treasury Department has released its latest report  on the fight against widespread fraud in the Earned Income Tax Credit program. The problem is, fraud is still winning. And there’s not even much of a fight.

“The Internal Revenue Service continues to make little progress in reducing improper payments of Earned Income Tax Credits,” a press release from Treasury’s inspector general for Tax Administration says. “The IRS estimates that 22 to 26 percent of EITC payments were issued improperly in Fiscal Year 2013. The dollar value of these improper payments was estimated to be between $13.3 billion and $15.6 billion.”

Wait.  Didn’t the President sign a bill in 2010 to fix all this?

The new report found that the IRS is simply ignoring the requirements of a law called the Improper Payments Elimination and Recovery Act, signed by President Obama in 2010, which requires the IRS to set fraud-control targets and keep improper payments below ten percent of all Earned Income Tax Credit payouts.

Whatever the EITC does to help the working poor, it is a boon to the Grifter-American community.  Fraudulent EITC claims are a staple of ID theft fraud and low-tech tax cheating in general.

It’s worth noting that the high rate of improper EITC payouts has not gone down in spite of the ever-increasing IRS requirements for preparers who issue returns claiming the credits.  This should give pause to folks who think IRS preparer regulations will stop fraud, though it won’t.

It’s also notable that Iowa recently increased its piggyback EITC to 15% of the federal credit — increasing the annual cost of the credit by an estimated $35 million.  Assuming Iowans are just as honest as other Americans, that means about $8 million of additional stimulus to the Iowa grifter economy.

Finally, the phase-out of the EITC functions as a hidden high marginal tax rate on the program’s intended beneficiaries, the working poor.  The effective marginal rate in Iowa exceeds 50% at some income levels.  Combined with other income-based phase-outs, the EITC becomes a poverty trap.


Related: Arnold Kling,  SNEP and the EITC. “My priors, which I think are supported by the research cited by Salam, is that trying to use a program like the EITC for social engineering is a mug’s game.”



Extenders advance in Senate.  Tax Analysts reports ($link)

Legislation that would extend for two years nearly all the tax provisions that expired at the end of 2013 cleared a procedural hurdle in the Senate May 13.

Senators voted 96 to 3 to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to H.R. 3474, a bill to exempt from the Affordable Care Act’s employer mandate employees with healthcare coverage through the Veterans Benefits Administration or through the military healthcare program TRICARE.

The bill is the legislative vehicle for the tax extenders. It will be amended to include the text of the Expiring Provisions Improvement Reform and Efficiency (EXPIRE) Act of 2014 (S. 2260) and likely that of the Tax Technical Corrections Act of 2014 (S. 2261), both of which the Senate Finance Committee passed April 3 via voice vote.

The bill that passes will probably look much like the Senate bill.  The House has advanced bills to make some of the perpetually-expiring provisions permanent, but the President, pretending that they won’t get passed every year anyway, says permanent extension is fiscally irresponsible.

Among the provisions to be extended yet again, mostly through 2015, are the research credit, new markets credits, wind and biofuel credits, bonus depreciation, and increased Sec. 179 deductions.  The five-year built-in gain tax recognition period is also extended through 2015.

Related: TaxGrrrl, Senate Moves Forward To Extend Tax Breaks For 2014


20120906-1O. Kay HendersonKnoxville Raceway ceremony for state tax break of up to $2 million:

Governor Terry Branstad went to Knoxville today to sign a bill into law that gives the Knoxville Raceway a state tax break to help finance improvements at the track.

“This is a great facility,” Branstad told Radio Iowa during a telephone interview right after the event. “Last year, in 2013, they attracted 211,000 visitors, so it’s a big tourism attraction and it’s a good investment and it’s great for the state to partner with the community for a project of this magnitude.”

Here’s how that partnership works: the racetrack will charge sales tax to its customers, and keep the money.  Only two other businesses are special enough to get this sweet deal.  Tough luck for the rest of us who don’t have the good connections and lobbyists.


Walnut st flowersJana Luttenegger, Updated E-Filing Requirements for Tax Preparers (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).  “The handbook is not exactly clear.

Jason Dinesen, Things Tax Preparers Say: S-Corporation Compensation.  “But too many business owners — and their accountants — treat S-corps like a magic wand that can just make taxes disappear completely.”

Kay Bell, IRS fight to regulate tax preparers officially over…for now

Peter Reilly, Can Somebody Explain Tax Shelters To Thomas Piketty?  In the unlikely event that the Piketty recommendations are ever enacted, Peter notes that “there will be a renaissance of shelter activity.”  Peter provides a “Cliff Notes” summary of this year’s big forgettable book I’ll never read, which I appreciate.  Also: Peter uses the tax-law-as-Swiss Army Knife analogy that I am so fond of.

Robert D. Flach, STILL MORE CLIENTS SCREWED BY THE TAX CODE.  “The list of taxpayers screwed by our current Tax Code is not a short one.  Today I add taxpayers with gambling winnings.”


20130110-2Howard Gleckman, How “Dead Men” Fiscal Policy Is Paralyzing Government (TaxVox).  He reviews a new book, Dead Men Ruling, by Gene Steurle:

“We are left with a budget for a declining nation,” Gene writes, “that invests ever-less in our future…and a broken government that presides over archaic, inefficient, and inequitable spending and tax programs.”

All this has happened due to a confluence of two unhappy trends: The first is what the late conservative writer Jude Wanniski memorably described almost four decades ago as the “Two-Santa Theory.”

The Santas are the two parties, each of whom pick our pockets to fill our stockings.


Alan Cole, The Simple Case for Tax Neutrality (Tax Policy Blog).  “When states give preferential rates of sales tax to certain goods, the most visible result is the legal bonanza that follows from trying to re-categorize goods into the preferred groupings. ”

David Brunori, Repealing the Property Tax Is an Asinine Idea (Tax Analysts Blog). “Public finance experts are almost unanimous in their belief that the property tax is the ideal way to fund local government services… Most importantly, the property tax ensures local political control.”

William McBride, What is Investment and How Do We Get More of It? (Tax Policy Blog).  “Full expensing for all investment, according to our analysis, would increase the capital stock by 16 percent and grow GDP by more than 5 percent.”


TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 370

News from the Profession.  AICPA Tackling the Important Issue of Male CPAs Wanting It All (Going Concern). 



Tax Roundup, 8/12/2013: Good intentions edition. And the mysteriously-lucrative profession of German toilet attendant.

Monday, August 12th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Good intentions don’t always mean good results.  That’s one of the lessons in Michael Schuyler’s post  Evaluating the Growth Effect of the Earned Income Credit at the Tax Policy Blog:

The Tax Foundation study concluded that while the EIC raises the incomes f low-income workers, its net result is to reduce both national output and total hours worked.  This result may seem surprising because the credit creates a strong incentive for workers with very low incomes who are within the EIC’s phase-in range to work more since each extra dollar of earnings brings a larger credit.  Unfortunately, for the larger number of low-to-middle income workers who are within the EIC’s phase-out zone, the loss of benefits with rising earnings generates a powerful deterrent against additional work effort.

 That “deterrent effect” results from the high hidden marginal tax rate on income in the EIC phaseout range:
The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The credit was invented with the worthy intention of encouraging those with the lowest incomes to find work, but it has the unintended, though predictable, effect of discouraging those who already have jobs from moving up.  It does, however, have a fine stimulative effect on grifters, as up to 25% of the credit is issued improperly (examples here and here).


IRS, Disclosure Authorization and Electronic Account Resolution retirement delayed three weeks.  It’s nice of them to delay making it harder for tax pros to resolve client problems.


Richard Doak, Salesman in Chief: Governors today focus on handing out tax ‘incentives’:

In the early days of the Republic, many states got burned by canal-building schemes and other enterprises that well-connected corporations talked state governments into financing.

By the time the Iowa constitutions were written, in 1846 and 1857, people had become wary of states getting involved with corporations. Hence the restrictions such as those in the Iowa Constitution.

Today, the restrictions are easily gotten around, and the spirit of state-corporate separation expressed in the Constitution is ignored as government rushes into entanglements.

Politicians will sell their souls for a mess of ribbon cuttings and press releases.


Megan McArdle, Fixing the Mandate From Hell:

I’m kind of surprised to hear a lot of liberals agree that the 30-hour rule is bad policy, and even more surprised to hear that it would be easy to repeal or reform. In fact, while I opposed the law, I find it easy to see why they designed an employer mandate for all employers who worked more than 30 hours, and difficult to imagine how it could be reformed.

Welcome to the brave new world of 29-hour per week jobs.


Brian Strahle,  FEAR AND UNCERTAINTY:  ARE YOU PLAYING THE “WAIT AND SEE” GAME?  “In the world of state taxes, companies are faced with vast amounts of
‘uncertainty’ when applying multiple state rules that lack conformity to  their company’s situation.”  I don’t think you need to qualify the uncertainty with scare quotes.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 95

Kay Bell, New York cop pleads guilty to identity theft, tax refund fraud

Jack Townsend, Is It the Defendant’s Burden to Prove Good Faith As a Defense to Willfulness?

Peter Reilly,  Windsor As A Precedent – Much More Than Taxes

TaxGrrrl, IRS Releases List Of Americans Hoping To Expatriate, Number Tops 1,000

Russ Fox, Once Again, Registration of a Tax Preparer Doesn’t Stop Him from Bad Behavior.   Tax preparer regulation just gives the bad ones a government seal of approval.


Look on the bright side! AICPA to CPA Exam Candidates: Hey, at Least You Don’t Have Kidney Stones! (Going Concern)

Flushing out tax crime.   Toilet attendant who kept £35,000 in loose change she made from tips faces tax evasion charges in Germany after investigators discover 1.4 tonne pile of coins in her garage (London Daily Mail).

It sounds like she was some sort of bathroom boss:

The website reported how the woman would drive to a number of toilets across the country in her Mercedes collecting the money.

Police started investigating the woman after she fell out with an employee.

Officers were called to one of the toilets after the pair started fighting but they later opened investigations into how the company was run after suspicions were raised.

It’s the price they pay, apparently, for not having savage unsupervised bathrooms like we deal with here.