Posts Tagged ‘Elaine Maag’

Tax Roundup, 12/15/14: Is today the day the expired provisions arise? And: Ames Day!

Monday, December 15th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Hey, calendar-year corporations and foundations, your fourth quarter estimates are due today.

lazarus risingCromnibus passes. Extenders today? The monstrous $1.1 trillion ($1,100,000,000,000) government funding bill that had been holding up passage of the one-year “extender” bill finally cleared the Senate over the weekend. We might see the Lazarus provisions rise again as early as today. The 55 provisions that expired at the end of 2013, and which HR 5771 would retroactively extend through the end of this month, include the $500,000 Section 179 limit, 50% bonus depreciation, and the research credit. The bill would also extend the five-year built-in gain tax recognition period and the rule allowing IRAs to contribute to charity.

I’ll be following developments and post if the bill clears today.

Update, 10:54: This from The Hill makes it look like nothing happens on the extenders before late tonight.

 

Ames! Today is the final session of this year’s Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School. We expect over 300 attendees here at the conference and another 80 webinar attendees.  I always learn a lot from teaching and hearing from the attendees. Thanks to everyone who attended.

 

Kay Bell, Cutting IRS budget is a bad idea for taxpayers, U.S. Treasury.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

Kay is correct. Congress continues to pile more policy into the tax law. The IRS has become a superagency with a portfolio covering everything from industrial policy to historic preservation to running the national health care finance system. Oh, and it’s supposed to collect the revenue to finance the government, too.

Unfortunately, with great power comes great responsibility. The IRS has been abusing the power and scurrying away from the responsibility. The new Commissioner has forfeited any goodwill he had by stonewalling Congressional investigators in the Tea Party scandal. He insisted to Congress that the agency had exhaustively tried to retrieve the missing Lerner e-mails, only to have them turn up on backup tapes.

Also, the IRS undercuts its claims of poverty when it spends on things like the “voluntary” preparer initiative to sneak in the preparer-regulation scheme that the courts have barred.

It’s hardly a surprise that Congress isn’t eager to fund a rogue agency with an untrustworthy leader. Until a new Commissioner can restore trust, IRS will continue to struggle to get funding.

 

20121217-1Robert D. Flach, THE RETURN OF THE GAO UNDERCOVER OPERATION:

In 2006 the Government Accountability Office (GAO) sent undercover operatives to 19 “commercial preparer” branch offices in a major metropolitan area posing as taxpayers looking to have their tax returns prepared. Errors were identified in 19 of the 19 completed federal returns, some “significant”.

As complicated as the tax law has gotten, this is no surprise, and it’s gotten a lot worse since 2006.

Tony Nitti, The Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2014: #3-Aragona Trust Changes The Way We Look At Real Estate Professionals.   This case is a big deal, and it definitely changes the landscape of trusts under the new 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax.

Robert Wood, IRS Can Audit For Three Years, Six….Or Forever. “Anyone who is hiding income or assets from the taxman should consider how long they need to be looking over their shoulder.

William Perez, What You Need to Know About the Penalty for Not Having Health Insurance

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About EAs, #3: Two Ways to the EA. One requires working for the IRS.

Leslie Book, CDP and Installment Agreements: Sometimes Court Review is Crucial; Other Times Not So Much. “This past week the Tax Court issued an opinion in a collection due process (CDP) case, Hosie v Commissioner. The case is a bad case for those who support CDP.”

Tim Todd, Tax Court Not Limited to Administrative Record in Plan Revocation Action

20141215-1

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 585.

Peter Reilly, Did You Hear The One About Lois Lerner Walking Into A Bar?

Elaine Maag, Will Immigrants Get A Tax Windfall From Refundable Credits? (TaxVox)

Alan Cole, The Problem with Free Stuff (Tax Policy Blog):

If you see a promotion for something like 7-Eleven’s Free Slurpee Day, you always end up having to temper your excitement when you realize that you’ll inevitably be waiting in line with the many others who want to enjoy the same treat. This is an unfortunate fact of life, the sort of thing we all reluctantly come to grips with by the time we turn twelve or so.

What puzzles me, then, is why we so often forget that fact of life when we’re sitting in traffic.

Roads are very much like free Slurpees. While roads are certainly not free to construct (much like a Slurpee isn’t free to make) using a road involves relatively little in the way of a user fee.

I’ve driven in Slurpee-like conditions. Good tires are a must.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/4/14: House passes extenders; Senate alternative appears dead. And: Gas tax fever!

Thursday, December 4th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today visitors: Click here for the Lincoln year-end planning link.

lazarus risingHouse passes extenders; Senate action not yet slated. The House of Representatives yesterday revived the Lazarus provisions of the tax law, passing HR 5771 on a 378-46 vote.

The bill now moves to the Senate, which has not yet scheduled a vote. The Hill reports that Senate Democrats have given up on promoting a competing bill, which probably means they will go along with the House bill. While the President has not said he would sign the House bill, he hasn’t threatened a veto; that probably means he will go along.

The expired tax provisions revived by the bill include the $500,000 Section 179 limit, 50% bonus depreciation, the research credit, and the five-year built-in gain period for S corporations. They also include crony subsidies like energy production credits and accelerated depreciation for racetracks. A compromise plan to extend some of the provisions permanently collapsed when the President threatened to veto it.

The house-passed bill only extends the tax breaks that expired at the end of last year through the end of this month. That means the new Congress will have to do this again in 2015. Let’s hope they get an earlier start than they did this year.

Related:

Wall Street Journal, House Approves Temporary Tax Breaks

Accounting Today, House Passes $42 Billion Plan to Revive U.S. Tax Breaks for 2014

 

If Iowa's income tax were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s income tax were a car, it would look like this.

Gas Tax Fever! The Greater Des Moines Partnership unveiled its legislative agenda yesterday. While it has a few good ideas, like reviewing Iowa’s pension plans for soundness, its priorities are crony-capitalist items like support for economic development tax credits and “public-private partnerships.” Its weak tax reform plank supports the Alternative Maximum Tax, which would allow individuals to choose an optional low-rate, broad base system. You’ll look in vain for anything specific to improve Iowa’s bottom-ten business tax climate — just a general call for lower rates. That may be because many large corporations have learned to use Iowa’s rats nest of special interest breaks and crony tax credits to their advantage.

The agenda also includes support for an increase in the gas tax to fund road projects.  That plank has some policy logic behind it, but it also is a tough sell. Caffeinated Thoughts reports that Iowans for Tax Relief has already come out against it. ITR opposition makes it hard for many GOP legislators to support the increase. Maybe that’s why the Sioux City Journal is reporting “Iowa legislative leaders murky on gas tax increase

 

Robert D. Flach, IT AIN’T NECESSARILY SO – H&R BLOCK CEO ALLEGEDLY CARES ABOUT EFFICIENT AND EFFECTIVE TAX ADMINISTRATION. “Here is what is a good idea for proper efficient and effective tax administration – remove the Earned Income Credit, and all other government social welfare and other benefit programs, from the Tax Code.” Amen, Brother Robert.

 

Jason Dinesen, who is a pioneer in the taxation of same-sex married couples, offers A Brief History of Marriage in the Tax Code: Introduction

Paul Neiffer, Irrigation Systems – Is that 7 or 15 Years?  Depends on whether it’s buried.

Tony Nitti, Sorry Mr. Ryan, But Corporate-Only Tax Reform Doesn’t Work. Somebody tell the President.

Kay Bell, Spend down your flexible spending account by Dec. 31

Jeff Stimpson, In the Blogs: Start Your Engines (Accounting Today)

 

Mark J. PerryTop 400 taxpayers paid almost as much in federal income taxes in 2010 as the entire bottom 50%:

top 400 bottom 50

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 574.  Yes, there are thousands of e-mails that may show the IRS improperly accessed confidential taxpayer records. Releasing them might violate taxpayer confidentiality, so they stay secret. How convenient.

The return confidentiality rules should be amended so that those abusing them can’t also hide behind them.

20140729-1Alan Cole, Bonus Depreciation is a Step Towards Fair Tax Accounting (Tax Policy Blog).

Elaine Maag, Why the More Generous Child and Earned Income Tax Credits Should Be Made Permanent (TaxVox). Because we like having 20% of it wasted or stolen?

Tax Justice Blog, Dave Camp’s Reform Plan Should Not Be the Starting Point for the Tax Debate.

 

Cara Griffith, Transparency Concerns Linger in Washington State (Tax Analysts Blog) Cockroaches and administrators tend to prefer darkness.

 

Career Corner. Protip for Future CPAs: Forging Signatures on Your Work Experience Form is Dumb (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 7/29/14: Whither Halbig and the ACA. And lots more!

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20121120-2The Big Tax News while I was on vacation was the Halbig decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.  The decision holds invalid the IRS decision allowing tax credit subsidies for policies purchased on federal insurance exchanges.  The impact of the decision was offset by a Fourth Circuit decision the same day coming to the opposite conclusion, but it is still a big deal, especially in light of some subsequent events.

The D.C. circuit has national implications because every taxpayer can come under its jurisdiction by litigating through the Court of Federal Claims.  An alert reader corrects me:

Your post today contains an error.  The  D.C. circuit is not the same as the federal circuit.  The court of federal claims is appealable to the federal circuit. The district court for the D.C. circuit is appealable to the D.C. circuit.  Halbig is a big deal in any event because the dc circuit instructed the district court to vacate the rule.  Vacated means that there is no rule anywhere.  In any event, SCOTUS will make the final call here.

As long as that decision stands — and the IRS will certainly ask the 15-member court to reconsider Halbig, decided by a three-member panel — it threatens not only the tax credits for the 37 states without their own exchanges, but it also invalidates the employer mandate tax in those states and takes much of the bite out of the individual mandate.  The South Carolina Policy Council explains why (my emphasis):

The subsidies are also important for their function as triggers of both the individual and employer mandate portions of the ACA. The ACA imposes a $2,000 per employee penalty for companies with more than 50 employees who do not offer “adequate health insurance” to their workers. This penalty is triggered when an employee accepts an IRS subsidy on a plan purchased through an exchange. If individuals in the 36 states without a state-run exchange are ineligible for subsidies, there will be no trigger to set off the employer mandate.

An absence of subsidies would also allow many people to avoid the ACA’s individual mandate, which requires citizens to maintain health insurance covering certain minimum benefits or pay a fine. This is because the ACA exempts citizens from the individual mandate whose out-of-pocket costs for health insurance exceed 8 percent of their household income. If IRS subsidies are removed, insurance plans offered on exchanges would exceed this cost threshold for many people – thereby providing them an exemption from the mandate.

Flickr image courtesy Tim under Creative Commons license

Flickr image courtesy Tim under Creative Commons license

This would devastate the already shaky economics of Obamacare.

The key ruling in Halbig is its finding that statutory language allowing tax credits through exchanges “established by a State” doesn’t cover the federal exchanges that are used in the 36 states without exchanges.   Critics of Halbig say that Congress couldn’t have been that stupid.  For example, Jonathan Gruber, an architect of the ACA, says“Literally every single person involved in the crafting of this law has said that it`s a typo, that they had no intention of excluding the federal states.”

That assertion has been challenged by a number of observers, notes Megan McArdle.  She cites a January 2012 speech by one Jonathan Gruber, an architect of the ACA:

Only about 10 states have really moved forward aggressively on setting up their exchanges. A number of states have even turned down millions of dollars in federal government grants as a statement of some sort — they don’t support health care reform.

Now, I guess I’m enough of a believer in democracy to think that when the voters in states see that by not setting up an exchange the politicians of a state are costing state residents hundreds and millions and billions of dollars, that they’ll eventually throw the guys out. But I don’t know that for sure. And that is really the ultimate threat, is, will people understand that, gee, if your governor doesn’t set up an exchange, you’re losing hundreds of millions of dollars of tax credits to be delivered to your citizens. [emphasis added] 

The 2012 Jonathan Gruber repeated the story that only state-established exchanges qualify for credits in other forums.   It’s remarkable that two ACA architects named Jonathan Gruber have such divergent views of what the bill does.  It’s even more remarkable that they are the same guy.  This seems like strong support for the D.C. Circuit’s approach.

supreme courtIf the ACA were just another tax bill, it would be pretty easy to predict that the Supreme Court would go with the D.C. Circuit’s approach, based on prior rulings involving statutes that reached results the IRS didn’t care for.  In the Gitlitz case, which arguably provided an unintended windfall for S corporation shareholders when the S corporation incurred non-taxable debt forgiveness income, the Supreme Court said in an 8-1 decision (footnotes and citations omitted, emphasis added):

Second, courts have discussed the policy concern that, if shareholders were permitted to pass through the discharge of indebtedness before reducing any tax attributes, the shareholders would wrongly experience a “double windfall”: They would be exempted from paying taxes on the full amount of the discharge of indebtedness, and they would be able to increase basis and deduct their previously suspended losses.  Because the Code’s plain text permits the taxpayers here to receive these benefits, we need not address this policy concern.

In other words, if Congress doesn’t like what it has done, it’s up to Congress to fix it, not the IRS.  Congress did just that with the Gitlitz result within a year of the decision.

Of course, the ACA isn’t typical tax legislation.  Chief Justice Roberts tied himself in knots to find a way to uphold Obamacare in 2012.  Politics makes it unlikely that the Gitlitz approach will be followed by the left side of the Supreme Court, and who knows how Justice Roberts will rule.  But it does appear at least possible that Halbig will be upheld.

What should taxpayers do?  My thought is to assume the mandates remain in effect and pay tax (or reduce your withholding) accordingly.  Then be prepared to file a refund claim if Halbig is upheld by the Supreme Court.  Plan for the worst and hope for the best.

At least one thoughtful commentator says that ultimately if Halbig is upheld, holdout states will fall into line and establish exchanges.  For the reasons laid out here, I don’t think that will happen, and Congress will be forced to clean up its mess.

 

Paul Neiffer, ACA Subsidies: One Court Strikes Down, Another Upholds

Kristy Maitre, IRS Releases Additional ACA Revenue Procedures and Draft Forms  (ISU-CALT)

 

20140729-2Jason Dinesen, Don’t Be “That” Business Owner.  “I see too many with preconceived notions of what they can “get by with.” I’ve seen and read about too many people whose life got turned upside-down when they ended up NOT “getting by with it” after all.”

Russ Fox,  2:42.  “That’s how long I spent on hold on the IRS Practitioner Priority Service (PPS) yesterday–two hours, forty-two minutes.”   It’s a good thing Practitioners are a “Priority,” or who knows how long he’d have been on hold.

Phil Hodgen, Green card holders, treaty elections, and exit tax

Stephen Olsen, Ct. of Fed. Claims Holds Merger Results in “Same Taxpayer” for Net Zero Interest Rate (Procedurally Taxing)

Peter Reilly wonders if it is Time To Let Kent Hovind Go Home?  Peter thinks the former owner of a theme park based on the idea that hominids and dinosaurs co-existed may have suffered enough for his tax misdeeds.

Robert D. Flach brings the fresh Tuesday Buzz!

Well, these things are never tidi.  Spanish Court Moving Forward With Messi Tax Evasion Case  (TaxGrrrl)

 

taxanalystslogoDavid Brunori, Who Wants to Tax a Millionaire? Lots of People (Tax Analysts Blog).  This is full fo good observations about the unwisdom of states soaking the “rich.”  Highlights include:

States do not (and should not) do a lot of redistributing to the very poor.

When states jack up taxes on the “rich,” the money doesn’t exactly go to people sleeping under bridges, as David explains (my emphasis):

I have written about this before.  I noted that “the real beneficiaries of most government spending, certainly at the state level, never come up. No one ever says that we need higher taxes because my friends in the construction business want new contracts. No one ever says that they want new taxes to expand bloated public employee union bureaucracies. Yes, crony capitalism and union bosses drive most calls for higher taxes.” My right-wing friends often criticize liberals calling for higher marginal taxes as delusional. But they know exactly what they’re doing. Often they want higher taxes just so they can give money to their friends.

The money taken from “the rich” goes to the well-connected.  Iowa’s highest-in-the-nation system fleeces those without pull to pay rich subsidies to well-connected politicians and corporations.  Better to throw out the crony subsidies and lower rates for the rest of us — like The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Tax Reform Plan would do.

 

Elaine Maag, The “Helping Working Families Afford Child Care Act” Would Help, but Doesn’t Solve the Timing Mismatch (TaxVox).  “Making the CDCTC refundable and increasing allowable expenses is a huge step in improving child care assistance for low-income families.”

 

20140729-1Joseph Thorndike, The Corporate Income Tax Will Never Be ‘Fixed.’ And That’s OK. (Tax Analysts Blog):

Again, I think the corporate income tax is on the way out. But that’s a long-term problem. It doesn’t mean we should throw in the towel right away. The corporate tax may, as McArdle suggests, be an “insane, unwinnable chess game” pitting lawyers against tax collectors. But for the time being, the game is still worth the candle.

I think Megan McArdle has the better case, that the corporation income tax needs to go away, one way or the other.   I like the idea of doing so via a corporation dividends-paid deduction, combined with an excise tax on dividends for otherwise-exempt stockholders, as a way to get there.

Scott Hodge, More on Inversions and the Effective Tax Rates of Foreign-Owned Firms.   “The administration may want to think twice about taking unilateral action without considering the consequences.”

Clint Stretch, Dreams of Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog).  Patsy Cline is invoked.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 446

 

Greg Kyte, Clarifying Sex and Auditor Independence After the EY and Ventas Affair (Going Concern).  Can an auditor be “independent” while sleeping with a CFO?  Well, auditors are supposed to have hearts of stone…

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/12/14: Hundreds of Panthers fear ID-theft. And: more smidgens!

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

uni-logoID Theft may affect 200 University of Northern Iowa employees.  KWWL.com reports:

In February, when the issue was first discovered, about 50 people had reported issues filing their federal income taxes. Now, University officials say 200 employees have come forward, and but not all of those are fraud. Still, that has psychology department secretary Jan Cornelius concerned. She said her social security number was stolen.

The problem was identified by taxpayers whose returns were rejected because somebody else had already filed under their numbers.  You need to be careful with your Social Security Number, and you should never transmit tax documents as unencrypted email attachments.  Use a secure file transfer portal, like Roth & Company’s Filedrop, to send tax files electronically.

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

More Smidgens.  The House Oversight Committee investigating the Tea Party Scandal issued a report yesterday blasting the idea that the IRS stall on right-side 501(c)(4) groups was just a non-political coincidence involving bumblers in Cincinnati.  Using IRS documents and e-mails, the report paints a picture of an effort driven by a highly-political bureaucrat to “do something” through IRS regulation to administratively reverse the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision.  From the report’s conclusion:

Evidence indicates Lerner and her Exempt Organizations unit took a three pronged approach to “do something about it” to “fix the problem”of nonprofit political speech:

1) Scrutiny of new applicants for tax – exempt status (which began as Tea Party targeting);

2) Plans to scrutinize organizations, like those supported by the “Koch Brothers,” that were already acting as 501(c)(4) organizations; and

3)“[O]ff plan” efforts to write new rules cracking down on political activity to replace those that had been in place since 1959. Even without her full testimony, and despite the fact that the IRS has still not turned over many of her e-mails, a political agenda to crack down on tax-exempt organizations comes into focus. Lerner believed the political participation of tax-exempt organizations harmed Democratic candidates, she believed something needed to be done, and she directed action from her unit at the IRS. Compounding the egregiousness of the inappropriate actions, Lerner’s own e-mails showed recognition that she would need to be “cautious” so it would not be a “per se political project.”

Committee Democrats continue to insist that there is no “political motivation,” and no evidence of White House involvement.  To deny that targeting “Tea Party” and “Koch-funded” organizations is political is to insult our intelligence.  As far as White House involvement, the Chicago Way isn’t for the Boss to pick up the phone and call the Cincinnati service center.  The President’s public in-your-face criticism of the Supreme Court for Citizens United at a State-of-the-Union address gave his supporters in the bureaucracy all the guidance they needed.

The TaxProf has a roundup.

 

roses in the snowWilliam Perez, Deductions for Self-Employed Persons.  “Deductions that go on Schedule C reduce both the self-employment tax and the federal income tax.”

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): E Is For EE Bonds   

Russ Fox, The Moral Climate may have Changed but the Law Hasn’t. “Thus, until Congress changes the law a professional gambler cannot deduct gambling losses in excess of wins.”

Kay Bell, Beware tax break bait and switch.  “Yes, gifts to your favorite charity can be deducted, but only if you itemize on Schedule A.”

Paul Neiffer, Permanent Means Permanent:

North Dakota law regarding easements is unique.  It appears to be the only state in the country that limits easements to 99 years by law.  Since the Tax Code requires that the conservation easement be of a permanent nature, the Tax Court ruled in favor of the IRS and disallowed all of the easement charitable donations.

Oops.  Still, I think anything “permanent” should be looked at skeptically.  Nobody knows whether it will seem wise to lock up a parcel 100 years from now.

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Tackling The Dreaded Section 754 Adjustment   

 

20120906-1David Brunori, Where Is the Outrage? (Tax Analysts Blog):

According to Good Jobs First, there are 514 economic development programs in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. More than 245,000 awards have been granted under those programs. I ask again, where is the outrage? The system is antithetical to the idea of free markets. A quarter of a million times, state governments decided what is best for producers and consumers. That should make us cringe. First, the government is inefficient at providing public goods, and it is terrible at manipulating the markets for private goods. But more importantly, those 514 economic development programs are almost all the result of insidious cronyism. Narrow business interests manipulate government policymakers, and those interests prosper to the detriment of everyone else. Free markets be damned.

And while I’m looking for outrage, where are the liberals? The 965 companies in the report received over $110 billion of public money. Berkshire Hathaway, a company with $485 billion in assets and $20 billion in profits, received over $1 billion of that money. Its chair, William Buffett, is worth about $58 billion. Buffet, by the way, is still a darling of the left. He has some nerve to call for higher taxes. The billion dollars his companies took would pay for a lot of teachers, healthcare, and other public goods. 

They take just a little bit at a time from all of us so we don’t notice, and they give it in big chunks to their well-connected friends, who certainly do notice.   The report David refers to is here.

 

Joseph Henchman, State Sales Tax Jurisdictions Approach 10,000 (Tax Policy Blog).  Small wonder online sellers don’t want to collect everyone’s sales tax.

Elaine Maag, The Many Moving Parts of Camp’s Tax Reform for Low-Income Families (TaxVox)

 

Joseph Thorndike, The Last Time Everyone Gave Up on Tax Reform, It Actually Happened (Tax Analysts Blog).  But not this time:

Ultimately, Reagan agreed to make tax reform a priority. And his support was crucial. No lawmaker, no matter how exalted, well intentioned, or energetic, can move the ball like a president.

Which is one very important reason why 2014 is different from 1984. President Obama has no discernible interest in fundamental tax reform. So conventional wisdom is right: The Camp tax plan is going nowhere fast.

I think that’s right.

 

All it needs is a little pasta and fresh lemon.  Argentina: Authorities investigate tax evasion via garlic exports through shell companies

Career Corner.  It Is Almost Certain You Will One Day Be Replaced by Machines (Going Concern).  

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/6/14: Mortgage credit program revived for Iowa. And: why your state budget surplus is a mirage.

Thursday, February 6th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

IFA logoThe Iowa Finance Authority has opened a program that will allow some Iowans to claim a credit, rather than a deduction, for mortgage interest.  From an IFA press release:

The Iowa Finance Authority has announced that eligible Iowans may buy a home and reduce their federal income tax liability by up to $2,000 a year for the life of their mortgage.

The 2014 Take Credit Mortgage Credit Certificate program will be available beginning this week through IFA Take Credit Program Participating Lenders. Approximately 585 Iowa home buyers are expected to benefit from the program.

It has been some years since these credits were available in Iowa.

The credits aren’t for everyone.  They are targeted to lower-income borrowers, with income limits varying by county.  IFA has a “quick check” page for users to determine eligibility.  But for those who qualify, they are a handy way to reduce mortgage costs.  The credit is claimed on Form 8396.

 

TaxProf, TRAC: IRS Criminal Prosecutions Up 23.4% in Obama Administration.  This is probably due to the explosion in tax-refund theft that was less of a priority than regulating preparers was for the Worst Commissioner Ever and the Obama Administration.

 

taxanalystslogoCara Griffith, The Myth of the Budget Surplus (Tax Analysts Blog):

There seems to be a lot of good news about state budgets lately. Newspaper headlines have changed from doom and gloom over budget crises during the recession to questions about how states will manage budget surpluses. Unfortunately, there are financial problems lurking beneath the surface, and one of the largest may be the underfunding of state and local government pension and healthcare plans.

Even Iowa’s relatively well-funded pension plan is 20% underfunded actuarially, and even that uses an absurd assumption of 7.5% investment returns.  The Taxpayers Association of Central Iowa has a lengthy, but excellent, analysis.  Public defined benefit plans are a lie.  They are a lie to taxpayers understating the cost of current pension accruals, a lie to public employees about what they will get after retirement, or both.

 

Elaine Maag of TaxVox raises Questions About Expanding the Childless EITC:

The EITC is often criticized for its built-in marriage penalty. Imagine a single mom with three kids who earns $17,500. Prior to marriage, she qualifies for the maximum credit of $6,143. But if she marries someone with identical earnings, the additional income will reduce her EITC to just $3,670.

If the childless EITC were expanded and the husband had his own EITC, he would lose all or part of his benefit when the couple married, magnifying the tax increase this couple would face relative to when they were not married. As long as the EITC phases out at higher incomes and is tied to joint income, this will remain an issue.

Not to mention the massive level of EITC fraud and the punitive marginal tax rates on taxpayers working their way out of poverty.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

 

Jana Luttenegger, Expired Housing-Related Tax Rules (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).  The exclusion for forgiven mortgage debt is the biggie.

William Perez, Finding the Right Filing Status.  If you are legally married, it’s either joint returns or married filing separate.  Single status is unavailable, even for same-sex couples married in a state that allows them to get married who live in a state that doesn’t.  William provides some excellent explanation.

 

20130419-1Janet Novack, IRS: Don’t Call Us, Look It Up On IRS.Gov.  Well, you might actually get a correct answer that way.

Kay Bell, What the ‘Taxman’ does and doesn’t collect 

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 273

Howard Gleckman, The Cruel Political Paradox of Deficit Reduction (TaxVox)

Carl Smith provides Another Update on Rand Cases in Tax Court at Procedurally Taxing.  The Rand cases hold that an “underpayment” for purposes of penalties does not include the portion of refundable tax credits that tax tax below zero.

Going Concern, Pot Taxes May Not Be Such a Cash Cow Due to, Well, the Cash.  Not to mention the disallowance of all non cost-of-goods-sold deduction for legal dealers.

 

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Tax Roundup, 9/20/2013: Dressing up your tax return. And look out, Ethiopia!

Friday, September 20th, 2013 by Joe Kristan
"Garcia" character in "Criminal Minds," via Wikipedia

“Garcia” character in “Criminal Minds,” via Wikipedia

I can’t prove my deductions, but you should allow them because I’m sure I have them, and it’s not that much in the big scheme of things.   An actress took a novel approach to convince the Tax Court to let her deduct clothing, makeup and other items that she said were business expenses in her acting career:

 Instead of relating particular exhibits to particular deductible categories in her brief, she repeated her claims that all of the disputed expenses were related to her employment and supported by the disorganized documents. She did not respond to respondent’s specific analysis of the documents and explanation of the applicable Code sections. Overall petitioner argues that she should be given special leeway because she obviously incurred deductible expenses and the amount of the deficiency is small.  

Cut me a break, what’s my little deficiency to a trillion-dollar deficit?  The court was unconvinced.  With respect to her deductions for clothing and makeup, the court noted:

Petitioner resided in California when she filed her petition. During 2009, petitioner was an actress, a writer, and a college student. She was a stand-in for a character known as Garcia on the television show “Criminal Minds.”

Petitioner also claimed as business expenses items including makeup and beauty expenses, wardrobe expenses, and laundry and cleaning expenses. She claims that these expenses were necessary because of the unique dress and makeup of the character Garcia.

Expenses relating to clothing, dry cleaning, and personal beauty items are deductible only if they are “not suitable for general or personal wear and not so worn”. Yeomans v. Commissioner, 30 T.C. 757, 767-769 (1958). Neither petitioner’s records nor her testimony tied specific items of expense to the type of clothing and related items that would not be suitable for everyday wear. To the extent that items cannot be tied to petitioner’s job with “Criminal Minds”, her arguments about the uniqueness of Garcia are not persuasive.

The moral?  Unless you have to buy a uniform, it’s hard to deduct clothes, as TV anchor Anietra Hamper learned the hard way.  And whatever you deduct, you need to have some way to support the deduction.  The argument that your small deduction is immaterial in the big scheme of things doesn’t work well.

Cite: McGovern, T.C. Summ. Op. 2013-74

 

James Taranto, who runs the Wall Street Journal’s “Best of the Web” feature (with a format suspiciously like the Tax Update’s Tax Roundup), has some good observations on the evolution of the IRS Tea Party scandal.  He suggests how the agency could come to target the President’s political opponents without anybody having to tell them to do so:

The memo presents no evidence that the White House directly ordered the IRS to crack down on political opponents. Instead, it is consistent with the theory, described here in May, that IRS personnel responded to “dog whistles” (in Peggy Noonan’s metaphor) in public statements from the president and his supporters.

That’s much more depressing than if the White House had issued such orders.  That means the problem is part of the IRS culture, making it very difficult to fix.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 134

Eliana Johnson, Senior Treasury Department Officials Knew of IRS Targeting in Spring 2012, Documents Suggest

 

Tony Nitti, One Mortgage, No Home Equity Loan: How Much Interest Can You Deduct?

TaxGrrrl, Forget Kiddie Tax, New Senate Proposal Would End ‘Parent Tax’

 

20130920-2

Haile Selassie, Emperor of Ethiopia

William McBride,  World Economic Forum: U.S. Still Sliding (Tax Policy Blog):

America’s least competitive areas include taxes and government debt. The U.S. ranks 69th, right behind Ethiopia, in terms of the impact taxes have on incentives to work and invest. The U.S. ranks 103rd of 144 countries in terms of the total tax rate as a percent of profits.

 Look out, Ethiopia.

 

Tax Justice Blog, Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act Would Curb Some of the Worst Multinational Corporations’ Tax Dodges.  This would be less of a problem if the problems noted in the previous item were addressed.

Elaine Maag, Senator Lee’s New Reform Plan Focuses on Young Children (TaxVox)

Andrew Lundeen, Roughing the Passer: Congress Won’t Find Much Revenue from Taxing the NFL (Tax Policy Blog)

Jack Townsend, Atypical Offshore Account Plea for Art Dealer

Leslie Book, Remands and the Nature of CDP Hearings (Procedurally Taxing)

 

Robert D. Flach has a mighty “meaty” Friday Buzz!

The Critical Question: Did Tax Court Just Say That There Are Thousands Of Unfiled Oil Partnership Returns ?  (Peter Reilly)

News from the profession: Accountants Love Their Jobs Because They Get to Manipulate Numbers All Day Long, Says Guy (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/26/2013: A map of state tax futility. And why bankers don’t like OREOs.

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Close enough to zero. Monday Map: Corporate Income Tax Revenue as a Percentage of All State/Local Tax Revenue (Nick Kasprak, Tax Policy Blog):

20130226-2

 

 

IRS Field Attorney Advice: Bank must capitalize indirect costs of holding “OREO” property under inventory capitalizetion rules.  From FAA  20123201F (my emphasis)

Section 263A applies to property that is acquired for resale. If § 263A applies, the taxpayer must capitalize both the direct costs of acquiring the property and the property’s allocable share of indirect costs.

In this case, X clearly acquires OREO in foreclosure (or in lieu of foreclosure) with an intent to resell the property. Bank regulators restrict the holding period for OREO and expect banks to exercise good faith efforts to sell the property. As required by applicable state and federal policies and regulations, it is our understanding that X advertises its OREO properties for sale, including those properties which it rents out. X’s Year6 Annual Report confirms that assets acquired through (or in lieu of) foreclosure are held for sale. In addition, OREO is acquired and held in the ordinary course of X’s trade or business. X’s Year6 Annual Report acknowledges as much when it states that X may foreclose on and take title to properties securing loans “during the ordinary course of business.” X engages in OREO transactions with frequency, regularity, and according to an “OREO disposition strategy.” (Year6 Annual Report, p.17). Thus, the OREO held by X constitutes property held by the taxpayer primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of its trade or business.

“OREO” is “other real estate owned,” for you non-bankers.  Bankers don’t care to hold much of that.

 

Joseph Henchman,  Nebraska Governor Withdraws Tax Reform Proposal; Legislature Look to Commission to Develop Alternatives (Tax Policy Blog).  But they aren’t giving up on tax reform.  So should Iowa.  The Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan is tanned, rested and ready!

Paul Neiffer,  Must Have W2 Wages to Deduct DPAD.  A hidden tax trap for the Schedule F farmer.

 

Great minds think alike:

TaxGrrrl,  How Will Your State Be Impacted By Sequestration?

Kay Bell,  How would your state fare under sequestration?

 

TaxProf,  3d Circuit Denies CARDS Tax Shelter.  Another turn-of-the-century tax shelter fails.

Elaine Maag, Education Tax Credits Rival Pell Grant Program in Size: Reforms Proposed (TaxVox).  The more you subsidize it, the more it costs.

Jeremy Scott, Taxing the Rich, Thenardier-Style (Tax.com):

But the influence of Les Miserables doesn’t just extend to the silver screen and stage. President Obama seems to be taking tax policy advice from the musical’s comical antagonist, Thenardier.

Well, that would explain many things.

Trish McIntire,  Referrals – A Double Edged Sword.

Peter Reilly,  What Were They Thinking ?   Another example of the unwisdom of failing to remit payroll taxes.

Linda Beale,  Private equity and real estate managers get a “costly and unjust [tax] perk”.  Not really, but some people really hate carried interests.

Me: Identity theft tax fraud: women’s work?

 

Put the champaign back on ice.  The Income Tax is NOT Turning 100 – Yet. (Joseph Thorndike, Tax.com).

One less metal home in town.  Demise of Another Lustron House.  (IowaBiz.com) These are funky steel houses, not mobile homes.  They don’t build ‘em like that anymore.

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/7/2013: Iowa Code Conformity Bill goes to Governor. And: West Des Moines denture tax evasion

Thursday, February 7th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1The Iowa House of Representatives  passed without changes SF 106, the bill updating Iowa’s income tax to incorporate last month’s Fiscal Cliff tax bill.  The bill conforms to all federal changes except for bonus depreciation, which remains unavailable on Iowa returns.

Now the bill goes to Governor Branstad.  The Governor vetoed a prior conformity bill because it adopted bonus depreciation; he is expected to sign this one.

The early passage of these bills is a relief to taxpayers affected by the federal changes.  Now they know how to file their Iowa 2012 returns.  Among the items affected by the bill:

– Section 179 depreciation.  Iowa now adopts the federal $500,000 limit for 2012 and 2013.

– IRA charitable distributions up to $100,000

– The above-the-line deductions for educator expenses and college tuition

– The optional deduction for state and local sales taxes.

No word yet on when the Governor will act on the bill.

 

West Des Moines denture-maker pleads to tax evasion.  The West Des Moines Patch reports:

Charles R. Barbour, who entered his plea to one count of income tax evasion in a proceeding before U.S. Magistrate Judge Celeste F. Bremer, will be sentenced on May 9.

In it, Barbour admitted that he understated tax year 2006 income in the amount of nearly $81,000, tax year 2007 income in the amount of nearly $51,000, tax year 2008 income in the amount of nearly $52,900 and tax year 2009 income in the amount of $11,300.

From the plea agreement it appears that the charges involve diversion of business receipts from his denture-making business to a personal bank account, and improper deductions:

Barbour willfully claimed false business expenses on the Schedules C for tax years 2007, 2008 and 2009; deducting internet and cable expenses for his residence as advertising expense; rent payments on a condominium and an apartment as rent expense; loan repayments to his parents as equipment repairs and maintenance expense; payments for his daughter’s medical expenses as medical supplies; payments to a local country club as professional development; and child support payments as professional fees and contract labor expenses.

The standard IRS audit programs for business expenses look for personal expenses disguised as business expenses, and an experienced examiner knows where to look.  That makes sneaking personal expenses onto a business return a bad bet — and if you make a habit of it, it can become a much bigger problem than back taxes and penalties.

 

Tyler Cowen,  Will health insurance premia rise for young males?

 Look at Table 1– where it says that the average premium for young healthy males will go from $2,000 to a little over $5,000. Yikes.

When the largely-optional penalty for not buying insurance is $695, it doesn’t seem likely that healthy young males will buy a lot of insurance — especially when they can buy it when they get sick because of the rules against pre-existing condition limits.  It’s hard to imagine this working well.

 

Jack Townsend,  Article for Canadians with Unreported Canadian Retirement Plans and Accounts.  More news from the foreign tax compliance jaywalker-shooting front.

Linda Beale,  Soon-to-be Google litigation with IRS over 2003-4 returns?  A disclosure in their 10-K.

Kaye Thomas,  Gaps in Cost Basis Reporting.  Don’t just take as gospel what the broker tells you.

Ellen Kant, Super Bowl Loophole (Tax Policy Blog).  On how the hugely-profitable NFL, and other sports leagues, are tax-exempt.

Elaine Maag, The Immigration Debate: Another Reason We Ought to Separate Work and Family Credits (TaxVox).

Have you ever tried to shoot one?  Oh, I thought you said “Quail.”  There Is Nothing Perplexing About Quill (Cara Griffith, Tax.com):

By saying that Quill created a perplexing inquiry gives credence to the idea that states can get around the physical presence requirement, but they can’t.

Try telling that to Iowa.

 

Russ Fox has a new book out, Tax Strategies for the Small Business OwnerCool!

Yeah, that will solve the deficit. Obama repeats call to end tax break for corporate jets, and more. (Patrick Temple-West, Tax Break).  I’m sure that will be wonderful news at the HondaJet North Carolina production facility that is newly up and running.

TaxGrrrl, Taxpayer Alleges IRS Agent Offered Sex In Exchange For Lower Tax Penalties On Audit.  Sounds far-fetched, but based on what I have seen of IRS agents, it would be a human rights offense.

 

You expected “Days of Our Lives?” The Situation Around the Registered Tax Return Preparer Program Has Become a Really Bad Soap Opera (Going Concern)

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Tax Roundup, 1/25/2013: Only a few days left for IRA distribution mulligan. And: A $750 check for each Iowa household?

Friday, January 25th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

A proposal to refund part of the state budget surplus.  The Des Moines Register reports:

Iowa House and Senate Republican leaders today proposed to give a flat $750 to every Iowa household in an effort to return to taxpayers the state’s $800 million budget surplus.

The money would be returned to taxpayers in the form of a tax credit, said Senate Republican Leader Bill Dix, R-Shell Rock, and House Speaker Kraig Paulsen, R-Hiawatha.

20120504-1That seems pretty straightforward.  Better still to give it back as part of simplifying the tax code, but better that than just spending it.  Yet just spending it has its advocates:

Senate Democrats who control their chamber said that since it’s early in  the session they are open to talking about the Republicans’ proposal, but they have other ideas.

Sen. Joe Bolkcom, D-Iowa City, who chairs the tax-writing Iowa Senate Ways and Means Committee, said Democrats are interested in providing earned income tax credits for lower-income Iowa families and raising the threshold for filing state income taxes. He added that Iowa needs to invest more tax money to clean up dirty rivers and streams, repair crumbling roads and bridges, upgrade the state’s education system and make other improvements.

The earned income credit is a welfare program run through tax returns, with a tremendous rate of fraud.  It’s also a poverty trap.  The phase-out of benefits with rising income serves as a stiff tax on improving your income.  And spending doesn’t become something else just because you call it “investing.”

Elaine Maag,  Earned Income Tax Awareness Day (TaxVox)

 

Kay Bell reminds us that taxpayers who failed to make a 2012 required minimum distribution from the IRA have a January 31 mulligan.   The tax law imposes a stiff penalty on taxpayers who have reached age 70 1/2 who fail to take a minimum amount out by year end.  Taxpayers who failed to take their 2012 withdrawal last year can roll the RMD amount to charity by January 31 and avoid the 50% penalty.

Taxpayers who took an IRA distribution in December can also roll that into a charity by January 31 and avoid having the distribution included in 2012 income.

These provisions were part of the Fiscal Cliff tax bill, which extended the tax-free status of IRA rollovers to charity along with a bunch of other expired provisions.

 

Just because your bank is a country bank doesn’t make the banker a bumpkin.  Four Nebraskans have been charged with “structuring” — breaking deposits into chunks under $10,000 to avoid federal cash reporting requirements.  Federal law requires banks to report cash transactions over $10,000.  Folks who don’t want the government to know about their cash sometimes attempt to use multiple smaller transactions to fly under the radar; that’s illegal.    Theindependent.com reports:

 Randy L. Evans, 59, of Grand Island is charged in a 15-count indictment.  In the first 14 counts, it is alleged that between March 29, 2010, and Dec. 27, 2011, Evans structured financial transactions to evade reporting requirements when he made deposits in the amount of $210,381 at Five Points Bank. Count 15 charges him with structuring financial
transactions to evade reporting requirements when he made 449 transactions between Jan. 4, 2010, and Feb. 28 at Five Points Bank in the amount of $2,030,322.

Bankers are required to report suspicious transactions, and if you make yourself a regular, they’ll notice — especially in a small-town bank.

 

Regrettably, yes.  Libertarian writer Sheldon Richman breaks the bad news: just because the income tax is a bad thing doesn’t make it unconstitutional:

Where does this leave liberty’s advocates? First, we have to face the facts. Like it or not, the U.S. Constitution empowers the Congress to levy any tax it wants. Anyone is free to come up with a contrary interpretation, but the constitutionally endowed courts have spoken. Reading one’s libertarian values into the Constitution is futile. For better or worse, the Constitution means what the occupants of the relevant constitutional offices say it means.

In other words, it doesn’t matter if you think the income tax is unconstitutional if the IRS, the federal judge, the Marshals Service and the Bureau of Prisons think otherwise.  Fighting the income tax by not filing ruins your finances without hurting the Leviathan one little bit.

 

Luring and subsidizing your competitors with your tax money.  Left-side advocacy group Good Jobs First has released a report slamming “incentive” tax breaks like those used for two fertilizer companies in Iowa last year.  The report doesn’t mention Iowa’s programs, but it provides a depressing list of corporate bribery in other states, including subsidies to lure employers from Kansas City, Kansas across the river to Kansas City, Missouri, and vice-versa.  Their press release gets it right:

Interstate job piracy is not a fruitful strategy for economic growth, [report author Greg] LeRoy noted: “The costs are high and the benefits are low, since a tiny number of companies get huge subsidies for moving what amounts to an insignificant number of jobs.” LeRoy added: “The flip side is job blackmail: the availability of relocation subsidies makes it possible for companies that have no intention of moving to extract payoffs from their home states to stay put.”

For all the abuse, the organization’s recommendations are modest.  I would eliminate all such subsidies and replace them with a simple low-rate tax system for everyone.  The Tax Update Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform would be a great start here.

 

TaxProf,  House Ways & Means Chair Proposes Mark-to-Market Tax on Financial Derivatives

IRS Asks Judge To Suspend Injunction Barring It From Regulating Tax Preparers

Jim Maule,  A Tax Question: So What Do You Do With Your Time?. A good discussion of the “material participation” rules that take on extra importance under the new Obamacare Net Investment Income Tax.

Anthony Nitti,  The Tax Impact of Obamacare On The Passthrough Income of Small Business Owners

Patrick Temple-West,  Firms keep stockpiles of ‘foreign’ cash in U.S., and more (Tax Break)

Joseph Henchman,  Tax Foundation and CBPP Agree: States Need Strong Rainy Day Funds (Tax Policy Blog)

Jamaal Solomon, Tax Organizer for Entertainers.  Independent entertainers who cross state lines can find their taxes complicated, so good recordkeeping is essential.

Robert W. Wood, Shhh, Home Office and other IRS Audit Trigger Secrets

David Cay Johnston, Missing Half the Cash (Tax.com)

Start your weekend early with a Friday Buzz from Robert D. Flach!

News you can use:  Stuff Creepy Accountants Like (Going Concern).  Wisconsin!

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Tax Roundup, 12/20/2012: Blizzard! And meeting interesting people via social media.

Thursday, December 20th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

20121220-3Yes, the blizzard came.  It’s still snowing at 6 a.m., with up to 14 inches.  Here’s what happens next:

* WINDS/VISIBILITY…NORTHWEST WINDS WILL BECOME VERY STRONG AND CONTINUE THROUGH THIS AFTERNOON. SUSTAINED WINDS OF 30 TO 40 MPH WITH GUSTS OVER 50 MPH ARE LIKELY. BLIZZARD CONDITIONS WILL BE WIDESPREAD BY 6 AM WITH BLOWING AND DRIFTING SNOW LEADING TO WHITEOUT CONDITIONS AT TIMES THROUGH THE DAY.

* IMPACTS…LIFE-THREATENING BLIZZARD CONDITIONS ARE EXPECTED INTO THURSDAY MORNING. TRAVEL WILL BECOME DIFFICULT…IF NOT IMPOSSIBLE DUE TO BLOWING AND DRIFTING SNOW. THE IOWA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ADVISES NO TRAVEL! POWER OUTAGES MAY BECOME MORE PREVALENT BY MORNING AS HEAVY SNOW IS WEIGHING DOWN TREES AND STRONG WINDS BY MORNING AND AFTERNOON MAY FELL TREES ON POWER LINES…RESULTING IN POWER OUTAGES.

So, telecommuting.

Still dancing on the edge of the cliff.  The President has threatened to veto House Speaker “Plan B” tax bill (see yesterday’s Tax Roundup).  The House is planning to vote on the bill today.  The Wall Street Journal reports ($link):

The talks remained frozen Wednesday as both sides awaited the outcome of Thursday’s vote. Messrs. Obama and Boehner (R., Ohio) have not negotiated since Monday and continued to take shots at each other in public.

“There are a lot of gyrations, tensions and difficulties, and this could still go awry,” said Rep. Tom Cole (R., Okla.). “But we are closer on Wednesday than we were on Friday. All the other major budget deals were all last-minute deals.”

Peter Suderman has tweeted:

20121220-1

Maybe so.  Forgive me if I’m not reassured.  Not when the acting IRS Commissioner has this to say (my emphasis):

As I stated in my letter dated November 13, 2012, the IRS has maintained the programming of its systems assuming that the AMT will be patched as it has been in previous years. I also indicated that if an AMT patch is not enacted by the end of this year, the IRS would need to make significant programming changes to conform our systems to reflect the expiration of the patch. In that event, given the magnitude and complexity of the changes needed, I want to reiterate that most taxpayers may not be able to file their 2012 tax returns until late in March of 2013, or even later.

As we consider the impact of the current policy uncertainty on the upcoming tax filing season, it is becoming apparent that an even larger number of taxpayers — 80 to 100 million of the 150 million total returns expected to be filed — may be unable to file.

That would make tax season even more fun!

Fiscal Cliff Notes:

Nick Kasprak, How do Personal Income Tax Increases Affect Small Business?  (Tax Policy Blog).  The post shows how much income that will be taxed under the President’s proposals and “Plan B” will be business income.  In Iowa, 25.1% of the adjusted gross income on returns with AGI over $200,000 is business income; the percentage is 37.24% on returns with AGI over $1 million.  In other words, increases in taxes on “the rich” punish Iowa employers.

Elaine Maag, Toppling Over the Fiscal Cliff Could Cost low-Income Families $1,000 in Reduced Tax Credits (TaxVox)

Patrick Temple-West, Boehner’s backup tax plan shakes up ‘fiscal cliff’ negotiations, and more (Tax Break)

Year-end techniques from the edge of the Fiscal Cliff.  My new post at IowaBiz.com, The Des Moines Business Record’s blog for entrepreneurs.

 

Cara Smith, Just Do It. A bad idea when a big company comes to the state looking for a special tax break.

Russ Fox, “Tax Guys” Get Taxing Result.   It seems that two Michigan preparers specialized in inventing earned income for clients to commit earned income tax credit fraud.

Paul Neiffer,  Annual Exclusion Update  Paul explains the annual gift tax exclusion.

TaxProf, Ninth Circuit: NOL ‘Carryover’ Does Not Include NOL ‘Carryback’

Jack Townsend,  More Swiss Bank Enablers Indicted

Peter Reilly,  No Bankruptcy Escape From Bad Tax Shelter And Compound Interest

William Perez,  Tax Software for Planning Out Your Year-End Tax Moves.

Kay Bell, Donder says harvest investment losses; Reindeer Year-end Tax Games Tip #7

 

Oversharing.  Social media experts caution us to be discreet in what we share on our Facebook pages.  A Florida woman failed to follow that advice, reports Tampa Bay Times:

TAMPA — Rashia Wilson all but dared investigators to catch her, court records show.

“I’m Rashia, the queen of IRS tax fraud,” Wilson said May 22 on her Facebook page, according to investigators. “I’m a millionaire for the record. So if you think that indicting me will be easy, it won’t. I promise you. I won’t do no time, dumb b——.”

It’s also bad form to make promises you may not be able to keep:

Grand jurors apparently got the message and responded with a 57-count indictment charging Wilson, 27, of Wimauma and her boyfriend, Maurice Larry, 26, of Tampa with mail fraud, filing false tax returns, conspiracy, aggravated identity theft and theft of government property.

She is charged with stealing over $1 million.  If the case is like many others coming out of the Tampa area, it involves identity theft.  It shows that the IRS is just sharp enough to go after you if you go out of your way to tell the world that you are tax fraud royalty.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/3/2012: Medicare 3.8% tax guidance issued. Meanwhile, to the cliff!

Monday, December 3rd, 2012 by Joe Kristan

The IRS issued proposed regulations for the 3.8% Obamacare tax on investment income Friday.  I will do detailed posts on the in the coming days as I study them.

I’ll note two important items from my first overview of the proposed rules:

  • The rules allow taxpayers a free opportunity to redo their activity “grouping” elections for the passive loss rules for 2013. “Passive” business activities are subject to the the 3.8% tax.  Because “passive” status often depends on how much time a taxpayer spends working in a business, how different operations or locations are grouped can determine whether they are passive.
  • The rules appear to allow you to pro-rate state income taxes in determining “net” investment income.  That’s taxpayer-friendly, but it adds another level of complexity.

For an initial take on the rules, see Anthony Nitti at Forbes.

Related:   Obamacare: it’s a tax!

 

David Brunori of Tax Analysts on the fiscal cliff discussion:

     Everyone knows that taxing the very rich will have no perceptible effect on the deficit. It’s all for show. The president and Democrats in Congress can say they stuck it to the millionaires and billionaires. Fairness will abound. The Republicans can tell the world that they are reasonable people willing to compromise on issues as important as taxes. But Americans will still get more government than they are willing to pay for.

     Some liberals have called for us to go over the cliff and to raise taxes across the board. Like Norquist, they are miscalculating. If everybody had to start paying more, there would be a lot more questioning of massive defense spending, egregious subsidies for industries, and entitlements run amok. But for now, we must be content with the rich paying more so we can get more than we deserve from our government.

You can’t pay for mass welfare benefits with a class tax.  The mania for taxing “the rich” is a distraction from the enormous tax increases on everybody that will be required.  The Rich Guy’s not buying.

 

Why the fiscal cliff is such a big fall.  The Bush Tax Cut Issue in One Chart (Ed Krayewski, Hit and Run):

He adds:

And for those who would say “well of course the government has to spend more when the economy is hurting” only one question applies: has it helped? If you think so, I’ve got a tiger-repellant rock to sell you.

Related:  ‘Fiscal Cliff’ follies: Why it may pay to take deductions early.  My latest post at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record blog for entrepreneurs.

Nobody’s serious I:  No ‘fiscal cliff’ deal without higher rates, Geithner says (CNN via Going Concern)

Nobody’s serious, II: Grassley and King push for extension of Wind Energy Tax Credit

 

Iowa admits its capital gain forms were a mess.  A protest rejection released by the Iowa Department of Revenue highlights how badly the Iowa 1040 has been designed with respect to the Iowa deduction for capital gains on the sale of businesses an business real estate.

The taxpayer had excluded regular capital gains from a brokerage account on her tax return.  Iowa properly rejected the deduction, but admitted her mistake was understandable:

Your position relies on the Department’s instructions for completing the tax return.  We found that you are not the only one that made this mistake, so our instructions now clarify that these types of capital gains do not qualify for the deduction as shown above.  In any event, the instructions are not controlling.

Iowa now has better wording on the deduction line and a flow chart to walk taxpayers through whether they should claim the deduction.  It’s a big improvement, but it should be better.  There should be a separate form to compute the deduction, with a checklist to complete to demonstrate eligibility.

The state examines every capital gain exclusion claim.  Taxpayers should be able to submit the information the state asks for with their returns to preclude the examination; even if it would have to be paper-filed, it would save the state the time and money spent on unneeded exams.

Related:  Iowa Capital Gain Break: how it works when you rent property to your business

 

NY Times: States and Cities Shovel $80 Billion/Year in Tax Incentives to Companies, With Little Proof of Their Effectiveness  (TaxProf):

A Times investigation has examined and tallied thousands of local incentives granted nationwide and has found that states, counties and cities are giving up more than $80 billion each year to companies. The beneficiaries come from virtually every corner of the corporate world, encompassing oil and coal conglomerates, technology and entertainment companies, banks and big-box retail chains.

The cost of the awards is certainly far higher. A full accounting, The Times discovered, is not possible because the incentives are granted by thousands of government agencies and officials, and many do not know the value of all their awards. Nor do they know if the money was worth it because they rarely track how many jobs are created. Even where officials do track incentives, they acknowledge that it is impossible to know whether the jobs would have been created without the aid.

It’s a chump’s game, and we taxpayers are the unwilling chumps.  These things are to economic growth what steroids are to long-term fitness.

 

When you don’t remit withheld taxes, it might not just be a matter of getting your payments caught up.  A New Jersey couple that ran an engineering firm failed to remit over $500,000 in withheld taxes to the IRS.  They were sentenced last week to 44 months in prison after being convicted of charges arising out of the nonpayment.  From the Department of Justice Press Release:

Evidence was also introduced that the DeMuros converted withheld funds for their business and personal use, including more than $280,000 in purchases from QVC, Home Shopping Network and Jewelry Television.

No doubt it was of the best-quality.  Oh, and the couple still has to pay over $1.3 million in restitution to the IRS.

Doug Shulman is no longer IRS Commissioner, but his legacy remains:

 ABC News: Alarming Rise in IRS Refund ID Thefts, Few Prosecuted: GAO Report

Dayton Daily News,  IRS says tax fraud attempts up 39 percent

Greg Mankiw,   Some Advice on Tax Planning

Richard Morrison,   The Tax Rate Paid by the Top 1% Is Double the National Average (Tax Policy Blog)

The Critical Question:  Will the Payroll Tax Cut Fall Silently Off the Cliff? (Elaine Maag, TaxVox)

Kay Bell:  Time to spend down your medical flexible savings account (FSA)

Paul Neiffer,  Senator Baucus Urges Extension of Current Estate Tax Laws

Jim Maule,  Passing the Tax Responsibility Buck

Peter Reilly,  Who Should Be Accelerating Income Into 2012?

Patrick Temple-West,  Most Americans face lower tax burden than in 1980, and more (Tax Break)

Robert D. Flach,  DAMNED IF THEY DO AND DAMNED IF THEY DON’T.

Tragedy:  Lindsay Lohan Has Yet To Settle Tax Bills With IRS, Faces Account Seizures (TaxGrrrl)

The Tax Update is also on Twitter (@joebwan) and Facebook!

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