Posts Tagged ‘Farm Tax School’

Tax Roundup, 11/12/13: Mason City is cold edition. But: a reprieve!

Tuesday, November 12th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

The ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School makes its Mason City stop today.  7 degrees and sunny.

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But we have a sold-out house today to keep us warm!  We are also sold out for Thursday in Ottumwa.  Meanwhile Paul Neiffer helps with the second day of the show today in Sheldon and tomorrow here.  Seats are going fast for our remaining sessions in Waterloo, Red Oak, Denison and Ames, so register today!  And if you come to one of the shows, please come up and say hi!

 

The first chart for any tax policy debate is in this post from Andrew Lundeen at the Tax Policy Blog,  Government at All Levels Redistributed $2 Trillion in 2012

 givers and takers

 From the study referenced in the post:

As Chart 1 illustrates, the typical family in the lowest 20 percent in 2012 (with market incomes between $0 and $17,104) pays an average of $6,331 in total taxes and receives $33,402 in spending from all levels of government. Thus, the average amount of redistribution to a typical family in the bottom quintile is estimated to be $27,071. The vast majority of this net benefit, a total of $21,158, comes as a result of federal policies.

Before considering any more taxes on “the rich,” it’s worth stopping to understand what is already happening, and to consider that if this isn’t solving the problem, maybe more of the same isn’t the answer.

 

You don’t get a “reprieve” from something you should look forward to: “Iowa gets Obamacare reprieve.”  Coming from Press-citizen.com, the party newspaper of the People’s Republic of Iowa City, that’s probably not the sort of headline to cheer up the administration.

 

train-wreck Megan McArdle, Hope Is All Obamacare Has Left :

When the tech geeks raised concerns about their ability to deliver the website on time, they are reported to have been told “Failure is not an option.” Unfortunately, this is what happens when you say “failure is not an option”: You don’t develop backup plans, which means that your failure may turn into a disaster.

Great idea!

 

Peter Suderman, Time to Start Considering Obamacare’s Worst Case Scenarios (Reason.com):

But it’s time to start considering the worst-case scenarios: that the exchanges continue to malfunction, that plan cancellations go into effect, that insurers see the political winds shifting and stop playing nice with the administration, and that significant numbers of people are left stranded without coverage as a result. Rather than reforming the individual market, which was flawed but did work for some people, Obamacare will have destroyed it and left only dysfunction and chaos in its wake. 

None of this makes me optimistic for a repeal of the inane 3.8% net investment income tax enacted to finance the debacle.  Cleaning up the disaster will be costly, and they’ll need the money for it.

 

Trish McIntire, The New January 21st.  “Despite the delay in the start of the tax season, taxpayers won’t get extra time to file their returns.”

 

Check out Robert D. Flach’s Tuesday Buzz!

Jack Townsend,  IRS Authority to Settle After Referral to DOJ Tax, a discussion of Ron Isley’s tax troubles.

Brian Mahany,  IRS Makes Important Changes For FBAR Appeals – FBAR Lawyer Blog

Fiduciary Income Tax Blog, Valuation of Indirect Ownership Through a Trust

Norton Francis, Narrow Tax Hikes Win Support in Several States (TaxVox)

 

All the news that’s fit to print.  NY Times: Estate Planning for Sex Toys (TaxProf)

News from the Profession.  Someone With Lots of Spare Time Has Doodled Big 4 Stereotypes (Going Concern).

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/28/13: Maquoketa! And the experts in preposterous.

Monday, October 28th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Today is the first session of the ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation 2013 Farm and Urbane Income Tax Schools.  Once again I am on the Day 1 team with Roger McEowen, the ringleader of the Center, and Kristy Maitre, the Iowa IRS Stakeholder Liaison.

We are starting in Maquoketa this year.  This is our first visit to Maquoketa, the county seat of Jackson County.   This replaces our former Muscatine session; we had to move when the conference center we were using closed.

Most Iowans know Maquoketa for Maquoketa Caves State Park.

Picture by Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

Picture by Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

If the session goes well, we won’t have to hold our next one underground.  If you can’t make it to Maquoketa, register today for one of the seven other farm school sessions!

 

Peter Reilly,  Organizing Junk Mail Does Not Qualify As Manufacturing.  Peter discusses the ADVO case we mentioned last week on the Section 199 “Domestic Production Activities Deduction.”  I like this:

The fact that what was being produced was 90,000 tons of crap, that was going to be quickly thrown away after annoying someone did not seem to be of any significance.  

It’s bad enough that the tax law has to distinguish “production.”  Imagine if the IRS agents had to distinguish crap.

 

Paul NeifferNow Congress is Calling the IRS “Preposterous” (At Least the Delay)!  Well, Congress would know about preposterous.  Paul will be one of the Day 2 speakers at the Farm and Urban Tax Schools in Sheldon, Mason City, Ottumwa and Ames.

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Low and Moderate Income Taxpayers Face High Marginal Tax Rates Too

Yesterday, the CBO released an interesting graphic showing the share of income earners below 450 percent of the federal poverty line. (Incomes up to $87,885 for a family of three).

From a sample of tax returns, they found that nearly 40 percent of those making 450 percent of the FPL and lower face a 30 to 39 percent marginal tax rate.

They also find that a good number of taxpayers face marginal tax rates that are even higher. More than 10 percent face a marginal tax rate between 40 and 49 percent. Some even face rates higher than 80 percent.

 

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This marginal rate is part of the poverty trap caused by the phase-out of means-tested welfare benefits like the Earned Income Tax Credit.  These cause programs touted as helping the poor to punish taxpayers who try to stop being poor.

 

Phil Hodgen,  Expatriate without filing FBARs? Sure thing

Kay Bell, Almost 700 IRS contractors owe $5.4 million in back taxes 

TaxProf, WSJ: States You Shouldn’t Be Caught Dead In

Trish McIntire explains her recent blogging silence.  Get well soon, Trish!

 

Jack Townsend,  Outlier Foreign Account Conviction Affirmed; Making a Witness Unavailable to the Defense.  He discusses prosecutorial success via intimidation.

Quotable.  From a comment by Dan Hanson at Marginal Revolution (via Tyler Cowen):

Failure isn’t rare for government IT projects – it’s the norm. Over 90% of them fail to deliver on time and on budget. But more frighteningly, over 40% of them fail absolutely and are never delivered. This is because the core requirements for a successful project – solid up-front analysis and requirements, tight control over requirements changes, and clear coordination of responsibility with accountability, are all things that government tends to be very poor at.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/17/2012: Ames! And fixing the cliff by fudging withholding.

Monday, December 17th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

The expectant crowd gathers in Ames, Iowa for the final 2012 session of the ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School. 

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350 practitioners are signed up, and the coffee’s on!

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Fiscal Cliff Notes

 Because writing big checks in April is always popular.  A few commenters have said that the Treasury Secretary can prevent Fiscal Cliff disaster by just setting the withholding tables to pretend that the tax law isn’t changing January 1.  Marie Sapirie of Tax Notes says it’s not that simple ($link)

Commentators have suggested that Geithner may even be able to prospectively implement the administration’s policy of raising taxes on taxpayers making more than $250,000 per year by increasing withholding only on income above that level. That is almost certainly wishful thinking. Whatever the “most appropriate” amount of withholding to reflect the tax rates in section 1 may be, section 3402(a) does not give the Treasury secretary the power to create withholding tables that have no basis in current or recently expired law.

Of course Secretary Geither hasn’t always been big on following the tax law.

TaxProf,  NY Times: Itemized Deduction Cap: Popular, But Unfair 

KayBell,   National Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson discusses fiscal cliff tax complications

TaxGrrrl,  Budget Resolution May Come Down To One Question

Steven Rosenthal,  Paying Taxes on Capital Gains Early: How Investors are Avoiding Tax Hikes (TaxVox): “All of this planning suggests that sophisticated taxpayers are outracing Congress again.” 

Nick Kasprak,Alternative Minimum Tax Increase Looming Over Fiscal Cliff Negotiations (Tax Policy Blog)

Robert D. Flach,  WHAT FOOLS THESE POLITICIANS BE!

Remain calm, all is well.  Deficit Hysteria and Debt Denialism (Joseph Thorndike, Tax.com)

 

TaxProf,  Sullivan: Why the SALT Deduction Is Always Under Attack

Megan McArldle discusses an interesting pension funding approach:

Big news in pensions today: Silverdex, a major US-based conglomerate with fingers in just about every economic pie, from mining to solar cells, turns out to have been stuffing its main pension fund full of… it’s own corporate bonds

Just kidding. 

I don’t really know how to say this, but sorry, I lied a little bit.  I’m not talking about a private company at all, because of course, if a private company did this, it would be completely and totally illegal.  Regulators would have shut this down decades ago and probably at least a few lower-level executives would have spent a little time in the pokey.  Instead this is, of course, a description of how the United States Social Security “trust fund” works.

Like so many things: private sector does it, it’s scandal and ruin.  Government does it, it’s Tuesday.

Courtney A. Strutt-Todd,  Tax Law Blog: Attacks on the Exemption for Municipal-Bond Interest and Why it is Important to the Average Taxpayer (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Paul Neiffer,  Another Nice Feature of a Living Trust

Brian Strahle,  D.C. Combined Reporting: How Much Will it Cost Your Company?

Missouri Tax Guy,   Capital Gains, What you need to know 

Trish McIntire links to the annoying new 2013 EIC Interview Sheet, so practitioners can double up as welfare caseworkers.

Russ Fox,  What Happens When Cigarette Taxes go Through the Roof?

Martin Sullivan,  Capital Gains Frustration for Tax Reformers (Tax.com).  His “reformers” want to increase the problems inherent in capital gains taxes by increasing them.  May their frustrations endure.

The Critical Question:  Naming Spousal IRAs After Senator Hutchison – Is That A Priority ?  (Peter Reilly)  I still think Roth & Company should get royalties for the Roth IRA…

Linda Beale,   Goggle’s Bermuda hideaway/HSBC’s too-big status: time to rein in the corporations!  Too big, eh?  Google’s entire market capitalization is about $234 billion this morning.  That’s how much the federal government spends in 23 days.  And it’s Google that’s too big? 

 Sorry, I think there’s already a mortgage on it.  A New Way to Reduce Our National Debt — Sell Alaska. (Greg Mankiw)

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Tax Roundup, 12/11/2012: Red Oak! And impossible dreams.

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

The Tax Update is in Red Oak, Iowa today for the seventh tour date for the Iowa State University Center for Agriculture and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School.  This is our first visit to Red Oak.  From Wikipedia:

Red Oak is a city in and the county seat of Montgomery County, Iowa, United States,[3] located along the East Nishnabotna River. The population was 5,742 in the 2010 census, a decline from the 6,197 population in the 2000 census.[4][5]

..

The community has had a disproportionate number of casualties in the Civil War and World War II.

In the American Civil War, the area provided more Union troops per capita than any other in the state.[10] Company M (which also included residents from Montgomery County had 160 casualties among its 250 members; 52 men were killed in action.[11]

Early World War II battles claimed a disproportionate number of soldiers from Red Oak (although the final casualty statistics tend to disprove the oft-repeated statement that Red Oak suffered more losses per capita than any other American community).[10][12][13] In the Battle of the Kasserine Pass in February 1943, forty-five soldiers from Red Oak alone were captured or killed.[14] At the time more than 100 telegrams arrived in Red Oak saying that its soldiers were missing in action.[15]

Here is the crowd:

 

I can confidently endorse the Red Oak coffee and donuts.  Register now for the last session next Monday in Ames!

 

Eric Toder,  The Coming AMT Debacle. (TaxVox)   If Congress fails to pass an alternative minimum tax “patch,” the AMT is slated to rise drastically for 2012:

Overall, AMT liability will rise from $34 billion to $120 billion. Of that $86 billion increase, new AMT taxpayers will owe $64 billion—an average of about $2,250–while those currently on the tax will pay another $22 billion—an increase of about $5,500 each over the nearly $8,500 average they would pay with a patch.

If you suspect that a tax that affects 32 million households is not limited to the rich, you are right. It is true the enhanced AMT will hit upper middle-income taxpayers the hardest – 98 percent of those with adjusted gross income between $200,000 and $500,000 will pay an average of almost $11,000 in AMT on top of their regular tax liability.

With our political class, failure is always an option. 

 

David Henderson, When Taxes are Cut, What Does Regressive Mean?:

The bottom line is this: Start with any system of progressive taxation, cut everyone’s taxes by the same percent, and you will have implemented, by their standard, a regressive tax cut.

Exactly.  If you only tax rich people, any tax cut “disproportionately benefits the rich.”

Greg MankiwMake Your Own Deficit-Reduction Plan, links to a Wall Street Journal’s interactive graphic featuring deficit reduction options.

Janet Novack, Gucci Match: Fiscal Cliff Tax Fight Pits The 2% Against The 0.1% And The Richest 400

Anthony Nitti,   Here’s Your Update On The Fiscal Cliff Negotiations: Both Parties Agree That the Other Party’s Proposal Stinks.  This time, they’re both right.

 

Paul Neiffer,   Watch Your Timing On Year-End Gifts 

Brian Strahle, D.C. Ruling Presents Franchise Tax Opportunity

Jack Townsend, I Should At Least Mention Stolen Identity Refund Fraud

To dream the impossible dream… Musical theater maven Robert D. Flach tilts at a windmill:

I have a dream that our elected officials in Washington can create a simple and fair Tax Code.
 
I have a dream that our elected officials in Washington are really not just self-centered and self-absorbed idiots.

That’s right up there with my dream of winning the Triple Crown. As a horse.

No, we’ve been trying that for a long time here.  Can tax on witch-doctors cure Swaziland’s fiscal pain? (Nanette Byrnes, Tax Break)

That’ll work:  Alan Simpson goes ‘Gangnam Style’ in deficit reduction video effort  (Kay Bell)

Sacre Bleu!  Gerard Depardieu Leaves France After Tax Increases (Joseph Henchman, Tax Policy Blog)

Robert Goulder,  Timeless Tax Policy & The Other Colbert (Tax.com)

It might someday help him clear the AGI floor for health cost deductions:  Law Student Wins Krispy Kreme Doughnuts for a Year and Wonders: What Are the Tax Consequences? (Tax Prof)

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Tax Roundup, 11/19/2012: Pushing the AMT patch over the Fiscal Cliff. Also: Muscatine!

Monday, November 19th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

The Tax Roundup is reporting from Muscatine, Iowa, home of the 900-lb gorilla of Iowa tax policy, Iowans for Tax Relief.  Also a 24/7 WalMart, for business travelers who forget to pack socks.

Roger McEowen and IRS Taxpayer Liason Christy Maitre give the latest scoop on the Fiscal Cliff at the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School, Muscatine session.

Department of We’re Doomed:   The leaders of the House Ways and Means Committee say that they don’t plan to do an “AMT patch” separately from the “fiscal cliff” negotiations for next year.  Absent a patch, the AMT exemption for 2012 will decline drastically, throwing tens of millions of new taxpayers into AMT and increasing the tax bill for some taxpayers by over $8,000.  Tax Analysts reports ($link)

Asked by reporters about the AMT patch, which has caused anxiety for IRS officials preparing for the coming tax return filing season, Ways and Means Chair Dave Camp, R-Mich., responded, “I’m hopeful that we will address AMT by the end of the year.” He added that he doesn’t think a patch will be passed as stand-alone legislation.

Ways and Means ranking minority member Sander M. Levin, D-Mich., also expects the AMT patch and the extenders to be included in a larger deal on the fiscal cliff. “I think it’s preferable for everything to be put into a package. They relate to each other,” he told Tax Analysts.

The IRS warned last week that failure to patch AMT will delay filing season for affected taxpayers to, at best, sometime in March, with punishing big tax bills for millions of unsuspecting taxpayers.  Now Congress ties the immediate catastrophe of not patching the AMT to the impending catastrophe of the scheduled tax  rate increase.   No small failures for these guys.

 

Fiscal Cliff self-help:  Pressure’s on to sell farmland before end of the year (Dan Piller, Des Moines Register:

The clean, placid appearance of post-harvest Iowa farmland appears to be far removed from the messy fog of Congressional politics and the fiscal cliff.

But pressure is intense to sell land before Jan. 1 when, if Congress doesn’t intervene, capital gains taxes will rise from 15 percent to 23.8 percent and deductions on estate taxes will drop from $5 million to $1 million.

Yes, taxes do affect behavior:

“The tax changes are on everybody’s minds. We have a sale every day, except Sundays, between now and Thankgiving,” regional sales manager Sam Kain of Farmers National Co. said before selling 169 acres of Bremer County farmland from the estate of Alvin and Maxine Walther on the day before the election.

“I’ve been in this business for 30 years and I’ve never seen it this busy,” Kain said.

Selling now doesn’t necessarily help with the estate tax problem (unless, improbably, farm prices continue to rise), but it can make a big difference on income taxes.

Related:

Anthony Nitti, 5 Tax Planning Strategies For Dealing With The Additional 3.8% Obamacare Tax On Investment Income

Peter Reilly,   Carbon Tax Getting Serious Consideration As CBO Seeks To Address Regressiveness.  Sorry, the rich guy isn’t buying.

Martin Sullivan,  The Hidden Economic Damage of Deduction Caps (Tax.com)

 

In other news…

Robert D. Flach,  DEDUCTING SANDY-RELATED VOLUNTEER EXPENSES

Because one disaster deserves another.  Hostess bakery’s closure prompts another try at a federal fat tax (Kay Bell)

At least it’s something they’re good at:  As Hostess Folds, Congress Thinks of New Ways To Kill Snack Food Industry (TaxGrrrl)

 

Paul Neiffer,   Don’t Forget The Small Employer Health Care Credit

Brian Strahle,  Take Advantage of Multistate Tax Year-End Issues and Opportunities

Jim Maule,   Taxation of Medical Study Payments

 

Be thankful, it could be worse.

As we wind down for Thanksgiving week, lets give thanks for not being in California.  David Henderson discusses the Golden State’s self-inflicted pending disaster in It’s not Go Galt: It’s Go to Texas:

As I have noted before, the Laffer Curve–the curve that relates tax revenues to tax rates–must be correct.  The relevant question is where we are on the Laffer Curve.  Are we on the part of the curve–the “prohibitive region”–where an increase in marginal tax rates will reduce revenues and a decrease in marginal tax rates will increase revenues?  For the United States, I think the answer is pretty clearly no.

But what about for California?  We are about to have an empirical test.

The Laffer Curve is the idea that there is a revenue maximizing tax rate.  It’s not zero, and it’s not 100%, because people would do very little that would result in a 100% tax.  The maximum rate is different for different taxes  — a gross receipts tax would have a lower revenue-maximizing rate than an income tax because it would not have deductions, for example.  Mr. Henderson says that’s also true for state income taxes:

When state governments increase tax rates, people in those states have a relevant option that is not relevant to a discussion of increases in federal tax rates.  Specifically, they can move to one of the other 49 states.  So a simple estimate of the elasticity of taxable income with respect to marginal tax rates will underestimate the actual elasticity. Some of those other states with lower marginal tax rates on high-income–and that includes virtually all the other states–will be attractive substitutes.  Texas, for example, has no income tax.  Neither do Washington, Florida, and Nevada, to name just 3 others.

That could cause the tax take for California from its new tax increases to be much less than they are hoping for:

Notice one powerful implication of this second reason that makes the analysis quite different from the analysis for federal tax-rate increases.  Whereas when the federal government raises tax rates, any loss in revenue is due mainly to people cutting back on their income somewhat, when a state government raises marginal tax rates, people who move to another state cut the income that the state taxes to zero.

It’s not just a theoretical issue, as Russ Fox reports in  Phoenix Woos California Businesses:

A hint to California: As you continue making the state more and more hostile to businesses, businesses are forced to react.  No business wants to move (it’s expensive and disruptive), but like my business that moved last year, eventually the desert wastes of Las Vegas or Phoenix start looking really attractive.

The California weather’s nice, but not at any price.

 

And Ontario doesn’t even have the nice weather.   The TaxProf,  Tax Consequences of Florida Marlins – Toronto Blue Jays Trade.

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Tax Roundup, 11/8/2012: Denison Day! And some things to look forward to.

Thursday, November 8th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

The Tax Update is on the road in beautiful Denison, Iowa, birthplace of Donna Reed!

 

I’m speaking at the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School.  There’s still time to register for the remaining five sessions!

 

“‘There are a lot of sales right now,’ explains Steve Bruere, president of Peoples Co. in West Des Moines.”  From IowaFarmerToday.com:

“I see a drop off (in the number of sales) after the first of the year.”’s one logical response to the looming increase in capital gain rates. 

With potential sellers concerned they may have to pay a 20 percent capital gains tax rate instead of 15 percent, and with many of them questioning what other tax changes may be coming, there has been a push to sell now.

The logic says if you were seriously considering a land sale, you would make sure it happened before the end of the year, Bruere says.

Actually, the rate will probably be 23.8%, including the new Obamacare tax on investment income.

More to look forward to:  “The IRS Small Business/Self-Employed Division plans to increase its audit activity for passthrough entities beginning in 2014, SB/SE Commissioner Faris Fink said November 7,”  reports Tax Analysts ($link).  But if you operate a C corporation, don’t be smug:

SB/SE is planning a one-year National Research Program project to study areas of noncompliance. Under the project, the division will examine 2,500 returns from corporations with assets of less than $250,000, Fink said.

Something to look forward to, like a colonoscopy appointment.

 

The Election is over. Now what?

TaxProf, Boehner Would Accept ‘New Revenue’ Under ’Right Conditions’

Going Concern, Hold the Phone, John Boehner Didn’t Say Anything About Taxes Going Up

 Martin Sullivan,   Wanna-Be Tax Reformers Need a Dose of Reality (Tax.com)

Daniel Shaviro,  Boehner on the possible terms for a fiscal cliff deal

Kay Bell,  Investors sell stock ahead of fiscal cliff, plus locking in 15 percent capital gains

Patrick Temple-West,  How far can Obama push on key issues including tax increases, and more

Anthony  Nitti,  With The Election Over, We Can Finally Do Some Meaningful Tax Planning. Six Year-End Steps To Consider.  #6 is bold planning indeed.

 

In other news… 

Robert D. Flach,  DEDUCTING SANDY

William Perez,  New Jersey Tax Relief for Hurricane Sandy

Linda Beale,  Tax Relief for Victims of Sandy

Richard Morrison,   Chart of the Day: Can Taxing Millionaires Eliminate the Deficit?  (No).

Brian Strahle,  How Virginia Based Companies Can Reduce Their State Income Tax Liability

TaxGrrrl, IRS Commissioner Says Public Goodbye After Election 2012

Jack Townsend,  Commissioner’s Swan Song – Excerpts on Offshore Bank Initiatives

 

Tomorrow is Doug Shulman’s last day as IRS Commissioner.  So how is the fight against tax refund fraud going?

Tampa Police Chief Jane Castor went public with her irritation at the slow pace of the investigation into a piece of the tax fraud scourge spreading among street criminals. Authorities say hundreds of millions of dollars in bogus income tax returns have been processed from the Tampa area alone.

“We have an individual that we know did in the ballpark of $9 million in tax fraud,” Castor said in February. “He was arrested and charged in September. And there’s no reason for us to believe that he’s slowed down at all.”

In March, Tampa Police Detective Sal Augeri testified before a U.S. Senate subcommittee in Washington about tax refund fraud and described the Simmons case without naming him.

“We have no reason to believe he has stopped committing this crime,” Augeri said then.

Russell B. Simmons, the man referred to above, pleaded guilty this week to tax fraud. He has to give up ill-gotten goods, including “… a $60,000 Bentley coupe and diamond jewelry that included a $30,000, 18-karat gold Rolex watch with a diamond dial; a 14-karat gold men’s bracelet with 2,420 diamonds; a 14-karat chain and “RS” pendant with 703 diamonds; and a 14-karat ring with 110 diamonds.

Every day the IRS let the identity thief continue to operate, he created new little nightmares, like those experienced by Jason Dinesen’s client, for the innocent taxpayers whose identities he stole.  Meanwhile, Commissioner Shulman was focusing IRS resources on creating a big, expensive and futile preparer regulation bureaucracy.  A man has to have priorities, after all.

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ISU-CALT farm tax school schedule released

Monday, February 6th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

The Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation has released its schedule for the 2012 Farm Tax Schools. The biggest change for this year is that a school in Red Oak will replace the Griswold session, probably because of the rush-hour traffic problems in Griswold:
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The schedule:
October 29-30: Mason City (North Iowa Area Community College)
November 7-8: Waterloo (Hawkeye Community College)
November 8-9: Denison (Boulders Conference Center)
November 12-13: Ottumwa (Bridge View Center)
November 19-20: Muscatine (Clarion Hotel)
November 27-28: Sheldon (Northwest Iowa Community College)
December 11-12: Red Oak (Red Coach Inn)
December 17-18: Ames (Quality Inn and Suites)
Watch for more details at the CALT site.

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Ottumwa party!

Thursday, November 17th, 2011 by Joe Kristan

The Tax Update is in Ottumwa today, helping out with the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm Tax School.
Here IRS Stakeholder Liason Christy Maitre works with a practitioner who has been waiting for the IRS to process his PTIN application:


Emcee Roger McEowen gets excited about excess soil fertility:

If you want to join the fun, we still have schools left this year in Waterloo, Griswold and Ames!

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Donna Reed Country

Monday, November 14th, 2011 by Joe Kristan

It’s a beautiful fall day in Denison, Iowa, where I’m helping out at the Iowa State University Farm Tax School. Only four sessions left, so register now!

Denison is Donna Reed’s hometown, but has been relatively quiet since.
Posting may be light today, but I will do what I can in the breaks.

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Mason City Monday

Monday, November 15th, 2010 by Joe Kristan

The Tax Update was up bright and early today to get ready for the ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation farm tax school at North Iowa Area Community College in Mason City.
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This one is sold out, so if you want to attend one of the last three schools — in Muscatine, Griswold and Ames — sign up today!

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Denison, 2010!

Monday, November 1st, 2010 by Joe Kristan

It’s a gorgeous, crisp fall morning in Western Iowa, where I am speaking at the ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation at the Boulders Conference Center in Denison. Also speaking are CALT director Roger McEowen and IRS Practitioner Liason Kristy Maitre.
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The audience includes Tax Update Twitter friend @BluffsCPA. You, too, can follow us on Twitter or “like” us on Facebook.

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Waterloo!

Monday, October 25th, 2010 by Joe Kristan

A happy crowd, including Iowa legal legend Orville Bloethe (front row, left) at the Waterloo session of the Iowa State University Center For Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm Tax School. If you can’t meet us in Waterloo, it’s not too late — sign up now to see us in Denison, Ottumwa, Mason City, Muscatine, Griswold or Ames!
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It’s a party in Ames!

Monday, December 14th, 2009 by Joe Kristan

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Some of the 300 happy practitioners at the ISU Center For Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm Tax School this morning in Ames. This is our last school for the year. Thanks to everybody who has seen us in Ames, Sheldon, Mason City, Waterloo, Griswold, Ottumwa, Muscatine and Denison!

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Monday in Muscatine!

Monday, November 23rd, 2009 by Joe Kristan

Eager and happy tax practioners raptly follow my presentation this morning at the Muscatine edition of the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm Tax School.
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If you haven’t signed up yet (and why not?), you can still sign on for the Denison and Ames schools!

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On stage in Ottumwa!

Thursday, November 12th, 2009 by Joe Kristan

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The Tax Update is on the road in Ottumwa today at Indian Hills Community College as part of the ISU Center for Agricultural Taxation Farm Tax School series, speaking to these happy practitioners. You can still sign up for schools in Muscatine, Denison, Mason City and Ames. Sign up today!

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Farm tax school!

Wednesday, September 30th, 2009 by Joe Kristan

Registration is open for the Iowa State Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation 2009 Farm Tax Schools. I will be joining the tour this year for the schools, which feature a great slate of instructors, including Neil Harl, who started the program; CALT director Roger McEowen; and practitioners David Bibler, James Goodman, and Lee Wilmarth. Kristie Maitre of the IRS will also be there.
Tour Dates, instructors and locations:

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Farm tax school: save the date!

Tuesday, March 17th, 2009 by Joe Kristan

The ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation has set the dates for the 2009 Farm Tax Schools. I will be on the tour for several of the dates this year, so get your tickets now!

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