Posts Tagged ‘FBAR’

Tax Roundup, 3/9/16: A College Savings Iowa contribution today can reduce 2015 Iowa tax. And: Shoot more jaywalkers!

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

csi logoYou can still make a College Savings Iowa 2015 contribution. While Section 529 plans provide tax-free earnings for college for taxpayers in all states, Iowans can get an extra tax break for them. 2015 contributions to College Savings Iowa or Iowa Advisor Sec. 529 plans can generate a deduction on Iowa state 1040s up to $3,163 per donee.

For the first time, Iowans can make their 2015 contributions as late as the April 30, 2016 due date of their 2015 tax return. In prior years you had to make the contribution by December 31 to get the deduction.

The $3,163 limit is per donee, per donor. That means a couple with 2 children can get four full deductions for 2015 529 contributions totaling up to $12,652. For a couple at the 8.98% top Iowa rate, that’s a savings of $1,136 on their Iowa return.

This is another of our occasional series of 2016 filing season tips. Collect them all!

 

Jack Townsend, Report on Remarks of AAG Tax and Practitioner Regarding Nonwillfulness and Foreign Account Enablers:

Ciraolo and Bryan Skarlatos questioned whether foreign account holders can remain nonwillful about foreign account reporting obligations at this stage.  The article quotes from her prepared comments (linked above) as follows:

After three very well-publicized voluntary disclosure programs, nearly 200 criminal prosecutions, ongoing criminal investigations and the increasing assessment and enforcement of substantial civil penalties for failure to report foreign financial accounts, a taxpayer’s claims of ignorance or lack of willfulness in failing to comply with disclosure and reporting obligations are, quite simply, neither credible nor well-received. 

This is so wrong. Something that is a big deal in the IRS enforcement bureaucracy can be invisible to a person going about their business, maybe taking a temporary position overseas or getting a U.S. green card.

People get in IRS trouble for having an interest in a foreign account they aren’t even aware of. One practitioner I know had to deal with an immigrant from India who paid thousands of dollars in penalties for not reporting an interest in a foreign bank account that her parents back home put her name on as a joint owner without her knowledge, and without her receiving any income from it. Others find themselves in hot water after get an inheritance overseas that they don’t learn about until after the reporting deadline.

The IRS remains clueless about how many people go through their daily financial lives without pondering whether there is an obscure form lurking to ruin them for non-compliance. The system is broken, but the only answer the enforcers have is to continue the beatings until morale improves.

 

20120906-1David Brunori speaks wisely: If You Need Tax Credits, You Shouldn’t Be in Business (Tax Analysts Blog)

Here’s what got me thinking. Iowa — no paradise when it comes to good tax policy — gave 186 companies tax credits worth more than $42 million last year. Those credits were handed out as an incentive to conduct research and development. There are other credits available for businesses. Oh, and the credits are refundable because, like with poor families receiving the earned income tax credit, R&D credits provide a critical safety net. All right, I’m being facetious.

Iowa’s biggest welfare recipient was technology company Rockwell Collins Inc., which received $12 million. Rockwell is a great company, but it has $5 billion in revenue. Giving money to Rockwell isn’t quite the same as giving money to a shoestring nonprofit feeding the homeless in Des Moines.

In all, 20 companies claimed more than $500,000 in R&D credits, including DuPont Co., Deere & Co., and Monsanto Co. I ask them, where is your pride? Do you really want a government handout?

For a full-throated defense of tax credit corporate welfare, today’s IowaBiz.com blogger, Brent Willett, offers Job creation fuel: R&D policy move is important for Iowa. Not surprisingly, the cost of paying these subsidies in increased taxes on less fortunate and less influential Iowa businesses never comes up. The “job creation” part is also weakly defended.

 

20160309-1

 

Russ Fox, Online Gambling Addresses Updated for 2016. Russ performs a valuable service in gathering street addresses of offshore online gaming websites. Online gaming accounts at these sites are “foreign financial accounts” for FBAR purposes, and you need a street address to fill out Form 114. They can be hard to find. Hat’s off to Russ.

TaxGrrrl, Tax Season Proving Confusing (Again) For Taxpayers Affected By Obamacare

Kay Bell, Have you received your Obamacare coverage forms yet? “Recipients of the B or C versions want to hang onto these forms as verification that they did have ACA required coverage, which they tell the Internal Revenue Service about by checking the appropriate box on their 1040EZ, 1040A or long form 1040.”

Michelle Drumbl, The Automated Substitute for Return Procedures (Procedurally Taxing) “The ASFR assessment process takes into account all income reported as earned by the taxpayer, but it ignores reported items that would reduce taxable income.”

Robert Wood, Erin Andrews Wins $55M Peephole Verdict But Faces Heavy IRS Tax Hit

Jim Maule, Buying and Selling Dependency Exemptions for Tax Purposes. “It’s too bad Congress cannot be indicted, convicted, and punished for making a mess of the tax system, continuing to make it worse, and refusing to clean it up.”

 

20160309-2

 

Annette Nellen, AICPA Advocacy on IRS Funding. It’s hard to see how the IRS gets more funding when it does such an awful job with the funding it has.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1035. “The IRS doesn’t know if its data backups are deleted or not created, and doesn’t test to ensure backups can be used if information is lost, even after a “significant” December 2014 incident, according to a Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) report.”

Alan Cole, Tax Policy Must Be Proportionate to Spending Policy (Tax Policy Blog). “This gets to the heart of one of the principles of good tax policy: your tax policy should actually be able to fund the government you want. One way or another, Donald Trump will have to assent to this principle.”

Elaine Maag, Complicated Families: Complicated Tax Returns (TaxVox):

The law is built on the idea that a child lives in a traditional family – married parents with only biologically related siblings. The tax unit it is presumed to include the adults supporting the child.

But increasingly, children live in arrangements that belie that traditional family; children move between homes of divorced or never-married parents in formal and informal custody arrangements; children live with unmarried, cohabiting parents; children live in multigenerational households. In short, children are supported by adults in multiple tax units.

But only one tax unit gets to claim the earned income credit for each child.

 

News from the Profession. Apparently Accountants Are Terrible on the Phone (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

xx

Share

Tax Roundup, 1/12/16: IRS wants to shoot more jaywalkers. And: the benefits of IRS ethics training.

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20120912-1They think it’s expensive because it is. Tax Analysts reports ($link) on a speech given by an IRS international tax deputy commissioner that shows how little the IRS cares about wreaking havoc on the lives of taxpayers who inadvertently fail to comply with the weird and obscure foreign account reporting rules. The talk by David Horton shows that the IRS continues to assume anybody who has failed to file FBAR forms is a bad actor. For example:

The IRS’s 2014 OVDP (Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program) guidance provides transitional rules for non-willful taxpayers who entered the OVDP earlier, but could have been eligible for the streamlined program. [Robert] Panoff wondered why they were incurring lower penalties than similarly situated taxpayers who completed the OVDP. 

Horton explained that these taxpayers are still in the OVDP, so they will get criminal clearance and a closing agreement, while streamlined participants get neither. Criminal clearance and a closing agreement are worth paying for, the thinking goes. A streamlined participant could later get a notice of deficiency for penalties that are assessed as taxes.

So a non-willful failure to file still benefits from “criminal clearance?” That’s a funny thing to need for a non-willful violation, and it shows an “it’s all criminal” mindset. Shoot all the jaywalkers!

The article has this:

Every practitioner hopes to shoehorn his offshore-account-holder clients into the streamlined program. Indeed, the only taxpayers who don’t welcome the streamlined program are recent immigrants who think that 5 percent of a home-country bank balance is a stiff price to pay for a green card.

That’s because it is ridiculously expensive.

Nowhere in the piece is any evidence that they (or the author) are aware that accidental Americans and compliant taxpayers can be financially ruined for failing to meet a requirement unknown to 95% of the populace. There’s certainly no awareness of the fundamental injustice of hitting taxpayers with 5-figure fines for committing personal finance abroad without an FBAR.

There is a crying need for foreign financial reporting reform. Two good first steps:

  1. Increase the FBAR foreign account thresholds to the amounts that apply for reporting foreign financial assets on Form 8938. These don’t begin to apply until the assets exceed $50,000, or $200,000 for taxpayers abroad. Using this threshold for foreign financial account filing would eliminate the vast majority of filings, leaving them only for taxpayers who actually have enough income to justify the hassle.
  2. Provide an automatic and penalty-free option to enable taxpayers to come in out of the cold, as long as they file before they are contacted by the IRS and any unreported tax required is relatively small. This would work much like the programs states have for businesses who want to come into compliance. The states benefit from getting the taxpayers in the system, and the taxpayers get in from the cold without financial ruin.

Unfortunately, the IRS apparently wants to go the other way: “Horton reported that while the IRS is still getting a steady flow of offshore voluntary disclosure program filings every month, that program has to end eventually.” Then it will be a choice to either stay out of compliance and risk financial disaster, or come into compliance and guarantee it.

 

20160112-1

 

But preparer regulation will help prevent preparer fraud! From a U.S. Attorney press release:

Yolanda Castro, 48, an employee of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service in Fresno, pleaded guilty today to aiding and assisting in the preparation of a false tax return, United States Attorney Benjamin B. Wagner announced.

According to court documents, Castro was employed by the IRS for approximately 20 years, including as a tax examiner and contact representative. Between 2007 and 2013, she prepared and filed false federal income tax returns for herself, her family members and others in which she fraudulently claimed tax deductions and credits. For instance, on her own 2008 tax return, Castro claimed a credit for education expenses that she did not incur, and provided the IRS phony textbook receipts to support the claim. Likewise, in tax returns she prepared for herself and others, Castro claimed child care expenses that had not been incurred.

Surely some ethics continuing education would have saved her.

 

Robert D. Flach has a little Buzz for your Tuesday. “Not much BUZZ today – but, as I always say, some BUZZ is better than no BUZZ.”

Russ Fox reminds us that it’s 1099 Time for 2016. “The best way to check whether or not you need to send a 1099 to a vendor is to know this before you pay a vendor’s invoice.”

William Perez, What You Need to Know about Reporting Payments Using Form 1099-MISC

TaxGrrrl, No, You Can’t Actually File Your Tax Return Early (And More Info About Tax Refunds). “Some tax preparers are suggesting in ads and on social media that they can somehow help you skip the line and get you a refund before anyone else. Don’t be fooled.”

Robert Wood, 12 Surprising Items IRS Says You Must Report On Your Taxes. You won’t believe number 2!

Jason Dinesen, Glossary: Social Security Wage Base. “The term Social Security Wage Base refers to the maximum amount of wages or self-employment income on which the 6.2% Social Security tax is based.”

Paul Neiffer, Relief for Older Farmers with IRAs. And not just farmers.

 

Keith Fogg, Improving Payroll Tax Compliance (Procedurally Taxing). “From my perspective working on these cases within the IRS, the failure of employers to pay over the collected taxes usually resulted from poor cash management.”

Renu Zaretsky, New Taxes, Excess Profits, and a Windfall. Lots of cynical posturing by desperate politicians in today’s TaxVox headline roundup.

 


20160112-2

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 978. The process of running out the clock continues.

Scott Greenberg, Which Tax Extenders are Left? (Tax Policy Blog):

Looking over the list below of remaining tax extenders, none of them seem like “must-pass” policies. As a result, the pressure is off of Congress to renew all of the tax extenders as a package. Instead, Congress should take the time to evaluate the remaining tax extenders one by one, making the good provisions permanent and letting the bad ones expire. Temporary tax policy is bad tax policy, and it’s about time that Congress laid the ritual of tax extenders to rest once and for all.

Let’s hope so.

 

The Critical Question. Would a cuddly mascot make the IRS lovable? (Kay Bell). That would look like a stuffed Cthulhu

The Critical Question II: Accounting Firms Allowing Side Gigs: Good Idea or Independence Mine Field? (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 12/11/15: Extender battle extended to next week; efforts to make some breaks permanent continue. And: Tina, Accidental American.

Friday, December 11th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20151211-1Extending the week. Congress had been scheduled to go home today, but now it looks like the session will drag through the weekend while they try to agree on spending and tax legislation.

Whither the extenders? The Hill reports that hope lives for permanent enactment of several of the important Lazarus provisions that have repeatedly died – most recently at the end of 2014 — and that need to be revived to be used on 2015 returns. From the report:

I understand the current projection is for the House to post the omnibus Monday and vote on it by Wednesday,” Senate Republican Whip John Cornyn (Texas) told reporters. “The goal is to wrap things up by Wednesday evening.”

He said the omnibus would be linked to a package extending expiring tax provisions. Senate negotiators say that package is likely to make several important tax breaks open-ended and place a moratorium on two ObamaCare taxes.

“They seem to be linked, although I can’t tell you whether it will be one vote or two votes, but clearly they’re part of the overall negotiations,” he added.

What would be made permanent? At least the R&D Credit and the $500,000 Section 179 deduction. These would be accompanied by permanent, and maybe increased, earned income credits, child credits, and education credits. How likely is it? The Hill says “Senate sources on Thursday said the chances of reaching a deal on a major tax deal were greater than 50 percent.”

Nothing is certain, though. Tax Analysts reports ($link) Permanent Tax Extenders Deal Continues to Elude Lawmakers. It quotes Rep. Steve Israel (D-N.Y.) as insisting that the child credit be indexed to inflation, and that other obstacles to agreement remain:

Israel noted that ultraconservative Republicans object to including renewable energy tax credits and family credits in the extenders deal, so votes from House Democrats are still essential regardless of what deal Senate Democrats reach with Republicans.

Here I’ll just note that there appear to be no such thing as “ultraliberals” to reporters, while “ultraconservatives” abound.

Rep. Bill Flores, R-Texas, chair of the House Republican Study Committee, said December 2 that his group believes that renewable energy credits should be phased out. “Special interest giveaways like the wind production tax credit and the solar investment tax credit have overstayed their welcome and their usefulness,” he said.

Flores’s group also does not support family credits, which he called “stimulus legacy items” that should not be renewed without heightened verification and oversight.

These obstacles could result in another two-year extension of the expiring provisions, though complete failure remains an option.

Prior coverage:

Ways and Means Chair introduces a Plan B as permanent extender talks continue.

Extender week?

 

20151124-2

 

Just how stupid is U.S. foreign taxation? This stupid. A heartbreaking and infuriating piece by Allison Christians shows the brain-dead Kafkaesque nightmare created by Congress and enforced by IRS to “crack down” on overseas taxpayers: Understanding the Accidental American: Tina’s Story. It tells the story of a 62 year-old woman who was born in the U.S. while her parents were students, but has lived all but her first six months in Canada. Ms. Christians makes a powerful case:

Related to that point, I think a taxpayer has a right to learn that her whole financial life is subject to harsh deterrents and penalties solely for the reason that it is not located in the United States, even and especially when she is not located in the United States. Again, I think she has the right to learn that not from blogs or word of mouth, but from the government that seeks to impose these rules on her. I think she’s got a right to be informed about a life-destroying force like PFIC by the government that seeks to unleash that force upon her, and a right to avoid that punishment by making different choices. And if that government can’t or won’t bother to inform her, or address the utter absurdity of stripping a person of their life savings as a consequence of inadequate form filling, I think she’s got a reason to complain that this is a pretty unfair administration of a very complex law — a law designed for millionaires with expensive tax accountants and not for Canadians carefully saving for retirement and not hiding anything from anyone.

When the IRS and the politicians crow about how effective their foreign enforcement efforts are, remember that a lot of it is coming out of the pockets of taxpayers like Tina.

(Via the TaxProf).

 

Kristine Tidgren, Iowa Court of Appeals Says LLC Corporate Veil Properly Pierced (The Ag Docket).

The court found that the trial court’s finding of inadequate capitalization was supported by substantial evidence. In so finding, the court noted the defendants’ history of moving funds between related entities, the lack of LLC assets and employees, and its failure to reduce losses to the plaintiff, despite knowing its funding was inadequate.

This sort of ruling will make businesses leery of using Iowa entities. An appeal to the Iowa Supreme Court is likely.

 

buzz 20151023-1Friday means Buzz day for Robert D. Flach. Today he covers the legislation requiring IRS to use private debt collectors, preparer regulations and more.

Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Delinquent Taxes May Mean No Passport. “ Imagine the problems for a taxpayer who is unaware of this new rule and not finding out until being stranded in the midst of traveling.”

Jason Dinesen, Choosing a Business Entity: Determining S-corporation Reasonable Salary. “A salary that’s considered reasonable for one corporation may not be reasonable for another corporation.”

Leslie Book, Tis the Season For Tax Procedure Legislation (Procedurally Taxing).  “Under the new legislation, the failure to file penalty may not be less than the lesser of $205 or 100 percent of the amount required to be shown as tax on the return (it used to be $135 or 100%).”

Robert Wood, Three Moves In December To Save Taxes Next April

TaxGrrrl, How Answering A Simple Question Makes You An Easy Target For Identity Thieves

 

20151105-1

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 946

Nicole Kaeding, Proposed Tax Increases in Alaska. Alaska may get an income tax.

Steven Rosenthal, Hillary Clinton Proposes Tough New Curbs on Corporate Tax Inversions (TaxVox). The “beatings will continue until morale improves” approach.

News from the Profession. Grant Thornton Hoping to Bring Soul-Crushing Disappointment to Charlotte Hornets With New Sponsorship (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 10/5/15: Cool implosion, but no tax break. And more tax fairy tales!

Monday, October 5th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

This happened in Downtown Des Moines over the weekend:

YouTube Video Courtesy star105

Preservationists wanted to save the building, the old YMCA. I never understood this. Some beautiful buildings have been lost in Des Moines, but this isn’t one of them. If you aren’t willing to buy a building and fix it up yourself, it doesn’t seem right to tell the owners that they have to do it with their own money.

But did they get a tax break for the implosion? Did they get to write off the cost of the building when they brought it down? It would seem logical — obviously the building is a total loss. But no, it doesn’t work that way. Internal Revenue Code Section 280B is pretty clear:

In the case of the demolition of any structure—
(1) no deduction otherwise allowable under this chapter shall be allowed to the owner or lessee of such structure for—

(A) any amount expended for such demolition, or
(B) any loss sustained on account of such demolition; and

(2) amounts described in paragraph (1) shall be treated as properly chargeable to capital account with respect to the land on which the demolished structure was located.

So not only is there no write-off of the building, the cost of the demolition itself is capitalized, along with any remaining basis in the building — to be recovered only when the land is sold someday. So the income tax law doesn’t encourage implosions. Pretty much the opposite.

 

20151001-2

 

Jack Townsend, IRS Makes FOIA Disclosures to Tax Analysts Regarding OVDP and Streamlined Processing. “One point that was already known to practitioners is that rejection of the transition streamlined relief inside OVDP is not a determination of wilfulness so that, upon opt out, the wilfulness penalty is pre-determined.”

Peter Reilly, Rand Paul Suffers Setback In Foreign Reporting Lawsuit

 

Kristine Tidgren, Let the Motions Begin: Drainage Districts Seek Partial Summary Judgment. Des Moines Water Works is suing upstream drainage districts for not keeping nitrates out of the river. 

Annette Nellen, Obamacare – can pieces be removed? “Obamacare has too many complicated tax provisions in addition to many complicated non-tax provisions.”

Kay Bell, Time to make your flexible spending account choices

Sonya Miller, Freezing the Refunds of Our Guests (Procedurally Taxing). “We are aware of a group of nonresident taxpayers (taxpayers that fall under the rules for aliens temporarily present in the United States as students, trainees, scholars, teachers, researchers, exchange visitors, and cultural exchange visitors) who had their 2014 refunds frozen.”

TaxGrrrl, Treasury Sends Dire Warning To Congress: We’re Running Out Of Money Faster Than Expected.

20151001-1

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 877878879. They’re still talking about impeaching Koskinen. If the administration really wants to build trust in the IRS, they’ll dump him. Until they do so, we can assume his stonewalling and stiff-arming of the GOP appropriators is the behavior the administration wants out of him.

Scott Greenberg, New Study Shows that Tuition Deduction Does Not Increase College Attendance (Tax Policy Blog):

 Last year, Bulman and Hoxby published a similar study of three federal education credits, which concluded that all three have a “negligible” effect on college attendance. This finding was in stark contrast to the Obama administration’s claim that the expansion of the American Opportunity Tax Credit made it possible for 12 million more students to earn a college degree.

The increase in subsidies over the years coincides with wild increases in tuition costs. I don’t believe that’s a coincidence.

 

Renu Zaretsky, Hope’s Limits, Math, and Cuts. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup talks about the apparent death of an international tax reform effort and efforts to improve IRS verification of earned income tax credit eligibility.

 

Russ Fox, There Is No Magic OID Process. Just like there is no Tax Fairy.

Me, Chasing the Tax Fairy. My latest at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record business professionals’ blog. I discuss four manifestations of the Tax Fairy cult – The ESOP Fairy, the Home-based Business Fairy, the Pennies-on-the-dollar Fairy, and the Classic 105 fairy that Hank Stern spotted.

 

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 8/3/15: Due date scramble edition, with extendable FBARs!

Monday, August 3rd, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150803-1Highway bill scrambles business return due dates. A “short term highway funding bill” (HR 22) has switched some tax return filing due dates from what they have been pretty much forever. The bill, signed last week by the President, responds to complaints that K-1s are arriving too late by accelerating the partnership return due date and delaying C corporation due dates — with one bizarre exception.

The changes, which take effect for years beginning after December 31, 2015:

1065 (Partnership) returns: Currently due April 15, or 3 1/2 months after year-end, with a five-month extension. The new due date is March 15 (or 2 1/2 months after year-end), with a six-month extension.

1120 (C corporation) returns: Currently due March 15, or 2 1/2 months after year-end, with a six-month extension available. The new law makes the due date April 15 (or 3 1/2 months after year-end), with a six-month extension. Except, weirdly, for C corporations with a June 30 year-end, which retain the old deadlines through 2025.

FBAR (form 114) reports of foreign financial accounts. These have been due on June 30, with no extension available. They will be due on April 15, but with a six-month extension available.

1041 (estate and trust income tax) returns retain their April 15 due date, but their extension period is shortened from six months to 5 1/2 months.

It’s not entirely clear yet how this will work. I hope the FBARs will be considered automatically extended if the 1040 or other return is extended, to help avoid paperwork foot-faults.

The bill is an empty gesture to 1040 filers who get frustrated waiting on K-1s. They won’t get issued any faster. K-1s aren’t delayed because people are sitting around waiting for the due date. They are delayed because the tax law is hard, businesses can be complex, and it takes time to get the work done. On top of that, everybody is on a calendar year, thanks to Congress, so the professionals are trying to get all the returns completed at the same time.

All this means is that more partnership returns will be extended. It won’t get the K-1s out any sooner. The only way to change that is to simplify the tax law and to once again enable pass-throughs to have tax years ending on dates other than December 31.

Additional coverage:

Robert Wood: Many IRS Tax Return Due Dates Just Changed, FBARs Too

Russ Fox, Deadline Changes for 2016 Tax Returns and 2016 FBAR. “It is unclear whether a separate extension for the FBAR will need to be filed. The reference to Treasury Regulation 1.6081-5 is for the automatic two-month extension of time to file for those residing outside the United States, so it appears those who do so reside will have a June 15th deadline for filing the FBAR (with a four-month extension available until October 15th).”

Kay Bell, Highway bill drives home some new tax laws

Paul Neiffer, Tax Return Due Date Changes and Other Items. “For estates required to file an estate tax return, they will now be required to report to the IRS basis information for all assets included in the estate.”

Kyle Pomerleau, Senate Approves Three-Month Highway Trust Fund Extension (Tax Policy Blog).

 

20150803-2

 

Congratulations to TaxGrrrl Kelly Phillips Erb. She has ditched tax practice to write on taxes full-time for Forbes.com. Well done!

William Perez, Every State’s Sales Tax Holiday for 2015

Jason Dinesen, New Nebraska Guidance on Same-Sex Marriage and Taxes

Matt McKinney, Do equal, 50/50 shareholders owe each other fiduciary duties? (IowaBiz.com)

Annette Nellen, Importance of lease terms for desired results. “If you want a particular tax result, be sure the lease agreement supports that result.”

Jana Luttenegger Weiler, NFL Decides to Give up Tax-Exempt Status (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

 

David Brunori, Michigan’s Wrongheaded Approach to Tax Policy. (Tax Analysts Blog):

Advocates of raising corporate taxes are assuming that people will want to stick it to corporate fat-cat shareholders. This is right out of the ‘‘tax the rich and give to the poor’’ playbook. Except in this case, proponents want to tax the rich and give it to construction contractors.

They want to tax the rich to give it to their friends — and that doesn’t mean the poor.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 816

 

20150803-3

 

Peter Reilly, Judicial Watch Reveals That They Read Tax Blogs At IRS:

At the time Joe Kristan thought that the IRS was wrong to raise the issue and that Senators were right to call the Service to account about it. And this is the part of the document dump that I found most interesting.  Paul Caron summarized Joe’s post  and that was apparently printed out numerous times at the IRS as there are multiple copies in the document dump.

The IRS reads the Tax Update, so you should too!

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 6/30/15: It’s FBAR Day! Foreign and gaming account owners, do or die.

Tuesday, June 30th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

 

fincen logoForm 114 or bust. Today is the unextendable deadline to file Form 114, the “FBAR” report of foreign financial accounts. It’s required if you own foreign financial accounts whose value reached $10,000 anytime in 2014. Penalties for failing to file can run to half the value of the account, so if it applies, you want to get it done. The form must be filed electronically.

Foreign financial accounts include bank or brokerage accounts held outside, even in an offshore branch of a U.S. bank. They also include online gaming accounts for sites located outside the U.S. More details on what is included is available at the IRS FBAR page.

You will need the mailing address of the branch where your foreign account is located. Russ Fox has done a great job of finding many street addresses for online gaming sites.

Is the Form 114 filing requirement absurd? Yes. The filing threshold is far too low, and it works to make regulatory violators out of Americans living and working overseas for the crime of committing personal finance abroad. Meanwhile, I would be surprised if any actual criminals are actually caught using Form 114; instead, it’s just used to increase penalties on those whose tax violations are found in other ways. Oh, and to extort money out of people who didn’t realize they were supposed to file the thing. Unfortunately, absurdity is what the IRS is all about.

Speaking of absurd, The Commerce Department BE-10 survey for those owning at least 10% of an offshore business is also due for e-filing today, with penalties into the thousands of dollars for non-filers.

Related: Russ Fox, Does a Nonresident Alien Spouse that Has Elected to be Treated as a US Person Need to File an FBAR?

 

Arnold Kling reports on what seems to me a very unwise idea: State Nullification of the Federal Income Tax?, involving the idea of “nullifying” the federal income tax by providing a state credit for whatever the federal income tax is, funded by state sales taxes. Arnold points out some of the obvious problems: “For example, if this were enacted, then residents would have no incentive to minimize their tax liability. Go ahead and realize all of your capital gains, because when you pay more Federal taxes, your state sends you a credit.”

 

20150630-1

Forest fires in Canada give Iowa a spooky sky today.

 

William Perez, Tax Implications of Supreme Court’s Same-Sex Marriage Ruling. “Together, [Jason] Dinesen and I came up with a list of all the tax things we should be concerned about as a result of the Supreme Court’s decision in Obergefell v. Hodges (pdf).”

Robert D. Flach brings his Tuesday Buzz, along with the less cheerful news that his Gmail account has been compromised. He ponders whether IRS Commissioner Koskinen is worse than his predecessor, Worst Commissioner Ever Shulman. I still give the prize to Shulman, but Koskinen is making a heck of a case for the honor.

Kay Bell, IRS ‘incompetence’ blamed for lost Lois Lerner emails. That’s certainly plausible, but the incompetence all seems to be on the side of hampering the investigation.

Robert Wood, If Uber, FedEx, Other Workers Are Employees, Who Pays What?

Joni Larson, Failing to Prove the Attorney-Client Privilege Applies (Procedurally Taxing). Some conversations you’d rather not share with the IRS.

Peter Reilly, Mario Biaggi’s Criminal Case Followed By Tax Travails. In some ways the tax decision coming on top of the criminal conviction really makes me think there might have been something to Biaggi’s contention that he was a victim of Giuliani’s ambition.  When you look at the big picture of the transactions, nobody seems to have been getting away with anything from an income tax perspective.”

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: Are Donations to a 501(c)(4) Deductible?

 

IMG_1429a

 

Elizabeth Malm, A Quick Primer on Personal Income Taxes (with GIFs!) (Tax Policy Blog). They’re nice, but no dancing cats. A great little post for anybody wanting an overview of state income taxes.

Gene Steuerle, Combined Tax Rates and Creating a 21st Century Social Welfare Budget (TaxVox).

Dalton Lane, Obergefell v. Hodges: Supreme Court Upholds Same-Sex Marriage (Tax Policy Blog):

The Supreme Court’s ruling has definitely simplified the tax system. Whether a same-sex marriage, or a opposite-sex marriage, the tax treatment is the same. Furthermore, same-sex couples will no longer have any difference in filing status between their state income taxes and federal income taxes.

It will make Jason Dinesen’s life easier, for sure.

Caleb Newquist, PwC Walks a Fine Line Between Its People and Clients on Same-Sex Marriage (Going Concern).

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 782

 

TaxGrrrl, 8 Signs That It’s Time To Get A New Tax Professional. They are all good signs, especially number 8.

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 6/24/15: New obscure dumb forms we choose to do together. And: Wine and Taxes!

Wednesday, June 24th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150528-1There’s a new stupid form in town. The Commerce Department this year springs a new form on people with interests in foreign businesses. Form BE-10 was originally due May 31, but the system for filing it crashed, leading to a new June 30 deadline.

BE-10 is a survey, not a tax form. The survey is done every five years, and formerly was required only when you were contacted by the Commerce Department. Now everyone with a 10% or more “direct or indirect” interest in a foreign business is supposed to file it. From Accounting Today:

The form is mainly intended for businesses with foreign investments. Originally individuals only had a filing requirement if they were directly contacted by the bureau, but last November, the government amended its regulations to require any U.S. person who had at least a 10 percent direct or indirect interest in a foreign business enterprise at any time during the U.S. person’s fiscal year to file the Form BE-10. A U.S. person includes individuals, trusts, estates, corporations and partnerships.

“With many of our clients fighting the IRS over FBAR penalties, we err on the side of filing whenever the government requests a U.S. person to file an international information report,” said Carolyn Turnbull, international tax services director at Vestal & Wiler CPAs in Orlando, Fla.

Penalties for failure to file the form range from $2,500 to $25,000. Even worse, individuals who willfully fail to file the form can face fines of up to $10,000 or imprisonment for a maximum of one year, or both.

$2,500 to $25,000 for not filling out a stupid survey. Remember, government is simply a word for the things we decide to do together, like clobber each other with big fines for obscure paperwork violations.

Robert Wood has more.

 

20150624-2

 

Kay Bell, Uncle Sam demands foreign bank account filing by June 30. The $10,000 threshold — and the whole FBAR regime, in fact — is absurd. Like so many regulations, it ensnares otherwise innocent people for paperwork violations while doing next to nothing to affect criminals, who don’t much care about getting the paperwork right.

Robert Wood, Offshore Banks Reveal Account Data, As IRS Amnesty For Many Involves 50% Penalty. Some amnesty.

Russ Fox, FBAR Due in One Week:

Because of the Hom decision of last year, we now must again report foreign online gambling accounts. That’s basically all online gambling sites except the legal sites in Delaware, Nevada, and New Jersey. I maintain a list of online gambling sites and their mailing addresses here.

Russ performs a valuable public service with this address list.

 

 

Samantha Jordan, Scott Drenkard, How High are Wine Taxes in Your State? (Tax Policy Blog). In Iowa, pretty dang high:
20150624-1

 

Considering it’s burgeoning wine industry, it’s surprising that there hasn’t been more effort to bring Iowa’s wine tax down. And some of the new Iowa wine isn’t half bad.

 

Jason Dinesen, Marriage in the Tax Code, Part 11: Meet the “Single Penalty”

Peter Reilly, Chief Counsel Gives Narrow Scope To Partnership Liability Regulations. “Note, here, that the taxpayers were insolvent and the field is being told to look harder for a possibly larger assessment.”

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Navigating The Multiple Definitions Of Nonrecourse And Recourse Liabilities

 

Carl Smith, Does Rev. Proc. 99-21 Validly Restrict Proof of Financial Disability, for Purposes of Extending the Refund Claim SOL, to Letters From Doctors of Medicine or Osteopathy? Part 1.

TaxGrrrl, Nevada Pops New Tax On Burning Man, iHeartRadio, Other Music Festivals

 

David Brunori, Rand Paul’s Tax Ideas Are Worth Serious Consideration (Tax Analysts Blog). 

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., a GOP presidential candidate, released his tax plan last week. As expected, some commentators piled on criticism. Howard Gleckman of the Urban Institute said Paul was trying to use the tax proposal to “fundamentally restructure the federal government as we know it.” Bob McIntyre, the director of Citizens for Tax Justice, said Paul’s plan would cost $15 trillion over 10 years. Other, less informed folks resorted to calling Paul names.

This criticism from liberals is neither unexpected nor irrational. These are folks who like to see more government spending and revenue raising. Paul is a small government Republican. Of course he wants to see less government and taxes. So it’s not surprising that his tax plan would, in a vacuum, lose the government money. The Tax Foundation says the cost would be $3 trillion over 10 years on a static basis. But that assumes Paul will keep spending at current levels. I suspect that if he became president, he’d support spending cuts equal to or greater than the cost of his tax plan.

I certainly would.

 

20150624-1

 

Howard Gleckman, CBO Has No Idea What Repeal of the ACA Means for the Economy or the Deficit (TaxVox). No more idea than when they said the ACA wouldn’t increase the deficit back when it was enacted.

 

Ethan Greene, Alaska Ends Film Tax Credit Program (Tax Policy Blog). States are beginning to realize that they are being had by the film industry.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 776:

In the continuing saga of the IRS, the Department of Justice, and their efforts to hide evidence and obstruct justice to protect Lois Lerner and the administration’s targeting of its political opposition, the IRS now claims that thousands of emails found on backup tapes Commissioner Koskinen told Congress did not exist are not IRS records, the IRS has no control over them, and they can’t produce them. 

The IRS has done nothing but obstruct and stonewall. If a taxpayer treated an IRS exam the way the IRS has treated this investigation, they’d be inviting the criminal agents in.

 

News from the Profession. Life at Deloitte Includes Slow Days (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 6/23/15: A foolproof tax prep scam! And more.

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2015 by Joe Kristan

One week left! To file your FBAR Form 114 reports of foreign financial accounts.

 

ice truckDid a Davenport preparer e-file different returns than he showed his clients? That’s what federal prosecutors allege. They have accused a Davenport man of preparing accurate tax returns for clients, but then e-filing different returns claiming larger refunds, diverting the extra refunds to his own account.

If true, the case is interesting in two ways.

First,It appears to have been based on fraudulent Schedule C sole proprietorship filings. These can be used to create sham losses to create extra refunds, or to create sham earned income to generate earned income tax credit. It was most likely an EITC scam, as fake schedule A deductions work as well for deductions, but not at all for generating refundable EITC.

Second, it was a horrible idea. It’s hard to imagine how he thought he would ever get away with filing returns different from what the client approved. Inevitably there would be a notice or other problem that would bring the scam to light. But the cops don’t spend their days chasing geniuses.

 

Robert Wood, Record 27 Years Prison For Tax Fraud, Beating Tax Fraud Queen’s 21 Years. The guy allegedly collected 7,000 Social Security numbers and scammed $1.8 in stolen refunds. Considering the hassle he created for the rightful holders of those numbers, that sounds about right.

buzz20141017Robert D. Flach has Tuesday Buzz for you, covering the ground from Trump to Kansas.

William Perez, Tax Advice for Cannabis Entrepreneurs. Speaking of buzz.

Hank Stern, CO-OPs: That flushing sound you hear…  It appears that other Obamacare health co-ops may go the way of Iowa’s CoOportunity.

Keith Fogg, Contrasting the Compromise Standards between the Chief Counsel, IRS and the Department of Justice in Litigated Cases (Procedurally Taxing)

Jack Townsend, Two More Swiss Banks Enter DPAs under US DOJ Swiss Bank Program. Swiss bank privacy is over. Taxpayers who have been counting on it need to check in with their attorneys.

 

Jeremy Scott, Supreme Court Could Create $353 Billion Deficit Problem (Tax Analysits Blog):

The wait continues for the Supreme Court’s decision in King v. Burwell — the Court did not release the opinion on June 22. If the Court decides in favor of King — basically making residents of 34 states ineligible for healthcare credits — that will gut President Obama’s healthcare reform effort, essentially leaving lawmakers with the choice to either fix or repeal the Affordable Care Act. Republicans are eager to do the latter, but the Congressional Budget Office may have made that more difficult. The CBO says that outright repeal would cost $353 billion over 10 years based on a static scoring model.

It’s a bit strange to think that it’s the Republicans’ responsibility to fix a law that was incompetently drafted by a Democratic Congress. And the House and Senate don’t seem inclined to follow that path anyway. 

It’s not the Supreme Court that would create the problem. It would be the administration and its Congressional allies that passed an unworkable and incoherent lawwith no support at all from the other party.

Kay Bell, No Supreme Court word yet on Obamacare subsidies,
but another part of the health care law is closer to repeal
. “The House voted on June 18 to get rid of the medical device tax.”

 

20150608-1

 

Dita Aisyah, Tax Extenders: Take Them or Leave Them, Part 2 (Tax Policy Blog):

Currently, all 50 or so tax extenders are expired for 2015, but Congress will likely pass them retroactively as they have in the past.

Some tax extenders are genuinely good policy, while some are bad. However, the concept of an extender is silly. They create unnecessary uncertainty for individuals and businesses who need to make important long term financial plans.

This very uncertainty creates the need for lobbyists to make annual pilgrimages to Congress to beg for another year of tax breaks. I suspect that Congress likes it that way.

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Senator Rand Paul’s Payroll Tax Swap. “One striking feature of the tax plan is that it eliminates payroll taxes.”

Bob McIntyre, Detractor Dangles Shiny Objects to Obscure Facts about Rand Paul’s Deficit-Inflating Flat Tax Proposal. (Tax Justice Blog). A left-wing tax site calls the Tax Foundation right-wing.

Steven Rosenthal, The Rich get Richer, with a Little Tax Help (TaxVox).

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 775. Today’s entry covers a non Tea Party organization whose exemption was stalled because it held views disapproved by the Administration.

 

News from the Profession. There’s a Lack of Talent to Succeed Accounting Firms Because the Talent Doesn’t Exist (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern). “A recent survey of accounting firm partners from the CPA Consultants’ Alliance found that over half of respondents (51.7%) said procrastination or denial was a primary cause for firms’ succession troubles.”

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 6/2/15: See what the thief filed to claim your refund. And: a crowded Irish address files 580 1040s!

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20111040logoIt seems only fair. In a policy change, the IRS will enable identity theft victims to see copies of fraudulent returns filed in their names, reports Tax Analysts ($link).

Tax-related identity theft victims will soon be able to obtain IRS copies of the fraudulent tax returns used to steal their identity, thanks in part to a push by Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H.

“Once we have a procedure in place, we will issue an announcement informing tax-related identity theft victims of the process for receiving a redacted copy of the fraudulent return,” IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said in a May 28 letter that acknowledged Ayotte as the impetus for the change in the tax agency’s identity theft policy.

The redactions will deal with other taxpayers included on the stolen return. I am guessing could include pretend spouses and dependents used by the ID thief.

This is good news for taxpayers, as it may help them resolve otherwise inexplicable problems with their IRS accounts. It also promises to help shed light on how the thefts occur and, perhaps, help practitioners suggest measures to fight the fraud. It’s also long overdue. It’s not as if thieves can reasonably expect confidentiality for their crimes.

 

20130316-1The luck of the IRisSh. The tax agency still seems to be way behind the ID thieves. This report from the Irish Times is hardly reassuring: 

An address in Kilkenny topped a table of addresses used for multiple potentially fraudulent tax return applications submitted to the Internal Revenue Service in 2012, a study by the US treasury has found.

The address in Kilkenny was used for 580 returns in 2012, which led to “refunds” totalling $218,974 being issued, according to the study by the treasury inspector general for tax administration in the United States.

The IRS likes to claim that budget constraints are behind its abject failure to control the identity theft refund fraud epidemic. The inability to flag hundreds of refunds claimed from the same offshore address — which would seem like an easy enough programming problem to solve — indicates the problems are deeper than lean budgets.

 An address in Kaunas, Lithuania, was used for 525 applications that prompted the payment of $156,274, while an address in Miami, Florida, came third on the list, with 417 applications leading to the payment of $221,806. 

Somehow this doesn’t tell me the IRS needs to expand its responsibilities — but Congress and the President clearly feel otherwise.

 

Will there finally be real steps to fight the problem? Tax Analysts also reports ($link) that the IRS, in cooperation with states and software vendors, will require additional information to process e-filings:

Central to the announcement is a greatly enhanced public-private effort to combat fraud through increased information sharing.

Another upshot is that industry and government will need to process returns differently starting with the 2016 filing season, said Alabama Department of Revenue Commissioner Julie Magee. On the front end, tax return preparation software providers will need to provide multifactor authentication steps when a taxpayer logs in or returns to a site, she said.

The changes also will require vendors to increase by a few dozen data points the amount of information collected from the taxpayer or the return and sent in a standardized format to the IRS and state revenue departments, Magee said.

The story says the details will be announced sometime this month to enable vendors to prepare for next season. We will cover the announcement when it is made.

 

20150529-1

 

Robert D. Flach has a fresh Tuesday Buzz roundup, covering topics as diverse as extenders and “I Love Lucy.

William Perez, The Key Benefits of Health Savings Accounts. Tax deductible contributions, tax-free accumulation, and tax-free withdrawals for qualified medical expenses.

Robert Wood, IRS Says If You’re Willful, FBAR Penalties Hit 100%, $10,000 If You’re Not

Peter Reilly, Conservation Easements – Tax Court Lets Owner Sell Them Or Give Them But Not Both

Jason Dinesen, History of Marriage in the Tax Code, Part 9: After Poe v. Seaborn. “Finally in 1948, Congress acted. For the first time, filing statuses were created and we moved closer to the tax system we know today.”

Kay Bell, Ohio becomes 25th state in which Amazon collects sales tax

Me, How states try to tax the visiting employee. My new post at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record Business Professionals Blog.

 

20120503-1

 

Alan Cole, Oregon to Experiment with Mileage-Based Tax (Tax Policy Blog):

Oregon will become the first state to implement a per-mile tax on driving. The tax is voluntary – an alternative to the state’s fuel tax. Drivers will get the choice of paying one or another. Should they choose the mileage-based tax, they will be charged 1.5 cents per mile, but get a credit to offset the taxes they pay on gas.

States have difficulty increasing gas taxes. Energy-efficient cars and electric (coal powered!) vehicles also are affecting gas tax revenues. The post doesn’t expain how the state will measure mileage; privacy issues promise to be a big obstacle for mileage taxes, but if this can be overcome, expect more states to follow Oregon.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 754

Martin Sullivan, How Grover Norquist’s Pledge Can Hurt the Conservative Cause (Tax Analysts Blog). “First, the pledge’s hard and fast prohibition on tax hikes can prevent signers from agreeing to compromises that would result in outcomes most conservatives would consider highly favorable.”

 

Scott Sumner asks Why are interest expenses tax deductible? (Econlog).

The cost of equity (dividends, etc.) is not tax deductible, while interest is deductible. But why?

Good question. I respond with another — why aren’t dividends deductible? That would prevent double taxation of corporate income while making sure corporations can’t be used as incorporated investment portfolios.

 

 

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 3/6/15: Crime Watch Edition. Rashia, still 21.

Friday, March 6th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

It’s the time of the year when exasperated taxpayers and preparers are tempted to say, “bugger all this, I’m going to go for the gusto and cheat on my taxes!” That’s when it’s useful to look in on an old friend of the Tax Update to see how well that’s going.

Rashia says "thanks, Commissioner!"

Rashia says “thanks, Commissioner!”

Let’s look in on Rashia Wilson, who proclaimed herself (on Facebook!) the “Queen of IRS Tax Fraud.” Her reign was cut short by federal identity theft tax refund charges, resulting in a 21-year sentence. And with federal sentences, you have to serve at least 90% of the time.

Ms. Wilson naturally was unhappy with this judicial lèse-majesté, so she appealed, citing procedural irregularities. The trial judge was ordered to reconsider. On further review, the call on the field stands. 21 years.  Robert Wood has more.

Iowa has tax ID fraud too. While South Florida may be the kingdom of tax refund fraud, it has colonies everywhere. Even in Iowa: Cedar Rapids woman charged with filing false tax returns (KWWL.com):

The United States Department of Justice says 33-year-old Gwendolyn Murray is charged with twelve counts of filing false claims for tax refunds, seven counts of theft of government property, and two counts of aggravated identity theft.­ The indictment containing the charges was unsealed on Tuesday.

It is alleged that Murray filed 12 fraudulent tax returns in 2012 and 2013 using other people’s names. She received refunds on seven of those tax returns. The court also alleges that Murray stole the identities of two people.

It’s good to prosecute ID thieves, but it’s far better to keep them from thieving. It’s eye-opening that 7 of the 12 alleged attempts allegedly succeeded. Criminals aren’t known for their impulse control or their ability to anticipate long-term consequences. If they see somebody get a bunch of cash just from keying in some numbers on a computer, they’re going to want some of that bling themselves, and they aren’t going to ponder the likelihood of a prison sentence first.  The IRS is pretty much leaving the door unlocked and the cash register open.

 

Megan McArdle says the culture of “getting a big refund” is part of the problem in Fewer Tax Refunds, Fewer Scams:

If all returns were submitted at the same time, and refunds were held until they could be cross-checked against the IRS’s copies of W-2s and 1099s, then this sort of fraud wouldn’t work very well; the IRS would know it had two returns and could start the process of figuring out which one was fraudulent before it mailed the check. But we love our early refunds, and people often count on getting that check as early as possible.

She offers wise advice:

However, there’s one thing you personally can do to fight tax fraud, and that’s make sure that you don’t give the government more money than you have to. You should never get excited about a tax refund; all it means is that you gave the government a substantial interest-free loan by withholding too much tax throughout the year. You should aim for your refund to be as small as possible — ideally, zero.

A system that sends $21 billion annually to fraudsters — and that number is rising rapidly — can’t continue forever. Part of this will be a technological fix.  My wife can’t buy a dress at Nordstrom in Chicago without triggering phone calls from two credit card companies.  Meanwhile, the IRS happily wires wads of cash to Rashia. One would hope the IRS could learn something from Visa and Discover.

But the IRS is bad at technology, so part of the fix will have to be slower (and ideally, smaller) refunds. This could include lower penalty thresholds for underpayments so that taxpayers will be more willing to risk owing a bit on April 15 — perhaps combined with withholding tables that leave taxpayers owing a bit, rather than getting refunds.

 

What else can you do to protect yourself? 

  • Be careful with your tax information. Never divulge your bank account or credit card info to strangers over the phone.
  • Assume any unexpected call from a tax agency is a scam.
  • Don’t send copies of 1099s and W-2s as e-mail attachments to your preparer, and don’t email a pdf of your 1040 to a loan officer. That leaves your information exposed.
  • When you transmit confidential information, use strong encryption, or better yet upload it via a secure file transfer site, like the FileDrop system we use at Roth & Company.

 

 

20150105-2Peter Reilly, IRS Grossly Unqualified To Make Determinations About Software Related Exempt Applications. The IRS is grossly unqualified for any number of things that Congress gives it to do. Just a very few that come immediately to mind:

– Determining what is “qualified research” for the research credit.

– Determining the energy properties of “green fuels” for the biofuel subsidies.

– Running the nation’s healthcare insurance finance system.

– Policing political speech by tax-exempt organizations.

An outfit that can’t keep two-bit grifters from cashing in billions in tax refunds annually shouldn’t be looking for new things to do.

 

Kay Bell, Tax identity thief mistakenly sends fake refund to real filer. The police don’t spend their days chasing geniuses.

Jack Townsend, More on Light Sentencing for Offshore Account Tax Crimes.

 

Russ Fox provides a valuable service with Online Gambling Addresses Updated for 2015. Taxpayers with offshore online gambling accounts are required to report them on the “FBAR” report of foreign financial accounts (Form 114). The FBAR requires a street address for the account, and these can be hard to find for gambling websites.

William Perez offers advice on how to Communicate Effectively with Your Tax Preparer. We aren’t always the best company this time of year. Come prepared, be efficient, and you can leave our office before we do something bizarre. Other than what we do for a living, of course.

Jason Dinesen, Marriage in the Tax Code, Part 3: Big Changes in 1917

Jim Maule, The IRS and the Taxpayer: Both Wrong. “The taxpayer argued that because the distribution from the IRA was less than the his investment in the IRA, it should be treated as a return of investment. The IRS argued that the entire distribution should be included in the taxpayer’s gross income. The Tax Court concluded that both the taxpayer and the IRS were wrong.”

 

20141226-1

 

Kyle Pomerleau, The Rubio-Lee Plan Would be Good for Everyone, Especially Low Income Earners (Tax Policy Blog):

If you take all the pieces of the Rubio-Lee tax plan together, it actually produces the largest increase in after-tax income for the lowest income earners, not the highest.

According to our analysis, the bottom decile of taxpayers will see an increase in after-tax income of 44.2 percent, a percentage increase in income nearly four times larger than the top 1 percent’s increase in after-tax income. But the plan doesn’t just increase the after-tax income of the top and the bottom. All taxpayers will see higher after-tax incomes due to this plan.

The Rubio-Lee plan, with its elimination of the double corporate tax and its business rate reductions, is the most promising tax reform plan to surface in a long time. But its opponents can never see wisdom in anything that benefits “the rich,” even when it benefits everyone else.

 

Renu Zaretsky, Expensive Plans, ACA Developments, and Exercises in Futility. Today’s TaxVox roundup has links to folks hating on Rubio-Lee, Spanish film tax credits, and more.

Patrick Smith, Supreme Court’s Direct Marketing Case May Have Great Significance in Anti-Injunction Act Cases (Procedurally Taxing)

 

20120503-1

Spring will come!

 

 

Cara Griffith, The Use of Big Data in Auditing (Tax Analysts Blog). “For state auditors, big data (like other types of data) could be used to better evaluate and select taxpayers for audit.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, 666

 

Why would he want a job with less power? Former IRS Commissioner Mark Everson To Run For President. Yes, Of The United States (Tony Nitti)

Culture Corner. A Tax Shelter Board Game Is a Thing That Exists (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

 

Share