Posts Tagged ‘Finland’

Tax Roundup, 9/3/2013: Iowa’s multi-talented revenue examiners. And social media dos and don’ts.

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

 

The Hoover Office Building, the warm and cuddly home of the Iowa Department of Revenue.

The Hoover Office Building, the warm and cuddly home of the Iowa Department of Revenue.

Iowa income tax examiners don’t just deal with state issues.  In recent years the Iowa Department of Revenue has been examining hobby loss issues by itself.  This is a departure from past practice, where Iowa usually only examined state-specific issues, like residency and allocation of multistate income.

A new protest resolution released last week shows that while the Department may start an examination on hobby loss issues, it doesn’t have to stop there.  The department examined a couple’s horse operation and concluded that it wasn’t operated for profit, disallowing the resulting “hobby losses.”  That’s not a shocking result, as horse operations are often challenged on hobby loss grounds.   But the department wasn’t done (my emphasis):

In regards to the day care business, the Department explained in previous correspondence that the taxpayers cannot take a deduction for the business use of the home, except for real estate taxes and mortgage insurance which are allowable on Schedule A.  The taxpayers have already filed amended returns reducing the meal expense claimed on the original returns.  The Department accepts the amended meal expenses.  The Department also denies several other items because they are not ordinary and necessary business expenses, such as landscaping, auto repair, and picture frames.  All items denied are on the enclosed schedule. 

The final adjustment is to charitable contributions on Schedule A.  The Department denies the  “Haiti” contributions for all three years because there is no evidence the contributions were made to a qualified  charitable organization.  See IRC Sec. 170(c).  Contributions made directly to an individual or to groups of individuals are not deductible.  Also, the Department denies the contributions to Covenant House on the 2009 return.  There is not enough information to confirm that Covenant House is a qualified organization.

If the Department comes for the hobby losses, they just might stay for the whole return.

Cite: Van Veldhuizen, Document Reference: 13201028

 

Peter Reilly, $10,000,000 North Carolina Domicile Case Shows Importance Of Planning   If you want to move to low-tax Florida before selling a business, you need to do it early and do it right.

Greg Mankiw, Marginal Tax Rates under Obamacare.  He quotes a new paper: “Measured in percentage points, the Affordable Care Act will, by 2015, add about twelve times more to average marginal labor income tax rates nationwide than the Massachusetts health reform added to average rates in Massachusetts following its 2006 statewide health reform.”

What does that mean?  Tyler Cowen quotes the same paper:

The law increases marginal tax rates by an average of five percentage points (of employee compensation), on top of the marginal tax rates that were already present before the it went into effect. The ACA’s addition to labor tax wedges is roughly equivalent to doubling both employer and employee payroll tax rates for half of the population. 


I’m sure that half is all in the top 1%.


The great Ronald Coase has died at a still too-young 102.  An appreciation. (via Tyler Cowen)

Courtney Strutt-Todd, IRS Provides Answers to Filing Questions for Same-Sex Couples (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog) 







After a big three-Buzz week last week, Robert D. Flach Buzzes again!



20130903-1Finland follies.  Finns normally sensible and wonderful people.  Our Finnish exchange student is terrific.  But like everyone else, they have politicians who won’t mind their own business,  reports Lyman Stone (Tax Policy Blog):
The Wall Street Journal reports that Finland’s 2011 tax on sugary goods is driving ice cream trucks out of business, and that Mexico is considering implementing its own sugar and sweets tax under the auspices of curbing obesity. In 2014, Finland will add more products, like cookies and jam, to its list of taxed goods. These taxes are particularly notable because Mexico has the second highest per capita soda consumption in the world, while Finland has among the highest rates of ice cream consumption.

Finland has some of the worlds highest consumption rates of alcohol and coffee.  And there’s no sugar in vodka.

TaxGrrrl, Would ‘Very High Taxes’ Keep Unemployment Rates Low?  Ask the Finnish ice cream truck drivers.



Career Advice Department, Social Media Section.  In my recent interview, I answered the question “what advice would you offer to the new accountant concerning the role of social media in their profession.”   If I were answering the question today, I would just say don’t do this.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/31/2012: No cliff deal yet. And Branstad won’t try to fix income tax this year.

Monday, December 31st, 2012 by Joe Kristan

No cliff deal.  As of this morning, the President and Congress continue to fail to to make a “fiscal cliff” deal.  Rest assured, though, that even when they cobble together a lame and harmful deal, as they will today or weeks from now, they won’t even begin to address the real fiscal calamity — the government’s incontinent spending.

The unforgivable sin of the current president, and the last one, and their Congressional enablers, is spreading the idea that the government can buy us all free stuff, and the rich guy will pick up the tab.  Sorry.  The rich guy isn’t buying.

 

Income taxes: the redheaded stepchild of Branstad tax policy?  It looks more and more like the Branstad agenda for the 2013 Iowa legislative session  won’t include income tax reform.  From the Sioux City Journal:

Asked during a recent interview if there was room in all that for income tax reductions during the 2013 session, Branstad replied: “Probably not.”

“Honestly, property tax would be my priority and I’d love to do income tax, too, and maybe, if revenues exceed expectation, we could provide some income tax relief in addition,” Branstad said. “But I think I would rather focus and get something permanent done on the property tax. That’s the place where we’re the least competitive.”

That’s a shame.  Given the economically unwise attitude of the Senate leader, maybe nothing is possible:

Senate Majority Leader Mike Gronstal, D-Council Bluffs, said he would need more details but at first blush he doubted it would go very far in the legislative process if it proved to be “just a way for the wealthiest Iowans to cut their taxes dramatically” while middle-class families picked up a greater share of the tab for the cost of state government.

That’s just silly.  The rich guy isn’t buying for Iowa either.  The wealthiest Iowans always can dramatically cut their taxes with a moving van, until Senator Gronstal figures out a way to keep them from escaping to zero-tax South Dakota or Florida.

Iowa’s income tax is way overdue for replacement.   Instead, it will get more Bondo and bumper stickers.

If Iowa's tax law were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s tax law were a car, it would look like this.

 

Fiscal Cliff Notes:

Greg Mankiw, New York Times:

When President Obama talks about taxing the rich, he means the top 2 percent of Americans. John A. Boehner, the House speaker, talks about an even thinner slice. But the current and future fiscal imbalances are too large to exempt 98 percent or more of the public from being part of the solution.       

Ultimately, unless we scale back entitlement programs far more than anyone in Washington is now seriously considering, we will have no choice but to increase taxes on a vast majority of Americans.

Think Finland.  Unless we choose to be Greece or Argentina.

Gongol: Fiscal Cliff…not resolved. I note a false choice:

The people who make the decisions at the highest level in this republic are either dishonest or utterly economically incompetent if they don’t say the following out loud: “We are demanding more out of our government than we can presently afford. We need to pay more, get less, or both.”

“Either?”  I say “both.”

Kay Bell: Senate ready for some football; adjourns Sunday without reaching fiscal cliff deal

TaxGrrrl, Budget Talks Stall As Reid Calls Latest GOP Move A ‘Poison Pill’

Kevin Drawbaugh, Fiscal cliff talks down to the wire (Tax Break)

Nick Kasprak, 2012 Likely to be First Year Without AMT Patch

Peter Reilly, Dysfunctional Congress – At Least They Are Not Maiming One Another.  If they don’t, maybe we should.

 

The roundup:

Cara Griffith, What Will Become of Physical Presence? (Tax.com)

Paul Neiffer,  Be Careful Of Fiscal Year Section 179 Issues!

Jason Dinesen,  6 Tax Predictions for 2012 — How Did I Do?

Tres Bien. French Court:  75% Tax Rate on Millionaires Is Unconstitutional (TaxProf)

Robert Goulder, Gérard Depardieu: Tax Exile (Tax.com)

TaxGrrrl, Congress Hasn’t Fixed The Budget Yet, Getting A Raise Anyway.  Courtesy of the President, who maybe thinks they make him look good by comparison.

Chris Sanchirico, New Ways to Think About a Tax on Public Companies

Insureblog,  Cavalcade of Risk #173: Post-Mayan Apocalypse Edition

The Critical Question: Is This Tax Preparation Nightmare Reawakening? (Jim Maule)
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