Posts Tagged ‘G. Brint Ryan’

Tax Roundup, 1/27/16: Sign right here, friend, it’s just paperwork! And: Tax Foundation vs. U of I prof.

Wednesday, January 27th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20151124-1What you’re signing isn’t necessarily what the nice salesman says you’re signing. A sad tax story in the Des Moines Register today shows how easy it is for a taxpayer to commit to a bad deal. The story, Misclassified: Iowa won’t refund veteran’s $5K payment, tells how a maintenance worker who was erroneously paid as an independent contractor by a Cedar Rapids furniture store ended up conceding a $5,000 sales tax liability he didn’t owe.

Iowa imposes a sales tax on “Janitorial and building maintenance or cleaning” for non-residential buildings. Because he was paid as an independent contractor, Iowa asserted sales tax on maintenance man James Robertson. He argued that he should have been classified as an employee, which would make the sales tax go away.

According to the story, Iowa was hounding him for unpaid taxes and preventing him from renewing his driver’s license. So he settled with Iowa for a $5,000 payment. From the story:

But he did so believing that the money he borrowed from a friend would be returned once a federal review process he was pursuing verified his claim he was not a contract worker.

The Internal Revenue Service on Oct. 14 determined that Robertson was indeed wrongly classified, documents he provided to The Des Moines Register show.

But that doesn’t mean he gets his $5,000 back, according to the Department of Revenue:

Victoria Daniels, a spokeswoman for the Department of Revenue, said it’s unlikely Robertson can win an appeal because he participated in what her agency calls its “offer in compromise” program.

Robertson signed a document during the settlement negotiations saying he accepts that “all administrative and judicial protests and actions filed in relation to these taxes and tax periods be dismissed.”

“When a person signs an offer in compromise, one of the things that they are signing their names to is the fact that they are giving up their appeal rights and the rights to get any of that money back,” Daniels said. “When you sign an offer in compromise with the Department of Revenue you are signing away any appeal rights you may or may not have had.”

IMG_1287Mr. Robertson didn’t think that’s what he had signed, according to the story (my emphasis):

Robertson said the documents he signed pertained to unpaid tax liabilities, not to his rights to a refund for taxes he never owed. And he said the department collectors led him to believe a refund would be made in the event it was shown he’d been unjustly classified as a contract employee.

This is why any battle between an unrepresented taxpayer and a tax agency is an unfair fight. The taxpayer drew a distinction between tax liabilities and tax refunds that doesn’t matter here. It’s all just taxes. While the nature of the document he signed may have been obvious to the people at the Department of Revenue who work with these things every day, it was all new and unclear to a taxpayer who had never encountered an offer in compromise. I hope he can find a way to get back his $5,000.

The Moral: In any tax controversy, be very careful what you sign. There are a number of ways you can forfeit important rights. If the dollars are big enough to matter to you, hire a tax pro. It doesn’t appear that Mr. Robertson did. Having a guide to the bureaucracy can be a big equalizer in an unfair fight. It’s not right to have to pay someone to help you avoid a tax you don’t owe in the first place, but it might be necessary to avoid something much worse.

 

 

Peter Fisher

Peter Fisher

Joseph Henchman, Open Letter: Errors on Peter Fisher’s Grading the States Website. The brilliant Mr. Henchman takes on U of Iowa prof and tax complexity advocate Peter Fisher’s attack on the Tax Foundation’s State Business Tax Climate Index.

Like most people who dislike the Tax Foundation’s ratings, Mr. Fisher doesn’t like the Index because it doesn’t measure things he wants to measure. But the Index only tries to measure business tax climate. It doesn’t measure regulatory climate, or quality of education, quality of life, weather, or income inequality. And because it makes states with certain tax policy sets look bad, people with an affinity for high taxes or crony capitalism try to change the subject.

 

Paul Neiffer, What Gets a Step-Up. “I continue to get questions regarding how much of a step-up in cost basis farmland gets when someone passes away.  Again, as with most tax questions, it depends.”

Kristine Tidgren, Iowa Supreme Court Says Ag Lease Violates Iowa Constitution (Ag Docket). “Article I, section 24 of the Iowa Constitution states that no lease of agricultural lands ‘shall be valid for a longer period than twenty years.'”

William Perez, Should Married Couples File Taxes Separately? “The Married Filing Separately filing status provides fewer tax benefits than filing joint returns, but it does protect each spouse from any tax mistakes the other spouse makes.”

Kay Bell, 3 marriage-related tax tips to celebrate Spouse’s Day

Jim Maule, “Who Knows the Tax Code Better Than Me?”. “No, it’s not ME asking that question. Who asked it? According to this story, Donald Trump did.” I suspect Mr. Trump knows just enough to hire someone who really does understand the tax law.

G. Brint Ryan, Fee Arrangements are a Matter between Taxpayers and their Advisors. “In an important win for business against government encroachment, a California Superior Court recently invalidated a rule restricting taxpayers from paying performance-based fees for professional services.”

Robert Wood, Missing An IRS Form 1099 For Your Taxes? Keep Quiet, Don’t Ask!

TaxGrrrl, Executors Seek $100 Million For Work On Estate Of ‘Queen Of Mean’ Leona Helmsley

Robert D. Flach, WHAT IS GOFUNDME?

The circus is in town. A media center takes shape at Capital Square, downtown Des Moines.

The circus is in town. A media center takes shape at Capital Square, downtown Des Moines.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 993. “Citizens Against Government Waste, CAGW Names IRS Commissioner John Koskinen 2015 Porker of the Year

Jacob Sullum, Corny Crony Capitalism in Iowa (Reason.com). “The RFS raises food prices and imposes a hidden tax on motorists because ethanol is more expensive than gasoline and produces less energy per gallon. Between 1982 and 2014, Manhattan Institute Senior Fellow Robert Bryce found, ethanol cost an average of 2.4 times as much as an energy-equivalent amount of gasoline.”

Howard Gleckman, Tyco, Tax Inversions, Income Shifting, and Lost Revenue (TaxVox)

Stuart Gibson, The Dissonance of European Tax Harmonization (Tax Analysts Blog). “The question: Why do so many Americans, even those new to the country or born to immigrant parents, find it so easy to self-identify as American, while so few Europeans identify primarily as European?”

Meg Wiehe, What to Watch for in 2016 State Tax Policy: Part 1 (Tax Justice Blog)

 

Career Corner. How Will Your Team Air Its Grievances This Busy Season? (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

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Tax Roundup, 12/31/14: Last minute tax moves: losses, gifts, and… weddings? Timing is everything!

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140608_2So.  2014 is down to its last few hours. What can we do today to make April 15, 2015 a little happier? Well, maybe less bad. It’s asking too much of one day to fix a year’s worth of tax problems, but today might still make a difference. A few things you can do yet today:

– Sell stocks at a loss to offset capital gains. It’s the trade date that counts in determining when a loss is incurred (except on a short sale). That means if you have incurred capital gains in 2014, you can sell loss stocks today and reduce your taxable gains for the year. Most individuals can deduct capital losses on a 1040 to the extent of your gains, plus $3,000. To the extent you fail to offset capital gains with the losses sitting in your portfolio, you are paying taxes voluntarilyJust make sure you make the trade in a taxable account and don’t repurchase the losers for 30 days.

– Consider making your state 4th quarter estimated tax payment today (and your federal payment, if you are an Iowan). Don’t do this rashly, as alternative minimum tax can make this a bad move for some taxpayers. Also, time value considerations can make this a bad move. But in the right circumstances, you can save a lot in April by getting your payment in the mail today.

– Make a charitable gift today, if you are so inclined. Gifts (and other deductions) paid with a credit card today are deductible, even if the credit card isn’t paid off until next year. Checks postmarked today are deductible this year. If you don’t know where to make your gifts, I have some suggestions; if you don’t like those, TaxGrrrl has some others.

– And if you are fanatical about tax planning, and someone else, you can change your marital status today. Your marital status on December 31 is your status for the whole year, as far as the IRS is concerned. But if you are seriously considering this, you definitely need to bring someone else into the discussion.

 

20120511-2A Tax Court Case yesterday shows how important year-end timing can beA Minnesota couple paid $2,150.85 of community college tuition for their daughter’s Spring 2011 semester on December 28, 2010. That normally would have qualified for an American Opportunity Tax Credit of about $2,037 — a dollar-for-dollar reduction fo their 2011 taxes. But they were four days too soon.

Tax Court Judge Marvel explains (my emphasis):

Generally, the American opportunity credit is allowed only when payment is made in the same year that the academic period begins. Sec. 1.25A-5(e)(1), Income Tax Regs. For cash method taxpayers, such as petitioners, qualified education expenses are treated as paid in the year in which the expenses are actually paid.

Because the semester didn’t begin until 2011, the 2010 payment didn’t count. Judge Marvel explains that close isn’t close enough:

We realize that the statutory requirements may seem to work a harsh result in a case such as this where a four-day delay in making the December 28, 2010, payment would have engendered a different result. However, the Court must apply the statute as written and follow the accompanying regulations when consistent therewith.

The Moral? When it comes to tax planning, the difference between December 31 and January 1 is one year, not one day. If timing matters, be sure to get on the right side of the line, and be sure you can document your timing. If you are mailing a big check, go Certified mail, return receipt requested, and save that postmark.

Cite: Ferm, T.C. Summ. Op. 2014-115.

 

If Iowa's income tax were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s income tax were a car, it would look like this.

Iowa rated 8th worst small business environment. The Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council has ranked the entrepreneurial environment of the 50 states. Iowa does poorly:

Iowa is the nation’s number one producer of corn. Unfortunately, it’s costly policy climate works against production from free enterprise and entrepreneurship in general. Iowa ranks 43rd in terms of its public policy climate for entrepreneurship and small business among the 50 states, according the 2014 “Small Business Policy Index.” While Iowa’s entrepreneurs, businesses, investors and workers benefit from fairly low crime rate and a low level of government debt, there are many negatives, such as high individual capital gains taxes; very high corporate income and capital gains taxes; high unemployment taxes; and a high level of government spending.

While I think overall Iowa is better than 43rd, our awful tax environment hurts. Our system of high rates with dozens of carve-out credits for the well-advised and well-connected works great for insiders, but not so well for the rest of us. Maybe 2015 will be the year Iowa considers serious tax reform, like The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.

 

Kay Bell, Donating and deducting a car

Jack Townsend, Reasonable Doubt and Jury Nullification

Jason Dinesen lists his Top 5 Blog Posts of 2014. My favorite is his #5, Having a Side Business in Multi-Level Marketing Doesn’t Make Personal Expenses Deductible

Tony Nitti warns us of Five Traps To Avoid When Deducting Mortgage Interest

Robert D Flach shares: MY NEW YEAR’S EVE TRADITIONS: “I type W-2s and 1099s.” Don’t get too wild, Robert!

Me, IRS issues Applicable Federal Rates (AFR) for January 2015

20141231-1

G. Brint Ryan, Who’s Afraid of the IRS? When Business Fights Back Against Government Overreach and Wins (Procedurally Taxing)

Annette Nellen,State taxes and bitcoin

Robert Wood, No Mickey Mouse Taxes On Jim Harbaugh’s $48M Michigan Deal And 49ers Exit. “Jim Harbaugh’s 49ers contract may be history, but his $48M Michigan deal has tax components that you might not expect.”

 

Howard Gleckman, Taxes, Charitable Gifts, the ACA, and Ineffective Deadlines (TaxVox).  “Scrambling to make a last-minute charitable donation to beat the New Year’s Eve deadline for a 2014 tax deduction? Take a deep breath and ask yourself, ‘Why am I going through this craziness now?'”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 601

 

Post-sequester commuting.

Not excited about all the wild New Years Eve hoopla? Maybe you prefer a more low-key celebration, like the one Robert D. Flach relates in MY NEW YEAR’S EVE TRADITIONS:

Every year during the day on New Year’s Eve I do the same thing I do during the day on Christmas Eve – I type W-2s and 1099s.

Live it up, Robert!

 

And Happy New Year to all of you Tax Update readers! This is it for 2014 here.  See you next week, and next year.

 

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