Posts Tagged ‘Gretchen Tegeler’

Tax Roundup, 3/14/16: Coupling week! And: remember your March 15 federal and state deadlines.

Monday, March 14th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

coupling20160213Coupling! We expect the Iowa General Assembly to pass the 2015 tax coupling bills this week, and the Governor is expected to sign. You can follow their progress at the General Assembly site. The extender bills have been renamed SF 2303 and HF 2433.

We will be following the developments and will post news as it happens.

 

March 15 looms. Tomorrow is the first real big deadline of the filing season. Corporate 1120 and 1120-S corporation returns are due.

If you can file on time, you should extend. The penalties for late filing without an extension can be painful, and you may miss the opportunity to make important elections that are only available on a timely-filed original return.

But it’s not just federal returns. While many states, like Iowa, have April due dates for corporations returns, 23 states  want the returns on March 15. Even if you are filing an S corporation return, where the corporation itself doesn’t file, many states require payment anyway — either as a misbegotten corporation tax, as in California, or as withholding on individual income taxes of non-resident shareholders.

Source: RIA Checkpoint.

Source: RIA Checkpoint.

Extensions can be tricky too. Many states either accept the federal extension or, like Iowa, automatically extend a return if the tax for the year is sufficiently paid by the original due date. But other states require a separate extension filing. States requiring a separate extension filing, even when no payment is due, include Arkansas, Connecticut, D.C., Florida, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, New York City, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, Vermont and West Virginia.

It’s already late — don’t put off those extensions any longer.

 

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Gretchen Tegeler, Can taxpayers ever get a break? (IowaBiz.com). “Alas, even the best-intentioned measures can be twisted into an argument to compound the taxpayer burden.”

Kristine Tidgren, Iowa Utilities Board Has Approved Bakken Pipeline (AgDocket).

Kay Bell, Filing deadline for 2012 taxes — and almost $1 billion in unclaimed tax refunds — is April 18

Jason Dinesen, Glossary of Tax Terms: Pass-Through Entity, “In tax terminology, a pass-through entity is a business where the end results of operations ‘pass through’ to the owners and are reported on the owners’ personal tax returns.”

Jack Townsend, Tax Obstruction Conviction Permits Inclusion in Tax Loss of Penalties and Interest. “That issue was whether the conviction for obstructing the collection of tax could include penalties and interest within the scope of the financial harm Black intended to inflict on the IRS by his obstructive acts.”

TaxGrrrl, On Pi Day, A Peek At Your Piece Of The National Tax Pie. “You can see your personalized taxpayer receipt by the dollars from the White House by plugging in the tax you paid in 2014 here.”

Andrew Mitchel, Rev. Rul. 2016-8: Tax Aspects of the Cuban Thaw

Robert Wood, As U.S. Passports For Domestic Flights Loom, IRS Can Now Revoke Passports. What could go wrong?

Leslie Book, Using Craigslist to Fish For Bogus Dependents (Procedurally Taxing)

Jim Maule, The Russian Sugar and Fat Tax Proposal: Smarter, More Sensible, or Just A Need for More Revenue?. Come now. Putin is just concerned for the health of his beloved people.

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1038Day 1039Day 1040.

Howard Gleckman, The Challenges of Modeling Presidential Tax Plans (TaxVox) “How much do tax changes affect the economy, and, in turn, what do those economic effects mean for the revenue cost of a reworked tax code?”

 

Just what kind of CPA are you? Take this quiz from the AICPA and find out. You want to know!

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/18/15: 2016 standard mileage rates are out. And: Extender bill clears House.

Friday, December 18th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today newsletter visitors: The post about fines and penalties is here.

54 cents

54 cents. The IRS yesterday released the new standard mileage rates for 2016:

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2016, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

  • 54 cents per mile for business miles driven, down from 57.5 cents for 2015
  • 19 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes, down from 23 cents for 2015
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations

The business mileage rate decreased 3.5 cents per mile and the medical, and moving expense rates decrease 4 cents per mile from the 2015 rates. The charitable rate is based on statute.

Gas has come down. Blame the speculators!

Related: William Perez, How to Deduct Car and Truck Expenses on Your TaxesKay Bell, Business mileage deduction rate to drop in 2016Russ Fox, 2016 Standard Mileage Rates Released

 

Extender bill moves to Senate. The House of Representatives yesterday approved the permanent extender bill, H.R. 2029, on a 318-109 vote. The bill moves to the Senate. The Hill reports:

In the Senate, support for the tax measure is more bipartisan than it is in the House. Senate Finance Committee ranking member Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) joined with the Republican chairmen of the House and Senate tax-writing committees in announcing the deal.

The Senate’s third-ranking Democrat, Charles Schumer (N.Y.), released a statement Wednesday praising the fact that the bill would cement a tax benefit for mass transit commuters in a win for his state.

The Extender bill will be considered as part of a package in the Seanate, reports Tax Analysts ($link):

House GOP leaders worked throughout the day to build support for passage of an omnibus appropriations bill for fiscal 2016. The $1.1 trillion spending measure, which is also an amendment to H.R. 2029, is scheduled for a vote on December 18. Lawmakers expect that both the tax and spending measures will be combined into one bill and move to the Senate later that day, where it is expected to pass with bipartisan support. 

The Hill reports the Senate vote may happen as soon as today.

Related: Scott Greenberg, The Twelve Most Important Provisions in the Latest Tax Bill (Tax Policy Blog). #1 on the list is the permanent $500,000 Section 179 ceiling.

 

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Fresh Friday Buzz! From Robert D. Flach.

Gretchen Tegeler, Change is difficult, as failed suburban services merger showed (IowaBiz.com).  “First, never assume anything when it comes to change, even if it seems like reasonable change. Always expect active opposition.”

Jim Maule, You Mean That Tax Refund Isn’t for Me? Really?. Judge Judy deals with a tax refund spent by an ex-girlfriend.

Peter Reilly, Venus Flytraps And Elusive Gator On Golf Course Not Worth Millions In Tax Deductions. A conservation easement goes very bad.

Robert Wood, Supermodel Bar Refaeli’s Alleged Tax Evasion On Gifts: Must You Report Yours? Gifts aren’t taxable income in the U.S., but the IRS doesn’t have to believe that money you receive is actually a gift, rather than compensation. It even has a form to report large gifts from overseas (Form 3520) so they can second guess whether amounts really are “gifts.” Large fines apply if you don’t file the form for years you receive such gifts.

TaxGrrrl, Tax Preparer For Mike ‘The Situation’ Sorrentino Pleads Guilty To Tax Fraud Conspiracy.

 

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Renu Zaretsky, Will they or won’t they? Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers prospects for the extender bill, among other things.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 953

Richard Phillips, Tax Wars: 3 Lessons about Tax Policy from the Star Wars Universe (Tax Policy Blog). “The Star Wars universe has problems with corporate tax enforcement and shell companies.”

News from the Profession. Big 4 Firms Still Getting Used to This Whole Regulation Thing (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/20/15: IRS issues workaround for absurdly complex “repair regs.” And: more good ACA news!

Friday, November 20th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

See update below. 

IMG_1218In a tacit admission that the new repair regs are nightmarishly complex, the IRS has issued a new “safe-harbor” procedure for allocating remodeling costs for restraurants and retail buildings between deductible repair costs and capitalized improvement costs.

Rev. Proc 2015-56 is available to most retail buildings and to restaurants.

(UPDATE: Brian Coddington notes correctly in the comments that this procedure only applies to taxpayers with an “applicable financial statement.” These are SEC statements, audited financial statements, or statements supplied to regulators other than the IRS. This seemingly gratuitous requirement greatly reduces the potential usefulness of this procedure. Why the IRS would restrict simplification to just those taxpayers least likely to need it is beyond me. I missed the applicable financial statement requirement in my initial take on the rule. My apologies, and my thanks to Brian for correcting me. Brian’s comment goes beyond this issue and is worth reading in full.)

It excludes vehicle dealers, gas stations, manufactured home dealers and “nonstore retailers.” It applies to business that own their own buildings and to landlords whose buildings hold qualifying businesses.

Under the procedure, 75% of “qualified remodel-refresh costs” are deductible, with the remaining 25% capitalized. The amount capitalized is depreciated over the life otherwise applied to the building. That generally means a 39-year life, but if the building is “qualified restaurant property” or “qualified retail improvement property,” the life can be as short as 15 years.

At first glance, it seems like a much more useful set of rules than the repair regs we were all fretting about this time last year. The biggest potential downside is that Rev. Proc. 2015-56 requires taxpayers to forego “partial disposition” treatment for buildings covered by the safe harbor. The taxpayer also has to elect “general asset account” depreciation for the building covered by the safe harbor.

The election will be made on Form 3115 as “automatic” accounting method change, as newly-designated automatic change number 222. It is available for years begining on or after January 1, 2014. As automatic changes have to normally be made with a timely-filed return, I don’t think we can change already-filed 2014 filings, but I will be digging into the lengthy procedure, and will amend this as needed as I get to understand it better.

 

The insurance markets aren’t doing what the President told them to do. 

First, Tyler Cowen, Further wounds for Obamacare: “To put it bluntly, I don’t think the mandate part of the bill is working.  These are mostly problems which decay and get worse, not problems which self-correct.”

Next, Megan McArdle, Obamacare Insurers Are Suffering. That Won’t End Well:

What UnitedHealth’s action suggests is that the company is not sure it can make money in this market at any price. Executives seem to be worried about our old enemy, the adverse selection death spiral, where prices go up and healthier customers drop out, which pushes insurers’ costs and customers’ prices up further, until all you’ve got is a handful of very sick people and a huge number of very expensive claims.

She adds:

This was part of a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad news cycle for Obamacare; as ProPublica journalist Charles Ornstein said on Twitter, “Not since 2013 have I seen such a disastrous stream of bad news headlines for Obamacare in one 24-hour stretch.” Stories included not just UnitedHealth’s dire warnings, but also updates in the ongoing saga of higher premiums, higher deductibles and smaller provider networks that have been coming out since open enrollment began.

I remember when we were told that the ACA would just get more popular over time as we all grew to love its benefits.

 

No, but they do make it easier to jack up tuition and administrative salaries. $23 Billion In Annual Federal Tax Credits For Higher Education Have No Effect On College Attendance (TaxProf). 

 

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Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Quiet Changes to Social Security Could Have Big Impact (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog):

The file and suspend option was and still is used by couples when one spouse, typically the higher earner, files for benefits but then suspends receiving his or her own benefits. This allows the other spouse to file and receive spousal benefits based on the higher earning spouse’s record for a certain number of years while the higher earning spouse delays benefits and earns delayed retirement credits. The result is larger benefits for the higher-earning spouse at age 70, but still allowing the lower-earning spouse to take benefits. This option has been eliminated — though there may still be time to file and suspend in the next 180 days and be grandfathered in for those who are currently eligible to do so.

Jana expects additional guidance soon.

 

Gretchen Tegeler, Many Iowa public employees are better off in retirement than working (IowaBiz.com). In some cases, we’re better off that they’re retired too.

Tony Nitti, The Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2015: #7: Decoding The Mortgage Interest Limitation, “Cohabitation, of course, is not limited to same-sex couples, and so the Ninth Circuit’s decision to allow each taxpayer who co-owns a house to claim an interest deduction on the full $1,100,000 of debt — provided they are not married filing separately — should be a welcome one for many.”

Russ Fox, Update on the Future of Daily Fantasy Sports:

I still think we will end up with a dichotomy within the states. States that are notoriously anti-gambling or have constitutional provisions against gambling (including much of the South: Texas, Florida, and Tennessee; Utah, and Hawaii) will ban DFS, either by Attorney General rulings or by court actions. Other states will regulate DFS. Some states will order the DFS companies to shut down until regulations are in place. A very small number of states will just ignore the issue, and leave DFS in an unregulated state.

A very small number of states realize that fantasy sports aren’t one of the major problems plaguing the republic.

TaxGrrrl, ‘Real Housewives’ Stars Joe & Teresa Giudice Hit With Federal Tax Lien

Robert Wood, More Banks Spill Tax Evasion Secrets To Avoid Criminal Charges, Account Holders Beware. Bank secrecy is pining for the fjords.

 

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Stephen J. Entin, Michael Schuyler, Some Tax Trip-Ups in the Democratic Debate (Tax Policy Blog):

Senator Sanders was asked how high he would raise the top tax rate. He answered, jokingly, that he would boost it a lot, although perhaps not to the 90% top tax rate in the Eisenhower Administration; that he, the Senator, was not as much of a socialist as Eisenhower!  In fact, the top tax rate was 91%…

One result of Ike’s policies was that he presided over three recessions in his eight years in office. Presumably, the Senator would not want to repeat that outcome.

I think Bernie would be willing to take that price to stick it to the man.

William Gale, David John, Two Important New Retirement Savings Initiatives from the Obama Administration (TaxVox) These guys think the MyRA program is important.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 925

 

Peter Reilly, Princeton University Will Have To Prove It Deserves Property Tax Exemption. I’d make them apologize for Woodrow Wilson first.

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/15/2015: How to do that last-minute filing right. And: C.R. ID thief sentenced, Iowa sales tax rule delayed.

Thursday, October 15th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

certifiedFile! Today is the last, final, immutable deadline for filing an extended 2014 1040.* What are the stakes for getting that return in today?

  • If you owe federal taxes, it’s the difference between a late payment penalty of 3% (1/2% per month since April 15) and a late filing penalty of 25% (5% per month, capped at 25%).
  • It’s the last chance to make a free grouping election of your activities for the ne investment income tax and passive loss rules.
  • If you have an international reporting form on your return — a 5471, 8865, 3520, 8938, or 8891, for example — it’s the only way to avoid an automatic $10,000 late penalty on your filing. These forms may be due if you own an interest in a foreign corporation, partnership or trust; if you received a foreign gift or inheritance; if you have foreign financial assets, like a loan to an overseas person; or if you have an interest in a Canadian retirement plan.

So how to file? If you haven’t started yet (ugh), Russ Fox has some tips. If your return is done and you just need to file, e-file if at all possible. That gives you the assurance that your return has arrived on time and saves you the hassle of a trip to the post office or the UPS or FedEx store. And I feel safer if my return doesn’t have to be touched by an actual IRS employee.

OK, you ask, why can’t I just drop it in the mail or use the office postage meter? After all, the Mailbox Rule says “timely mailed, timely filed.”

Because then you have no proof that you filed on time. If the letter gets lost, or delayed, the IRS can call it “late” and you have no way to prove otherwise. If you have anything at stake with a timely-filing, it’s foolish to rely on the competence of the postal service and the goodwill of someone at the IRS service center.

If you aren’t e-filing, the best thing to do is to go to the post office, spring for Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested, and get a hand-stamped postmark. Save it and keep it with the return receipt when that comes back. That will ward off late-filing vampires. Filling out the certified mail slip and running it through the office postage meter or using a Stamps.com postmark doesn’t work.

If you can’t make it to the post office before they close, then you can go to the FedEx Store or UPS store and use a “designated private delivery service.” This is trickier. You have to use one of the delivery methods specified by IRS Rev. Proc. . For example, “UPS Ground” doesn’t work, but “UPS 2nd Day Air” does work. Make sure the shipping paperwork shows today’s date. Be sure to use the proper IRS service center street address, because the private services can’t use the IRS post office box addresses.

*Unless you are a South Carolina flood victim, a war zone resident, or a non-resident alien.

Related: CERTIFIED MAIL: THE HIDE YOU SAVE MAY BE YOUR OWN

 

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Five years for Cedar Rapids ID ThiefKWWL.com reports an Iowa woman will go away for 61 months after pleading guilty to one count of ID theft. The Government’s sentencing memorandum says Gwendolyn Murray prepared “at least 136 false and fraudulent returns.” Ninety-four of them were processed, netting over $380,000 in refunds.

And that’s the real crime. The IRS has such poor controls that an amateur, probably using an off-the-shelf tax prep software package, could help herself to that much taxpayer money before getting caught. The chances of getting that back are about the same as my chances of a pro baseball career. And yet the IRS says the real problem is that honest preparers don’t have to take a compentency literacy test and submit a fee and paperwork.

Related: TIGTA: 1,300 IRS Computers, 50% Of IRS Servers Are Running Outdated Operating Systems, Putting Taxpayer Data At Risk (TaxProf)

 

Iowa Sales Tax Rule for Manufacturing Supplies to be delayed six months. It will now take effect July 1, 2016, reports AP.

 

Gretchen Tegeler, Ask questions about your property taxes (IowaBiz.com):

You may not realize you are supporting not only your city, county and school district, but also Broadlawns Medical Center, Des Moines Area Regional Transit (DART) and the Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC).

For instance, 8.6 percent of the property taxes my husband and I pay on our home are going to Broadlawns. The single largest percentage increase in our property taxes (and this would be the case for most everyone in Polk County) is for DART, a whopping 10.4 percent!  

I’m sure it’s worth every penny…

 

Roger McEowen, Obamacare; Reimbursement of Health Insurance Premiums; and Limited (and Inconsistent) Transitional Relief (AgDocket). On the incomplete and confusing relief for “Section 105 plans” being clobbered by insane ACA regulations.

 

Paul Neiffer, What about Partnerships?:

The ACA mandates an $100 per day per employee penalty for providing non-qualified health insurance to more than one employee.  Many of our farm operations operate as S corporations and partnerships.  There is specific IRS guidance that allows shareholders and partners to deduct these health insurance premiums for owners and since this guidance did not line up with the guidance on the imposition of the $100 per day penalty, the IRS issued a notice earlier this year that indicated S corporations could continue to file their returns the same way until the end of this year.

However, this notice appeared to be silent on the treatment for partnerships and partners. 

They had to pass it for us to find out what was in it.

 

Peter Reilly, Santorum 20/20 Flat Tax Might Be Hard On Many Small Businesses. “I don’t understand why there does not seem to be more excitement about the elimination of business interest deductions.” Maybe because it’s Rick Santorum.

Robert WoodU.S. Tax 35%, Ireland 12.5%, New Irish Tech Rate 6.25%, Any Questions?

Kay Bell, Be like Trump: Pay as little tax as possible

 

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David Brunori, Getting Taxpayers to Rat on Each Other: Uncool (Tax Analysts Blog):

Private citizens should not be in the business of administering or enforcing the tax laws. The most obvious reason is that they do not have the expertise or the context to judge whether taxes are being evaded rather than, say, avoided. It is hard enough for trained tax professionals to ascertain the difference between tax fraud and very aggressive tax planning. That task should be left to the professionals.

Not to mention the free play it gives to bitter ex-lovers or spouses, shakedown artists, and parasites in general.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 889

 

A big thank you to Gretchen Tegeler and the Taxpayers Association of Central Iowa for inviting me to be on a panel last night on small business tax and regulation last night. I wish I could have lingered to chat longer, and enjoy some of that delicious Lucca food, but it being October 14 and all, I couldn’t stick around. It was a good session with lots fo great discussion.

 

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Tax Roundup, 9/8/15: One Week to the 15th. And: First-world tax payment problems.

Tuesday, September 8th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150803-1September 15 is one week away. If you have extended partnership, corporation or trust returns, time is running short. There are many reasons to file on time:

  • Tax elections made on a late return, including automatic accounting method changes, may not count. With all of the “repair regulation” method changes this year, that could be a big deal.
  • If you owe money, late filing turns a 1/2% per month late-payment penalty into a 5% per month (up to 25%) late filing penalty.
  • If you have a pass-through entity, late-filing triggers a $195 per K-1 per month penalty.

Remember to e-file, or to document timely paper filing via Certified Mail, return receipt requested, or with a shipping bill from an authorized private delivery service.

 

Gretchen TegelerDART: A property tax funded amenity (IowaBiz.com). Disturbing trends on the inability of the Des Moines-area public transportation service to cover its operations through fares:

...it does appear the service expansions are generating more ridership  However, as was noted last year, property taxes are basically covering the cost of these additional riders. Total operating revenue was 10.1 percent below projections for the year that closed June 30th, 2015; with fixed route operating revenue being 8.65% percent short of budget.

The overall trends have not changed much from a year ago. Total operating revenue is still less than it was four years ago despite substantial service expansions and improvements since that time. Basically, as it weighs future improvements for DART, the community will need to decide if it is willing to continue to raise property taxes to fund them.

The post includes this chart:

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That doesn’t include the cost of the recently-completed $18 million Palace of Transit.

 

TaxGrrrl, Mega-Mansion Attracts Notice By Feds, Results In Criminal Charges:

According to local sources, federal agents flying in and out of Pittsburgh noticed the size and scope of a mansion belonging to Joe Nocito, Sr., and started asking questions. Those questions eventually led to a guilty plea last week from Ann E. Harris, the personal assistant, secretary and bookkeeper for Nocito, in a tax evasion scheme thought to involve as much as $250 million.

If you are a tax evader, it’s unwise to flaunt your wealth, especially to the point of attracting attention from passing aircraft. But maybe that would take the fun out of the thing.

 

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Russ Fox, The Family that Commits Tax Evasion Together Goes to ClubFed Together. “This is yet another reminder for everyone who uses a payroll service to join EFTPS and make sure your payroll deposits are being made. Trust but verify is excellent practice in payroll.”

Kay Bell, Labor Day tax tip: Union dues might be tax deductible

Scott Greenberg, This Labor Day, How High is the Tax Burden on American Labor? (Tax Policy Blog). “In 2014, the average wage worker saw his or her labor income decrease by 31.5 percent due to federal, state, and local taxes, according to the OECD.”

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Excluding Gain On Sale Of Home, And Recognizing Gain On Repossession

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: Tax Implications of the Unlicensed Daycare Provider

Jim Maule, “Who Knows Taxes Better Than Me?” Professor Maule notes that Donald Trump’s understanding of tax law and economics might not be all that Mr. Trump thinks it is.

Peter Reilly, From Russia With Built In Losses. “There is a certain irony to the whole thing as it seems like financiers were too focused on looting the US treasury with phony shelters to see the probably larger upside of distressed Russian assets.”

Robert D. Flach, DONALD TRUMP FOR PRESIDENT IS A LOT LIKE OBAMACARE, That isn’t meant as a compliment.

 

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Leslie Book, Tax Court Opinion Reaffirming Validity of Regulations Addressing Foreign Earned Income Exclusion Illustrates Chevron Application (Procedurally Taxing)

Robert Wood, IRS Gets Tax Data From India As Black Money Hunt Hits Americans Too

Jack Townsend, IRS and DOJ Tax Conferences Before Indictment. That doesn’t sound like fun at all.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 849850851852

 

Renu Zaretsky, Deals, Dreams, and Data. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers the ground from A (Amazon’s sweet Illinois tax credit deal and Apple’s Irish strategy) to Zaretsky.

Cara Griffith, Why Is It So Hard to Find Information on the Sharing of Taxpayer Information? (Tax Analysts Blog). “Taxpayers are expected to blindly provide massive amounts of information to tax authorities, but are then not allowed to know the process through which one state or municipality shares information with another.”

 

I’ll make sure not to have this problem when I file in April:

Effective January 1, 2016, the IRS will not accept any payment greater than $99,999,999.00. Two or more checks will be required, or we recommend that the taxpayers use Fed Wire to make their payments.

If I did owe more than $100 million, I would be tempted to write one of the checks for $99,999,999.01, just to see if they are serious. Not to give away my income secrets, but I’m pretty sure my 2015 taxable income will spare me the temptation.

Cite: Announcement 2015-23.

 

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Tax Roundup, 8/5/15: Steal employment taxes? YOLO! And: what are your state’s real pension liabilities?

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150805-1Living it up now, dealing with the prison time later. The few times I have seen taxpayers get behind on payroll taxes, it has been a case of a struggling business choosing to pay vendors with money withheld from employees for taxes. It’s an unwise move; the tax law makes “responsible persons” personally liable for unpaid employment taxes, even (especially) if the business shuts down. Still, I can sympathize with these folks even though they are making bad decisions.

But there is another class of employment tax non-payers. For shorthand, I’ll call them the “YOLO” employers. A Kansas City business owner falls into this category, if a Justice Department Press Release is to be believed (my emphasis):

Joseph Patrick Balano, 54, of Kansas City, Mo., pleaded guilty before U.S. District Judge Gary A. Fenner to the charge contained in a Jan. 7, 2014, federal indictment.

By pleading guilty today, Balano admitted that he withheld employment taxes from his employees, but instead of paying over those taxes to the government, Balano kept most of those taxes for his own personal use. Balano used the money to finance his own personal expenses and expenses for family members, including gambling, mortgage payments (residence and lake house) and car payments.

Payroll tax theft is a pretty hopeless crime. It’s not like the IRS will fail to notice, and it you are living high on the stolen funds, criminal investigators are likely to step in. It’s only a matter of time.

Yet you only live once, and who knows what tomorrow brings? These thieves spend the money now on the good life, and maybe the sweet meteor of death will end the whole world come before the prison term starts. Winning!

 

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Gretchen Tegeler, How much indebtedness does Iowa really have? (IowaBiz.com):

Statewide, the total net pension liability for the two largest systems, the Iowa Public Employees Retirement System (IPERS) and the Municipal Fire and Police Retirement System of Iowa (MFPRSI) is $4.3 billion, representing 32.4 percent more than the total of all other outstanding debt for governments in these systems.  In other words, if we thought we had $13.4 billion in total debt, we really have 32.4 percent more than that. 

But it’s worse than that. This assumes annual investment returns for pension funds of 7.5%. Under a more realistic 6.5% return, the debt goes up 63.5% over what has been disclosed.

Public defined benefit plans are a lie. Using improbable actuarial assumptions, and sometimes by just not making plan contributions, politicians either lie to taxpayers about how much current services cost, or to public employees about how much they can expect at retirement, or both.

Wall Street Journal, New Rule to Lift Veil on Tax Breaks (Via TaxProf). “The rule approved Monday by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board, the municipal equivalent of the board that sets the standards for corporate reporting, will require government officials to show the value of property, sales and income taxes that have been waived under agreements with companies or other taxpayers.”

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Kay Bell, Form 1098-T will be needed to claim education tax breaks

Jason Dinesen, Glossary: Net Income/Net Loss. “Net income is what’s left after expenses. If you spent more than you took in, you have a net loss.”

Jim Maule, Mileage-Based Road Fee Inching Ahead.

 

Tony Nitti, In 2016 Election, Candidate’s Tax Returns Simply Don’t Matter. Ultimately a very depressing viewpoint, if you read the whole thing.

Alan Cole, The Details of Hillary Clinton’s Capital Gains Tax Proposal (Tax Policy Blog). “Tax structures that discourage realizations are prone to a ‘lock-in’ effect, where investors cannot reallocate to more productive investments or rebalance their portfolios to mitigate risk, because of the tax implications. The Wall Street Journal was critical of the proposal on these grounds.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 818

Renu Zaretsky, On Carbon, Soda, and the Safety Net. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup mentions the tax implications of the administration’s carbon reduction power grab, among other things.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 7/2/15: Lives, Fortunes and Sacred Honor Edition. And: why Iowa can’t have nice things.

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan

 

20150702-1Patriotism can be costly. The founders pledged “our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor” when they voted for independence 239 years ago today. But not everyone is down for the “Fortunes” part.

A construction contractor in Florida leaned on patriotism to minimize taxes. The Tax Court takes up the story (citations omitted):

Petitioner became involved with certain organizations and individuals, such as the Patriot Network, We the People, and Richard Cornforth, that advocate tax avoidance and encourage actions to frustrate and delay the IRS’ collection efforts. He paid an annual fee to the Patriot Network for access to its Web site and for assistance with tax problems. Petitioner testified that he became convinced that Federal income taxes were “illegitimate” and that caselaw showed that individuals who had refused to pay taxes were prevailing in court.

That caselaw must be interesting. This sort of tax protest argument never actually works in avoiding taxes, though occasionally tax deniers can convince a jury that they actually believed this stuff enough to not be intentional tax criminals.

The taxpayer tried some legal incantations to help his patriotic cause:

On January 23, 2008, petitioner filed a notarized document entitled “Official Declaration of Domicile” with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Volusia County, Florida. The document stated that petitioner did not believe himself to be a U.S. citizen but was rather “One of the People”, a “Florida [S]tate Citizen”, a “Sovereign”, and a “Man upon the land”. Petitioner filed this document at the suggestion of one of the tax-avoidance organizations.

20120531-2The “man upon the land” thing is a new one, to me. Unfortunately for our taxpayer, it didn’t work any better than the “One of the People” thing in Tax Court yesterday. He appears to have been a successful contractor, if the amount of taxes he was assessed is an indication, and the IRS probably noticed that there was no income being reported on the 1099s issued to him.

An examination got underway, and it went as well as you might expect, given the patriotic advice he was taking (my emphasis):

Revenue Agent Pritchard sent petitioner a letter dated April 24, 2009, stating that he had submitted Form 12153 prematurely, as no tax had been assessed yet. On May 6, 2009, Revenue Agent Pritchard sent petitioner a letter informing him that his arguments were frivolous and providing Code citations and IRS guidance pertaining to his filing requirements and respondent’s authority to impose and collect income tax. The letter specifically addressed promoters of tax-avoidance activities, stating: “These people base their arguments on legal statements taken out of context and on frivolous arguments that have been repeatedly rejected by [F]ederal courts.”

Nevertheless, at the suggestion of the aforementioned tax-avoidance organizations, petitioner continued to send letters to Revenue Agent Pritchard espousing similar arguments and often accompanied by Forms 12153. For example, with assistance from the Patriot Network, petitioner sent Revenue Agent Pritchard a letter dated May 13, 2009, threatening legal action against her and the United States. Petitioner also sent Revenue Agent Pritchard a letter dated July 14, 2009, “demanding that * * * [she] send * * * [him] a certified assessment of how * * * [she has] now came [sic] up with this alleged amount & the name of the person or persons preparing it”, and a letter dated October 23, 2009, and addressed to “Tax Collector” that requests a section 6320/6330 hearing and is accompanied by an attachment of materials that petitioner received from the Patriot Network

IMG_0216Lacking cooperation from the taxpayer, the IRS did things the hard way, backing into taxable income based on bank deposits and 1099s. The result was over $238,000 in taxes assessed over four years, plus interest and fraud penalties.

At some point after the taxpayer commenced Tax Court proceedings, lucidity overcame him:

Petitioner relied on the Patriot Network Web site during the early stages of this case. For example, petitioner followed the Patriot Network’s advice to file a request for admissions and a motion in limine to exclude from evidence the bank  records that respondent had obtained. However, petitioner testified that he subsequently realized he had made foolish mistakes “in trying to follow other people” and that he was trying to fix those mistakes. He hired an accountant to file late returns for 2008-11, and he testified that he would no longer be paying the annual fee to the Patriot Network.

That probably helped him establish business deductions that the IRS might not have otherwise allowed, but it didn’t undo his prior patriotism:

We commend petitioner for adjusting his behavior during the pendency of this case and for his considerable work in reconstructing largely accurate and very helpful summaries of his business income and expenses for the years at issue. However, we cannot discount months of uncooperative behavior that gives insight into petitioner’s intent in not filing Federal tax returns. Petitioner’s failure to cooperate with respondent is persuasive circumstantial evidence of fraud.

So he kept his life and, perhaps, his honor, but he lost a fortune: $237,976 in fraud penalties on top of $328,000 in taxes and $57,000 in late payment penalties.

The Moral? If you follow the advice of “Patriot” outfits to not pay your taxes, you may be unwittingly pledging your fortune. Unlike the founders, though, you won’t win.

Cite: Porter, T.C. Memo 2015-122.

 

Gretchen Tegeler, Why priorities don’t get funded (IowaBiz.com):

One of the most significant “built-in” spending components affecting all state and local governments in Iowa is public pension debt. Our public pension systems guarantee retirees a monthly benefit for life, the size of which depends on how long they worked and at what salary. The system is built upon a financial model that involves a whole series of assumptions. If the assumptions don’t pan out, taxpayers are still on the hook to pay the benefits.

And the assumptions have not panned out.

Public defined benefit pensions are a lie. It is either a lie to the taxpayers about the cost of current services, a lie to the public employees about the size of their pensions, or some of both. A move to a defined contribution model, where benefits are limited to the amount funded, is long overdue.

 

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Kay Bell, Tax record keeping rules and tips. Jeb Bush keeps his tax returns for at least 33 years. Should you?

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: Issue a 1099-C to a Deadbeat Client or Customer? Um, no.

 

Scott Greenberg, Gavin Ekins, Tax Policy Helped Create Puerto Rico’s Fiscal Crisis (Tax Policy Blog). “While the United States federal tax code helped create the conditions for Puerto Rico’s fiscal crisis, the Puerto Rican tax code played a much more direct role in bringing the crisis to a head.”

Tracy Gordon, Puerto Rico: Not Your Father’s Debt Crisis – or Your Greek Uncle’s (TaxVox). “In a remarkable statement, Governor Alejandro Garcia Padilla announced this week that Puerto Rico’s debts are ‘not payable.’ Nobody was really surprised.”

Cara Griffith, Texas Comptroller Improves Transparency of Administrative Decisions (Tax Analysts Blog)

Patrick J. Smith, The Implications for Tax Litigation of the Supreme Court’s Decision in Michigan v. EPA (Procedurally Taxing) “While it is probably the case that in many challenges to tax regulations, the cost of compliance with the regulation may not be a realistic basis for challenge, there is no principled reason why in appropriate cases, the cost of compliance with a tax regulation might not form part or all of the basis for challenge.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 784

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No Tax Update tomorrow. Our office is closed for Independence Day. Enjoy the fireworks, but spare a thought for those who have fought for independence, including 10 men who never made it back to base from a mission 71 years ago Sunday.

 

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Tax Roundup, 6/10/15: Canada finds tax freedom today. And: limits to states tax reach.

Wednesday, June 10th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

canada flagOh, Canada. The Tax Foundation determined that the U.S. “Tax Freedom Day” was April 24 this year. Our neighbor to the north has had to wait until today, reports the Fraser Institute:

Tax Freedom Day measures the total yearly tax burden imposed on Canadian families by the federal, provincial and local governments.

“Without our Tax Freedom Day calculations, it’s nearly impossible for Canadian families to know all the taxes they pay each year because federal, provincial and local governments levy such a wide range of taxes,” said Charles Lammam, director of fiscal studies at the Fraser Institute and co-author of Canadians Celebrate Tax Freedom Day on June 10, 2015.

The list of taxes includes income taxes, payroll taxes, health taxes, sales taxes, property taxes, fuel taxes, vehicle taxes, profit taxes, import taxes, “sin” taxes and more.

In 2015, the average Canadian family (with two or more people) will pay $44,980 in total taxes or 43.7 per cent of its annual income.

The lateness of the date may surprise some U.S. tax practitioners who are familiar with Canada’s low 15% top corporation tax rate — less than half the U.S. 35% top rate. But Canada more than makes up for it with high provincial taxes and a national sales tax.

 

iowa-illustrated_Page_01Fencing in state tax collectors. A proposed “Business Activity Tax Simplification Act of 2015” (H.R. 2584) would update the rules restricting the ability of states to tax interstate activity:

Business Activity Tax Simplification Act of 2015 Expands the federal prohibition against state taxation of interstate commerce to:


(1) include taxation of out-of-state transactions involving all forms of property, including intangible personal property and services (currently, only sales of tangible personal property are protected); and
(2) prohibit state taxation of an out-of-state entity unless such entity has a physical presence in the taxing state. Sets forth criteria for:
(1) determining that a person has a physical presence in a state, and
(2) the computation of the tax liability of affiliated businesses operating in a state.

Congress last addressed these rules in 1959. The world of multistate commerce today would hardly be recognizable to an Eisenhower-era tax planner. States constantly try to expand their reach to non-voters in other states. State taxes are becoming the largest portion of the tax compliance bill to more and more small businesses. Simplification is way overdue. Unfortunately, this bill will probably go nowhere.

 

Gretchen Tegeler, Public sector health plans are costly for taxpayers (IowaBiz.com):

Health exchange plans try to encourage members to be conscious of the cost of services.  They require subscribers to pay 100 percent of the cost of nearly everything, up to the deductible. The deductibles are set deliberately high — $3,750 for a single plan and $7,500 for a family plan in our example. Public employee plans, on the other hand, which already cost employees very little in premiums, tend to have extremely low co-pays and deductibles. So employees have minimal exposure to the actual cost of services, and minimal incentive to stay healthy.

When you don’t have to compete to stay in business, this is what happens.

 

Another ACA Success Story. The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration reports that delays in getting information from insurance exchanges will make it impossible for the IRS to verify all health insurance subsidy claims.

Hank Stern, Yeah, about that promise… (InsureBlog).

 

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Jason Dinesen, Are HRAs Always Appropriate for Sole Proprietors? Part 3

Timothy Todd, Ninth Circuit Vacates Tax Court Decision On Transferee Liability. The case involves a “Midco” transaction involving the use of a loss company to give a buyer an asset deal and a seller a stock deal in the sale of a C corporation.

TaxGrrrl, Footballer Lionel Messi To Face Trial On Tax Fraud Charges. That’s a soccer player, in case you are trying to remember what NFL team he’s on.

Robert Wood, Hastert Pleads Not Guilty, But Can Write Off Blackmail On His Taxes

Caleb Newquist, Who Wants to Work at a Small Accounting Firm? (Going Concern). If it’s you, let me know.

Jim Maule, The Return of the Lap Dance Tax Challenge. “Despite having a fairly good grasp of tax law generally, and a passable understanding of sales taxation, I would have struggled with this case because, as others can attest, I don’t quite understand art.”

 

20120816-1David Brunori, Brownback Can’t Catch a Break (Tax Analysts Blog).

I think Brownback had the right idea and the wrong approach. He wanted to reduce tax burdens on Kansas citizens. That is laudable for two reasons. First, in the long run, lower taxes will lead to greater economic growth. Second, the money belongs to Kansans. Politicians don’t have an inherent right to people’s property. And it doesn’t matter whether lawmakers’ motivations are noble or venal — it’s not their money.

But I think Brownback made a terrible error when he exempted from tax all income from passthrough entities.

That approach is exactly backwards. You should broaden the base when you lower the rates. And while you should make sure you don’t tax income twice, you want to catch it once.

Kay Bell, Louisiana lawmakers ask D.C. lobbyist for tax hike permission. “Spoiler alert: Americans for Tax Reform’s Grover Norquist says ‘no'”

 

Scott Greenberg, Progressive Policy Institute Calls for Cutting Corporate Tax Rates (Tax Policy Blog). “Right now, companies can take advantage of lower tax rates in Europe by relocating their legal location through an inversion. But, if new international tax rules force companies to actually move jobs overseas to take advantage of Europe’s lower tax rates, companies would likely shift jobs away from the U.S. as well.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 762. He links to a piece arguing “First, the IRS, while effective at collecting taxes, is a poor agency to task with regulating advocacy organizations, especially those, such as the advocacy groups covered under 501(c)(4), that cannot offer donors a tax deduction.” Actually, every non-revenue task assumed by the IRS weakens their effectiveness in collecting taxes.

Playing hard to get. Does Saying “No Chance” Increase the Chances of Reform? Renu Zaretsky’s TaxVox headline roundup covers tax reform, internet taxes, and patent boxes today.

 

News from the Profession. The Greatest Reality TV Accountants, Awarded and Ranked (Leona May, Going Concern). I’d love to see Robert D. Flach do this.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/20/15: Cheer up, it could have been even worse!

Monday, April 20th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20140929-1Tax Season is over. For me, the end is officially the moment I transmit my e-file extension to the IRS. Now it’s time to pick up the threads of the life and tax practice that are put aside in the final three-week frantic trudge.

Tax Season has become, for me, all about the last three weeks. That’s when everybody finally has their corrected 1099s, most of the public partnership K-1s are in, and the pass-through closely-held businesses are mostly done. No matter how well I keep up until then, suddenly I am a week behind and working frantically to catch up. Inevitably something unexpected snarls the works — maybe an unexpected client crisis, or a business transaction unhappily timed to coincide with filing season. As the tax law gets more complex every year, it compresses the filing season for many clients to a narrower period beginning closer to April 15 every year.

Robert D. Flach has posted his paper-filed thoughts on the recent filing season: “It certainly wasn’t the worst, or the best, in my 44 years.”

It wasn’t the worst I’ve seen. That was the one two years ago, when a January 1, 2013 tax law changed the rules for 2012, and Iowa dawdled in updating its code references to incorporate the federal changes — leading to filing season chaos.

Our worst fears of tax season weren’t realized, thanks to last-minute filing relief for ACA victims participants owing money, a one-year waiver of the deadly penalties for ACA non-compliance by small-employer insurance reimbursement arrangements, and an 11th-hour waiver of the “repair regs” accounting method change filing for smaller businesses.

Still, it was pretty bad. Probably the worst part of this season was the exponential increase in identity theft. The continuing failure of the IRS to deal with this problem is disgraceful. The failure of Congress to address it is nearly as bad.

No, the solution isn’t to give Commissioner Koskinen all the money he wants. It’s a systems and controls problem, and the last time the IRS got a blank check for systems upgrades, they boggled it entirely. And nothing Mr. Koskinen has done gives any confidence that he can be trusted with it.

20140910-1The solution starts with a new commissioner. It will include slower refunds. It will include system upgrades that will, for example, reject e-filings claiming earned-income credits for somebody who habitually files returns with adjusted gross income in the millions (We had multiple ID thefts of six and seven-figure filers this year). It will include a long-term system upgrade, with long-term funding to be released only in steps as progress is made. And maybe the solution includes changing the culture that thinks tax refunds are a good thing.

Related: Fix The Tax Code Friday: Delaying Tax Refunds To Stop Fraud (TaxGrrrl). “Would you be willing to wait a few more weeks for your refund to allow for forms matching if it slowed down the incidents of tax fraud?”

 

Tony Nitti, How (Not) To Spend Your Tax Refund. “The goal with sound tax planning should never be to generate the largest refund; after all, the bigger the refund, the more of your hard-earned money you loaned, interest-free, to the IRS for a period of months.”

Jason Dinesen, Tax Season Recap 2015: What a Strange Season, Part 1

William Perez, What To Do if You Missed the Tax Deadline. “There were the usual issues here and there with getting info from clients, and a few clients were surly or price-sensitive. But it wasn’t too bad overall.”

Kay Bell, Missed April 15 tax deadline? Got an extension? Now what?

Robert Wood, You Just Filed Your Taxes, Is It Too Early To Amend?

Peter Reilly, Heir Of Honduran Timber Fortune Wins Large Refund In Tax Court. “Using the IRS as a weapon in a business dispute is, well, not good business.”

 

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While I took a break, the IRS Tea Party Scandal rolled on. The TaxProf continued his IRS Scandal Series: The IRS Scandal, Day 711Day 710Day 709Day 708Day 707.

 

David Brunori, The Arrogant and the Greedy Team Up to Take Your Money (Tax Analysts Blog). David explains (my emphasis)  the real reason why certain people have their dresses over their heads about the menace of e-cigarettes:

E-cigarette taxation best illustrates the confluence of arrogance and avarice. Those who cannot keep themselves from playing nanny have already begun to bar e-cigarettes from public places (to prevent the dreaded secondhand water vapor). And of course we have the obligatory restrictions on their use by kids. But the tobacco abolitionists would like to tax e-cigarettes with the knowledge that if you tax something, you get less of it. Don’t be fooled. These people do not care about your health. They care about lording over you.

But there are others (like Bowser) who cast a covetous eye on electronic smokes. Two factors drive that thinking. If people smoke real cigarettes less, the states will lose tens of millions of dollars. E-cigarettes need to be taxed to replace that revenue (because it really isn’t about your health). Since a lot of tobacco tax revenue is earmarked for schools, taxing e-cigarettes is all about the kids. Raising real taxes to pay for public services is hard. Teaming up with the prohibitionists is much easier.

It’s Baptists and bootleggers all the way down.

 

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Gretchen Tegeler, There’s more to the story than tax rates (IowaBiz.com). “Property taxes are a combination of the property tax rate, applied to the portion of a property’s assessed value that is taxable. Even if a city keeps a constant rate, it may be collecting a lot more property tax revenue (with property owners paying a lot more, too), if there’s more valuation to tax.”

Career Corner. What Did You Learn This Busy Season? (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/26/15: Is Iowa 2014 tax season in jeopordy? And: how “trust fund tax” encourages trusts.

Monday, January 26th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today visitors: Here is the accounting method post mentioned by “in the blogs.”

 

20130117-1Uh-oh. Is there a holdup on passing the annual “conformity” bill at the statehouse? This from Republican State Senator Bill Anderson in the Sioux City Journal is a bad sign:

Senate Democrats are playing politics with the issue. The Department of Revenue is recommending accountants tell clients to delay filing their taxes until a decision is made. Senate Democrats’ indecisiveness to pass legislation in a timely manner creates uncertainty for taxpayers and tax professionals, preventing them from filing returns.

I had not heard there was any difficulty here. I hope it’s not serious, but I will be watching it more closely now.

This is another example of why Iowa should have a “floating conformity” rule. I don’t understand why they can’t say they will automatically adopt federal extender changes. If they want to leave out bonus depreciation, that could be done with language excluding that from the automatic conformity. We shouldn’t have to go into February without knowing what the state tax law is for the prior year.

 

Janet Novack, Obama Attack On “Trust Fund Loophole” Could Increase Tax Advantage Of Trusts. “Without step-up, there would, for example, be an even greater tax advantage to putting assets that are likely to explode in value—such as founders’ stock in a hot start-up—into an irrevocable trust for children or grandchildren.”

 

Kay Bell, Capital gains gain in income reporting, but tax hike unlikely

Jack Townsend, Fifth Circuit Rejects Attempt on Direct Appeal to Withdraw Guilty Plea in False Claims Conspiracy Case

Jim Maule, No Agreement? No Alimony Deduction. In divorce, paperwork is everything.

Robert Wood, 10 Crazy Sounding Tax Deductions IRS Says Are Legit. My favorite is “free beer.”

20130607-2Anthony Nitti, IRS Futher Limits Deductions For State-Legal Marijuana Facilities:

Most notably, Section 280E provides that “no deduction is allowed for any amount incurred in a business that consists of trafficking in controlled substances.” Because marijuana finds itself on Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act, the IRS has the ammunition necessary to deny the deductions of any facility that sells the drug.

And it does. Regularly.

I hope nobody really believes this actually prevents any drug crimes. What it does is add a crushing tax debt that helps ensure that anybody who gets involved in drug traffic can never reform and become a productive member of society.

 

Robert Goulder, Should the Mayor of London Pay U.S. Taxes? (Tax Analysts Blog):

True, there are tax treaty protections at play and foreign tax credits available. But the point of the story isn’t double taxation; it’s jurisdictional overreach. Many will argue that a citizenship-based tax regime is unfair and heavy-handed.

The U.S. is the only country that does it. Oh, Eritrea, too.

Stephen Olsen, The Gift that Keeps on Taking–Does Section 6324(b) Limit Gift Tax to the Value of the Gift or Can the IRS Take More? (Procedurally Taxing)

 

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

Alan Cole, The IRS Has Too Many Responsibilities (Tax Policy Blog):

On one hand, the IRS’s basic responsibilities have gotten less onerous over the years. More and more taxpayers file electronically, which means that everything just zips straight into the IRS’s computer system with little need for human oversight. This should mean that the IRS really doesn’t need to grow, and if anything it could stand to shrink.

But on the other hand, the IRS has been overloaded with all sorts of additional responsibilities. It’s acting as an extension of the Department of Health and Human Services in enforcing the Affordable Care Act. It’s acting as an extension of the Federal Election Commission and regulating political speech (an authority it has perhaps not used so well.) It’s acting as an extension of the Department of Energy with its residential energy credits, and it’s acting as an extension of the Department of Education in offering deductions and credits for teachers and students. It has to figure out who has health insurance and who has children and where the children live. It even has to try to get data from foreign banks, due to the complexity of our worldwide system of taxation. The more arbitrary things find their way into the tax code, the more verification systems the IRS has to put in place.

These are only a few of the non-revenue responsibilities dumped on the IRS that uses the tax law as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Beyond the bottle opener and the screwdriver, every gadget you add makes it harder to use it as a knife, and now we have a Swiss Army Knife the size of a railcar.

 

20140919-2Gretchen Tegeler, Benefits and Costs of DARTing Forward  (IowaBiz.com), on the troubling financial structure behind Des Moines’ public tansportaiton:

Despite a nearly 20 percent increase in ridership over this period, there has been no associated increase in fare-based revenue.  If more millennials are riding the bus, why aren’t we seeing an increase in operating revenue?  The absence of growth in operating revenue suggests that all of the recent improvements in service and ridership have been funded by non-users, i.e. from increases in property taxes.  Are we okay with this model? How far should we go with it?

Maybe if they had to rely more on farebox revenue, they would spend less on things like the downtown Palace of Transit.

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 627

Glenn Reynolds, Middle-class Savings Like Blood in the Water. Paying for “free” college and student loan subsidies by taking money out of the pockets of those who save for college sets up a strange incentive structure.

Megan McArdle, Uncle Sam Is Coming After Your Savings. They need it to buy you “free” stuff.

 

Career Corner. The Public Accountant’s Definitive Guide to Disclosure of Past Convictions (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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