Posts Tagged ‘Hank Stern’

Tax Roundup, 4/10/14: Still plenty of time for an IRA! And Iowa Tax Freedom Day looms.

Thursday, April 10th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

IRAWhen the tax deadline is looming, taxpayers looking for the Tax Fairy to wish away their tax problems often overlook the old-fashioned IRA.  You can still make 2013 IRA contributions through April 15.  An Individual Retirement Account contribution may be able to score you a 2013 deduction (or even a tax credit) for 2013; even if you don’t qualify for current tax savings, they are a nice and cheap way to build-up tax-sheltered savings.

IRAs come in two flavors: “traditional” and “Roth.”  Traditional IRAs build up their income tax-free, but earnings on them are taxable when they come out.  If you meet certain conditions, your traditional IRAs come with sprinkles: – a tax deduction.  If you don’t get the deduction going in, your principal is tax-free going out.

Roth IRAs never offer a deduction, but they leave a sweeter aftertaste: if you hold them long enough, income on Roth IRA assets is never taxed.  And unlike traditional IRAs, you are never forced to start withdrawing funds from the IRA, so the tax-free build-up can go on indefinitely.

Both traditional and Roth IRAs require you to have wage or self-employment net income.  The limits for contributions are the lesser of your taxable compensation or $5,500 ($6,500 if you were 50 by December 31, 2013).  You can contribute to a traditional IRA at any income level, but deductions phase out at higher income levels if you (or your spouse) are covered by a retirement plan at work.  The availability of Roth IRA contributions phases out at higher income levels regardless of whether you participate in another retirement plan.

One very useful way to use Roth IRAs is for teenagers and young adults.  A parent can fund a Roth IRA for them based on part-time job income — no matter what parent income is.  This starts a tax-free retirement fund for the young earner at a very age, giving the power of compound interest lots of time to do its magic.  And from what I’ve seen, parental Roth funding is much appreciated by the recipients.

While time is short, you can still fund a 2013 IRA if you make your contribution no later than April 15.  You can set one up at your friendly community bank or online with a mutual fund company on you lunch hour.  No, it probably won’t make your 2013 taxes go away, but it can be a nice step towards financial security for you or your kids.

This is the latest of our 2014 Filing Season Tips — a new one every day thorugh April 15!

Russ Fox, Bozo Tax Tip #4: Honey, You Don’t Exist!: “Perhaps it’s something in the water, but this year Aaron and I have seen multiple cases of individuals who have ignored that marriage license and filed as single if married.”

 

Kyle Pomerleau, When is My State’s Tax Freedom Day?  (Tax Policy Bl0g) Iowa’s is this Sunday.

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Kristy Maitre, How to Report National Mortgage Settlement Payments

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): X Is For XD   

Paul Neiffer, Trusts Can Get You in Trouble

Jason Dinesen, Tax Court Case Involving Radio DJ Strikes Close to Home for Me, Part 2 

 

Hey, preparers: are you ready to trust the IRS to regulate your livelihood?  A Week Before Tax Day, IRS Misses Crucial Windows XP Deadline (Washington Post, via the TaxProf)

Kay Bell, Computer problems for IRS, Canadian tax agency

 

20140401-1Alan Cole, Mainstream Economics Support Low Taxes on Capital Income (Tax Policy Bl0g): “The overwhelming bulk of the evidence is that taxes have a negative effect on economic growth, and that the effect is particularly strong on tax bases that include capital income.”  But, the rich!  Inequality!

Donald Marron, Seven Tax Issues Facing Small Business (TaxVox): “America’s tax system is needlessly complex, economically harmful, and often unfair.”

Cara Griffith, Guidance Today, Gone Tomorrow (Tax Analysts Blog).  ”A recent Arkansas court opinion points out what might be a troubling trend in state taxation: the inability of taxpayers to rely on administrative guidance because the state can retract or supersede it on a moment’s notice.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 336.  It was a big day, with evidence that Lois Lerner was working behind the scenes with the ranking Democrat on the Ways and Means Committee to harass the opposition.

Tax Justice Blog, Is the Obama Administration Blocking International Efforts to Address Corporate Tax Avoidance? 

William Perez, Tax Reform Act of 2014, Part 4, Tax Credits

 

Hank Stern, The ObamaTax Domino Effect.  ”While we’ve all seen the horrendous rate increases caused by the ObamaTax (including on our 1040′s), thee are other victims.”

“Pro-business” isn’t “pro-market,” a distinction utterly lost on Iowa officials.

David Brunori: I’ll Raise a Glass to Lower Booze Taxes (Tax Analysts Blog) ”Jack Daniels is not bourbon, by the way, but Tennessee whiskey. There is apparently a difference, but frankly, after the first glass, I can never tell.”

Next: legislators are terrible at legislating.  GAO Went Undercover to Discover Tax Preparers Are Terrible at Tax Preparing (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/21/14: Reforming S corporations to a frazzle. And: cleaning up at the laundromat!

Friday, March 21st, 2014 by Joe Kristan

S-SidewalkThe legislative process has been likened to sausage making.  Sausage doesn’t get more appetizing if you keep looking at it closely over a period of weeks, and neither does the Camp “tax reform” plan.  Andrew Lundeen and Kyle Pomerleau at the Tax Policy Blog today highlight some gristly features of the grand effort by the head GOP taxwriter:

The proposal leaves in place high tax rates for many S corporations, subjects them to additional payroll taxes, creates new distortions between types of industries, and produces two tax rate bubbles.

They note these major S corporation changes:

Creates Different Tax Treatment for Manufacturing and Non-Manufacturing Industries

Camp’s tax reform package introduces complication with a new 10 percent surtax for non-manufacturing income. To make things more complicated, the additional 10 percent surtax would be calculated on a different income scale: modified adjusted gross income or MAGI. This essentially creates two side by side tax codes, a la the AMT, and individuals and businesses would have to calculate their AGI for one and their MAGI for the other.

As I noted, it doesn’t simplify the code by getting rid of the economically foolish Section 199 production deduction; it just moves it to a different section.

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The Difference between Active and Passive Shareholders

The difference between active and passive shareholders is important for determining the marginal tax rates for S corporations under Chairman Camp’s plan.

That’s true now, but you’d expect a “reform” plan to get rid of this sort of gratuitous and difficult-to-enforce difference.

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Changes to Self-Employment Taxes: the 70/30 Split Rule for SECA Taxes

Under current law, the IRS requires business owners to pay themselves a reasonable wage in order to prevent people from gaming this income distinction in order to avoid the extra 15.3 percent payroll tax hit.

Camp’s plan would replace the current reasonable wage standard with a 70/30 split, changing the rules for active shareholders. The rule would require that active shareholders of S corporations report 70 percent of their total earning as wage income.

I think it’s just one step on the way to a 100/0 split.

Tax Rate Bubble

Another element of Camp’s tax plan is the creation marginal tax rate bubbles. This occurs when a marginal tax rate, for example, goes from 10 percent to 15 percent and back down to 10 percent. We have a post that discusses the marginal tax rates under Camp’s plan, which you can find here.

When a “reform” plan comes with so many phase-outs and distortions, it’s not actually reforming anything.  I think the Camp plan will come to be seen as a false move and a lost opportunity.

 

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): K Is For Keogh Plans   

20140321-3TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 316

William Perez, Average Sales Tax Rates by State: 2014, highlighting a Tax Policy Blog analysis.

Annette Nellen, Revenues versus tax collections.  ”A recent blog post on LinkedIn’s Sales and Use Tax Legislative Updates included a comment from B.J. Pritchett suggesting that what governments collect in taxes should not be called “revenues” because it is not from selling goods and services.”

Tax Justice BlogState News Quick Hits: Don’t Expect Much from Congress.  Always a good idea.

Kay Bell, Senate Finance plans tax extenders vote for week of March 31.  She links to an article quoting a Senate Finance spokeswoman as saying “No decisions have been made on the content of the measure or the timing for a committee session and vote.”

Howard Gleckman, Fiscal Reality Check: Will Congress Pay for the Tax Extenders and the Doc Fix?  Extenders themselves are a scam.  Congress passes them over and over a year at a time so they can pretend that they cost less than they do — funky accounting that would get a public company CFO jail time, but standard procedure in Congress.

 

Jack Townsend, U.S. Attorney Enabler Sentenced for Assisting Offshore Evasion 

 

A new Cavalcade of Risk is up at Insurance Regulatory Law.  The Cavalcade is a venerable roundup of insurance and risk-management posts.  Hank Stern’s contribution, an interview with Neal Halder of Principal Financial Group about their “accelerated underwriting” process for life insurance, is a great read.

Jason Dinesen, Fair Warning: More Baseball Posts to Pop Up this Year.  That’s a good thing.

 

20140321-4Think he reported this income?  Man With Deep Pockets Busted Stealing a Lot of Laundry Money (Going Concern):

Just how many loads of laundry could one do with $460,000 in stolen quarters?

That’s probably not the question asked by public works inspector Thomas Rica, who pleaded guilty this week to stealing that much in quarters from the meter collection room of the New Jersey town for which he worked.

At the laundromats I used back in school, that would have been nearly enough quarters to get your clothes dry.

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/24/14: Executive stock spiff proposed for Iowa. And: Haiku!

Friday, January 24th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1Legislators propose to exempt employer stock gains from employee Iowa income tax.   S.F. 2043 would exclude from taxation capital gains from stock received by an “employee-owner” of a company “on account of employment” with the corporation, and acquired while the taxpayer was still employed..  While it isn’t entirely clear from the legislation, it would appear to include long or short-term gains, and would include stock acquired by exercise of options or stock bonus plans.  It’s not clear that it would apply to gains on ESOP shares, which are generally issued to owners or redeemed on retirement, but I suspect it would.

It’s an astonishingly broad exclusion.  Once elected, it would apply to stock gifted by the employee-owner to spouses and lineal descendants.  It wouldn’t apply to many family owned companies, because it requires five shareholders, at least two unrelated under IRC Section 318 attribution.  Interestingly, the bill misstates Sec. 318, saying:

Two persons are considered related when, under section 318 of the Internal Revenue Code, one is a person who owns, directly or indirectly, capital stock that if directly owned would be attributed to the other person, or is the brother, sister, aunt, uncle, cousin, niece, or nephew of the other person who owns capital stock either directly or indirectly.

No, that would be Section 267 attribution, and only for pass-throughs.  Section 318 only makes a taxpayer related to:

his spouse (other than a spouse who is legally separated from the individual under a decree of divorce or separate maintenance), and

(ii) his children, grandchildren, and parents. 

No siblings, nieces or nephews to be seen.  If they can’t even read the Code, should they really be messing with the state income tax?

If the Iowa income tax is so awful that we need to carve out a special exemption to executive stockholders to get them to come to Iowa, we should fix it for everyone, not just for them.  Does anybody really doubt that Iowa would be more attractive to business with no corporate income tax and a 4% top individual income tax rate than with the current system plus a new executive spiff?  Come on, legislators:  take the Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan off the shelf!

Related: Iowa House advances one-time stock gain bill, on a similar bill introduced last year.

 

David Henderson, Steve Moore’s Alternative Maximum Tax (Econlog).  Governor Branstad floated a plan to allow taxpayers to choose between Iowa’s current baroque income tax and a simpler one with lower rates, before abandoning it prior to the opening of the legislative session.   I thought I was being clever by calling an alternative maximum tax.  David reports that Steve Moore came up with both the idea and the name for a proposal he made for the federal tax system in the 1990s.

I still don’t care for it.  In practice we would be computing the tax both ways and paying the lesser amount.  By adding another computation to the process, it would actually make things harder.  The only way it would work would be if it resulted in lower taxes for everyone; then in a few years they could repeal the regular income tax without anyone noticing.

 

20120531-1The 200th edition of the Cavalcade of Risk is up!  This milestone edition of the long-lived roundup of insurance and risk management posts is at Rootfin.  Congratulations to Hank Stern, the evil genius behind the Cavalcade; he participates in this edition with Hacktastic!, on the security troubles of Healthcare.gov, and government’s efforts to hush them up:

See, the problem isn’t the wide-open portal, it’s the folks trying to alert the folks who run it that there is, in fact, a problem. I’m reminded of a certain Middle East river.

More alarming still, though, is that that it’s not just the state folks yelling “burn the witch:” now the FBI has warned Mr Hermansen to zip his lips. That’ll sure make the problem go away.

Your healthcare is in the very best of hands.

 

Jim Maule, How Not to Compute a Casualty Loss Deduction:

The taxpayer claimed a $12,020 casualty loss deduction on account of the loss of the vehicle. The taxpayer computed the deduction by subtracting the $48,000 from $60,020, the original value of the vehicle. However, the first step in computing the amount of a casualty loss deduction is to subtract the insurance recovery from the difference between the value of the property immediately before the casualty and the value of the property immediately after the casualty, unless the taxpayer chooses to use cost of repairs as a substitute measure, though that was not relevant in this case.  Because the taxpayer did not provide evidence of those values, and because the Tax Court was unwilling to assume that the vehicle’s value immediately before the accident was the same as its value when it was new, it upheld the determination of the IRS that the taxpayer was not entitled to a casualty loss deduction.

The IRS often examines casualty loss deductions, so you need to do your legwork on getting the valuations documented before you file.

 

Jason Dinesen, Small Businesses — Review Those Benefit Programs  “When was the last time your small business reviewed the benefit programs your business offers?”

William Perez weighs in on Finding the Right Tax Professional.

Kay Bell, Tax season is tax scam, tax identity theft season. “If you get any unexpected communication in any form that is purportedly from the IRS, especially at the start of tax season, be wary.”  And they will never initiate contact by phone or email.

Paul Neiffer, Cash Does Not Equal Gain.  You can’t make taxable gain go away by using it to pay off loans.

Trish McIntire, Kansas Taxes – Sneaky Changes.

Robert D. Flach brings the Friday Buzz!

 

Kyle Pomerleau, High-Income Taxpayers Could Face a Top Marginal Tax Rate over 50 percent this Tax Season.  Be glad we don’t take it all, serf!  He computes Iowa’s top combined rate at 47.4%.

 

taxanalystslogoChristopher Bergin, Fortress Secrecy – No News Here (Tax Analysts Blog).

Anyone familiar with my writing knows that I have bent over backwards to give the IRS the benefit of the doubt in this black eye some call the “exemption scandal.” I must admit I’m getting a little tired of bending.

Back in the day, as the saying goes, I often referred to the IRS as Fortress Secrecy, a term meant to describe the agency’s obsession with hiding as much of its operations as it can get away with. I am not a casual observer, and I have never seen things this bad. Everything the IRS has done in addressing the exemption scandal leads to just one conclusion: that this agency now believes it is accountable to no one other than itself.

Because shut up, peasant.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 260

Howard Gleckman, Fiscal Magic: Paying for New Highways by Cutting Corporate Taxes (TaxVox)

 

Frank Agostino, Jairo G. Cano, and Crystal Loyer.  Guest posters at Procedurally Taxing, including the prolific Tax Court litigator Frank Agostino, discuss how IRS rules against giving false testimony bolstered an IRS man’s own case, in Section 1203 to Bolster a Taxpayer’s Credibility at Trial.

Jack Townsend, Required Records IRS Summons Enforced Again

 

News from the Profession.  Pulling Back the Curtain on Making Partner in a Big 4 Firm. Just sell, baby!

TaxGrrrl has Fun With Taxes: Tax Haiku 2014.

I’ll try it.

Here comes tax season

April 15 arrives swiftly

I need a stiff drink.

OK, I’ll keep the day job.

 

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Tax Roundup, 8/29/2013: Individual mandate regs go final. And: the office velociraptor!

Thursday, August 29th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20121120-2Avik Roy,  White House Publishes Final Regulations For Obamacare’s Individual Mandate — Seven Things You Need To Know.  Key points:

You pay a fine if your spouse and kids are uninsured.

If you claim dependents on your tax return, you’re responsible for paying the mandate fines if your dependents don’t have health insurance.

This provision takes on special importance because of its interaction with Obamacare’s employer mandate. Under the health law, employers with more than 50 full-time-equivalent workers are required to offer health coverage to their employees and employees’ dependents under the age of 26. Employers are not required to offer coverage to employees’ spouses. Hence, a worker who gets coverage through his job will be forced, under the individual mandate, to purchase coverage on his own for his spouse, if he or she doesn’t have other sources of coverage. A worker who doesn’t get coverage through his job will need to purchase coverage not only for himself, but also his dependents.

But all is not lost:

The IRS can’t go after you if you don’t pay the fine.

Basically, the only thing the IRS can do to make you pay the mandate fine is to withhold it from your tax refund, if you’re due one. So if you carefully calibrate your withholdings, such that you aren’t due a refund at the end of the year, the IRS has no way to collect the mandate fine.

That is, until you overpay some year, or they change the rules.

Related: Health Care Act And The Road To Good Intentions  A guest post by Scott Lovingood at TaxGrrrl’s place.

Also: Ask The Taxgirl: Taxing Health Care Benefits   

 

TaxProf,  Seventh Circuit Joins Majority of Circuits in Upholding Valuation Misstatement Penalties in DAD Tax Shelter.  The “distressed asset debt” shelter would purportedly allow people who needed tax losses to get them by acquiring interests in partnerships with worthless South American consumer debt, using pretend basis from notes.  Judge Posner found it unconvincing:

The intention was simply to create the appearance that the investors’ interest in the partnership had a high enough basis to enable the entire built-in loss that the shelter investors had acquired to be offset against their taxable income. But all this means is that the investors should not have been permitted to deduct their entire built-in loss — yet in fact they shouldn’t have been permitted to deduct any part of it, because the partnership was a sham.

The DADs were among the least plausible of the mass-marketed shelters, and that’s saying something.

Cite: Superior Trading LLC, CA-7, No. 12-3367.

 

Phil Hodgen,  Green card received in 2007? Expatriate in 2013 or else.  Give us your huddled masses.  We’ll fix them!

20130607-2Sometimes the author and the story are made for one another.  Roche: Taxation of Medical Marijuana Businesses (TaxProf).  The story explains why the tax law isn’t kind to these folks:

Section 280E represents a departure from the longstanding practice of generally taxing illegal businesses in the same manner as legal businesses and effectively causes medical marijuana businesses to be taxed on their gross income rather than their net income. Medical marijuana businesses are, however, allowed to reduce their gross revenue by cost of goods sold in arriving at gross income. This puts medical marijuana businesses in the unusual position of wanting to capitalize as many of their otherwise deductible expenses to inventory as possible, unlike most businesses, which would prefer a current deduction.

It would be interesting to see an IRS exam where they want you to capitalize less to inventory.

 

Paul Neiffer, What’s my tax on selling equipment?  If it’s a gain, usually it’s ordinary income.

William Perez,  2012 Corporate Returns Due September 16.  Also, extended 1041s and 1065s.

 

Jack Townsend, Switzerland Reportedly Strikes Deal with U.S. for the “Other” Banks; Implications for U.S. Depositors.

Linda Beale, Swiss and US Apparently Reach Deal on Bank Disclosures related to Tax Evasion

 

Bounty hunting in Pennsylvania?  Philadelphia’s Use of Contingent Fee Auditors (Cara Griffith, Tax Analysts Blog)

 

I’m late to the new Cavalcade of Risk at My Personal Finance Journey.  Lots of good risk management items, including Hank Stern’s The Down Syndrome Conundrum.

What this country needs… What We Need Is a Godless Tax Code! (Christopher Bergin, Tax Analysts Blog)  Doesn’t Satanic count?

Kay Bell, State taxes, assorted fuel fees, drive up cost of a gallon of gas

 

Peter Reilly,   Tea Party Patriots Inc And IRS – Who Is Being Unreasonable ?  Peter seems to think that the IRS wasn’t clearly unreasonable in holding up Tea Party applications.  I think he misses the point — the whole process was one-sided.  Only right-side groups got the IRS slow-walk, while “progressive” applications skated through;

7-30-13-irs-targeting-statistics-of-files-produced-by-irs-through-july-29-2-Peter is right, though, when he says “We Really Should Not Have Accountants Trying To Figure This Stuff Out.”  John Kass explains how this stuff works in IRS scandal a reminder of how I learned about The Chicago Way

 

Career Advice: Would I Recommend the Tax Prep Industry to a Young Person? Probably Not  (Jason Dinesen:

Going Concern, Let’s Play Another Round of Accountant/Not an Accountant!  I found the first one too frightening to continue.

 

Finally - if you think you’ve had a bad day at the office, it could have been worse:

(via Lynnley Browning’s Twitter feed)

 

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Tax Roundup, 7/12/13: We get scam email. And flappers!

Friday, July 12th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Don’t be stupid.  Yes, you hardly need to consult your CPA for that advice, but I think of it every time I get spam email like this:

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Somewhere I read that email scammers make their pitches stupid on purpose to identify the dumbest marks, as they are easiest to fleece.  This one certainly does so.  Some signs of stupid:

  • The email address: smoggiest@HELP.STATE.TX.US.GOV.    Come on.
  • The salutation:  “Dear Accountant Officer.”  It sounds like it’s addressing somebody who issues parking tickets to CPAs.
  • The English of someone not brought up speaking English: “Hereby you are notified…”
  • The use of “please” by a revenue agency.  Please…

Folks, the IRS and state taxing agencies don’t send notices like this via email.  When you get one, delete it — and never click the links.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 64

Janet Novack, 4 Steps To Take Now That Stretch IRAs Are Endangered:

But the new stretch IRA limits, which Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus (D-Mont.)  first floated in the Senate last year, would require most retirement accounts inherited by anyone other than a spouse to be distributed (and in the case of non-Roth accounts taxed) within five years of the owner’s death…

The limit on stretch IRAs, which also appeared in President Obama’s most recent budget proposals, would raise $4.6 billion over 10 years, Congress’ Joint Committee on Taxation estimates.  

Janet explains how this possibility can affect your thinking about beneficiary designations and Roth conversions, among other things.

 

Christopher Bergin, Jaws (Tax Analysts Blog):

Clearly, the IRS did some inappropriate things in handling the applications for exemption for tea-party groups and others. But I would prefer to have congressional committees working on making sure our tax agency operates fairly and efficiently rather than going on witch-hunts.

Christopher is right, and as a practitioner I don’t want to see tax adminstration get any worse.   Still, you can’t ignore the long-term benefit for punishing bureaucratic misbehavior.  It would require a suicidal level of tolerance for GOP legislators to let bygones be bygones after the outrageous behavior of the IRS in the Tea Party scandal.  Maybe some budget haircut is needed to make the IRS less eager to take sides next election.

 

Howard Gleckman,  How Not to Fix the IRS:
Forgive me, but let’s try to apply a dash of common sense to the agency’s problems. After months of looking, the IRS’ most vocal critics have found no evidence that its poor processing of requests by political organizations seeking tax-exempt status was politically-motivated.
It was, however, real. And its cause seems to be a staff that suffered from low skills, poor training, low morale, a shortage of resources, and bad management. It is hard to see how cutting an organization’s budget by one-third will fix any of these problems.

Saying that it wasn’t politically-motivated over and over doesn’t make it so.  As the Treasury Inspector General has reaffirmed, the IRS treated right-side outfits far worse than left-side outfits.  That doesn’t just happen — the thing speaks for itself.   And considering Lois Lerner’s partisan past with the Federal Election Commission, the circumstantial evidence of bias is overwhelming.  The “overworked and underfunded” defense of IRS behavior doesn’t fit these facts.

Still, it would be nice if Congress would use its funding power carefully to punish bad behavior, rather than as a meataxe that will harm innocent taxpayers as much as guilty bureaucrats.

 

Kay Bell, States could get more money by modernizing sales tax laws

Brian Mahany, TICs and REITS – “Accidents Waiting To Happen”  Many REITs are perfectly good investments.  I like them myself.  But illiquid ones can lock up your money while generating big liquid fees to a broker.

Tax Justice Blog, Undocumented Immigrants Pay Taxes, and Will Pay More Under Immigration

TaxGrrrl, Parents Sue School For Art Auction Gone Bad.  Some parents apparently shouldn’t be allowed to run around loose.

 

There’s a new Cavalcade of Risk up at Workerscompensation.com! Don’t miss Hank Stern’s Hunger Games and the MVNHS©, about ingenious health care cost savings innovations across the pond.

Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

Robert D. Flach has your Friday Buzz ready!

Great Grandpa knew this.  Not all flappers are created equal (Rob Smith, IowaBiz.com)

The Critical Question: Is Diet Soda Worse than Regular Soda? (Scott Drenkard, Tax Policy Blog)

 

 

Friday workplace fun.  Let’s Discuss: Big 4 Bullies (Going Concern):

Probably the most irritating thing, according to this study, is that these people get ahead. We’ve all seen it.

That’s about how I remember it.  They rarely get the comeuppance they deserve, but when they do, it’s awesome.

 

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Fall is here Cavalcade!

Monday, September 24th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

It’s officially autumn, the mornings are getting chilly — so warm up at the new Cavalcade of Risk!

Jeff Rosen hosts the latest edition of the blog world’s roundup of insurance and risk management.  Don’ t miss Hank Stern’s contribution about a program offering free term insurance for struggling families.

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State fair cavalcade!

Friday, August 10th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

It’s State Fair week!

Don’t be a big boar.  Head straight to the newest edition of the Cavalcade of Risk — this week at Workers’ Comp Insider —  for the best the blog world has to offer on insurance and risk managment.  Don’t miss Hank Stern on insuring risks in countries with, er, special needs.

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Wildfire Cavalcade

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012 by Joe Kristan

It’s a wildfire-themed Cavalcade of Risk at the Colorado Health Insurance Insider!

Wikipedia image.

Stay cool with the blog world’s roundup of insurance and risk-management.  I find comfort in Hank Stern’s post showing that dark chocolate is a key to good health.

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Tax Roundup, 6/29/2012: Supreme Court Frenzy edition

Friday, June 29th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

 Janet Novack: How Health Insurance Individual Mandate Quacks Like A Tax:

Roberts concludes the mandate functions more like a tax than the “penalty” for not buying insurance the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act labels it as, because in most cases “the amount due will be far less than the price of insurance,’’ and the IRS is “not allowed to use those means most suggestive of a punitive sanction, such as criminal prosecution,’’ to enforce it.

Because the penalty is so low as to be ineffective, it invites actuarial disaster.  Because insurers can’t reject you for a pre-exisiting condition, it will be cheaper to wait until you are sick to get “insurance.”

Peter Reilly: Julian Block On The Tax In The Health Care Act That Everybody Knew Was A Tax. He notes an anomoly in the wage and “unearned income” surtaxes:

Whether by design or inadvertence, Congress created rules that require a person to pay more Medicare surtaxes solely because he or she is married. Congress allows two cohabitating singles to each have up to $200,000 in wages without exceeding the threshold for the 0.9 percent tax. Congress penalizes them if they marry. Wages above $250,000 exposes them to the 0.9 percent tax. Similarly, two cohabitating singles each can have MAGI of as much as $200,000 without exceeding the threshold for the 3.8 percent tax. If they marry, MAGI above $250,000 exposes them to the 3.8 percent tax. Their reward for a walk down the aisle is that they could become liable for both surtaxes.

The question answers itself.   “So here’s my issue. What if our politicians are giving us a health care system that is as screwed up as our tax system? I’m just asking.”  (Christopher Bergin).

Unintended Consequences: Hank Stern explains the Obamacare “50th Employee problem” at Insureblog:

Here’s the problem: if you currently employ 49 people, you’re not going to be hiring that 50th guy, because that would cancel your exemption. Which means your current workforce is either going to have to work harder (to make up for that missing 50th employee), or you’re going to need to scale back even further.

The Eve of Destruction “The Supreme Court once acknowledged that the ‘power to tax is the power to destroy.’ Let the destruction begin!” (David Windish)

Howard Gleckman at TaxVox, The Supreme Court Says the Health Care Mandate is a Constitutional Tax:

But the Court rejected the White House’s main legal argument—that Congress has the authority under the Commerce Clause to require people to get insurance. It will be interesting to see how legal scholars read this in the coming weeks: Is the Court saying that tax policy is the only tool Congress has to enact certain social welfare programs? If so, it would put an already-stressed tax code under even greater pressure.  

I get an Instapundit mention No link, alas… (update: linked now, thanks Instapundit!)

And a floor wax and a dessert topping!  The Individual Insurance Mandate is Constitutional Because it is Both a Penalty and a Tax. Wait…What?  (Anthony Nitti)

Martin Sullivan: The Great Anti-Climax: Using Tax Law to Deliver Economic Incentive is Constitutional

Kay Bell: Tax component saves health care act

Paul Neiffer: ObamaCare Survives The Supreme Court!  “For  now, the most immediate effect facing farmers is the imposition of the Medicare Surtax on earned income and unearned income starting January 1, 2013.”

TaxGrrrl: When Is A Penalty A Tax? Sorting Through The SCOTUS Health Care Decision.

Tax Policy Blog has a Roundup of Reactions to Supreme Court Health Care Ruling

If you want to read about something besides yesterday’s Supreme Court decision:

Hiring the Right Accountants For Your Business (Missouri Tax Guy)

Russ Fox:  eFile an FBAR? Use Internet Explorer, Not Firefox or Chrome.  Remember, it’s due tomorrow.

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Steamy Cavalcade!

Friday, February 10th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

The cold weather may be dragging on, so fire up the boiler and steam on down to the 150th edition of the Cavalcade of Risk, hosted by My Wealth Builder.

This edition of the blog world’s roundup of insurance and risk management includes, among other gems, Hank Stern on the menace, or not, of earbuds. Check it out!

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Sporting life Cavalcade!

Friday, July 29th, 2011 by Joe Kristan

Do you know that the only sport riskier than cheerleading is Cave Diving? This is just one of the valuable insights at the new Cavalcade of Risk!

My Personal Finance Journey hosts this edition of the greatest roundup of insurance and risk-management posts in recorded history. So hang up the cell phone, hoist that canoe, and portage over there now!

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Blam! It’s a new Cavalcade of Risk!

Thursday, June 16th, 2011 by Joe Kristan

There’s a new Cavalcade of Risk up at Political Calculations!
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The fine insurance and risk-management posts assembled include Hank Stern’s coverage of a man being sued for allegedly inflating his net worth to get $50 million in life insurance coverage.

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Winter’s revenge Cavalcade

Thursday, March 24th, 2011 by Joe Kristan

So what if the weather is cold again, and there’s snow in the forecast? Just heat up the Weinermobile and drive on in to the new Cavalcade of Risk!
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The one and only roundup of Insurance and risk management blog posts is at My Personal Finance Journey this week. Hank Stern from InsureBlog is there, as usual, this time with coverage of the new federal long-term care coverage program, and its discontents. No, I didn’t know it existed either.

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Valentine’s Day Cavalcade

Friday, February 11th, 2011 by Joe Kristan

The new Cavalcade of Risk is up at the Disease Management Blog!
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It’s still chilly out, so curl up with your deer one and the premier roundup of insurance and risk-management blog posts. Don’t miss Insureblogger Hank Stern’s discussion of the long-term care component of Obamacare.

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The great fall weather Cavalcade!

Thursday, October 21st, 2010 by Joe Kristan

The beautiful fall days just keep rolling on, so get on board the new Cavalcade of Risk at Worker’s Comp Insider.
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It’s always a good day to visit the blog world’s premier roundup of insurance and risk-management posts. For those of you car jocks out there, don’t miss Hank Stern’s video of a crash involving a1959 Chevy Bel Air and a 2009 Chevy Malibu. Surely the old behemoth will come out better… right?

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Corn-pickin’ Cavalcade

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010 by Joe Kristan

If you can get in from the fields for a break, stop by the new Cavalcade of Risk at Wenchypoos!
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The harvest is bountiful in this edition of the blogosphere’s best insurance and risk management thinking — not least Hank Stern’s analysis of recent hikes in Long-Term Care insurance rates.

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Why wait for the train when you can join the Cavalcade?

Tuesday, April 27th, 2010 by Joe Kristan

There’s a new Cavalcade of Risk up at My Wealth Builder!
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Take the express to the blog world’s premier roundup of insurance and risk-management posts, including Hank Stern’s intriguing post about well-insured woman who drowned fully-clothed in her tub after a night out drinking martinis with her “companion” who also happened to be beneficiary on a life insurance policy.

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