Posts Tagged ‘Hank Stern’

Tax Roundup, 3/16/16: Coupling heads to the Governor. And: Trainwrecks, brackets, and that dreaded DNA!

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

coupling20160213Almost Coupled. Both houses of the Iowa General Assembly passed the bill to couple the Iowa tax law to federal tax law for 2015, with the exception of bonus depreciation (HF 2433). The House of Representatives vote was overwhelming, and the Senate was unanimous.

The debates before the votes featured complaints about how school funding is suffering because businesses get the same Section 179 deduction on their Iowa returns as on their federal returns. Yet not one school-funder mentioned any other ideas about finding additional $97.6 million funding lost to the Fiscal 2016 budget. For example:

Iowa credits fy 2017

So apparently school kids are important, but less so than, say, the Geothermal Heat Pump tax credit. (Related: What Iowa considers more important than Sec. 179.)

The bill also repeals the manufacturing supplies sales tax rule set forth by the Department of Revenue that was set to take effect in July. It replaced it with the manufacturing supplies tax exemption passed by the house in 2014, only to die in the Iowa Senate.

In addition to Section 179 coupling, the bill also allows on Iowa 1040s a number of other provisions enacted by Congress in December, including:

Exclusion for IRA contributions to charity
Exclusion of gain from qualified small business stock
Basis adjustment for S corporation charitable contributions
Built-in gain tax five-year recognition period
$250 above-the-line educator expense deduction
Exclusion of home mortgage debt forgiveness
Qualified tuition deduction
Optional sales tax deduction
Conservation easement deductions
Deduction for food inventory contributions

The Des Moines Register coverage of yesterday’s votes makes it appear that the Governor is on board, though he hasn’t said so in so many words. It quotes spokesman Ben Hammes:

“As the chief executive, it is the governor’s job to look at how this bill fits into the bigger budget picture and how it will impact jobs and Iowa taxpayers and he will review it accordingly. The governor is pleased that the Legislature was able to come together and find resolution on these key issues,” Hammes said.

So he doesn’t exactly say he’ll sign. I think he will, but I will feel better when he does.

Unfortunately, the bill only applies to 2015, so we have to do it all again next year.

 

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Hank Stern, More (bad) trainwreck news (InsureBlog):

As we mentioned at the end of January, Open Enrollment v3.0 was pretty much doomed from the start:

“About 6 million people have signed up for health coverage that will take effect on Jan. 1 in the states that use the [404Care].gov enrollment.”

That was way off the (implausibly) predicted 21 million anticipated to sign up. But it’s also only part of the story…

It’s not affordable, and they don’t care.

 

Mitch Maahs, Tax Brackets: Revisiting the Tax on Gambling Winnings just in Time for the NCAA Tourney (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). “Note however that losses may only be deducted to offset gambling winnings, and are only deductible up to the amount of winnings for the year.”

William Perez, New Rules for Deducting Repairs and Maintenance. “The IRS increased the threshold for deducting repairs and maintenance expenses under the safe harbor election from $500 to $2,500.”

TaxGrrrl, FBAR, FATCA Filings Top 1 Million As IRS Increases Scrutiny On Foreign Accounts. “The penalties for noncompliance may, under the law, result in civil penalties, criminal penalties or both: the list of potential penalties that may apply is distressingly long. It’s all very draconian but it’s also very real.”

 

Jack Townsend, Tax Court Holds FBAR Penalty Collected Is Not in the $2,000,000 Threshold for Whistleblower Award under § 7623(b)

Jason Dinesen, What is a 501(c)(3) and What’s the Big Deal? “First of all, the terms not-for-profit and tax-exempt are not interchangeable.”

A. Levar Taylor, Update On The “Late Return” Dischargeability Litigation: 9th Circuit To Hold Oral Argument in Smith Case (Procedurally Taxing)

Robert Wood, What To Provide When IRS Requests Documents

 

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Caleb Newquist, That Time One of Donald Trump’s Companies Got in Trouble for Reporting Ludicrously Deceptive Non-GAAP Results (Going Concern).

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1042. Timely thoughts of what happens when the power to abuse taxpayers goes to a new abuser-in-chief.

David Brunori, Immigrants Continue to Be Good for Us (Tax Analysts Blog). “In a report, the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy says immigrants who entered the country illegally paid roughly $11.6 billion in state and local taxes in 2013.”

Renu Zaretsky, Budget Battles Continue. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers federal proposed budget and Pennsylvania’s no budget, among other news.

 

If you are perplexed by voter choices this year, this may help explain things. 80% of Americans Support Mandatory Labels on “Food Containing DNA” (Ilya Somin)

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Tax Roundup, 3/2/16: It’s your fault. You trusted us! And: don’t get phished.

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016 by Joe Kristan

coupling20160213Insults always convince the insulted. Those dumb small businesses, thinking Congress and the legislature would do what they have been doing every year. That’s apparently the take of Iowa Senator Robb Hogg, reports the Caffeinated Thoughts blog:

State Senator Robb Hogg (D-Cedar Rapids) was very critical of small business owners and farmers who have contacted their legislators urging their support on coupling with federal tax changes which encourage growth in Iowa’s economy. Even worse, Senator Hogg shifted the blame from the inaction of Senate Democrats to Congress.

“I understand there are a lot of big crocodile tears being shed over this issue,” Hogg said. “Congress is to blame.”

“Those investment decisions have been made and maybe people had this belief that it might or would happen, but that doesn’t justify their claim that they were counting on it.”

Congress has renewed the higher Section 179 limit every year since 2009, and Iowa has coupled with the $500,000 limit since 2010. There was no indication that Iowa would do anything different until the Governor said otherwise in January. Either way, it’s still a big tax increase just as the ag economy is sagging.

I’ll also add that Sen. Hogg misuses the term “crocodile tears.” Per phrases.org.uk:

Meaning

To weep crocodile tears is to put on an insincere show of sorrow.

Origin

The allusion is to the ancient notion that crocodiles weep while devouring their prey. Crocodiles do indeed have lachrymal glands and produce tears to lubricate the eyes as humans do. They don’t cry with emotion though. Whatever experience they have when devouring prey we can be certain it isn’t remorse.

There’s nothing insincere about the sorrow of finding your taxes increased. The term is better reserved for someone who says, gee, too bad we need to take more of your money, but we sure do need to spend it.

Still, the tactic of criticizing your constituents is an interesting approach. It does seems to work on a national level lately.

 

Kay Bell, March arrives not as lion or lamb, but as a fish phish:

In this latest phishing ploy, one of several the IRS has seen surging this tax-filing season, the faux corporate execs are asking for payroll data, including W-2 forms that contain Social Security numbers and other personally identifiable information.

“This is a new twist on an old scheme using the cover of the tax season and W-2 filings to try tricking people into sharing personal data. Now the criminals are focusing their schemes on company payroll departments,” warns IRS Commissioner John Koskinen.

“If your CEO appears to be emailing you for a list of company employees, check it out before you respond,” adds Koskinen. “Everyone has a responsibility to remain diligent about confirming the identity of people requesting personal information about employees.

Just this morning I got an email from someone I never heard of with a heading: “W2 Information EIN: 13-2655998.” Don’t click on this sort of thing. It’s bad news.

 

Kristine Tidgren, A New Farm Year Begins: Pay Taxes and Perfect Landlord’s Lien! (AgDocket)

Hank Stern, Aetna joins the parade (InsureBlog):

Aetna, and its Coventry affiliate, becomes the next major player to cry “no mas” on new business. In email this morning:

We will not pay commissions for sales with coverage effective dates after March 1, 2016, and continuing through December 31, 2016 effective dates.  This applies to on- and off-exchange business.”

If an insurance company doesn’t pay commissions, it’s a safe bet that they aren’t making money on the product.

Robert Wood, To Fight IRS Tax Bills, Go Step By Step

 

William Perez, Tax Advice for Cannabis Entrepreneurs. Interestingly juxtaposed with another post:

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It’s certainly conceivable that someone could find both posts useful.

 

Jason Dinesen, Sometimes I Wish I Could Just Prepare 1040-EZs.

 

 

Scott Drenkard, Celebrating 75 Years of Facts & Figures (Tax Policy Blog):

Today we released the 2016 edition of Facts & Figures, our pocket- and purse-sized booklet on quick tax facts. This publication has a long history—it dates back to 1941, when our think tank (which was just four years old at the time) published a booklet that was both a source of otherwise hard-to-find government data, and also a treasure trove of infographics to illuminate that information.

The Tax Foundation continues to be a valuable source of tax data and analysis, even though some folks don’t like the math.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1028

Renu Zaretsky, What comes after a big night for Clinton and Trump? The TaxVox headline roundup covers the Super Tuesday results and other tax news.

News from the Profession. FLASH: Sales, Accounting Personnel Face Pressure to Meet Revenue Goals (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

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Tax Roundup, 2/1/2016: Caucus day, and other plagues.

Monday, February 1st, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20160131-1Is there such a thing as snow locusts? Today is the last day Iowa will be plagued by presidential candidates and their relentless ads and emails. Tonight, blizzard and winter storm warnings across the state.

Lots of things go into choosing a candidate. We kid ourselves if we think it is all rational. Many voters put as much thought into their political preferences as they do into choosing a favorite sports team. Most voters are much more informed about their sports teams than their votes.

But Tax Update readers are different!  You especially want to know about candidate tax policies. Fortunately, the Tax Foundation has an excellent Comparison of Presidential Tax Plans and Their Economic Effects. I like this chart they provide:

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You’ll notice that only one plan is projected to have positive economic effects while reducing the budget deficit over 10 years. I like that one.

 

Other Caucus-related links:

Tax Policy Center Major candidate tax proposals, a center-left analysis.

TaxProf, Clinton (47%), Sanders (54%) Propose Highest Capital Gain Tax Rates (Now 24%) In History

Tyler Cowen, My favorite things Iowa (Marginal Revolution). “The bottom line: Who would have thought ‘jazz musician’ would be the strongest category here?” Speak for yourself, buddy!

 

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Russ Fox, The Liberty to Commit Tax Fraud:

This story does show two things. First, requiring every tax professional to obtain a license won’t stop tax fraud. The alleged fraud here was started by an individual with a PTIN, someone who assuredly could obtain the former RTRP designation or the current AFSP “seal of approval.” Second, the Department of Justice news release notes, “In the past decade, the Tax Division has obtained injunctions against hundreds of unscrupulous tax preparers.” This is absolutely true, and the DOJ should be commended for their work. It also shows that licensing every tax professional isn’t needed to get rid of unscrupulous ones.

Amen.

William Perez, When Does an 83(b) Election Make Sense? 

Paul Neiffer, Pre-1977 Purchases May Get 100% Step-up or Not! Involving old joint interests in property.

Kay Bell, W-2, 1099 forms delivery deadline is here

Jack Townsend, 60 Minutes Exposé on Money Laundering Into the U.S.

Jason Dinesen, Not All Donations to Charity Are Deductible. Time, for example.

Kristine Tidgren, Des Moines Water Works Lawsuit Gets More Complicated (AgDocket)

Peter Reilly, NorCal Tea Party Patriots V IRS – Grassroots Or Astroturf?

Leslie Book, Migraine Caused by Improper IRS Collection Action During Bankruptcy Stay Triggers Damages for Emotional Distress

Robert Wood, Worst Lottery To Win Is IRS Audit Lottery, So Decrease Your Odds

TaxGrrrl, Understanding Your Tax Forms 2016: 1098-T, Tuition Statement

Tony Nitti, IRS Rules On Whether Trade-In Of Private Jet Qualifies For A Tax-Free Like-Kind Exchange

Happy Blogiversary! to Hank Stern for 10 years of Insureblog.

 

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Matt Gardner, International Speedway Reaps Benefits of Revived “NASCAR Tax Break” (Tax Justice Blog). In which the Tax Justice people sctually make a lot of sense: “In the context of our growing budget deficits, the annual cost of the NASCAR giveaway is a drop in the bucket at less than $20 million, making it a small part of the $680 billion extenders package. But because its benefits are narrowly focused on a few privileged companies, the damaging effects of this tax break go way beyond its fiscal cost.”

Donald Marron, What Should We Do with the Money from Taxing “Bads”? (TaxVox)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 996Day 997, Day 998. Day 997 links to  IRS’s New Ethics Chief Once Ordered Records Be Illegally Destroyed. These are the people who think they need to regulate tax preparers to keep us in line.

 

Scott Drenkard, David Bowie: Tax Planning Hero (Tax Policy Blog). “Taxes really matter, especially for an artist like Bowie who had a lot of options for where to reside and earn income.”

Robert D. Flach, THE TWELVE DAYS OF TAX SEASON

 

Finally, in honor of the Iowa Caucuses I quote the great Arnold Kling, who captures my feelings about these proceedings perfectly:

To me, political campaigns are not sacred events, to be eagerly anticipated and avidly followed. They are brutal assaults on reason. I look forward to election season about as much as a gulf coast resident looks forward to hurricane season.

Only the beginning of a wise and profound post. Read it all.

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Tax Roundup, 1/21/16: Defying Governor, House conformity bill includes $500,000 Section 179 limit.

Thursday, January 21st, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20151118-1Reason to hope, reasons to despair. The Iowa House Ways and Means Chairman introduced a “code conformity” bill yesterday (HSB 535) that includes the federal $500,000 Section 179 limit. This defies the wishes of Governor Branstad, who says the state can’t afford the expanded deduction. He would only allow a $25,000 deduction for asset purchases that would otherwise have to be capitalized and depreciated.

The bill, as expected, does not adopt bonus depreciation for Iowa.

The Section 179 conformity proposal is is good news. It appears that Ways and Means Republicans sense that their business and farm constituents won’t appreciate a big tax increase, especially in a year that looks like it will be a down year around the state. Now attention will turn to the Senate, where Democratic Majority Leader Gronstal controls what legislation reaches the floor. If he supports the legislation, it is likely to pass. The Governor would probably be able to kill it with a veto, but would he?

That brings up my first reason to despair. Unless the Governor backs down or some compromise is reached, the conformity bill is likely to be delayed. Affected taxpayers will have to wait to file their 2015 Iowa returns until they know what the tax law is; if they guess wrong, they will incur the expense of amending their returns. It compresses the filing season into an ever-narrower window and delays refunds.

The biggest issue is likely to be the budget impact. While I haven’t seen a current figure, last year’s Section 179 conformity bill was estimated to reduce state revenues by $88.5 million.

capitol burning 10904I certainly have a list of possible pay-fors, starting with the newest proposed credit, a $10 million  “renewable biochemical tax credit” (SSB 3001). It is refundable, meaning it isn’t just a tax reduction, but an actual cash subsidy to taxpayers whose credit exceeds their Iowa tax. That easily could happen, as it is based on pounds of qualifying stuff produced. It will only go to taxpayers who “enter into an agreement” with the economic development administration. In other words, for insiders who know where to pull strings.

And here is another reason to despair. It appears this new boondoggle is going to slide right on through. From the Des Moines Register (my emphasis):

More than a dozen lobbyists representing businesses, farm organizations, economic development groups and other expressed support, and there was no opposition. Gov. Terry Branstad has listed renewable chemical manufacturing tax credits as a key item in his 2016 legislative agenda.

Under the bill, the maximum amount of state tax credits available annually to any one business for the production of renewable chemicals would be either $1 million or $500,000, depending how long the company has operated in Iowa.

Even Mark Chelgren (R-Ottumwa), who has in the past voted against corporate welfare tax credits, is on board with this one.

It will be very difficult to get the Governor to go along with the higher Section 179 limits without spending or tax credit cuts to offset the revenue loss. The Governor seems dead set against cutting cronyist tax credits. If the legislature agrees with him, Section 179 has a very difficult fight this session. Failure to adopt the federal Section 179 limit would represent a triumph of a handful of insiders over the businesses and farms in every county that would have their taxes increased to pay for subsidies.

 

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Iowa increases security to prevent tax fraud (thegazette.com):

The Iowa Department of Revenue has upped its security game after seeing more than 10,000 fraudulent tax returns last year.

This tax season, the agency will use technology to better track fraudsters, validate bank accounts before making direct deposits and share information with the IRS, other states, software providers and banks.

The story says Iowa stopped $11.6 million in fake refund claims last year on 10,600 fraudulent returns.

 

Hank Stern, O’Care in Real Life (InsureBlog):

So, one of my small group clients just lost the last person on his group plan. It had gotten so expensive that no one could really afford to stay on it. Shopping around didn’t help: everything we looked at was at least as expensive for comparable benefits. And the plan was pretty much bare-bones, not a lot of fat to trim.

Tom has been a client – and friend – for almost 30 years. A small business owner, he was proud to be able to offer his employees coverage. Now that’s gone.

He said “If you like your plan, you can keep your plan.” He didn’t say you could afford it.

Kristine Tidgren, Farm Lease Questions Often Arise This Time of Year (Ag Docket)

Robert D. Flach, A VERY IMPORTANT REMINDER. “Don’t listen to a broker, a banker, an insurance salesman, or your Uncle Charlie!   You wouldn’t ask your butcher for a medical opinion, so why would you accept tax advice from your MD?”

Keith Fogg, Public Policy Cases Accepted by the Taxpayer Advocate Service (Procedurally Taxing). “If you have an issue that raises policy issues for a group of taxpayers, you can bring this to the attention of the NTA in hopes that it will make the policy list and open the doors to TAS assistance.”

Paul Neiffer, Top 10 Reasons You Might Need Accrual Accounting. “Although this list is designed to be humorous, the reality is that all farmers should consider using accrual accounting to manage their farm operation.”

Kay Bell, Smooth tax season start? Not for some TaxAct users. “Just a few days before the filing season and Free File opened for business, the tax software manufacturer sent a letter to about 450 customers, notifying them of a data breach.”

Jack Townsend, Should Proof of No Tax Evaded Be Admissible as Defense in Crime Not Requiring Tax Evaded as an Element

 

Tony Nitti, An Ode To Tax Season: How To Bid Farewell To Your Family.

Tax season is here. Tax season is the worst. But don’t just abandon your family for the next three months with no explanation; make them aware of the series of mistakes that were set into motion long ago that led you to this self-imposed hell. And tell them with rhymes! 

That may be why my grown kid is a musician, and the high schooler wants to be one.

 

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David Brunori, Good Government Developments in the Tax World (Tax Analysts Blog). No Iowa items make the list.

David Henderson, The Economics of the Cadillac Health Care Tax, Part IPart II. “But now that I have done a more careful analysis with some plausible numbers, I am seriously undecided.”

Kyle Pomerleau, Senator Hatch To Introduce Corporate Integration Plan (Tax Policy Blog). “Not only does the double tax on equity investment increase the cost of capital, it creates economic distortions. The most obvious one is the distortion towards debt-financed investments.”

Renu Zaretsky, Market Woes and the Price of Breaks. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers stupid things from proposed financial transaction taxes to the ongoing Kansas budget and tax policy disaster.

 

Robert Wood, IRS Wipes Another Hard Drive Defying Court Order…But You Must Keep Tax Records. Darn right, peasant!

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 987.

 

Career Corner. Stop Doing Other People’s Work Because It Saves Time (Leona May, Going Concern). A classic symptom of Senior Accountant’s Disease.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/22/15: If you want a 2015 qualified plan, time to fly! And lots more.

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
The view from Tax Update world headquaters yesterday.

The view from Tax Update world headquaters yesterday.

10 days to get a qualified plan in place. Some of the best deductions for sole proprietors and one-owner corporations are found in the tax law’s “qualified plan” rules. A payment to a qualified pension or profit-sharing plan is deductible now, grows tax free, and is only taxable on retirement. For one-employee companies, it’s a deduction for taking money from one pocket and putting it in another.

One of the best of these opportunities is the “Solo 401(k),” which allows a deduction of up to $53,000 for contributions to a solo owner-employee’s retirement plan. But there’s one little catch: the plan has to be in place by December 31 of this year to allow a 2015 deduction.

If that sort of deduction sounds attractive, you should consult a qualified plan professional. Some brokerage houses can steer you the right way, as can the Vanguard mutual fund company.

Remember, though, that once money is in a qualified plan, expect it to stay there. Early withdrawals face a 10% penalty, as well as income tax liability. 401(k) plans generally can’t be investors in or lenders to the plan owner’s business. There are annual compliance costs that inevitably reduce the tax benefits. Still, for an annual deduction that size, some inconvenience can be tolerated.

This is the second installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series. Collect them all!

 

Kay Bell, Upcoming filing season will start on time: Jan. 19, 2016. Almost none of my clients are ready by then. While I’m glad that the season isn’t delayed by a failure to pass an extender bill, I think identity theft requires a later start to issuing tax refunds. They shouldn’t be processed until W-2 and 1099 information is in the IRS system – preferably with special W-2 codes like those the IRS is experimenting with this season to catch fraudulent claims. 

Of course, that means the government will sit on overpayments longer. That should be addressed by changing the “I got a big refund!” culture. That could be done by lowering to 75% the amount of taxes that have to be paid in by April 15 to avoid a penalty and by changing the withholding tables to make refunds less likely.

 

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Robert D. Flach comes through with a “meaty” Christmas Week Buzz, with lots of Extender bill discussion and a hint of perhaps the most unusual Christmas Eve tradition ever.

Tony Nitti, Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2015: #4 – Who Can Qualify As A Real Estate Pro?

Russ Fox, Are Tips (Gratuities) at the Poker Table Deductible? “As long as the tip is reasonable, it’s clear that a professional poker player can deduct the tip as a business expense.” You’ll have to read the post to see whether it works for amateurs.

William Perez, All About the Earned Income Tax Credit. “The easiest way to find out if you qualify for the earned income credit is to use an application found on the IRS Web site called the EITC Assistant.”

Andrew Mitchel offers a True / False Quiz on FAST Act Passport Revocation Provisions

Hank Stern, Major O’Care Disappointment (Insureblog). “Now that the (disastrous) first phase of the 2016 Open Enrollment season is behind us, lets’ take a look at what a huge disappointment it was.”

Carlton Smith, Tilden v. Comm’r: Postal Service Tracking Data Determines Timeliness of Tax Court Petition (Procedurally Taxing)

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2015: PACT For Animals

 

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Scott Greenberg, Fact-checking Hillary Clinton on Millionaires’ Taxes (Tax Policy Blog). “There are very few millionaires in the U.S. that pay “10 percent to nothing” in taxes.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 957. Today’s link goes to a Washington Post story that says “There is no love lost between Republicans in Congress and the Internal Revenue Service, whether it’s their dislike for the tax code, the current tax commissioner or their fury at the agency’s treatment a few years ago of conservative groups.” If you want to see increases in the IRS budget, you want Commissioner Koskinen to resign.

Howard Gleckman presents The TaxVox Lump of Coal Awards for the Ten Worst Tax Ideas of 2015. While I might quibble with one or two of the choices, it’s a strong list. For example:

8. Tax credits for what ails you. Hillary Clinton has taken a page out of Bill Clinton’s fiscal playbook: Identify a kitchen table problem and propose a modest tax subsidy to relieve the pain. She has tax credits for families burdened by the high costs of education, caring for aging parents, and high medical costs. And she’s proposed another credit to encourage employers to give workers a stake in their companies. My TPC colleague Gene Steuerle has a name for this: tax deform.

It’s more than a federal problem, for sure.

 

Matt Gardner, What Apple’s Tim Cook Gets Wrong About Its Tax Avoidance (Tax Justice Blog). Mr. Cook has the temerity to think that he has a duty to shareholders, instead of to grasping politicians.

 

Career Corner (or, News from the Profession). Former EY Employee Who Liked Secretly Filming People in the Bathroom Given Four Years to Think About His Choices (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/9/15: Ways and Means Chair introduces a Plan B as permanent extender talks continue.

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20151209-1Slow train to Extenderville. The House Ways and Means Chairman has introduced a two-year extender bill (H.R. 34) as Plan B as negotiations for permanent enactment of some temporary tax provisions continue. A summary of the bill is here. The bill would retroactively revive dozens of the Lazarus provisions that expired at the end of 2014. These include:

-The $500,000 limit for Section 179 deductions for otherwise capitalized capital expenditures. The limit will otherwise be $25,000.

-The research credit.

-Bonus depreciation

-The ability to roll up to $100,000 from an IRA directly to charity without it going through the 1040 first.

-The five-year “recognition period” for S corporation built-in gains.

The bill also includes substantial permanent restrictions on the spin-offs of corporate real estate into Real Estate Investment Trusts, along with some minor reform of the special “FIRPTA” withholding tax rules on foreign real estate.

The push for a longer-term extensions isn’t dead yet, though. The Hill reports that Hopes rise for major tax package:

Sen. Ron Wyden (Ore.), the senior Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee, painted an optimistic picture during a private meeting Tuesday of Senate Democrats.

“I think it went through a trough this weekend, and then, maybe, early yesterday afternoon a bit of a breakthrough,” said Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.). 

The core of a bigger deal would indefinitely extend the research and development tax credit and the Section 179 deduction for small-business expensing, two Republican priorities that have support from pro-business Democrats.

It would also make open-ended expansions of the child tax credit, the earned income tax credit and the American opportunity tax credit, central pieces of President Obama’s 2009 stimulus package.

The President has not committed to signing a either a permanent bill or a  temporary expiring provisions bill, so there’s no guarantee anything will happen. While they have always eventually passed an extender bill during this administration, failure remains an option.

Related: What are Real Estate Provisions Doing in the Latest Tax Extenders Bill? (Scott Greenberg, Tax Policy Blog). “All in all, there’s not much of a justification for the existence of FIRPTA in the first place.”

 

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Robert D. Flach, FOR MY FELLOW TAX PROFESSIONALS – A SPECIAL REQUEST. Robert would like to see a unified advocacy organization for tax pros.

TaxGrrrl, Cloudy Security: What Your Advisor Doesn’t Know About Cloud Computing Could Hurt You. Using a cloud service provider doesn’t waive your obligations to protect client data.

Kay Bell, California has $28 million in unclaimed state tax refunds

Jason Dinesen, Glossary: Draws. “In tax terminology, the term “draw” refers to money taken out of a sole proprietorship by the proprietor, or out of a partnership by a partner.”

Keith Fogg, Requesting an Offset Bypass Refund and Tracing Offsets to Non-IRS Sources (Procedurally Taxing). “Under the right circumstances the IRS will apply administrative procedures to override the general rule required by IRS 6402 to offset the refund of a taxpayer to satisfy an outstanding liability.”

 

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Hank Stern, UHC Doubles Down on Comp (Insureblog). United Healthcare is losing money on its ACA exchange policies, so it no longer is paying brokers to sell them. I’ve never heard of such a thing, and it is compelling evidence that the economics of Obamacare are unsustainable.

Dave Nelson, The human element of information security (IowaBiz). “Social engineering is nothing more than a hacker attacking a human rather than a computer.  They use their knowledge of human behavior to con a user into giving them information over the phone, clicking links in emails or giving them physical access to systems or data.”

Jack Townsend, One More Bank Obtains NPA under DOJ Swiss Bank Program

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 944. A fellow law professor shows a thin skin.

Howard Gleckman, Bush’s Tax Plan Would Add $6.8 Trillion to the National Debt, Benefit High-Income Households (TaxVox).

 

Career Corner, Accounting Firms Should Get Rid of Managers (Going Concern). If your firm has some to spare, send them my way.

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/26/15: No surprise, no Tea Party charges. And: the proposed Iowa graduate tax break.

Monday, October 26th, 2015 by Joe Kristan
Toby Miles, IRS.

Toby Miles, IRS.

You break news on Friday when you want to bury it. And that’s what the Department of Justice did when it told Congress that it would not prosecute Lois Lerner, or anybody else in IRS, as a result of the Tea Party Scandal.

Not that anybody would expect otherwise. The Justice Department continues to act as the Administration’s scandal goalie. The fix was in once the President changed his tune from “this is terrible” to “not even a smidgen of corruption.”

Throughout the investigation, not a single IRS employee reported any allegation, concern, or suspicion that the handling of tax-exempt applications — or any other IRS function — was motivated by political bias, discriminatory intent, or corruption. Among these witnesses were several IRS employees who were critical of Ms. Lerner’s and other officials’ leadership, as well as others who volunteered to us that they are politically conservative. Moreover, both TIGTA and the IRS’s Whistleblower Office confirmed that neither has received internal complaints from IRS employees alleging that officials’ handling of tax-exempt applications was motivated by political or other discriminatory bias.

The Investors Business Daily gets this right:

This is absurd. Lerner was caught red-handed targeting Tea Party and other conservative groups, wrote partisan emails to prove it, then engaged in a massive cover-up effort — with a suspiciously crashed server, an oddly missing BlackBerry and plenty of excuses.

She evaded even more accountability by shielding herself with the Fifth Amendment in Congress.

It was only Tea Party groups that had to wait years for approval. Considering the destroyed emails, “lost” backups, and Ms. Lerner’s peculiar interest in communication methods that could not be traced, there’s too much smoke and ash to believe there was no fire.

TaxProf has more: The IRS Scandal, Day 898Day 899Day 900. The fix is put in, and we’re told that means that there is no scandal.

Also:

Robert Wood, Obama Administration Learned From Lois, Dodging IRS Scandal. “Deny, stonewall, deny.”

TaxGrrrl, DOJ Says No Criminal Charges For Lerner, Others In IRS Scandal, Closes Investigation

 

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Jana Luttenegger Weiler, IRS Releases Inflation Adjustments for 2016 (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).

Kay Bell, Securing taxpayer data is the IRS’ biggest challenge

Russ Fox, Over 1,100 Returns Filed from Two Addresses Lead to Two Heading to ClubFed

Robert D. Flach, WHO MUST FILE A 2016, or 2015, TAX RETURN? “FYI, based on the new inflation adjustments recently announced by the Internal Revenue Service, you do not have to file a 2016 Form 1040, or 1040A, unless your “gross income” is at least…” Visit Robert to find the numbers.

 

Hank Stern, Easy come, easy go:

“[T]he GAO report found that … at least $1.6 billion [is] unaccounted for.”

That’s out of over $5 billion in “loans” sent to states, most of which went for state-based Exchanges (which, per SCOTUS, don’t actually exist).

That must be the “affordable” part of the Affordable Care Act.”

 

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Joseph Thorndike, Mexico Is Having Second Thoughts About the Soda Tax – And So Should Everyone Else (Tax Analysts Blog). “If a big tax dissuades people from drinking Mountain Dew, maybe they will lose weight. But maybe they will continue to scarf down their Twinkies with a cupful of untaxed water – and keep packing on the pounds.”

Scott Greenberg, Reviewing Paul Ryan’s Short Term as Chairman of Ways and Means (Tax Policy Blog). “In the last 10 months, the Ways and Means Committee has brought 52 bills to the House floor, tied for most with the Energy and Commerce Committee. Out of these bills, 15 were passed into law, the most out of any committee.”

Howard Gleckman, Little Difference Between the Cadillac Tax and a Cap on the Tax Exclusion for Employer Health Plans (TaxVox).

 

Caleb Newquist, Accountant Won’t Be Taking a Walk in the Woods Anytime Soon. “James Hammes, who spent 6 years on the lam walking the Appalachian Trail, pleaded guilty earlier today to wire fraud.”

 

David Brunori discusses ($link) a tax break proposed by Iowa graduate students for… themselves.

The idea is that if you graduate from any college or university in Iowa and stay in the state, you would get a 50 percent tax break for five years. If you move to a rural part of the state, you get a 75 percent tax reduction. As an Easterner, I learned everything I know about Iowa from Joe Kristan’s blog. But I could have sworn most of the state is rural.

In any event, kids, this is a terrible tax policy idea. It will solve no brain-drain problem — although employers may pay less since these graduates won’t be paying taxes. Here is just one problem: If you’re not paying taxes, someone else is. That someone else is probably a poor guy or gal who didn’t graduate from college and is making a lot less than you. I thought college kids would be more empathetic than that.

While most of the state is rural, but most of the jobs for college graduates aren’t.

David gets the policy exactly right. It’s tough to justify a special deal for a young prosperous couple with accounting or law degrees while the people building their suburban house and watching their kids pay full fare.

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/22/15: Iowa to credit municipal taxes in other states, allow out-of-state credit against school surtaxes. Plus: 2016 numbers!

Thursday, October 22nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150925-2City taxes eligible for credit; school district surtaxes must be counted. Like other states, Iowa gives its residents a credit for taxes paid in other states. The credit is supposed to be the lesser of the tax imposed by the other state on the income taxed by that state or the Iowa tax on the same income.

Iowa has excluded the surtaxes applied by many Iowa school districts from the total Iowa tax against which the taxes paid in the other states are compared. Iowa has also excluded out-of-state municipal income taxes, like the Kansas City Earnings Tax, from the list of taxes eligible for the credit.

The Department of Revenue has announced that the Wynne decision earlier this year requires the tax credit to be applied taking the surtax into account:

The Iowa Department of Revenue’s (“the Department”) previous practice was to calculate the surtax prior to applying the out-of-state tax credit.  This produced a similar result to Maryland’s; that is, Iowa’s out-of-state tax credit was only being applied to state income tax liability, not local tax (surtax) liability.  Because this practice is inconsistent with the Supreme Court ruling, the Department must change its practice.  The result is that the out-of-state tax credit calculated on form IA 130 must be applied prior to other nonrefundable Iowa tax credits and before calculation of any school district surtax or EMS surtax. 

The Department also is expanding the credit to apply to municipal income taxes (my emphasis):

Any Iowa resident who has paid taxes on income earned in any other state, a local jurisdiction of any other state, or the District of Columbia may be eligible for a refund. 

This will apply to many S corporation and partnership owners whose businesses are involved in other states. I suspect the Kansas City earnings tax may be one of the more commonly municipal taxes paid by Iowans, but such taxes are also commonly seen in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Kentucky. Some localities collect these taxes through “composite” returns filed by the S corporations or partnerships on behalf of their owners, so partners and shareholders should review their K-1 information to see whether they contain municipal taxes that can generate Iowa refunds.

Iowans will have to file amended returns under the normal IA 1040X refund claim process:

The 2015 IA 1040 and IA 130 will reflect these changes; however, prior year Iowa forms will not.  For taxpayers filing 2013 or 2014 returns for the first time or amending those returns using the IA 1040, rather than the IA 1040X, the out-of-state tax credit calculated on form IA 130 should be entered after line 49 on the IA 1040, rather than on line 57 as shown on the form for those prior years. For tax years 2007 through 2012, the out-of-state tax credit calculated on form IA 130 should be entered after line 52 on the IA 1040, rather than on line 62.

The period to claim 2011 refund may still be open until October 31 for Iowans who filed their 2011 returns at the extended return deadline. Otherwise refunds may be avaialable for 2012 and later filings.

Related:

Joseph Henchman, Iowa to Refund Local Income Taxes After Wynne Decision (Tax Policy Blog)

Des Moines Register, Court ruling gives 32,000 Iowa households tax refunds

Prior Coverage: Is yesterday’s U.S. Supreme Court decision an Iowa refund opportunity?

 

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Kay Bell, IRS issues 2016 tax inflation adjustments

Me, 2016 401(k) max remains $18,000; most other qualified plan limits unchanged and FICA Max remains unchanged for 2016 at $118,500.

 

William Perez discusses Various Types of Individual Retirement Accounts.

Hank Stern, Two more CO-OPS down the tubes (Insureblog). The Colorado and Oregon co-ops follow Iowa’s Co-Oportunity into co-oblivion.

Alan Cole, The CBO Thinks Repealing Obamacare Mandates Would Lower the Deficit. Here’s Why. (Tax Policy Blog):

The numbers tell the same story that the paragraph above tells: some people respond to the penalties by paying them, but others respond to the penalties by purchasing (often-subsidized) insurance. The subsidies paid to the latter group actually outweigh the revenue the government earns from the penalties.

What a disaster.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 896

 

Aidan Russell Davis, New ITEP Brief: A Primer on State Rainy Day Funds (Tax Justice Blog). “Rather than waiting for another crisis to occur, ITEP’s new policy brief explains why states should make structural improvements to their rainy day funds right now.”

 

Because they’re not hiring? Six Percent of People Looking for Talent Not Sure What All the Complaining Is About (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

The Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is 29 years old today. 

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My, how you’ve grown.

 

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Tax Roundup, 9/21/15: If you step away from the Iowa business, Iowa rules say sell within five years.

Monday, September 21st, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150811-1When you get out of the business, Iowa wants you to really get out.  Iowa has a tough tax environment for business, consistently ranking in the bottom 20% in the Tax Foundation’s Business Tax Climate Index. But there’s a pot of gold at the end of the road for entrepreneurs tough enough to stick it out for at least ten years.

The Iowa Capital Gain Deduction excludes from Iowa tax the capital gains on the sale of the assets of a business, or on real estate used in a business, if the business was held for at least ten years and the taxpayer “materially participated” in the business for ten years at the time of sale. And that’s the catch.

This rule tripped up a Johnson County, Iowa couple this month in the Iowa Court of Appeals. The couple ran a rooming house in Iowa city and ran it full-time from 1981 to 1994 — safely longer than ten years. In 1994 they contracted out the daily operation of the business. The couple continued to pay bills, approve major expenditures and renovations, and perform some maintenance activities. They sold out in 2005.

The “material participation” rules are the same as the federal “passive loss” rules under Section 469. Most of these rules are based on time spent in the business during the year. For example, if you spend 500 hours working in a non-rental business during a year, that means you materially participate.

Several material participation rules apply when a taxpayer retires from the business. One applies only to farmers: if you retire at the time you start collecting social security, and you have materially participated otherwise in at least five of the prior eight years, you are considered to materially participate for the rest of your life. Once you participate in a “personal service” business for three years, your material participation is set for life.

For all other businesses, you are considered to materially participate if you have met one of the hour-based requirements in five of the prior ten years. As a practical matter, that means a retiring entrepreneur who continues to own the business is still materially participating for five years after stepping down.

That’s where the taxpayers here failed the material participation tests. While they easily met the requirement to hold the property for ten years, they were not material participants at the time of the sale. The court held that they failed to prove material participation after 1994. That would mean they would have until 1999 to sell and still be material participants. After that, they failed the five-of-the-last-ten-years test.

The Moral: Taxpayers who step back from an Iowa business shouldn’t wait too long to sell if they want to avoid Iowa capital gains tax. If you meet the ten-year holding period and material participation requirement, you have five years to find a buyer.

Cite: Lance, Iowa Court of Appeals No. 14-1144 (9/10/2015).

Roger McEowen has an excellent discussion of this case for Tax Place subscribers. If you practice Iowa tax regularly, the $150 annual subscription is a great bargain.

Related:

Iowa Capital Gain Deduction: an illustration

MATERIAL PARTICIPATION BASICS

 

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Hank Stern of Insureblog discusses some Dubious 105 Tricks:

Here’s the concept in a nutshell (emphasis on “nut”):

My employer claims that signing up for this “105 Classic Plan” will allow me to make %30+ of my income tax free. The jist [sic] of it is that they will take $560 per (bi-weekly) pay period out of my check, somehow “make it tax free” and refund most of it back through some vague “loan” that I apparently don’t have to pay back.

This will reduce my income taxes pretty massively… but not only that, the company making my money untaxable claims it will pay 75% of all my out of pocket medical expenses up to $12,000.

It’s sort of an underpants gnome tax plan:

  1. Take money out.
  2. ?
  3. Tax free!

It of course doesn’t work. There is no Tax Fairy.

 

Russ Fox, A 0% Chance of Success Didn’t Deter Him! “Well, one fact that I’ve mentioned in the past is that IRS Criminal Investigations looks at all allegations of employment tax fraud. The reason is obvious: The IRS doesn’t like the idea of people stealing from them.”

Kay Bell, How do fantasy sports differ from gambling? As far as I can tell, gambling takes less time.

Robert D. Flach, REQUIRED NEW YORK STATE CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR TAX PREPARERS. “To be perfectly honest all of the four-hours of sessions were a total waste of my time.” Senators Hatch and Wyden want to spread the time-waste nationwide.

Peter Reilly, Presidential Race – Let’s Talk Religion Politics And The IRS.

Robert Wood, IRS Delays FATCA To Help Banks, But Offshore Account Disclosures Continue

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 863864865

 

TaxGrrrl, Coca-Cola Says IRS Wants $3.3 Billion In Additional Tax Following Audit

Caleb Newquist, Coca-Cola Can’t Beat the Feeling That Its Taxes Are Just Fine (Going Concern). “Coca-Cola Co. is learning that the IRS side of life includes a challenge to its transfer pricing method.”

 

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Tax Roundup, 6/26/15: Supreme Court saves ACA subsidies — and taxes.

Friday, June 26th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

 

supreme courtThe Supreme Court upholds new punitive taxes on thousands of Iowa employers and uninsured individuals. That’s the flip side of the decision yesterday ruling that tax credits remain available for health insurance purchased on the federal exchanges, despite the language of the Obamacare statute — a ruling characterized by the Des Moines Register as “Obamacare ruling protects 40,000 Iowans’ subsidies.

Here’s what it means to those footing the bill:

– The employer mandates will take effect in all states as scheduled. The “Employer Shared Responsibility provisions” require employers to purchase “adequate” health coverage for employees.  It applied in 2014 to employers with over 100 “full-time equivalent” employees in 2013.  In 2015, it applies to employers who had over 50 full-time equivalent employees in 2014. It applies to government and non-profit employers, as well as to businesses.

Employers who fail to offer coverage to 95% of their FTEs and dependents are subject to a $2,000 penalty, pro-rated for months where coverage is lacking, for non-covered FTEs, with a 30-employee exemption. “Full-time Equivalent” means 30 hours per week.

The penalties kick in only if at least one employee claims the coverage tax credit. Yesterday’s decision ensures the mandate applies in all states — rather than just the 14 with state-run exchanges — because the triggering credits will remain available nationwide.

The individual mandate tax applies fully in all states. The “Individual Shared Responsibility Provision” penalizes individuals who aren’t covered at work and who fail to purchase “adequate” and “affordable” coverage. The penalty for 2015 is the greater of $325 ($162.50 for those under 18) or 2% of “household” income. It is prorated if coverage is obtained for some months and not others.

Yesterday’s decision broadens the reach of the tax because the penalty only applies if available coverage is “affordable.” The tax credits are used in computing “affordability,” so the availability of the credits nationwide broadens the tax to many more taxpayers.

20121120-2The Section 36B tax credit remains available nationwide. This is the refundable credit that was the subject of yesterday’s decision. It is estimated when coverage is obtained and applied against coverage costs for the year. It is “trued up” when the taxpayer files their 1040 for the coverage year — a process that can sometimes mean more credit, but that sometimes triggers a big balance due.  Because the credit phases out in steps, one extra dollar of income can trigger thousands of dollars of additional taxes:

Consider a middle-aged married couple earning $62,040, 400 percent of the FPL for a two-person household ($15,510.) If the second cheapest Silver plan in their area costs $1,200 per month, they would receive a subsidy of $8,506 in order to cap that plan’s price at 9.5 percent of their income. However, if they earned $62,041—only a dollar more—the entire subsidy would evaporate. 

Because the $8,506 would have been applied to health premiums, the household would have to pay it back on April 15.

What do I think of the decision? In March I wrote:

In a less politically-sensitive context, one could expect a 9-0 or 8-1 decision against the IRS. That’s what happened in Gitlitz, where the court ruled that the IRS couldn’t regulate away a perceived misdrafting of the tax code’s S corporation basis rules that allowed a windfall to taxpayers whose S corporations had debt forgiveness income. “Because the Code’s plain text permits the taxpayers here to receive these benefits, we need not address this policy concern.” But because a decision against IRS here would invalidate key parts of Obamacare in most of the country, politics is a big part of the process.

That means I think the Scalia dissent gets it right, but we don’t get to file tax returns based on the dissent. It should give pause to those who write legislation, though — there’s no telling how the Supremes will read their work if they don’t like what it does.

Other coverage:

William Perez, What You Need to Know about the Premium Assistance Tax Credit

TaxGrrrl, Supreme Court Upholds King, Says Obamacare Tax Credits Apply To All States

Kay Bell, Let the Affordable Care Act repeal efforts begin (again)

Hank Stern, SCOTUScare Fallout. “Obamacare Ruling May Have Just Killed State-Based Exchanges

Andy Grewal, Grewal: King v. Burwell — The IRS Isn’t An Expert? (TaxProf Blog)

Tyler Cowen, King vs. Burwell, and other stuff. “So on net I take this to be good news, although arguably it is bad news that it is good news.”

Megan McArdle, Subsidies and All, Obamacare Stays

Alan Cole, James Kennedy, King v. Burwell: Supreme Court Upholds Subsidies to Federal Exchanges (Tax Policy Blog)

Roger McEowen,  The U.S. Supreme Court and Statutory Construction – Words Don’t Mean What They Say (AgDocket)

 

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Stuff other than the Supreme Court decision:

Jason Dinesen, Choosing a Business Entity: Sole Proprietor

Joseph Thorndike, Rand Paul’s Tax Plan May Be Radical, But It’s Not Impossible (Tax Analysts Blog) “But radical doesn’t mean impossible. Since proportionality lies at the heart of Paul’s plan, history suggests it might have a shot.”

Ethan Greene, Net Investment Income Tax Handicaps Those Meant to Benefit (Tax Policy Blog). “The irony of the NIIT is it taxes the very demographic it was intended to aid; that is, retirees relying on their savings and investment, and those with disabilities, counting on trust income or estate inheritance to maintain their quality of life.”

Donald Marron, Everything You Should Know about Taxing Carbon. (TaxVox)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 778

Caleb Newquist, The Accounting Profession’s Murky Future (Going Concern)

 

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