Posts Tagged ‘Howard Gleckman’

Tax Roundup, 3/21/14: Reforming S corporations to a frazzle. And: cleaning up at the laundromat!

Friday, March 21st, 2014 by Joe Kristan

S-SidewalkThe legislative process has been likened to sausage making.  Sausage doesn’t get more appetizing if you keep looking at it closely over a period of weeks, and neither does the Camp “tax reform” plan.  Andrew Lundeen and Kyle Pomerleau at the Tax Policy Blog today highlight some gristly features of the grand effort by the head GOP taxwriter:

The proposal leaves in place high tax rates for many S corporations, subjects them to additional payroll taxes, creates new distortions between types of industries, and produces two tax rate bubbles.

They note these major S corporation changes:

Creates Different Tax Treatment for Manufacturing and Non-Manufacturing Industries

Camp’s tax reform package introduces complication with a new 10 percent surtax for non-manufacturing income. To make things more complicated, the additional 10 percent surtax would be calculated on a different income scale: modified adjusted gross income or MAGI. This essentially creates two side by side tax codes, a la the AMT, and individuals and businesses would have to calculate their AGI for one and their MAGI for the other.

As I noted, it doesn’t simplify the code by getting rid of the economically foolish Section 199 production deduction; it just moves it to a different section.

20140321-1

The Difference between Active and Passive Shareholders

The difference between active and passive shareholders is important for determining the marginal tax rates for S corporations under Chairman Camp’s plan.

That’s true now, but you’d expect a “reform” plan to get rid of this sort of gratuitous and difficult-to-enforce difference.

20140321-2

Changes to Self-Employment Taxes: the 70/30 Split Rule for SECA Taxes

Under current law, the IRS requires business owners to pay themselves a reasonable wage in order to prevent people from gaming this income distinction in order to avoid the extra 15.3 percent payroll tax hit.

Camp’s plan would replace the current reasonable wage standard with a 70/30 split, changing the rules for active shareholders. The rule would require that active shareholders of S corporations report 70 percent of their total earning as wage income.

I think it’s just one step on the way to a 100/0 split.

Tax Rate Bubble

Another element of Camp’s tax plan is the creation marginal tax rate bubbles. This occurs when a marginal tax rate, for example, goes from 10 percent to 15 percent and back down to 10 percent. We have a post that discusses the marginal tax rates under Camp’s plan, which you can find here.

When a “reform” plan comes with so many phase-outs and distortions, it’s not actually reforming anything.  I think the Camp plan will come to be seen as a false move and a lost opportunity.

 

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): K Is For Keogh Plans   

20140321-3TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 316

William Perez, Average Sales Tax Rates by State: 2014, highlighting a Tax Policy Blog analysis.

Annette Nellen, Revenues versus tax collections.  “A recent blog post on LinkedIn’s Sales and Use Tax Legislative Updates included a comment from B.J. Pritchett suggesting that what governments collect in taxes should not be called “revenues” because it is not from selling goods and services.”

Tax Justice BlogState News Quick Hits: Don’t Expect Much from Congress.  Always a good idea.

Kay Bell, Senate Finance plans tax extenders vote for week of March 31.  She links to an article quoting a Senate Finance spokeswoman as saying “No decisions have been made on the content of the measure or the timing for a committee session and vote.”

Howard Gleckman, Fiscal Reality Check: Will Congress Pay for the Tax Extenders and the Doc Fix?  Extenders themselves are a scam.  Congress passes them over and over a year at a time so they can pretend that they cost less than they do — funky accounting that would get a public company CFO jail time, but standard procedure in Congress.

 

Jack Townsend, U.S. Attorney Enabler Sentenced for Assisting Offshore Evasion 

 

A new Cavalcade of Risk is up at Insurance Regulatory Law.  The Cavalcade is a venerable roundup of insurance and risk-management posts.  Hank Stern’s contribution, an interview with Neal Halder of Principal Financial Group about their “accelerated underwriting” process for life insurance, is a great read.

Jason Dinesen, Fair Warning: More Baseball Posts to Pop Up this Year.  That’s a good thing.

 

20140321-4Think he reported this income?  Man With Deep Pockets Busted Stealing a Lot of Laundry Money (Going Concern):

Just how many loads of laundry could one do with $460,000 in stolen quarters?

That’s probably not the question asked by public works inspector Thomas Rica, who pleaded guilty this week to stealing that much in quarters from the meter collection room of the New Jersey town for which he worked.

At the laundromats I used back in school, that would have been nearly enough quarters to get your clothes dry.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/19/14: Are taxes turning Iowa red? And: Statehouse Update!

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Is Iowa really a red state?  According to personal finance site WalletHub, Iowa is a red state.  But didn’t Iowa vote for Obama the last two elections?  Not that kind of red state.  WalletHub’s map has states with the most burdensome taxes as red states, and those with less burdensome taxes as green:

 

WalletHub

From WalletHub:

 WalletHub analyzed how state and local tax rates compare to the national median in the 50 states as well as the District of Columbia.  We compared eight different types of taxation in order to determine:  1) Which states have the highest and lowest tax rates; 2) how those rates compare to the national median; 3) which states offer the most value in terms of low taxation and high cost-of-living adjusted income levels.

WalletHub says Iowans have a tax burden 26% above the national average.  They note, though, that when the rank is adjusted based on our cost of living, Iowa improves 10 places on their rankings.

This is a different measurement than the Tax Foundations well-known Business Tax Climate Indexwhich places Iowa at 11th-worst.  Either way, it’s not a healthy system.  And nothing major is likely to happen to change it anytime soon.  Still, the The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan shows the way!

 

20130117-1Supplies sales tax exemption advances.  The Iowa General Assembly isn’t entirely idle on the tax front.  Sometimes that’s a good thing, as in the House passage yesterday of HF 2443, exempting supplies used in manufacturing from sales tax.  Business inputs in general should not be subject to sales tax, as they are likely to be taxed again when the finished product is sold.

Other than that, there isn’t a lot else to report on the Iowa tax legislative scene.  The speedway tax break remains alive.  The bill to broaden the Iowa capital gain “ten and ten” exclusion hasn’t cleared the committee level.  Silly legislation continues to be introduced, like a 50% state tax credit for payments of principal and interest on student loans (HSB 673).  Let’s encourage crushing student debt burdens!

But sometimes its best when the legislature does nothing.  It’s hard to complain that HF 2770, the bill to pay doctors at their average charge rates with tax credits for “volunteering,” has languished.

 

Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how big is legacy is.

Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how big is legacy is.

The TaxProf notes the Death of Former IRS Commissioner Randoph Thrower; Was Fired for Refusing President’s Request to Audit His Enemies, quoting a New York Times story:

The end came in January 1971, after Mr. Thrower requested a meeting with the president, hoping to warn him personally about the pressure White House staff members had been placing on the IRS to audit the tax returns of certain individuals. Beginning with antiwar leaders and civil rights figures, the list had grown to include journalists and members of Congress, among them every Democratic senator up for re-election in 1970, Mr. Thrower told investigators years later. He was certain the president was unaware of this and would agree that “any suggestion of the introduction of political influence into the IRS” could damage his presidency, he said.

Mr. Thrower received two responses. The first was a memo from the president’s appointments secretary saying a meeting would not be possible; the second was a phone call from John D. Ehrlichman, the president’s domestic affairs adviser, telling him he was fired.

I’ll just note here that Doug Shulman, worst commissioner ever, left on his own terms.

 

David Brunori, Hawaii Tax Credit Craziness (Tax Analysts Blog):

According to some excellent reporting in the Honolulu Civil Beat, the Legislature is considering a slew of tax incentives to promote manufacturing in the state. Yes, there are those (particularly established manufacturers) who would like to promote something other than tourism, hosting of naval bases, and pineapple production. The main proposal (SB 3082) would provide tax credits for employee training and some equipment purchases. The goal is to turn Hawaii into 1960s Pittsburgh or Flint Mich., in their heyday. I have my doubts. 

I don’t think that really plays to Hawaii’s strengths.

 

20120817-1Howard Gleckman, A Terrible Response to the Internet Tax Mess (TaxVox)

Under the plan, the federal government would let retailers collect tax based on the levy where the seller is located, no matter where the purchaser resides. This would apply to all retailers, as long as they had no physical presence in the consumer’s state.

A firm could base its “home jurisdiction” on the state where it has the most employees, the most physical assets, or the state it designates as its principal place of business for federal tax purposes.

Given the nature of online sellers, changing locations to a no-sales-tax state would be fairly easy.

Interesting.  I wonder if a “universal mail order sales tax rate” might ultimately be the answer.  You could set this universal rate at, say, the average national sales tax rate, collect it from all buyers, and remit it to the delivery state through a clearinghouse run by the state revenue agencies.

 

Paul Neiffer, Cash Rents Equals Extra 3.8% on Sale. “However, once you are done farming and are simply renting the ground to other farmers (including relatives), then the rental income will be subject to the tax and even worse, selling the farmland for a large gain will result in extra tax.”

Jana Luttenegger, Filing From Home, and Health Insurance Reporting on W-2s (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): J Is For Jury Duty Pay   

 

Everything is spinning out of control! Suburban Cleveland Councilman Denies Getting in Brawl With Liberty Tax Sign Spinner (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/17/14: Celebrate the corporation due date responsibly! And more.

Monday, March 17th, 2014 by Joe Kristan


daydrinkers
Corporate 2013 returns are due today! Or at least the extensions.  It looks like massive celebrations are in store this year, for some reason, but be sure to get your filing in before you hit the bars.  A late S corporation return results in a stiff penalty: $195 per K-1.  That penalty will be repeated for each additional month the filing is late.

C corporations have their own late filing penalty, 5% of any deficiency.  If you owe but can’t pay, you should still file or extend; then the penalty is only 1/2% of the deficiency.

How should I file or extend?  Glad you asked.  Electronic filing is the best and safest way, because you can get electronic confirmation.  No trip to the post office, no holding on to a postmarked receipt, no worrying about the mail truck going up in flames.

If you prefer not to e-file, then take the trouble to get proof of filing.  The cheapest is to go to the post office and mail your return or extension Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested.  Get a stamped postmark for your package and put it in a safe place.  It also helps to write the certified mail receipt number on top of the return or extension before sealing the envelope for additional proof.

If you lose track of time because of all the festive distractions today, and you find the local post office has closed, you still may be able to get your filing in.  The IRS treats shipping on the due date by a designated private delivery service as a timely filing.  That means your local Fed-Ex office or UPS store might be able to take care of you.  If you do go that route, be sure you use one of the specific services approved by the IRS, and make sure the shipping slip uses today’s date.  You also will need the street address for the IRS service center that your filing is going to, as private delivery services can’t use P.O. Box addresses.

Oh, and apparently green is the official color for corporate return day this year.

Russ Fox, The Other March 17th Deadline: Form 1042s. “The form 1042 series (1042, 1042-S, and 1042-T) is used to report annual withholding for US-source income of foreigners.”

 

20120906-1The revival of the sales tax subsidy for the Iowa Speedway advances in the legislaturereports The Des Moines Register:

The Newton track has received a tax break since it opened in 2006 — a 5 percent rebate of state sales tax collected at the track, totaling about $3.5 million so far. But the law authorizing the tax break required that the facility must be owned at least 25 percent by Iowans.

The purchase by NASCAR, stock-car racing’s sanctioning body, means ownership is 100 percent from outside Iowa. A law change is required to keep the tax-rebate money flowing. Supporters of the tax break say it will help bolster Iowa tourism and spur the state’s economy.

Of course, this favors the track over every other entertainment and tourist venue in Iowa, none of whom get to keep the sales taxes they collect.

 

William Perez, Itemizing Deductions. “If the total of all these itemized deductions is higher than the standard deduction, then a person usually obtains the least amount of tax by itemizing.”

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): H Is For Holding Period

Kay Bell, Dealing with a 1099-K for tax-free residential rental income

Jason Dinesen, Glossary of Tax Terms: Refundable Credits  “The term “refundable credit” refers to a tax credit that can produce a tax refund even if your tax liability is $0.”

Peter Reilly, Building Repair Deductions – Thirty Per Cent Of What?  “All the toilets together perform a discrete and critical function in the operation of the plumbing system” is the best line that I could find in the ninety odd pages of Regulation 1.263(a)-3 “Amounts paid to improve tangible property”commonly known as the “repair regs”.    Peter makes a good effort at explaining a brutally boring set of rules that is actually also important.

Keith Fogg, Confusing Lien and Levy (Procedurally Taxing).  May you never need to know the difference.

Tony Nitti, Online Sportsbook Founder Held Liable for $36 Million In Tax And Penalties

 

20130121-2Annette Nellen, Brick wall hit by IRS in its efforts to regulate all return preparers.  Too bad, so sad.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 312

Alan Cole, Cadillac Tax Confirms: Employers Respond to Tax Changes (Tax Policy Blog). “According to the report, many companies are already making changes in anticipation of the tax, converting to less generous plans.”

Bill Gale, Howard Gleckman, Dave Camp’s Most Valuable Contribution to Tax Reform (TaxVox):

 Still, the 1000-page bill puts his plan out there in all its gory detail. It shows just how tough it is to pull together a reform that cuts rates and trims tax preferences while maintaining today’s revenue and the distribution of burdens.

It will be easier if you worry less about “maintaining today’s distribution of burdens.”  As far as I know, we haven’t achieved some perfect distributional model that should never be messed with.

 

From the Wall Street Journal comes Audit Bait: The Dirty Dozen — Moves That Could Trigger IRS Scrutiny:

  1. Forget to claim reported income.
  2. Take outsize deductions, especially for charitable gifts or travel and entertainment.
  3. Hide offshore accounts.
  4. Claim certain items on small-businesses returns.
  5. Pretend a money-losing pastime is a business.
  6. Use suspiciously round numbers.
  7. File an amended return.
  8. Use a dubious tax preparer.
  9. Be a tax protester.
  10. Provoke a whistleblower.
  11. Fail to claim canceled debt as income.
  12. Fail to file.

Yes, all those things are true.  But if you really want to get examined, you might consider putting your returns claiming refunds on absurd grounds on a website that purports to “crack the code.”  Just a thought, in case you don’t find your life exciting enough. (Hat tip: TaxProf.)

 

News from the Profession. Deloitte Exec Gets Six-Week Vacation Thanks to Wife’s Heavy Foot, Russian Frivolity (Going Concern)

I hear his parents are upset.  32-yr-old Playboy ‘playmate of the year’ in trouble over 90-YEAR-OLD BOYFRIEND (Malaysia Times)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/13/14: Looming Payday Edition. And: incentives galore!

Thursday, March 13th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20130104-1Deduction day looms.   March 15 is the deadline for calendar-year corporate return filings and payments.  It’s also an important deadline for accrual-basis taxpayers for another reason:  compensation accrued at year-end by a calendar-year accrual-basis taxpayer has to be paid by March 15 of the following year to be deductible in the year accrued.

As every first-year accounting student learns, accrual accounting tries to match expenses with the period in which the income is earned.  If a bonus is based on calendar-year sales or profits, it normally can’t be paid until after year-end, when the numbers are sorted out; still, the bonus is related to those sales, so accrual accounting counts the expense against that year’s income.

The tax law has many limits on accrual accounting.  For example, accrued expenses to “related parties,” typically owners and their families, can’t be deducted until the expenses are actually paid.  The tax law gives accrual businesses 2 1/2 months after year-end to pay accrued compensation to non-related employees.  Otherwise, the deduction is deferred until the year in which the employee is paid.

Does the compensation have to be paid by Saturday, or can I wait until Monday?  The tax law provides that when tax returns are due on a weekend, the deadline is extended to the following monday.  That’s why 2013 calendar-year corporation returns  are due March 17, 2014 – March 15 is on Saturday this year.

But the IRS says that doesn’t work for compensation.  Rev. Rul. 83-116 holds that it only applies to “acts required to be performed in connection with the determination, collection, or refund of taxes”  – things like filing returns.  So, according to IRS, the March 15 deadline still stands for payment 0f 2013 accrued compensation.  It’s not clear that the IRS would win in court on this — they have lost on a similar issue — but you don’t want to be the test case.  If you want to deduct 2013 accrued compensation on your 2013 return, pay it by Saturday.

 

 

haroldIncentives!  Coralville Likely on the Hook for Large Chunk of Von Maur Taxes.  Coralville marches to the beat of its own drummer, who apparently is heavily medicated.

Hey, let’s pay $34 million to build a Des Moines Convention Hotel!  Brian Gongol reports “The city financed the hotel to help spur convention business…but now it’s in danger of losing money.”  You don’t say.

Tax Justice Blog, Film Tax Credit Arms Race Continues: “Saying “no” to Hollywood can be a difficult thing for states, but here are a few examples of lawmakers and other stakeholders questioning the dubious merits of these credits within the last few weeks”.

Good.  Iowa doesn’t seem to have been badly hurt since it turned from subsidizing filmmakers to jailing them.

Related: Robert Wood, Film Taxes Ensnares Beckhams, Bob Geldof, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Annie Lennox & More

 

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): F Is For Foreign Tax Credit.  “For many taxpayers, it’s more advantageous to claim income taxes you paid or accrued during the year to a foreign country or U.S. possession as a credit than as a deduction.”

William Perez, Chart: Total Refundable Credits from 1990 to 2011.  There are more of them now.

Peter Reilly, Hedge Fund, TEFRA And Community Property Give Woman Tax Nightmare

Russ Fox, The IRS Needs Volunteers for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

 

Cara Griffith, States’ Perspectives on Federal Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog)

Joseph Henchman, Nebraska Legislators Approve Inflation Indexing But Drop Major Tax Overhaul (Tax Policy Blog)

Howard Gleckman, Mike Lee’s Tax Plan: An Intriguing Idea That Would Add $2.4 Trillion to the Deficit (TaxVox)

Kay Bell, House panel finally looking at Internet sales tax legislation

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 308

News from the Profession.  Tweeting a Lot About Audit Stuff Can Get You a Job at Deloitte.  (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/11/14: Employer mandate “shared responsibility” delayed for some. And: fresh scam!

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20121120-2It’s such a disaster, we’re only going to force some employers to do it right now. The IRS has issued final regulations on the employer health insurance mandate that delay their impact on companies with 50-100 employees until 2016.  The “shared responsibility provisions” — such a creepy name — will still apply to employers with 100 “full-time equivalent” employees in 2015.  The Wall Street Journal reports:

 Under the original 2010 health law, employers with the equivalent of at least 50 full-time workers had to offer coverage or pay a penalty starting at $2,000 a worker beginning in 2014. Last year, the administration delayed the requirement for the first time by moving it to 2015.

The new rules for companies with 50 to 99 workers would cover about 2% of all U.S. businesses, which include 7% of workers, or 7.9 million people, according to 2011 Census figures compiled by the Small Business Administration. The rules for companies with 100 or more workers affect another 2% of businesses, which employ more than 74 million people.

You’ll look in vain in either Sec. 4980H, the “shared responsibility” tax code section, or Sec. 1513 of the Affordable Care Act, which enacted 4980H, for anything that says the provision can take effect later than 2014.  Once again the administration is making it up as it goes in a tacit admission that Obamacare is a half-baked mess.  I hope somebody with 100 employees sues the IRS on equal-protection grounds to enjoin this politically-motivated selective enforcement.   To me it’s another clue that the individual mandate will also be delayed, and ultimately abandoned.

Paul Neiffer, Some ACA Relief for Employers with 50 to 99 Employees

Jason Dinesen, The Affordable Care Act and Small Businesses   

Martin Sullivan, Forget Obamacare for a Minute. Here’s Some Good News About Health Policy (Tax Analysts Blog).  

 

Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

New filing season, same old scams.  Our area IRS Taxpayer Liason says this email is circulating:

Dear Applicant,

An Income Tax repayment is a refund of tax that you’ve overpaid.
Internal Revenue Service  ( IRS ) has received new information about your taxable
income you’ve overpaid too much tax through your job or pension in previous years.

There was a mistake with your tax, which an error occurred on your tax return,
and therefore your income reduced. Your employer also used the wrong tax code.

You are eligible to receive a refund of $2670.48 USD as your recent tax refund.
IRS will send you a repayment. You’ll get the repayment either by cheque in the post or by bank transfer.

Please click here to get your tax refund on your Visa or Mastercard now.

Note : Your refund can be delayed for a variety of reasons. For example submitting
invalid records or applying after the deadline.

Best Wishes,

IRS Tax Refund Service Team
Internal Revenue Service.

Of course it is a scam.  Some obvious clues: a real IRS notice doesn’t have to tell you that it’s dealing in “USD.”  We say “checks” in the US; you get “cheques” in Canada, the UK, or other old Commonwealth countries.  IRS doesn’t do refunds on credit cards.  And, of course, the most important clue:  the IRS will never initiate contact you with an e-mail or phone call.  If an email says it’s from the IRS, it’s not.

 

TaxGrrrl, Understanding Your Tax Forms: The W-2   

 

haroldHooray for Hollywood!  Movie Producer Peter Hoffman Charged With Film Tax Credit Fraud.  It involves Louisiana, which continues its co-dependent relationship with Hollywood with film tax subsidies.  Iowa, sadder but wiser, now prefers producer room and board subsidies to Film Tax Credits.

 

Howard Gleckman, Incoming Senate Finance Chair Wyden Outlines His Tax Agenda (TaxVox):

Speaking in Los Angeles to a conference sponsored jointly by the USC Gould School of Law and the Tax Policy Center, Wyden framed his tax agenda around several key issues:

Narrow the gap between taxation of investment income and ordinary income.

Significantly increase the standard deduction.

Simplify and enhance the refundable Child Tax Credit and Earned Income Tax Credit.

Revise savings incentives by creating a new investment account for all Americans at birth, shift savings subsidies from high-income taxpayers to low- and moderate-income households, and consolidate and simplify the current tangle of existing tax-preferred savings incentives.

Enhance job training.

Restore Build America Bonds—a short-lived idea that partially replaced tax-exempt state and local bonds with direct federal subsidies. He’d also seek ways to encourage business to funnel overseas earnings into domestic infrastructure investment.

It’s a disappointing agenda from somebody considered a thoughtful center-left voice on tax policy.   Any tax on investment income is best understood as a double-tax, and I don’t think by “narrowing the gap” he means lowering ordinary inocme rates.  His second, third and fourth points are fine, but the “Enhance job training” and “Build America Bond” proposals are just political pinatas to be broken open by insiders.  If you want to see what jobs training dollars really accomplish, I refer you to Iowa’s own CIETC.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 278

checkboxJeremy Scott, Check the Box for Tax Avoidance (Tax Analysts Blog).  

The check-the-box rules allowed multinationals to create entities that were treated one way in a foreign jurisdiction and another by the United States. These entities, so-called hybrids, are at the core of companies like Apple’s tax strategies, and they have been used to bring about obscenely low effective tax rates (2.3 percent on $700 billion in foreign earnings, according to the Obama administration).

I think any corporate above zero is obscenely high.

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Proposal to Exempt Olympians’ Prize Money from Taxation: Good Politics, Wrong Solution (Tax Policy Blog)

Kay Bell, IRS takes a bite out of U.S. Olympic medalists’ winnings

 

Keith Fogg, Holding People Hostage for the Payment of Tax – Writ Ne Exeat Republica (Procedurally Taxing). No, he’s not talking about tax season.

 

News from the Profession: PwC Will Probably Be the First Accounting Firm to Replace Interns With Robots.  (Going Concern).  Makes sense, as they were the first to do so with partners.

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Tax Roundup, 2/7/14: Love it or leave it edition! And: Coralville tax scam.

Friday, February 7th, 2014 by Joe Kristan


20140207-1
Making America a better place to leave.  
2013 Expatriations Increase by 221% (Andrew Mitchel):

We do not believe that the primary reason for the increase in expatriations is for political purposes or for individuals to reduce taxes.  Instead, we believe that there are likely three principal reasons for the recent increases in the number of expatriations:

  1. Increased awareness of the obligation to file U.S. tax returns by U.S. citizens and U.S. tax residents living outside the U.S.;
  2. The ever-increasing burden of complying with U.S. tax laws; and
  3. The fear generated by the potentially bankrupting penalties for failure to file U.S. tax returns when an individual holds substantial non-U.S. assets.

The increase in expatriations may also be partly due to a 2008 change in the expatriation rules.

When a foot-fault can break you, you might not want to play the game anymore.  When they start shooting you for jaywalking, you might not want to be on that street at all.

 

20140106-1It’s never too cold for a tax scam.  From CBS2Iowa.com:

Coralville police say they’re receiving more reports of a telephone tax scam. CBS 2 News first told you about the scam last month. The IRS says the scam targets taxpayers, especially recent immigrants. A caller claims to be an IRS agent and says the victim owes money. The victim is told to repay the money using a preloaded debit card or a wire transfer. If the victim refuses, the caller threatens to arrest or deport them or suspend his or her drivers license. The scammer uses a fake name and fake IRS badge number. The caller has found a way to make caller IDs show the number as the IRS toll-free line. To appear more legitimate, the scammer may also send a fake email or recite part of the victim’s social security number. After threatening the victim, the caller may hang up. A second scammer may later call the victim, pretending to be from the local police department or DMV.

It sounds like the scam described in this IRS web page.  If they haven’t sent you a letter first, the IRS isn’t going to call you.  Nor will they contact you via e-mail.  The IRS gives this advice:

  • If you know you owe taxes or you think you might owe taxes, call the IRS at 1.800.829.1040. The IRS employees at that line can help you with a payment issue – if there really is such an issue.
  • If you know you don’t owe taxes or have no reason to think that you owe any taxes (for example, you’ve never received a bill or the caller made some bogus threats as described above), then call and report the incident to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 1.800.366.4484.
  • If you’ve been targeted by this scam, you should also contact the Federal Trade Commission and use their “FTC Complaint Assistant” at FTC.gov.  Please add “IRS Telephone Scam” to the comments of your complaint.

Paying taxes you actually owe is enough fun without sending extra to scammers.

 

20121120-2

Fiduciary Income Tax Blog, 65-Day Rule — 2014:

Fiduciaries of estates and complex trusts have the option to treat certain distributions as having occurred last year. An election can be made with respect to distributions made within 65 days after the end of a tax year. The 65th day of 2014 is Thursday, March 6.

Think of it as a trust mulligan.  With the 3.8% Obamacare Net Investment Income Tax applying at around $12,000 of trust income, many trusts will want to use the 65-day rule to get the income to beneficiaries whose income is under the thresholds.

 

William Perez, Understanding Personal Exemptions

Jason Dinesen, Financing a Small Business: 4 Items to Remember.  “Don’t spend money just to get tax deductions.”

Kay Bell, Federal itemized deduction claims state-by-state

TaxGrrrl, Looking For Your Tax Refund? What You Need To Know So Far For 2014 

 

This Koskinen isn't the IRS commissioner

This Koskinen isn’t the IRS commissioner

Christopher Bergin, New IRS Commissioner Wants to Move Forward – We Should Let Him (Tax Analysts Blog):

Koskinen needs the time and space to do what everybody agrees must be done: Fix the IRS. The investigations must continue. But the new commissioner needs to move forward as well. That means not avoiding the problems, but going at them in a positive, not in a negative way. That’s what good leaders do. We should give the man a chance to show us he is one.

He could hardly be worse than the last one.

Howard Gleckman, Individual Income Taxes May Soon Generate Half of All Federal Tax Revenue (TaxVox)

CBO explains much of the rise in individual income taxes by expected increases in real incomes produced by a recovering economy, including higher wages, salaries, capital gains, and income to owners of pass-through firms, who report their taxes on their individual returns. CBO also expects a significant increase in distributions from retirement accounts for at least the next few years, driven in part by higher asset values.

Two other reasons: Higher tax rates for upper-income households (including the surtax in the Affordable Care Act) and the phenomenon known as real bracket creep. Tax brackets are adjusted for inflation but not economic growth. For at least the next few years, CBO figures incomes will grow faster than those inflation-adjusted brackets.

Oddly, these projections assume the expiring provisions actually expire.  Not likely.

Joseph Henchman, Response to Jesse Myerson’s Land Tax Idea (Tax Policy Blog).  Nice effort, but I’m not sure you need to respond to somebody who says Communism gets a bad rap.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 274

Jack Townsend, Another Swiss Bank Enabler Indicted in SDNY

J. Richard Harvey, Jr., Surprising Statistics on Corporate Disclosures of Uncertain Tax Positions (UTP) (Procedurally Taxing):

 

The Critical Question: Does the NFL Need a Billion Dollar Subsidy Annually from Taxpayers? (Tax Justice Blog)

Career Corner.  Protip to Government Accountants: If You’re Into Kiddie Porn, You Probably Shouldn’t Watch It At Work (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/6/14: Mortgage credit program revived for Iowa. And: why your state budget surplus is a mirage.

Thursday, February 6th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

IFA logoThe Iowa Finance Authority has opened a program that will allow some Iowans to claim a credit, rather than a deduction, for mortgage interest.  From an IFA press release:

The Iowa Finance Authority has announced that eligible Iowans may buy a home and reduce their federal income tax liability by up to $2,000 a year for the life of their mortgage.

The 2014 Take Credit Mortgage Credit Certificate program will be available beginning this week through IFA Take Credit Program Participating Lenders. Approximately 585 Iowa home buyers are expected to benefit from the program.

It has been some years since these credits were available in Iowa.

The credits aren’t for everyone.  They are targeted to lower-income borrowers, with income limits varying by county.  IFA has a “quick check” page for users to determine eligibility.  But for those who qualify, they are a handy way to reduce mortgage costs.  The credit is claimed on Form 8396.

 

TaxProf, TRAC: IRS Criminal Prosecutions Up 23.4% in Obama Administration.  This is probably due to the explosion in tax-refund theft that was less of a priority than regulating preparers was for the Worst Commissioner Ever and the Obama Administration.

 

taxanalystslogoCara Griffith, The Myth of the Budget Surplus (Tax Analysts Blog):

There seems to be a lot of good news about state budgets lately. Newspaper headlines have changed from doom and gloom over budget crises during the recession to questions about how states will manage budget surpluses. Unfortunately, there are financial problems lurking beneath the surface, and one of the largest may be the underfunding of state and local government pension and healthcare plans.

Even Iowa’s relatively well-funded pension plan is 20% underfunded actuarially, and even that uses an absurd assumption of 7.5% investment returns.  The Taxpayers Association of Central Iowa has a lengthy, but excellent, analysis.  Public defined benefit plans are a lie.  They are a lie to taxpayers understating the cost of current pension accruals, a lie to public employees about what they will get after retirement, or both.

 

Elaine Maag of TaxVox raises Questions About Expanding the Childless EITC:

The EITC is often criticized for its built-in marriage penalty. Imagine a single mom with three kids who earns $17,500. Prior to marriage, she qualifies for the maximum credit of $6,143. But if she marries someone with identical earnings, the additional income will reduce her EITC to just $3,670.

If the childless EITC were expanded and the husband had his own EITC, he would lose all or part of his benefit when the couple married, magnifying the tax increase this couple would face relative to when they were not married. As long as the EITC phases out at higher incomes and is tied to joint income, this will remain an issue.

Not to mention the massive level of EITC fraud and the punitive marginal tax rates on taxpayers working their way out of poverty.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

 

Jana Luttenegger, Expired Housing-Related Tax Rules (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).  The exclusion for forgiven mortgage debt is the biggie.

William Perez, Finding the Right Filing Status.  If you are legally married, it’s either joint returns or married filing separate.  Single status is unavailable, even for same-sex couples married in a state that allows them to get married who live in a state that doesn’t.  William provides some excellent explanation.

 

20130419-1Janet Novack, IRS: Don’t Call Us, Look It Up On IRS.Gov.  Well, you might actually get a correct answer that way.

Kay Bell, What the ‘Taxman’ does and doesn’t collect 

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 273

Howard Gleckman, The Cruel Political Paradox of Deficit Reduction (TaxVox)

Carl Smith provides Another Update on Rand Cases in Tax Court at Procedurally Taxing.  The Rand cases hold that an “underpayment” for purposes of penalties does not include the portion of refundable tax credits that tax tax below zero.

Going Concern, Pot Taxes May Not Be Such a Cash Cow Due to, Well, the Cash.  Not to mention the disallowance of all non cost-of-goods-sold deduction for legal dealers.

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/22/14: Let’s pay it for Hollywood! And: choosing a preparer.

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

haroldTaking your money and giving it to Hollywood.  Oscar Nominees Cash In On State Tax Subsidies (Howard Gleckman, TaxVox):

Each of the nine movies nominated for this year’s Oscar for best film may already have taken home a pile of tax subsidies. Seven brought back state goodies from the U.S. and two got cash for their work in the U.K.

And, according to data collected by the Manhattan Institute, the winner is….Wolf of Wall Street. The $100 million black comedy about (irony alert) over-the-top greed among sleazy stockbrokers got a 30 percent tax credit for making the movie in New York State.

The Empire State isn’t even the most generous when it comes to doling out tax incentives to filmmakers. In Louisiana, moviemakers not only get a 30 percent credit against overall in-state production costs but also an additional 5 percent payroll credit. Even better, filmmakers with no state tax liability can monetize the credits by selling them to firms that do owe Louisiana tax or even selling them back to the state at 85 percent of their value.

Iowa used to do this, until its film tax credit program collapsed in scandal and disgrace following revelations that filmmakers were charging fancy cars and personal items to Iowa taxpayers under the guise of “economic development.   Further revelations showed that millions of dollars of pretend expenses were used to claim the credit, taking advantage of credulous administration and almost non-existent oversight.

More from Howard Gleckman:

No doubt these credits are good for filmmakers. And I’m sure residents get a kick out of seeing Leonardo DiCaprio shooting a scene in their neighborhood (assuming they are not steamed over the related traffic jam). But is there an economic payoff in return for these substantial lost tax revenues as supporters claim?

Most studies conclude there is not.

It’s amazing that politicians think Hollywood deserves their taxpayers dollars.  Fortunately, Iowa film subsidies now are limited to housing and meal expenses for filmmakers.

 

Jason Dinesen, Deducting Miles Driven for Charity.  “Taxpayers can take a deduction of 14 cents/mile for mileage driven in giving services to a charitable organization, or taxpayers can take a deduction for the actual cost of gas and oil associated with giving services to a charitable organization.”

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: The Sneaky Tax Consequences of Real Estate Repossessions 

 

Choosing a preparer?

Kay Bell, Time to pick the proper tax pro.  She gets one thing wrong about the IRS:  “For years, the agency has been trying to set up a system under which it register and test tax preparers to help ensure that they meet a minimum competency level.”

No, the agency simply wants to expand its control over preparers and help powerful friends in the big tax prep franchises.  The “minimum competency level” stuff is a weak pretext.

Robert D. Flach, IT’S THAT TIME OF YEAR AGAIN – CHOOSING A TAX PREPARER:

Contrary to the popular “urban tax myth”, unfortunately perpetuated by uninformed journalists and bloggers, just because a person has the initials “CPA” after his/her name does not mean that he/she knows his arse from a hole in the ground when it comes to preparing 1040s.  

True.  But a lot of the best prepaers are CPAs.  Not everybody needs a CPA.  Many folks just need somebody who knows a little more than they do to help them put the W-2 income in the right place.  But if you are doing a complex business return — even on a 1040 — a CPA may be your best bet.

That’s not to say only CPAs are competent preparers.  Enrolled Agents can be very good, and there are many very competent unregulated preparers, like Robert.  I think the competence curve between CPAs and unenrolled preparers would look something like this:

competence curve

The more complex your return, the more likely it is that you will want to bring in an Enrolled Agent or a CPA, but if you already have a strong unregulated preparer who is taking care of your tax needs, you’d be foolish to switch.

 

Paul Neiffer, Average is Important for 2013 Tax Filing.  Farm income averaging, that is.  Another example of a provision that would result in frivolous return penalties for anyone but farmers.

Fairmark.com: Share Identification Under Attack

 

20121120-2Tea Party: Resolved: Obamacare Is Now Beyond Rescue.  Oh, wait, that wasn’t the Tea Party.   It was a debate audience on New York’s Upper West Side.  

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 258

William Perez, The Number of Sole Proprietors has been Rising for 30 Years

Tax Justice Blog: CTJ Submits Comments on the Finance Committee Chairman Baucus’ International Tax Reform Proposal.  They have very different, and largely opposite, concerns from the Tax Foundation.

Jack Townsend, Tax Notes Article on IRS 2013 Victories in Offshore Evasion

 

gatsoNext: automated pedestrian jaywalking camera fines, for our own safety:  NYC Cops Allegedly Beat Up Jaywalking Elderly Man, Refused to Tell Son Which Hospital He Was In (Ed Krayewski, Reason.com)

But I thought it was about traffic safety, not money…  Council members: Traffic camera revenue helped keep property taxes down, pay for public safety.

 

The importance of philanthropy: Warren Buffett Offers $1 Billion For Perfect March Madness Bracket  (TaxGrrrl)

 

The Critical Question: A Meat Tax? Seriously?  (Joseph Thorndike, Tax Analysts Blog).

News From the Profession: Guy Who Couldn’t Hack Two Years in Public Accounting Needs Validation He Isn’t a Loser (Going Concern)

It’s Academic!  How Not to Use Your Faculty Laptop (TaxProf)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/21/14: Weaponizing the IRS. And: whither Section 179?

Tuesday, January 21st, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

The new, “weaponized” IRS is a focus of Glenn Reynolds, the Instapundit, in a USA Today Column:

Since then, of course, the new “weaponized IRS” has, in fact, come to be seen as illegitimate by many more Americans. I suspect that, over time, this loss of moral legitimacy will cause many to base their tax strategies on what they think they can get away with, not on what they’re entitled to. And when they hear of someone being audited, many Americans will ask not “what did he do wrong?” but “who in government did he offend?”

This is particularly true since the Obama administration is currently changing IRS rules to muzzle Tea Partiers.

While I don’t think it’s that bad yet, it’s headed that way if things don’t change.  And, as Glenn points out, it’s not changing:

Meanwhile, the person chosen to “investigate” the IRS’s targeting of Tea Party groups in 2010-2012 is Barbara Bosserman, a “long-time Obama campaign donor.” So the IRS’s credibility is in no danger of being rebuilt any time soon.

I think this is a terrible and shortsighted mistake by the Administration.  So much of its agenda, especially Obamacare, depends on effective IRS administration, but as the recent budget agreement proved, the GOP isn’t going to fund the IRS when it thinks that’s the same as funding the opposition.

The USA Today piece makes broader points about the effect of the loss of faith in civil servants as apolitical technocrats; read the whole thing.

Via the TaxProf.

Andrew Lundeen at Tax Policy Blog has two new posts on tax reform.  In Tax Reform Should Simplify the Code and Grow the Economy, he says:

We need to eliminate the biases in the code against savings and investment, so individuals have the incentive to add back to the economy, and businesses have the capital to buy new machines, structures, and equipment – all the things that give workers the ability to be more productive and earn higher wages. And we need a tax code that is simple and understandable, so taxpayers know exactly what they pay and why. 

Max Baucus

Max Baucus

We’ve been going the wrong way now for 27 years.  In Responses to Senator Baucus’s Staff Discussion Drafts, he curbs his enthusiasm for the tax reform options offered by outgoing Senate Finance Committee Chairman Baucus:

Generally speaking, we found that the tax reform proposals in these drafts go in the wrong direction. Our modeling shows that they damage economic growth, hurt investment, and, in many instances, violate the principles of sound tax policy: simplicity, transparency, neutrality, and stability.

The post links to a point-by-point examination of the Baucus proposals.

 

 

TaxProf, Martin Luther King, Jr. and the IRS:

This past year, much ado was made about the so-called “IRS-Gate” and concerns that the Obama administration may have used the agency to target Tea Party and other right wing groups. … [W]hat often is not stated during the Martin Luther King Holiday weekend is that King, early in his leadership of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), was routinely subjected to IRS audits of his individual accounts, SCLC accounts as well as accounts of his lawyers, first starting during the administration of President Dwight Eisenhower and continuing through the Kennedy administration.

If you audit me, I shall become more powerful than you can possibly imagine…

Kay Bell, IRS abuse of power, now and in MLK’s day. “Overall, the IRS is paying for its operational indiscretions by receiving less money and more restrictions on how it does spend what funds it has.”

 

Paul Neiffer, Section 179 Update (or Not):

 Here are my official updated odds on when we might know what the actual 2014 Section 179 amounts will be:

By Memorial Day 10 Billion to 1

By Labor Day 10 Million to 1

By the November Mid-Term elections 500 to 1

Between the November Mid-Term Elections and December 15, 2014 25 to 1

After December 15, 2014 and before January 1, 2015 1 to 1

After December 31, 2014 5 to 1

I give about 5 to 1 odds in favor of the current Sec. 179 deduction being extended to $500,000 for 2014, and I think that Paul is right that it is most likely to occur during the lame-duck session.  I think odds are about 50-50 on an extension of 50% bonus depreciation. It’s too bad the Feds have closed Intrade, as this would be a betting market I would like to follow.

 

HelmsleyTaxTrials, Leona Helmsley, Angry Employees Strike Back:

Their mistreatment of employees and squabbles over bills are the stuff of legend and left prosecutors rife with eager witnesses when it came time for trial.

Helmsley was just as arrogant about her taxes, famously telling her housekeeper: “We don’t pay taxes, only the little people pay taxes.”  Helmsley participated in several schemes to avoid paying millions of dollar in income and sales taxes.  

Sometimes that sort of thing comes back and bites you; read the post to see how it bit Helmsley.

 

William Perez on an important topic: Tips for Securely Sending Tax Documents To Your Accountant.  First, don’t send anything with your Social Security Number in an unencrypted email.  Like many firms, Roth & Company offers a secure upload platform to send sensitive information.  If your tax firm has one, use it.  They are the safest way to transmit confidential information and files.

 

Phil Hodgen wonders whether there is a Delay in approving renunciations at State Department?  It’s harder to shoot jaywalkers when they are running away.

Missouri Tax Guy goes back to basics with An Introduction to the Double-Entry Bookkeeping System.  Just remember, Debits are on the door side.

Andrew Mitchel has posted a New Resource Page: 2013 Developments in U.S. International Tax

 

Kay Bell, $4 billion more tax breaks for Boeing from Washington State. Taxing you to give money to folks with good lobbyists.

Jim Maule is appropriately annoyed by the use of the term “IRS Code.”  It’s the Internal Revenue Code, and it’s written by Congress, not the IRS.  Remember that when you vote.

Keith Fogg, Qualified Offers – Is it meaningless to offer what you think a case is worth? (Procedurally Taxing)

Jack Townsend, The New Provision for Tax Restitution and Ex Post Facto

 

The Critical Question: Is Kent Hovind A Tax Protester?  It doesn’t seem like a more promising career path for him than his forays into evolutionary biology.

TaxGrrrl, Hot Tub Tax Machine: News Anchor Takes Plea In Scandal.

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/15/14: Serving society by shooting jaywalkers, sending billionaires to elementary school.

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Don’t forget to mail your 1040 first quarter estimated tax payments today!

 

Wikipedia image

Wikipedia image

“Society will be best served by allowing him to continue his good works.”  So said Federal Judge Charles Kocaras in sentencing Beanie Baby Billionaire Ty Warner to two years of probation and 500 hours of community service.  Mr. Warner admitted evading taxes on more than $3.3 million in income through the use of Swiss accounts in a plea deal, but his total unpaid taxes was in the neighborhood of $5.6 million, according to Bloomberg News.

So Mr. Beanie Baby gets to do good works.  It’s remarkable, considering the federal sentencing guidelines for a $5 million tax loss start at a 51-month sentence.

Meanwhile, an American woman who has lived her adult life in France is terrified that she will be financially ruined if she starts complying with foreign reporting requirements that she had no idea existed.  A Canadian born of an American parent who has never been to the U.S. faces ruinous penalties because he never filed U.S. tax returns or FBAR reports — it never occurred to him that he might have to file U.S. taxes.  A second-generation American who inherited a foreign bank account from her father faces a minimum of $40,000 in penalties after not paying a whopping $100 in income tax on the account, which she didn’t even know existed.

So society is best served by allowing Mr. Beanie Baby to help out in classrooms, while the IRS quietly imposes outrageous penalties on the innocent conduct of non-billionaires for foot-faulting their paperwork?  I think society would be best served by letting people voluntarily come into compliance without facing financial ruin.  I think society would be best served by not imposing insanely severe penalties for failing to report a Canadian bank account on time when no tax was avoided.  I think society would be best served by not terrorizing Americans abroad for committing personal finance.  But I’m not a federal judge, so my idea of what best serves society doesn’t mean much.

Related:

Jack Townsend, The Beanie Baby Man, The Tax Evader Adult Man, Ty Warner, Gets Probation!  “I do ask the question that comes immediately to mind.  What is it about the very rich that seems to resonate with sentencing judges?”

Janet Novack, No Jail Time For Beanie Babies Billionaire Tax Evader Ty Warner   “Even after those payments, he will still, according to an accounting he gave the government, be worth more than $1.8 billion.”

 

Kyle Pomerleau, IRS Data on Income Shifts Shows Progressivity of Federal Individual Income Tax (Tax Policy Blog):

In 1980, the top 1 percent accounted for 8.46 percent of adjusted gross income and 19.06 percent of income taxes paid: a difference of 10.59 percent. By 2011, their share of income increased to 18.7 and their share of all income taxes paid increased to 35.06; the difference increased to 16.35 percent.

Top 1 pays more than bottom 90

 

So increasing taxes on the rich didn’t make things more “equal.”  How about that.

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Howard Gleckman, IRS Gets Hammered in the 2014 Budget Agreement (TaxVox):

The Internal Revenue Service is one of the biggest losers in the 2014 budget deal agreed to last night by House and Senate negotiators. Under the agreement, the service would get just $11.3 billion, which is $526 million below its 2013 budget and $1.7 billion less than President Obama requested. 

Congress uses the tax law as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  It has a sprawling portfolio that ranges from energy policy to welfare to health care — responsibilities that dwarf many of the cabinet agencies nominally overseeing those areas.  Yet Congress, while increasing the responsibility of the IRS more and more, is cutting its resources.  That won’t end well.

Yet the IRS in a way has itself to blame.  It’s outrageous politicization under Doug Shulman and the resulting Tea Party harassment have had the predictable effect of making the Republicans consider the IRS a political opponent.  Nobody wants to fund the opposition.  And no, I don’t buy Mr. Gleckman’s line that “…the 501(c)(4) mess was caused in part by a lack of resources.”  If you don’t have resources, you don’t spend extra time singling out certain political views for “special” treatment.”

 

David Brunori, Apple and Wal-Mart Are Perfect Together in a World of Bad Tax Policy (Tax Analysts Blog):

In any event, the purveyors of tomorrow’s technology and cheap toiletries recently got together to lobby for a sales tax holiday in Wisconsin. In that regard at least, Apple and Wal-Mart are very much alike. They favor bad tax policy when it helps their bottom line. 

Of course they do.  The real shame is the legislators who make it happen.

microsoft-apple

 

TaxGrrrl, No Criminal Charges Expected In FBI Investigation Into IRS Scandal

William Perez discusses Prices for Professional Tax Preparation Services.

Kay Bell, California has $16 million in undeliverable 2012 tax refunds

Robert D. Flach, THE FUTURE OF THE RTRP DESIGNATION – THE CONVERSATION CONTINUES:  “To be effective the organization that administers the independent voluntary RTRP credential must have the backing, support, and recognition of the entire industry, and not just one component or organization.”

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 251

If the sentence is carried out on April 16, it’s cruel and unusual punishment.  Governor Christie Redeems Himself By Signing “CPA Death Penalty” Legislation in New Jersey (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/8/2014: Instructions for the Net Investment Income Tax! And new foreign account reporting rules.

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140108-1Almost four years after the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the IRS has issued draft instructions for the act’s “Net Investment Income Tax” form, Form 8960 — which itself has only been issued as a draft so far.  With work already underway on many returns subject to this tax, especially trust returns, the timing is lame.  But this is one aspect of Obamacare that isn’t going to get punted, so we will have to go to war with the forms we have.

The draft instructions provide worksheets for some of the more baroque computations that will be needed to complete the form, including the net loss computation and the allocation of itemized deductions to net investment income.  Still, much of the work will have to be done off-the-forms on preparer worksheets applying the regulations.  Tony Nitti says:

That is my big takeaway from the instructions – there’s no faking it. When we saw that this new, complex area of the law would ultimately be computed on a one-page form, we anticipated that the meat of the computation would be done off-form in worksheets provided by the instructions. And that’s exactly what happened. But that shifts the onus back to us as tax advisors to make sure our inputs are correct, which means we must understand the nuances of the final regulations.

Based on my review of the instructions, it will be virtually impossible for a tax advisor to accurately compute, for example, the Net Gains and Losses worksheet without a solid understanding of the types of gains and losses the final regulations contemplate being included in and excluded from net investment income.

As with the rest of the ACA, what could possibly go wrong?

 

Russ Fox, FBAR Changes for 2014

First, Form TD F 90-22.1 is no more. The FBAR has a new form number, Form 114.

Second, as of last July the FBAR must be electronically filed. The good news is that as of last October, your tax accountant can file the form for you as long as you complete Form 114a.

Also, notes Russ, the filing requirement now kicks in when the balance of all foreign accounts together exceeds $10,000.  It used to be account-by-account.

 

William Perez offers Resources for Preparing Form 1099-MISC for Small Businesses

Kay Bell says it’s Time to get organized for your 2014 tax filing tasks

Paul Neiffer advises us to Decant a Trust – Not Wine.

 

David Brunori on the unwisdom of subjecting business inputs to sales tax:

Indeed, virtually every state tax commission that has studied this issue has concluded that business inputs should be exempt from tax. Why? When you tax business purchases, the tax becomes part of the cost of doing business, and companies try very hard to pass those costs on to consumers. Two bad things then happen. First, consumers unwittingly pay the tax in the form of higher prices. It is a hidden tax and a most cynical way of financing government. Second, consumers often pay sales tax on the tax embedded in the retail price of the goods they purchase. So we are actually taxing a tax. This “cascading” amounts to awful tax policy.

But, as David points out, that doesn’t stop the demagogues:

Several years ago, I had the opportunity to talk to a group of legislators about sales tax policy. I was asked if I had any ideas for reform. I mentioned the common ideas of broadening the base by taxing services and remote sales, and lowering rates. I also said that states should exempt business purchases from the sales tax. One legislator looked at me like I had three heads and asked, “Do you mean letting corporations off the hook for sales taxes?” He asked where the justice was in a system that would make poor working families pay sales tax but let multinational companies go free.

Not all that different from the Iowa Senate’s approach to income taxes.

 

Andrew Lundeen, The Top 1 Percent Pays More in Taxes than the Bottom 90 Percent (Tax Policy Blog):

An interesting piece of information from the chart below is that after the 01/03 Bush tax cuts, often claimed to be a tax cut for the rich, the tax burden of the top 1 percent actually increased significantly.

Top 1 pays more than bottom 90

No matter how much you jack up taxes on the “top 1%,” the same people always will say “the rich” aren’t paying “their fair share” and need to indulge in some “shared sacrifice.”

 

Howard Gleckman, Taxing Bitcoin (TaxVox)

What if bitcoin is a currency for tax purposes, the same as, say a euro? In that case, profits from sales would be taxed as ordinary income, with a top rate of 39.6 percent, though all losses could offset other income.

Either way, the mere act of buying something [with Bitcoins] would likely be a taxable event.

Tax Justice Blog, GE Just Lost a Tax Break – and Congress Will Probably Fix That.  That’s what fixers do.

Jack Townsend, Prosecuting the Banks: Does the U.S. Prefer Foreign Banks to U.S. Banks?

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 244

Programming note: I will be doing a tax update program sponsored by the Institute for Management Accountants over the Iowa Cable Network tomorrow evening at 6:00 p.m.  It’s a chance to get your continuing education for 2014 off to a roaring start.  I figure on talking about an hour, with an emphasis on the new Net Investment Income regulations and other 2013 changes we will see this filing season.  I’ll also cover some of the more interesting cases and rulings of the last year.

In case you were wondering, our friends at Going Concern explain How To Tell if Your Accounting Firm is Really a Car Wash

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Tax Roundup, 1/6/2014: Start this year’s year-end planning now! And lots more.

Monday, January 6th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140106-1I’m back.  It was good to take a little time off after year-end planning season and before the 2013 return season starts.  But now that it’s 12 below with howling winds, I might as well be at the office.

It was sort of a busman’s holiday, though, as I got an early start on my 2014 year-end tax planning.   While December year-end planning is important, it’s asking a lot of one month to do the work of all 12.  You can do some important tax planning in January that will pay off all year long.  For example:

- You can fund your 2014 Individual Retirement Account right now.  If you are married, you can also fund your spousal IRA.  The maximum contribution is $5,500, or $6,500 if you will reach at least age 50 by December 31, 2014.

- You can fund your 2014 Health Savings Account today too.  The HSA limit for taxpayers with a high-deductible plan and family coverage is $6,550 this year; for a single plan, the limit is $3,300.  You need to have a qualifying high-deductible insurance policy, but if you do, you can deduct your contribution and withdraw funds for tax-deductible expenses tax-free.  If you leave the funds in, they accumulate tax-free and can be withdrawn tax-free later for qualifying health costs.  If you stay too healthy to use the funds on medical care, withdrawals are taxed much like IRA withdrawals.

Using spousal IRAs and an HSA, a 50-year old with family coverage can tuck away a combined $19,550 right now and have it earn interest or dividends tax free right away — 15 1/2 months sooner than if you wait until April 15, 2015, the last day you can make these contributions.  And by saving it now, you won’t be tempted to spend it later in the year.

A few other things that you can do right away to get some of your 2014 year-end planning out of the way:

- If you care about estate planning, nothing keeps you from making the $14,000 maximum 2014 exempt gift to your preferred family donees right now.

- Make sure you’ve maxed out your 2014 401(k) deferral with your HR people — or at the very least, be sure you are deferring as much as you can get your employer to match.

- If you are an Iowan with kids, you can make a 2014 College Savings Iowa contribution that you can deduct on your 2014 Iowa 1040.  The maximum deductible contribution is $3,098 per donor, per beneficiary, so a married couple with two kids can put away $12,392 right now.  The Iowa tax benefit works like an 8.98% bonus to you for putting money in your college savings pocket.

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 242: Lois Lerner Is 2013 Tax Person of the Year.  The TaxProf provides access to a Tax Analysts piece that says:

     While many of the Service’s problems were not necessarily its own fault, the exempt organization scandal was an almost entirely self-inflicted wound. No one personifies that scandal more than Lois Lerner.

Lerner ignited a political and media firestorm when she confessed in May that the exempt organizations unit of the IRS Tax-Exempt and Government Entities Division inappropriately handled many Tea Party groups’ exemption applications.

The now former exempt organizations director’s admission and subsequent refusal to testify before Congress contributed to her becoming the public face of the scandal. Although Lerner does not bear sole responsibility for the IRS’s missteps in processing conservative groups’ exemption applications, the publicity of her role in one of the year’s biggest news stories earns her the distinction of being Tax Notes’ 2013 Person of the Year. 

And in spite of much wishful thinking, it is a scandal.

It’s worth noting that Tax Analysts gives an honorable mention to Dan Alban, the Institute for Justice attorney behind the District Court defeat for the IRS preparer regulation power grab.

 

1040 2013William Perez, How Soon Can a Person File Their 2013 Tax Return?: “The Internal Revenue Service plans to begin processing personal tax returns on Friday, January 31, 2014, for the tax year 2013 (IR-2013-100).”  But don’t even try to get it done until you have your W-2s and 1099s all in hand.

Jana Luttenegger, Reinstating Tax-Exempt Organizations  (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). She explains new IRS procedures for organizations that have lost their exemption by failing to file annual reports with the IRS.

Kay BellSocial Security taxable earnings cap in 2014 is $117,000. Thousands have already hit that tax limit.

Jason Dinesen, Small Business Planning: Got Your Financial Statements and Budget Done Yet?

Paul Neiffer, Remember Your Simplified Home Office Deduction

TaxGrrrl, What You Need To Know About Taxes In 2014: Expired Tax Breaks, Obamacare Penalties & More.

Russ Fox, 1099 Time.  A look at who has to issue information returns, and who gets them.

 

Robert D. Flach poses AN ETHICAL, AND PERHAPS LEGAL, DILEMMA:

Beginning with the 2014 Form 1040, am I legally, or ethically, required to assess my client a penalty for not having health insurance coverage?  Or can I, as I do with the penalty for underpayment of estimated tax, ignore the issue and leave it to the IRS to determine if a penalty is appropriate?  Will I face a potential preparer penalty if I ignore the issue?

It’s a good question.  I suspect they plan to make us ask the question, under the same sort of rules that make preparers unpaid social workers for the earned income tax credit.  I don’t expect to ever have to ask the question, though, as I think this dilemma will resolve itself by an indefinite delay, and eventual repeal, of the individual mandate as Obamacare falls apart.

 

David Brunori, State Tax Reform Advice for 2014 – Think About Spending (Tax Analysts Blog). Sometimes I think that’s all they think about.  But hear David out:

But in thinking about tax reform efforts in the past year, I am more convinced than ever that our refusal to rethink the size of government makes fixing problems with the tax code impossible. Here is what we know. Cutting government programs is difficult because each program has a constituency that will fight like a gladiator to protect its access to public money. So when the topic of tax reform comes up, conservatives and liberals vow to find a fix that will neither raise nor decrease spending. But we also know that politicians – the majority anyway – generally hate raising taxes. This reflects the fact that most of their constituents hate the idea of paying more taxes. But the costs of government continue to increase. And that leads to worse tax policy as states look to gimmicks, excises, gambling, and other junk ways of collecting revenue. It also ensures that some horrible tax policies are never fixed.

If the government dialed back spending to population-and-inflation adjusted 1990 numbers, I don’t think mass famines would result.

Scott Hodge, Despite Rising Inequality, Tax Code is at Most Progressive in Decades (Tax Policy Blog). I’m not sure “despite” is the right word here.

Annette Nellen, Continued bonus depreciation or tax reform?

Cara Griffith, Cyclists: The Next Great Source of Tax Revenue? (Tax Analysts Blog):

 While I strongly believe taxes should not be used to encourage or discourage behavior, the effect of requiring cyclists to register their bikes is not the big problem with these types of proposals. The real problem is that they don’t raise any revenue. Dowell’s suggestion that a bike registration fee would raise some $10 million for the city of Chicago is a pipe dream. Almost every cent would be used simply to administer the program.

From the interests of the bureaucrats proposing the program, just funding new patronage jobs is a perfectly acceptable result.

Howard Gleckman, Time To Park The Commuter Tax Subsidy (TaxVox)

Peter Reilly, Are IRS Property Seizures The Stuff Of Reality TV?   Now there’s some grim viewing.

The ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation has a shiny new look at its website.

Tony Nitti, Yes Virginia, There Is A Tax Extender Bill In Congress.

The Critical Question: If You Won the Lottery Tomorrow, Would You Still Go to Work? (Going Concern).  Only to clean out my desk, and laugh.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/27/2013: Should you prepay your taxes for the deduction?

Friday, December 27th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20111040logoIs it worth paying taxes early to get a deduction early?   Many more taxpayers will have to ask that question this year for the unfortunate reason that the increase in the top regular rate to 39.6% makes their regular tax higher than the alternative minimum tax.  While it’s cold consolation, you can use your deduction for state tax payments when you aren’t subject to AMT.

First you have to make sure you can use the deduction at all.  You can’t use a deduction for taxes paid on your federal return if you don’t itemize, or if you are subject to AMT.  If you pass these tests, then you should ponder if you are going to be in a much higher bracket next year.  Assuming that you are in the same bracket for both years, and that no change in the tax law will affect your deduction, it’s a time-value-of-money question.

The charts below show the tax benefit of prepaying $1,000 of state and local taxes at the federal tax brackets. The first bracket shown is the top Iowa rate, to enable Iowans to determine the value of prepaying federal taxes.  It shows the present value at several key payment dates:

 

January 15: Federal fourth quarter 2013 payments are due

January 31: due date of Iowa fourth quarter estimated taxes.

March 1: due date of first Iowa property tax installment.

April 15: due date of most state individual tax returns.

April 30: due date of Iowa individual tax returns.

September 1: due date of second Iowa property tax installment.

pv tax prepayment3

If the benefit is in green, prepayment makes sense.  If it is red, the time value lost by paying early exceeds the benefit of accelerating the deduction by a year, assuming that the benefit will arrive on April 15.

This chart is only accurate assuming all of its underlying assumptions are met, so use it with caution.   It does illustrate that prepaying January taxes usually makes sense, but prepaying September taxes seldom does.

Come back tomorrow for another installment of our 2013 year-end tax tips series!

 

Howard Gleckman, Finance Chairman In-Waiting Ron Wyden Is A Tax Reformer (TaxVox):

The 64-year-old Wyden, who has a history of proposing creative, ambitious, and sometimes controversial ideas, initially sponsored a tax code overhaul in 2010 with former GOP senator Judd Gregg of New Hampshire. After Gregg retired, Wyden found another GOP cosponsor in Dan Coates of Indiana. Wyden-Coates follows the broad outline of the original Wyden-Gregg plan.

For individuals, it would set three rates—15-25-35. The top bracket would kick in at $140,000 for couples filing jointly. It would repeal the Alternative Minimum Tax, nearly triple the standard deduction, and create a 35 percent exclusion for long-term capital gains and dividends (equal to a rate of 22.75 percent for top-bracket taxpayers). It would eliminate the tax advantages of many employee benefits–but not employer-sponsored health insurance–and simplify tax-preferred savings.

While the plan would preserve most other individual tax preferences, the very large standard deduction would sharply limit the number of taxpayers who take them (even today, fewer than one-third itemize).

Wyden-Coates would cut the corporate rate to 24 percent from 35 percent.

I can think of a better tax reform, but Wyden-Coates would be a huge improvement over what we have.

 

taxanalystslogoCara Griffith, Enabling an Informed Debate (Tax Analysts Blog):

A transparent tax system, in which there are no “secret tax laws,” is a better tax system in that taxpayers more clearly understand the laws they are required to comply with, tax officials can more easily administer the law, and both sides can engage in a more informed debate about tax policy.

I would add that the transparency should extend to subsidies, like Economic development tax credits, that are run through state tax returns.

 

Jason Dinesen, Capital Losses and Tax Planning 

Kay Bell,  Valuing your tax-deductible donations of household goods

Jim Maule, How to Lose a Charitable Contribution Deduction.  If you leave an anonymous gold coin or jewelry piece in a Salvation Army kettle, it does no good on your 1040.

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving: Ride For Reading   “Our featured charity, Ride for Reading, delivers books to children in underserved communities… by bicycle!”

 

 

TaxProf, Court: Home Depot Cannot Use Out-of-State IP Affiliate to Shift Income From Arizona,  Don’t expect state courts to uphold tricks that reduce state revenue.

Arnold Kling describes Two Views of Obamacare, and explains how it is far from a “market approach.”

 

20120514-1The flip side of the “Facebook stock option loophole”: Mark Zuckerberg’s $2 Billion Tax Bill (TaxProf).  People who complain about the deduction for stock option compensation never mention that the same amount is income to the option holders, usually at higher rates.

 

 

Memory Lane beckons at Robert D. Flach’s place with 2013: THE YEAR IN TAXES – PART ONE:

Perhaps tied for the top tax story of the year (with the death of DOMA, which I will discuss later) is the David-versus-Goliath victory of three independent tax return preparers who felt the cost of the IRS mandatory RTRP tax preparer regulation regime, especially the annual CPE requirement, was “prohibitive” for their small practices and joined with the Institute for Justice to challenge the licensing program in federal court in Loving v IRS.

Go, David!

 

The Critical Question: Did Tenth Circuit Help KPMG Weasel Out Of Liability To Buy.com Founder?  (Peter Reilly)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/26/2013: Tax loss harvest time! And: people like you to give them money.

Thursday, December 26th, 2013 by Joe Kristan


harvest
Harvest those tax losses.  
Just as millions of disappointed gift recipients rush the retailers to improve on Santa today, investors can get busy over the next few days trying to make the best of their own disappointments.  They can cash out losses on disappointing investments to shelter their 2013 gains.  Some tips to make sure you do it right:

- You have to take the loss in a taxable account. A loss in an IRA or 401(k) plan doesn’t help you.

- Normally the “trade date” is the effective date for tax purposes, so you can sell a stock as late as December 31 this year and still deduct the loss on your 2009 1040.

- If you have a loss on a short sale, the tax law treats it as closing on the settlement date, not the trade date, so you can’t wait to the last minute to close a short sale to get a deduction.

- You don’t need to overdo it.  You can deduct your capital losses only to the extent of your capital gains, plus $3000.  But if you do overdo it, individual capital losses carry forward indefinitely.

- Harvesting losses helps taxpayers subject to the Obamacare/ACA Net Investment Income Tax to the extent it helps for regular taxes.

- Watch out for the wash sale rules. If you buy the same stock within the 30 days preceding or following the sale of a loss stock, your loss is disallowed. This is true even if you sell from a taxable account and buy in an IRA, according to the IRS.

Come back tomorrow for another 2013 year-end tax tip!

 

Paul Neiffer offers Some Quick Year-End Tax Tips

 

20120906-1Give away money and folks will line up.State tax credit program hits a big bump: It’s out of money, and that’s a good sign,”  reports the Des Moines Business Record:

Economic development officials in Des Moines and other Iowa cities have been told to stop sending requests for a state economic development tax credit. The reason: The fund is tapped out.

Greater Des Moines developers were told during a meeting last week with officials from the Iowa Economic Development Authority and the city of Des Moines that a tax credit program used to provide gap financing for multimillion-dollar developments has reached its $3 million annual cap on the ability to transfer the credits, a key element in financing the projects.

“Transferable” tax credits are actually subsidies. It is economically identical to giving the developers a license to factor the state’s receivables at a small discount.

Local developers, the Greater Des Moines Partnership, and state officials will press the Iowa Legislature to at least raise the $3 million cap and make adjustments that could eliminate the ranking system.

So people who want the state to give them more of our money and the state officials that give away our money want the legislature to make it easier to give away our money. What could go wrong?

 

Speaking of the people giving away our money,  State-owned Honey Creek Resort near Moravia continues to struggle financially.  (thegazette.com, via Gongol) What madness led the government to open a resort?  Maybe the same madness that makes people think the government should be allocating investment capital.

 

tf logoJoseph Henchman, Tax Foundation Wins State Tax Notes Honor, Third Year Running:

For three years running now, we have been honored as most influential in state tax policy by State Tax Notes (subscription req’d). This year, they present it as an unranked list of ten recipients. The list is five state officials, three lawyers, one legislator, and us…

Given the response of the Iowa legislature to my suggestions, I am sure that I rank among the ten least influential in state tax policy.  I wonder if there’s a prize for that?

 

Howard Gleckman,  TheTaxVox 2013 Lump of Coal Award: Wait ‘Til Next Year Edition.  He doesn’t think the Tea Party scandal was more than “merely bungling the job on a bipartisan basis.”  Given the overwhelming attention paid to the right, that’s an unsupported statement.   Mr. Gleckman is a man of the center-left; when it’s your opponents being targeted, it’s easier to conclude that it’s all fair.

 

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: When Structuring The Sale Of Your Business Goes Wrong   Tony addresses the related-party debacle of Fish v. Commissioner, where a Kansas City taxpayer generated $9 million in ordinary income when he thought he was going to have capital gains, because a partial cash-out of his business worked out to be a sale of goodwill to a related party.

Margaret Van Houten,  Do My Estate Planning Documents Need to Have Special Language to Deal with My Digital Assets?  (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Russ Fox, Nominations Due for 2013 Tax Offender of the Year.  Sadly, Russ will have plenty of worthy candidates.

 

TreeTreetreetreetreePeter Reilly offers Kind Christmas Wishes To Those Behind Bars And The Tax Collectors Too  “So when you think treeabout it, you realize that one of the reasons that Jesus was born in Bethlehem was that Joseph and Mary were tax compliant.”

Kay Bell, The Christmas tax story

Jason Dinesen, Greatest Hits: Deducting Mileage from a Home Office   

TaxProf, World Giving Index 2013: U.S. Is #1

Me, What’s new in year-end tax planning, my new post at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record’s Business Professionals’ Blog.

Career Corner. How to Choose Between Two Big 4 Offers When You Have No Clue What Either Involves (Going Concern)

 

TaxGrrrl, The True Cost Of Christmas: Santa’s Tax Bill:

Compensation is taxed to the elves as income – but Santa has taxes to pay on their behalf. Payroll taxes – at the employer contribution rate of 7.65% – for the elves work out to $1,890,927.

Santa doesn’t pay income taxes on compensation paid to the elves but he does have to manage their withholding according to any forms W-4 provided to him. Fortunately for Santa, there is no withholding requirement for state taxes in Alaska. 

I would argue the residency issue.  Technically, the North Pole is in the middle of the ocean, and I don’t believe there are territorial claims though.  Of course, with his fearsome legendary powers of retaliation, no IRS agent wanting to be on the “nice” list would mess with him.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/20/2013: S corporation built-in gain window closing? And more!

Friday, December 20th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

S-SidewalkThe S corporation Built-in gain window is closing.  The main benefit of S corporations since 1986 is that their income is only taxed once — when it is earned, on the tax returns of its owners.  After-tax earnings may be distributed to owners without another tax; undistributed earnings increase the basis of the owners’ stock, reducing gains when the stock is sold.

C corporations, in contrast pay a tax on their own income.  C corporation shareholders pay a second tax when the after-tax earnings are distributed; they don’t get a basis step-up for undistributed earnings, so they pay the second tax on undistributed earnings as part of their gain when they sell their shares.

To keep C corporations from becoming S corporations and liquidating the next day, Congress enacted the Built-in Gains Tax in the 1986 tax reforms.  This tax applies to any C corporation that makes an S corporation election.  It hits all “built-in gains” recognized during the “recognition period” following the election at 35%; the after-tax built-in gains are then also taxed on shareholder returns.

“Built-in gains” are any income items accrued as a C corporation as of the day of the S election.  For example, if the corporation owns land with a cost of $10,000 and a value of $15,000 as of the date of the S election, it has a $5,000 built-in gain.  If it sells the land during the “recognition period,” it pays the tax on the lesser of the actual gain or the $5,000 built-in gain.

The recognition period was 10 years when the tax was enacted.  It has been reduced to 5 years by temporary legislation, but absent new legislation it will revert to 10 years starting January 1.  That means S corporations that made elections taking effect in 2004-2007 can sell built-in gain assets before December 31 without the tax, but the same gain will be subject to the tax starting January 1.   That has obvious year-end planning implications.   If you are going to sell soon, it may be best to sell right now, as two weeks from now may be too late.

Yes, it is possible that the five-year period will get extended again, but who wants to count on Congress?

More 2013 year-end tax tips every day through December 31 at the Tax Update!

 

Why the IRS shouldn’t get political.  People who don’t think the IRS Tea Party scandal is serious need to consider how other places use the tax law.  France24 reports: Putin to pardon jailed tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky.

Mr. Khordorkovsky was imprisoned for 10 years on tax evasion charges.  His real offense was opposing Vladimir Putin while wealthy.  The message was surely heard by other wealthy Russians with the means to oppose the regime.

As complicated as the tax law is, it would be easy work for a politicized IRS to make trouble for disfavored opponents.  That’s why the Tea Party scandal is so serious, and why the new proposals to regulate 501(c)(4) outfits are so outrageous.  And yes, it could happen here.  It did.

 

Flickr image courtesy Shock264 under Creative Commons license

Flickr image courtesy Shock264 under Creative Commons license

If it needs a subsidy to happen, it probably shouldn’t happen.  Tax break for wind power is up in the air, advocates say (Des Moines Register)

The wind provision is one of about 50 tax credits that are expected to expire at the end of 2013. U.S. Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Ia., said the tax credits, which are usually dealt with together, failed to get a vote in Congress this year because key lawmakers thought they could include them as part of a major tax-reform bill.

Grassley told reporters that passage of a more sweeping tax overhaul appears unlikely. Senate Finance Chairman Max Baucus, D-Mont., told him last week that Congress expects to deal with wind and the other tax credits in 2014. “He wasn’t specific on when it would happen, but he said we are going to have to do (extensions of the tax credits) next year,” Grassley told reporters.

These things are passed one year at a time to pretend that they are much less expensive than they are under Congressional budget rules.   A felony in the private sector, business as usual in Congress.

 

Alan Cole,  Party in the UK (Tax Policy Blog)

Critically, the UK has improved its tax system substantially. It is moving towards a more competitive, more neutral tax base that treats all sorts of economic activity equally. While they have been willing to increase sales taxes – a neutral, simple tax – they are also reducing the costly corporate tax. Corporate taxes tend to substantially reduce the welfare of everyone – both the owners of corporate stock and the workers who depend on heavy capital investments. They have also abolished crippling financial transaction taxes.

Crippling financial transaction taxes like the one supported by Iowa Senator Harkin and his would-be successor Bruce Braley.

 

Jason Dinesen, Death Master File Changes Coming — Finally!  “All I can say is — thank you Congress (how often do we say that anymore?), and it’s about time.”

William Perez,  Using a Donor-Advised Fund to Donate to Charity at Year End

Howard Gleckman,  A New Look at Who Benefits from Tax Expenditures.  “There is a tax expenditure under the holiday tree for just about everyone.”

Speaking of trees.  O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree, Please Congress don’t tax our Christmas Trees (Kay Bell)

TaxGrrrl,  12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2013: Helping Hands Center For Special Needs   

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 225

Tax Justice Blog,  State News Quick Hits in Wisconsin, Illinois, Kentucky and Oklahoma

News from the Profession.  Short Sellers, Moms, Son of God, all Credited with Encouraging PwC’s Vigorous Audit of Herbalife (Going Concern)

Get your Friday Buzz from Robert D. Flach!

 

IrwinIrwinirwin.jpgQuotable me.  From Peter Reilly, Andrew Schiff Does Not Recommend That You Imitate His Father Irwin:

When I asked Joe Kristan for his thoughts on the matter he summed up the realist perspective pretty well:

“Oh, my.

“I don’t care to go down the rabbit hole on the tax protester arguments. However convincing they may seem to adherents, they just don’t work. Given the choice between Irwin Schiff’s theories and all the federal judges that have ruled on these arguments – and they’ve been put before the courts countless times – a wise taxpayer goes with what the judges say. Every time. You can believe there is no income tax, but if the IRS agent, the federal judge, the federal marshals, and the Bureau of Prisons say otherwise, for all practical purposes there is an income tax.”

Yep, I said that.  Thanks, Peter!

 

Mom can’t share everything.  Mothers are famous for sharing all with their kids, but sometimes it doesn’t work out.  From STLtoday.com:

A Creve Coeur venture capitalist was sentenced to five years in federal prison Thursday on a tax evasion charge for dodging millions of dollars in taxes from 2006-2009, the U.S. Attorney’s office said.

Burton Douglas Morriss, 50, should have paid $5.5 million, prosecutors said, but used $18 million in tax losses in 2007 alone to reduce the amount he claimed to owe. The companies that incurred the losses “were established as single member limited liability companies for Morriss’s mother” and she had already claimed those losses in past returns, prosecutors said.

Five years is the maximum sentence for a one-count tax evasion plea.   It’s not nice to steal Momma’s tax losses.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/11/13: Iowa DOT restricts revenue cameras. And: whither extenders?

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013 by Joe Kristan


gatso
Department of Transportation enacts tax reduction.  
From the Des Moines Register:

Cities and counties would have to prove the need for traffic enforcement cameras on major highways under rules approved Tuesday by the Iowa Transportation Commission.

The new rules — which could take effect as early as February — would force a re-evaluation of all speeding and red-light cameras now placed on interstate highways, U.S. highways and state highways and require any new cameras to first win the Department of Transportation’s approval.

It’s not clear what effect this will have on the revenue cameras, like the one on Eastbound I-235 by Waveland Golf Course, but given the howls from the affected municipal pickpockets who profit from the cameras in the runup to the rules, I suspect it means fewer cameras.   The municipalities like their tax on passing motorists, at least those who aren’t “special.”

Of course they always invoke safety, in spite of inconclusive or contradictory evidence.  But if it really were about safety, you would see them experimenting with other solutions, like all-red phases at red lights and longer yellows.   When they have to say it’s not about the money, it’s about the money.

 

Howard Gleckman,  Whither the Tax Extenders? (TaxVox):

If published reports are correct–and if the deal does not fall apart–Congress would partially replace the hated automatic across-the-board spending cuts (the sequester) with more traditional targets for each federal agency. In effect, it would freeze discretionary spending at about $1 trillion-a-year for the next two years. Without a new agreement the 2014 level would be $967 billion.

The deal would replace the sequester cuts with a grab-bag of other reductions in planned spending and a bunch of increased fees for airline travelers and others.

But the “t” word will go unspoken in this agreement. There will reportedly be no tax hikes in the bargain. But neither will there be a continuation of expiring provisions. And there is no chance they will be extended in any other bill in calendar 2013.

That likely means no action on the “expiring provisions” until after the 2014 elections.  That means we might not know whether a bunch of tax breaks we have gotten used to will be extended into 2014 until next December, or maybe even later.  A few of the biggies:

  • The Section 179 limit on expensing otherwise depreciable property falls to $25,000 next year, from the current $500,000, absent an extender bill.
  • 50% bonus depreciation goes away.
  • The research credit disappears, as do a bunch of biofuel and wind credits.
  • The current five-year “recognition period” for built-in gains in S corporations goes back to ten years, from the current five-year period.

My money is still on an extension of these provisions, effective January 1, 2014, even if enacted later, but my confidence is wavering.

 

20121220-3William Perez, Selling Profitable Investments as Part of a Year-End Tax Strategy. “Taxpayers in the two lowest tax brackets of 10% and 15% may especially want to consider selling profitable long-term investments.”  Why?  Zero taxes on capital gains, as William explains.

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Tax Treatment of Commuting Costs   

Kay Bell, Standard tax deduction amounts bumped up for 2014

Jana Luttenegger, 2014 Mileage Rates (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Jason Dinesen, Philosophical Question About Section 108, Principal Residences and Cancelled Debt  “My question is. what if the homeowner moves out before the foreclosure process is complete?”

TaxGrrrl, You’re A Mean One, Mr. Grinch: Christmas Tree Tax Proposal Returns 

Russ Fox,  Bank Notice on IRS Tax Refund Fraud.  “While I salute the IRS (and the banks) for doing something, this effort is equivalent to patching one hole in a roof that has over a hundred leaks.”

Robert D. Flach offers SOME GOOD CONVERSATIONS ON TAX PROFESSIONAL ISSUES

 

 

Leslie Book,  TEFRA and Affected Items Notices of Deficiency (Procedurally Taxing).  “In this post, I will attempt to give readers a map as to how IRS can move from shamming a partnership-based tax shelter to assessing tax against the partner or partners that were attempting to game the system.”

 

Kyle Pomerleau, High Income Households Paid an Effective Tax Rate 16 times Higher than Low Income Households in 2010 (Tax Policy Blog).  He provides more commentary on a recent Congressional Budget Office report (my emphasis):

In 2010, the average effective tax rate for all households was 18.1 percent. This is the average combined effective rate of individual income taxes, social security taxes, corporate income taxes, and excise taxes. The top income quintile paid an average effective tax rate of 24 percent.  The lowest quintile had an average effective rate of 1.5 percent. The top quintile’s effective tax rate of 24 percent is 16 times higher than 1.5 percent for those in the lowest quintile.

cbo rates by income group

This is why any federal tax cut “disproportionately benefits the wealthy.”  You can only cut taxes for people who pay taxes.

 

The Critical Question: When Does the Conspiracy End? (Jack Townsend)

News from the Profession: Deloitte Associate Exercises Powers of Persuasion; Scores Firm-Subsidized Xbox One (Going Concern)

 

20131211-1Atlanta county gives money to prosperous media company.  Cobb County, Future Home of the Atlanta Braves, Strikes Out (Elia Peterson, Tax Policy Blog, my emphasis):

The county is projected to have to finance around $300 million for the development.  This includes a one-time $14 million transportation improvement subsidy, a $10 million commitment from the Cumberland Community Improvement District (CID), and payments worth $276 million of a bond issue. The bonds are financed by redirecting funds from two existing taxes (hotel & property taxes) and creating three new revenue sources (a rental car tax, a property tax in the Cumberland CID, and a hotel fee) combined to the tune of $17.9 million annually for the next 30 years.

Liberty Media, the owner of the Braves, despite being a very successful company (owning stakes in SiriusXM, Barnes & Noble, and Time Warner) had their investment subsidized by Cobb County taxpayers. Liberty Media retains most of the rights to the stadium and profits while Cobb County gets next to nothing except the promise of “surefire” economic development (the city won’t even be allowed access to the stadium they built except for special occasions).

Build it and you can’t come!

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/2/2013: Remember the January 15 property tax credit deadline! And: final 3.8% tax regs.

Monday, December 2nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1There’s a new deadline this year for Iowa business owners with real property.   Iowa business owners have a January 15, 2014 deadline to apply for the business property tax credit enacted in this year’s legislative session.  Many have yet to apply, reports gazette.com:

Commercial property owners have been slow to apply for a new property tax credit designed to give a little boost to small businesses.

Most business owners who own the property in which the business operates are eligible for the Iowa Business Property Tax Credit.

A $50 million pool of money is available for the first year of the new tax credit. The state legislature included the credit in an historic property tax relief bill signed into law on June 12.

“It is important they get them in now so we can process them,” said Cedar Rapids City Assessor Scott Labus.

Businesses can find the form online here.  It should be filed with the local county assessor’s office. The gazette.com article says the maximum credit for the coming assessment year is $523.

 

Paul Neiffer,  Final Net Investment Income Regs Have Good News For Farmers:

In Final Regulations issued earlier this week, the IRS changed their interpretation of this rule and have now indicated that any self-rented real estate or rental real estate that has been properly grouped with a material participation entity will not be subject to the tax.  In even better news, any gain from selling this type of property will also be exempt from the tax.

Good news not just for farmers, but for any business where the owners rent property to a corporation they control.

 

Tony Nitti, IRS Issues Final Net Investment Income Tax Regulations: A First Look And More   It was a dirty trick to issue them over Thanksgiving, when I wasn’t watching.   I will be posting on some key issues.

 

20130419-1Illinois storm victims get filing relief (IRS news release):

The President has declared the counties of Champaign, Douglas, Fayette, Grundy, Jasper, La Salle, Massac, Pope, Tazewell, Vermilion, Wabash, Washington, Wayne, Will and Woodford a federal disaster area. Individuals who reside or have a business in these counties may qualify for tax relief.

The declaration permits the IRS to postpone certain deadlines for taxpayers who reside or have a business in the disaster area. For instance, certain deadlines falling on or after Nov. 17, and on or before Feb. 28, 2014, have been postponed to Feb. 28, 2014.

The IRS is also waiving the failure-to-deposit penalties for employment and excise tax deposits due on or after Nov. 17, and on or before Dec. 2, as long as the deposits are made by Dec. 2, 2013.

You don’t have to be damaged to qualify, you just have to be located in the affected area.

 

No, that’s not the real threat.  The Muscatine Journal mistakes the painkiller for the ailment:

Tax breaks for wind-power producers are set to expire in a little more than a month, threatening hundreds of manufacturing and energy jobs in the state if nothing is done.

In Iowa, much of the attention has focused on the federal Renewable Fuel Standard in which the federal government guarantees a market for biofuels. But for Iowa’s turbine manufacturers and power companies, it’s the federal production tax credit that takes precedence.

It’s not the loss of the tax credits that threatens these industries.  It’s their inability to survive without subsidies or, in the case of ethanol makers, their inability to sell their product unless people are forced by law to buy it.  The subsidies only dull the recipients awareness of their real ailment.

 

David Brunori, Confusing Tax Cuts with Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog):

But increasing or decreasing tax burdens should not be confused with tax reform. Tax reform should mean something. I define tax reform as meaningful changes to the tax system that comport with the general notions of sound tax policy. The goal should be to make the system fairer, neutral, more efficient, and more stable. The changes should also increase economic development and job growth. And they should ensure that the government raises enough revenue to meet the public service demands of the citizenry. Changing the rates or tinkering at the margins is not reform.

Nor is giving tax spiffs to influential or sympathetic constituencies, but that’s been the Iowa way for some time now.

 

20120529-2Lyman Stone, Missouri Considering “Massive” Incentives for Boeing (Tax Policy Blog):

This is bad tax policy in spades. Governor Nixon rejected a flawed, but still broad, tax cut on the grounds that taxes don’t matter much for businesses, but government services do. Now Missouri policymakers may try to attract one specific company with a “massive” and narrowly-targeted tax break, despite lack of evidence that incentives lead to economic growth, and ample evidence that they create problems.

It’s all about directing funds to insiders with good lobbyists.

 

Cara Griffith, A Change of Culture (Tax Analysts Blog).  She talks about the natural tendency of tax authorities to conceal information and make tax practice an insiders’ game.  She notes that North Carolina doesn’t release private rulings and hasn’t updated public corporate directives since April 2012.  Iowa is better, but they haven’t updated their “What’s new” website since August.

 

William Perez, Updated Form W-9.  With the additional rules of FATCA piled on top of existing foreign withholding rules, you should make sure to get a W-9 from your vendors, depositors and ownership groups.

 

Jason Dinesen reminds us of the Iowa Insurance Premium Deduction

Trish McIntire reminds us that Refund Advances are really expensive loans.

Robert D. Flach, TO PER DIEM OR NOT TO PER DIEM – THAT IS THE QUESTION.

 

Kay Bell offers some Tax-saving moves to make by Dec. 31, 2013

Howard Gleckman,  Obama Will Try to Clarify the Role of Tax-Exempt Groups in Politics.  Your new role in furthering public debate?  Shut up!

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 207

Tax Justice Blog: This Holiday, The Tax Justice Team Is Thankful For…  In other words, watch your wallets, folks.

The Critical Question: Do We Need A Clergy Tax Simplification Act Of 2014?    (Peter Reilly)

Going Concern, 10 Things Accounting Professionals Should Be Thankful For This Year

TaxGrrrl, This Man’s Nuts: Plan To Sell Testicle For New Car Is Taxable   As if there weren’t enough non-tax arguments against this plan.

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/22/13: Baucus proposes end of depreciation as we know it; also targets LIFO, cash-method farming.

Friday, November 22nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan
Max Baucus

Max Baucus

Baucus aims at LIFO, depreciation.  Senator Max Baucus has issued a tax reform proposal that slows depreciation and eliminates LIFO.  While it is a long way from becoming law — and certainly won’t become law in its current form — it will help shape the next round of tax reform.  Some key points:

-Depreciation for non-real estate assets would be computed not asset by assets, but in “pools,” with a set percentage of the amount of assets in each pool deducted during the year.  If the pool goes negative with dispositions, income is recognized.  There would be four “pools” with varying recovery percentages.

- Buildings would be depreciated under current rules, but over 43 years.

- The annual Section 179 limit would be $1 million, but with a phaseout starting at $2 million of assets placed in service.

- Research expenses would be capitalized and amortized over five years.

- LIFO would be repealed.

- Advertising costs would only be half deductible currently with the rest amortized over 5 years.

- Farmers would lose their exemption from accrual-basis accounting.

I think this goes the wrong way, adding complexity and lengthening lives.  I would prefer more immediate expensing.  LIFO repeal, and maybe the farm rule,  are the only proposals that seem to actually simplify anything.  The rest seem like high-toned revenue grabs.  If the revenue all goes to reduce rates, that wouldn’t be so bad, but I doubt that’s the idea.

 

Victor Fleischer, Tax Proposal for an Economy No Longer Rooted in Manufacturing:

The Baucus proposal aims to make the tax system match economic reality, removing the tax distortions from the equation. It would group tangible assets into just four different pools, with a fixed percentage of cost recovery applied to the tax basis of each pool each year, ranging from 38 percent for short-lived assets to 5 percent for certain long-lived assets.

It would be hard to make the case for giving the priority to tangible assets, and yet that is precisely what current law does by allowing rapid depreciation. At a minimum, the tax depreciation system should strive for neutrality and not discourage investment in intangibles and human capital.

That’s true.  Yet it’s hard to see how the Baucus proposal to require R&D costs to be amortized over five years, or the proposal to require 20-year amortization of intangibles instead of the current 15 years, encourages investments in intangibles and human capital.

Via Lynnley Browning’s Twitter feed.

The TaxProf has a roundup of the plan:  Senate Finance Committee Releases Depreciation and Accounting Tax Reform Plan 

William Perez, Draft Tax Reform Proposals from the Senate Finance Committee

Paul Neiffer, MAJOR Farm Tax Law Changes Proposed by Senate

Leslie Book, Senator Baucus Releases Proposals to Reform Administration of Tax Laws (Procedurally Taxing.

 

St. Louis loses another preparer.  From a Department of Justice Press Release:

A federal district judge in St. Louis has permanently barred defendants Joseph Burns, Joseph Thomas and International Tax Service Inc. from preparing federal tax returns for others, the Justice Department announced today…

According to the complaint, the defendants repeatedly fabricated expenses and deductions on customers’ returns and falsely claimed head of household status for customers who were married in order to illegally understate their customers’ federal tax liabilities and to obtain fraudulent tax refunds. The complaint also alleged that the defendants falsely claimed that some of their customers earned income from businesses that the defendants fabricated or increased the amount of business income their customers earned in order to illegally claim the maximum earned income tax credit on customers’ returns.

The IRS has certainly given their clients’ returns a good going over.  That’s the risk of going with a preparer whose results are too good to be true.

 

Scott Hodge, Andrew Lundeen, America Has Become a Nation of Dual-Income Working Couples (Tax Policy Blog)

20131122-1

Though its a brave man who tells the stay-at-home she’s not “working” after a day spent between taking care of an elderly parent and little kids.

 

Jason Dinesen,  Life After DOMA: What if You Amend One Year But Not the Next?

TaxGrrrl, When Mom and Dad Move In: The ‘Granny-Flat Tax Exemption’ For the Sandwich Generation 

Jana Luttenegger, Electronic Signatures, What’s Next? (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).  E-filing of wills?

Phil Hodgen, U.S. brokerage accounts after you expatriate

Russ Fox, It’s All Greek to Me. Don’t gamble in Greece, seems to be the point.

 

20121120-2Kay Bell, Ways & Means’ tax plays in GOP anti-Obamacare game plan

Howard Gleckman,  How Washington May Turn June Into Fiscal February (TaxVox).  Yes they’ll be running out of our money again soon.

Christopher Bergin, The End of the Era of Multinationals (Tax Analysts Blog)

Tax Justice Blog, Scott Walker’s Tax Record Will Be on the Wisconsin Ballot Next Year.  Shockingly, TJB doesn’t like Walker.

Tony Nitti, International Tax Reform For Dummies 

Visit Robert D. Flach for fresh Friday Buzz!

 

News from the Profession: New Audit Associate Looking For Prank Ideas, Possibly a New Job in Near Future (Going Concern)

Oh, one more thing: Magnus!

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Tax Roundup, 11/20/13: Are reports of the death of Instant Tax Service premature? And: film credits = bait car?

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013 by Joe Kristan
"Fez" Ogbasion, Instant Tax Service CEO.

“Fez” Ogbazion, Instant Tax Service CEO.

Is Instant Tax Service still dead?  Maybe not, reports TaxGrrrl: In Apparent Defiance Of Court Order, Fourth Largest Tax Biz In Country Preps For Sale :

Within a week of the Order, [founder "Fez"] Ogbazion was said to be engaged in discussions relating to the sale of the company, an activity that would appear to be barred under the injunction. Todd Bryant, General Counsel for ITS Financial, confirmed via email that “[a]n asset sale is being considered.”

It was a puzzle, though, as to who might be interested in purchasing the beleaguered company.

An insider, it turns out.  TaxGrrrl questions whether that will work, given that the court order seems designed to destroy the company and salt the earth so it can never return.  Judge for yourself (my emphasis):

Based on the foregoing, IT IS HEREBY ORDERED pursuant to I.R.C. §§ 7402 and 7408 that Defendants ITS Financial, LLC, TCA Financial, LLC, Tax Tree, LLC, and Fesum Ogbazion, and their representatives, agents, employees, attorneys, and/or any person or entity acting in active concert or participation with them, are PERMANENTLY ENJOINED from directly or indirectly, by use of any means:

A. Operating, or being involved with in any way, any work or business relating in any way to preparation of tax returns; and, accordingly, Defendants ITS Financial, LLC, TCA Financial, LLC, and Tax Tree, LLC shall cease to operate; and Defendant Fesum Ogbazion shall cease operating, or being involved with in any way, any work or business relating in any way to preparation of tax returns;

B. Acting as tax return preparers; and/or acting or operating as a franchisor of businesses relating in any way to preparation of tax returns;

C. Supervising or managing or assisting tax return preparers; and/or owning, operating, or engaging in work or a business relating in any way to preparation of tax returns;

D. Assisting with or directing the preparation or filing of tax returns, amended returns, claims for refund, or other related documents;

E. Representing before the Internal Revenue Service any person or organization whose tax liabilities are under examination or investigation by the IRS;

F. Organizing, promoting, providing, advising or selling any business or work of tax services;

They seem to be looking for a loophole here by selling assets, rather than stock, though the injunction against “selling any business” would seem to cover that.  I suspect the judge will make things clear in the coming days.

Prior coverage: Judge shuts down Instant Tax Service.

 

Instant Tax, meet Mo’ Money.  Owner of St. Louis tax prep franchise gets 20 months for 20130919-2fraud (stltoday.com):

The owner of a Mo’ Money tax preparation franchise in St. Louis was sentenced to 20 months in federal prison on Tuesday after pleading guilty in July to conspiracy to commit tax fraud and aiding and abetting the preparation of false tax returns.

Jimi Clark, 57, of Memphis, Tenn., and four employees were arrested and indicted in October 2012 on one felony count each of conspiracy to commit tax fraud. All were accused of falsely claiming educational tax credits on at least 47 tax returns for 2009.

Refundable credits like the American Opportunity Credit and the Earned Income Credit are the fuel for the fraudulent return industry.

 

haroldLyman Stone,  California Film Tax Credit Faces Controversy, Delay (Tax Policy Blog):

 A recent FBI sting in California revealed that state Senator Ron Calderon may have taken up to $60,000 in exchange for pushing to lower eligibility requirements for California’s $100-million-a-year film tax incentive program. This isn’t the first time film incentives have been connected to corruption and scandal. Indeed, a scandal about misallocation of film tax credits ultimately led to the demise of Iowa’s program over the last few years.

Sometimes I think that Iowa’s Film Credit Program was just an elaborate “Bait Car” episode that ultimately didn’t run because the stealing was too easy.

 

Elizabeth MalmMaryland Governor Touts Benefits of Film Tax Credits, Despite Evidence to the Contrary  (Tax Policy Bl0g).  Iowa has stopped giving filmmakers money and is instead giving them time, with no apparent bad economic effects.

Kay Bell, Coast-to-coast concerns about film and TV tax credits

 

David Henderson, Saez You: Income Distribution without Key Components of Income.  It turns out one of the most-cited articles on income inequality leaves out a lot of income, particularly government transfers and welfare benefits.  He notes notes, increased transfers are always advocated as a cure for inequality, and yet by the measuring stick used, it can never “help.”

 

Clint Stretch, Turning Down the Heat on Energy Tax Policy  (Tax Analysts Blog).  He notes the new oil and gas boom, and that “Oil and gas tax incentives are not responsible.”

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 195

Source: The Tax Foundation

Source: The Tax Foundation

Howard Gleckman, Baucus Proposes International Tax Reform But Future Action Remains Uncertain (TaxVox)

According to the plan, passive income from overseas activities would continue to be taxed at U.S. rates. Most income from the sale of goods and services overseas would also be taxed at full U.S. rates. The draft would end the practice of deferral that allows firms to avoid U.S. tax on foreign earnings until they bring those profits home. However, income that is currently parked overseas would be taxed at a 20 percent rate payable over 8 years.

Baucus would move the U.S. closer to a territorial system favored by many multinationals and GOP lawmakers. Under such a system, income is taxed in the jurisdiction where it is earned rather than by the firm’s home country. While the plan does not fix a specific tax rate, staffers say Baucus is aiming to reduce the corporate rate from 35 percent to about 30 percent.

But in the Baucus plan, this shift closer to a territorial tax comes at a price. To limit the ability of multinationals to game the system, the plan would impose a stiff minimum tax on income earned overseas by foreign affiliates of U.S. parent companies.

Reducing the corporate rate is fine, but remember that most business income is taxed on 1040s anymore.

 

Tax Justice Blog,  Statement from CTJ Director Robert McIntyre: Is the Baucus Plan for Multinational Corporations a Prelude to a Middle-Class Tax Increase?

 

Peter Reilly has been playing hooky at the commemoration of yesterday’s 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address.  I’m jealous.

The Critical Question: Hasn’t the Government Done Enough to Mess Up Higher Education Finance? (David Brunori, Tax Analysts Blog)  Well, I’m sure they can always mess it up even more.

News from the Profession. Non-Traditional Holiday Celebrations at Accounting Firms, Care To Add Yours?

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/8/13: Kyle Orton gets the bad news about the Tax Fairy. And: how many Lithuanians can you fit into a mailbox?

Friday, November 8th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

tax fairyKyle Orton’s old lawyer fails to find the Tax Fairy, departs the tax business.  From a Department of Justice press release:

A federal court has permanently barred Gary J. Stern from promoting tax fraud schemes and from preparing related tax returns, the Justice Department announced today.  The civil injunction order, to which Stern consented without admitting the allegations against him, was entered by Judge Robert Gettleman of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.  The order permanently bars Stern from preparing various types of tax returns for individuals, estates and trusts, partnerships or corporations (IRS Forms 1040, 1041, 1065, and 1120), among others. 

According to the complaint, Stern designed at least three tax-fraud schemes that helped hundreds of customers falsely claim over $16 million in improper tax credits and avoid paying income tax on at least $3.4 million.  Stern allegedly promoted the schemes to customers, colleagues, and business associates.  The complaint alleges that his customers included lawyers, entrepreneurs and professional football players, and some of the latter, including NFL quarterback Kyle Orton, have sued Stern in connection with the tax scheme, alleging fraud, breach of fiduciary duty and professional malpractice. 

Mr. Stern seems to have led his clients on a merry chase after the Tax Fairy, the legendary sprite who can wave her wand and make your taxes disappear.  Kyle Orton is a graduate of Southeast Polk High School near Des Moines, where the truth about the Tax Fairy apparently was not in the syllabus.

Related: Jack Townsend, Chicago Lawyer Enjoined From Promoting Fraudulent Tax Schemes 

 

20131108-1Maybe Lithuanian apartments are crowded?  USA Today reports:

The Internal Revenue Service sent 655 tax refunds to a single address in Kaunas, Lithuania — failing to recognize that the refunds were likely part of an identity theft scheme. Another 343 tax refunds went to a single address in Shanghai, China.

Thousands more potentially fraudulent refunds — totaling millions of dollars — went to places in Bulgaria, Ireland and Canada in 2011.

In all, a report from the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration today found 1.5 million potentially fraudulent tax returns that went undetected by the IRS, costing taxpayers $3.2 billion.

When your controls don’t notice something like that, you have a lot more urgent problems than regulating preparers.   Yet Congress and the Administration think the IRS is ready to take on overseeing your health insurance purchases.  What could go wrong?

Tony Nitti is moved to offer the IRS a proposition:

MR. IRS,

REQUEST FOR URGENT BUSINESS RELATIONSHIP

FIRST, I MUST SOLICIT YOUR STRICTEST CONFIDENCE IN THIS TRANSACTION. THIS IS BY VIRTUE OF ITS NATURE AS BEING UTTERLY CONFIDENTIAL AND ‘TOP SECRET’.

Heh.

 

 

S-SidewalkCosting taxpayers by not taking their money.  Tax Analysts reports ($link):

Democrats seeking to raise revenue in ongoing budget talks have circulated a list of tax preferences they would like to see eliminated, including a provision that allows some wealthy individuals to avoid large payroll taxes, the carried interest preference, and the tax break for expenses businesses incur when moving operations overseas. 

The “provision that allows some wealthy individuals to avoid large payroll taxes” is called Subchapter S.  Form 1120-S K-1 income has never been subject to payroll or self-employment tax.  This bothers the congresscritters (my emphasis):

Commonly known as the “Newt Gingrich/John Edwards” loophole, it is most often used by owners of Subchapter S corporations to avoid the 3.9% Medicare tax on earnings, which costs taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars every year.  Many S corporation shareholders receive both wages from the S corporation and a share of the S corporation’s profits, but they pay payroll tax only on their wages.

“Costs” taxpayers?  From my point of view, and from that of my S corporation clients, it saves taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars every year — but keeps it out of the hands of grasping politicians, so it’s perceived as a bad thing, by grasping politicians.

The versions of this “loophole closer” proposed in the past have been lame.  When all they have to offer on tax policy is warmed over lameness like these, they aren’t serious.

 

 

TaxProf, Brunson: Preventing IRS Abuse of the Tax System.  The TaxProf quotes a new article by Samuel D. Brunson:

The IRS can act in ways that violate both the letter and the intent of the tax law. Where such violations either provide benefits to select groups of taxpayers without directly harming others, or where the harm to taxpayers is de minimis, nobody has the ability or incentive to challenge the IRS and require it to enforce the tax law as written.

Congress could control the IRS’s abuse of the tax law. Using insights from the literature of administrative oversight, this Article proposes that Congress provide standing on third parties to challenge IRS actions. If properly designed and implemented, such “fire-alarm oversight” would permit oversight at a significantly lower cost than creating another oversight board. At the same time, it would be more effective at finding and responding to IRS abuse of the tax system and would generally preserve the IRS’s administrative discretion in deciding how to enforce the tax law.

Right now the IRS — and by extension the administration in power — can pick and choose what parts of the law it wants to apply.  For example, the current administration has chosen to allow tax credits for participants in federal insurance exchanges, which the law does not authorize, while unilaterally delaying the employer insurance mandate but not the individual mandate.  Somebody should be able to challenge this sort of fiat government.

 

More on the shutdown of Instant Tax Service, a story we covered yesterday:Irwin

Department of Justice press release: Federal Court in Ohio Shuts Down Nation’s Fourth-Largest Tax-Preparation Firm and Bars CEO from Tax-Preparation Business

 

Irwinirwin.jpgPeter Reilly, Ninth Circuit Rules Against Irwin Schiff Sentence Appeal:

Irwin Schiff is probably one of the more famous alternate tax thinkers.  His seminal work “How Anyone Can Stop Paying Income Taxes” is available in hardcover on Amazon for one cent.

Mr. Schiff appealed his sentence on tax crimes on the basis that his attorney failed to raise a “bipolar disorder” defense and what an attorney I know calls the “good faith fraud” defense — the Cheek argument that you really thought the wacky stuff you were saying is true.  Peter wisely notes:

The problem with the Cheek defense is that you have to be smart to raise it, but if you show that you are too smart, then it does not work.

Its a fine line — smart enough to spend “thousands of hours” researching the tax law, but not smart enough to avoid a massive misunderstanding of it.

 

Jana Luttenegger,  IRS Change to Use-Or-Lose Rule for FSA Accounts (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog): “New IRS rules permit employers to allow participants in a health Flexible Spending Arrangement (FSA) to carry over unused amounts up to $500 from one plan year to the next.”

 

Paul Neiffer, Trusts Get Hit with New 3.8% Tax too. And hard.

Kay Bell, It could be time to harvest capital gains and future tax savings

Rush Nigut,  Careful Planning Necessary When Using Retirement Monies to Fund Startup Business

Brian Strahle, IGNORANCE MAY NOT BE BLISS WHEN IT COMES TO ‘ZAPPERS’  These are software apps designed to hide point-of-sale receipts from the taxman.

Phil Hodgen’s Exit Tax Book: Chapter 9 – Estate and Gift Tax for the Covered Expatriate

Catch your Friday Buzz with Robert D. Flach!

TaxGrrrl,  Former NFL Star Cites Concussions, Receives Prison Sentence For Role In Tax Fraud 

Leslie Book,  TIGTA Report on VITA Errors (Procedurally Taxing)

 

Howard Gleckman,  Can Expiring Tax Provisions Save the Budget Talks? (TaxVox).  “Sadly, it is hard to see how.”

 

Not strictly tax-related, but good reading anyway:  How to Put the Brakes on Consumers’ Debt(Megan McArdle).  Megan points out the wisdom of spending less than you take in, in preference to trying to get the government to cover your shortfalls.

 

News you can use: 3 ways to screw up your next website (Josh Larson at IowaBiz.com)

News from the Profession: Failed PwC Auditor Finds Success in Burning Bridges With This Ridiculous Farewell Email (Going Concern)

 

Quick thinking.  From The Des Moines Register:

A Des Moines man awoke to find a stranger in his living room Thursday afternoon, police said. When the victim confronted the burglar, the suspect reportedly offered to mow the victim’s lawn for $5.

Guy needs to work on his pricing model.

 

 

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