Posts Tagged ‘Howard Gleckman’

Tax Roundup, 7/28/14: Out of the Wilderness edition.

Monday, July 28th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Joe K as Ted KI’m back from the Philmont Scout Ranch.  81 rough and hilly miles in 10 days, not counting wrong turns, and all but about 12 with full pack.  The remainder were side trips up mountains.

It was a memorable and wonderful experience, even though I don’t intend to repeat it anytime soon.  I went with a great crew (including my younger son), and a skilled and wise adult “co-advisor,” so mostly I just got to enjoy the scenery and work on my new Unabomber Cowboy look.  I got a bunch of New Mexico mountain flora and fauna photos, many of which will be used as decoration on the Tax Roundups in the coming weeks.

I missed some tax stuff, which I will try to catch up on over the next few days.  I especially need to ponder the implications of the Halbig decision by the D.C. Circuit, striking down tax credits for Obamacare, and, perhaps, the employer and individual mandates for non-exchange state residents.

For the record, I had to clear my spam filter of 50,852 assuredly wonderful comments, and another 128 that got through the spambox for moderation. If you made a non-spam comment that I deleted, I’m sorry.  With so much spam, I have to take the spam filter’s word for it.

Today’s roundup will be abbreviated, as I still have to dig out from the usual post-vacation accumulation of chores.

 

20140728-1Roger McEowen, D.C. Circuit Says IRS Illegally Created Obamacare Tax; Fourth Circuit Sees No Evil.  “The D.C. Circuit’s decision relieves millions of persons from the penalty tax under I.R.C. Sec. 36B that the Congress did not state were subject to the tax.  Most assuredly, the government will ask the full court to hear reconsider the decision.”

TaxGrrrl, Courts Issue Conflicting Rulings On Obamacare Tax Credits: Which One Got It Right?   

William Perez, List of Sales Tax Holidays in 2014.  Iowa’s is this weekend.

Jana Luttenegger, Change in One-Per-Year Rollover Rules on IRA (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Peter Reilly, Pulling IRS Into Your Business Dispute Might Not Be Such A Good Idea.  No kidding.

Robert D. Flach just keeps Buzzing!

 

Christopher Bergin, Inversion Diversion (Tax Analysts Blog):

There’s a lot more wrong with the tax system than corporate inversions. But that’s not the point. With all that’s going on in the world, when President Obama jumps on the anti-inversion bandwagon, it will give the official seal of approval to inversions as this summer’s red herring.  

The talk of corporations making tax moves as “deserters” is repulsive — as if their only duty is to generate revenue for Uncle Sam, without regards to their owners and customers.

Howard Gleckman, The Bring Jobs Home Act Won’t (TaxVox)

Joshua Miller, Richard Borean, Higher Education Tax Credits are a Windfall for Universities.  Of course they are.  You didn’t think they were for students, did you?

Accounting Today,  Former IRS Employee Arrested in Identity Theft Ring.  How do people think IRS regulation of preparers will stop fraud when IRS employment doesn’t.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 445

News from the Profession.  This Complete Idiot Cheated on the Open Book Ethics Exam, Ratted Self Out. (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 7/9/14: It’s an outrage! Oh, we did it? That’s fine. And: Economic development cyanide!

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

So the taxpayer wants a tax refund.  He calls an IRS agent, who says she will look into it and call back.  Impatient taxpayer calls the agent back five times and tells her she is being uncooperative, finally telling her to “put her money where her mouth is.”  Taxpayer several days later sends the agent a letter telling her that she could issue the tax refund, but chooses not to, and demands the IRS submit some documents.  The IRS schedules a meeting, and the taxpayer insists on the refund now.  The taxpayer attempts to put a lien on the agent’s property for the balance due.

Naturally the taxpayer finds this doesn’t work, and gets hit with all sorts of penalties for this, right?  No, the taxpayer gets off scot-free.  Can you believe it?

Oops, I misspoke.  I got the names backwards.  The IRS was doing this to the taxpayer, and the courts this week refused to impose penalties on the agency for hounding a 71-year-old lady for back taxes on a failed like-kind exchange.

Sauce for the goose really ought to be sauce for the gander.  The IRS has a lot more resources and a lot more ability to follow the law than the average taxpayer.  Yet while the IRS and the courts routinely slap penalties on inadvertent or naive violations of a complex tax law, the courts rarely hold the powerful IRS to the same standards, and it almost never penalizes the agents for misbehavior towards taxpayers.

Cite: Antioco v. United States; USDC CA-ND, No. 3:13-cv-00924

Stephen Olsen, IRS Not Liftin the Penalties — Fed Circuit Denies Taxpayer’s Reasonable Cause Argument (Procedurally Taxing) The courts stack the deck against the taxpayer a little more.

 

20120906-1Don Boudreaux“Damn! My Neighbor Swallowed Cyanide. I Guess I Gotta Swallow Cyanide, Too.”  He’s talking about the crony subsidy Export-Import Bank, but his apt argument applies just as well to state “economic development” tax credits:

Subsidies and other economic privileges weaken the domestic economy.  They do so because, in order to artificially bolster industries that excel at satisfying politicians, such privileges necessarily transfer resources away from industries that excel at satisfying consumers.  Because Mr Summers (like nearly all economists) apparently accepts this sound argument, he especially should see that subsidies are not the economic equivalent of armaments: an armaments build-up does indeed strengthen the country militarily; subsidies, in contrast, weaken the country economically.

So when foreign governments subsidize industries (for example, through export credits of the sort doled out by the Ex-Im Bank), they themselves weaken their own countries’ economies relative to economies whose governments dispense no subsidies or other special privileges.

Taxing your existing taxpayers to lure and fund their competitors is a bad idea, even if Illinois is doing it too.

 

IRAJason Dinesen, ROBS Transactions – Be Very Careful of Using Retirement Funds to Start a Business.  Jason discusses the unwisdom of having your IRA invest in your business.  It can be a catastrophically expensive source of capital.

William Perez, Wage and Salary Income.   How it’s taxed.

Kay Bell, Pot shop seeks Tax Court relief from cash tax payment penalty.  You have to remit your taxes electronically.  We won’t let you have a bank account to transmit it from.  Understand?

Jim Maule’s Tax Myth series continues with “The IRS Gave Me a Refund.”  ” I suppose that those who are concerned that the federal government or a state government might run out of money before the refund is paid are overjoyed when the refund arrives, but as a realistic, practical matter, simply getting one’s money back isn’t a joyous occasion.”

Peter Reilly, Should You Follow The Clintons And Do Your QPRT Sooner Rather Than Later?

Robert W. Wood, Five Stages Of Grief, IRS Version.  I see clients go through all five stages every April.

 

20140508-1Kyle Pomerleau, Bonus Depreciation is a Bonus, but Full Expensing is Ideal (Tax Policy Blog)  “An Ideal tax code would allow the full $100 cost of the oven to be deducted in the year in which it was purchased.”

Howard Gleckman, New TPC Analysis: What Dave Camp’s Tax Reform Plan Would Really Mean (TaxVox)

Kelly Davis, Tax Policy and the Race for the Governor’s Mansion: Kansas Edition (Tax Justice Blog).  “This Kansas gubernatorial election is shaping up to be a referendum on Governor Sam Brownback’s tax cuts and supply-side economics generally.”

Jeremy Scott, Could EU Probe Signal the End of Sweetheart Tax Deals? (Tax Analysts Blog)  “U.S. tax rules are clearly complicit in multinationals’ ability to lower their tax burden, but the European Union is now examining whether its member states are inappropriately aiding some companies through so-called sweetheart transfer pricing arrangements.”

Accounting Today has your Tax Fraud Blotter.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 426

News from the Profession:  Consultant Shares Secrets For Milking the Most Out of CPA Firm Staff (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 7/2/14: How to make the least of that office manager job. And: IRS gets around to the obvious!

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014 by Joe Kristan


20140508-2No office manager is paid enough for this.  
The tax law doesn’t like it at all when an employer withholds payroll taxes from paychecks and fails to pass it on to the IRS.  One tool the IRS uses to encourage compliance is the “responsible person” penalty.  If a person with responsibility for remitting payroll taxes knowingly fails to do so, the IRS can assess that person with a 100% penalty — even if that person didn’t get any of the money.

A Virginia federal district court recently drove that lesson home to a Ms. Horne, an office manager for a medical practice:

A. Responsible Person

Horne was a responsible person for the Company for each quarter of 2006 through 2010. First, Horne was the Company’s Officer Manager throughout that time period. Second, Horne had substantial authority over payroll because she prepared and signed the Company’s payroll checks. Third, because Horne was charged with preparing checks to creditors, she necessarily determined which creditors to pay. Fourth, Horne participated in day-to-day management of the Company, including making decisions about employee compensation, maintaining the Company’s books and records, and preparing financial information to be presented at shareholder meetings. Fifth, at all relevant times, Horne had authority to, and did, sign checks drawn on the Company’s bank account. Sixth, Horne participated in decisions regarding the hiring and firing of employees.

B. Willful Action

From 2006 to 2010, Horne was aware of the Company’s unpaid employment tax liabilities as they accrued. However, she continued to prepare and sign checks to pay other creditors in preference over the United States. Accordingly, the Court finds that Horne acted willfully in failing to pay over to the Service the taxes withheld from the wages of the Company’s employees.

IV. CONCLUSION

For the aforementioned reasons, the Court will GRANT the Motion. Horne is, thus, liable to the United States in the amount of $2,926,809.51, plus statutory interest accruing from December 23, 2013. 

 

It’s hard to save $2.9 million even on the best office manager salary.

Update:  An excellent point made in the comments:  “I feel for anyone placed in the tough position of losing a job to avoid liability for an employer’s inability to pay its tax liability to the IRS, but the 100% penalty imposed by Section 6672 on responsible persons makes it clear that the job is not worth the tax problem arising from a company’s failure to pay its trust fund taxes.”

 

Cite: Miller v. United States et al.; No. 3:13-cv-00728

 

 

20130723-3IRS takes obvious measures to fight refund fraud five years late.  From Tax Analysts ($link)

     Starting in January 2015, the IRS will no longer make direct deposits of more than three tax refunds into one financial account, Commissioner John Koskinen told tax return preparers at the IRS Nationwide Tax Forum in Chicago July 1.

The move is meant to enhance the IRS’s efforts to combat stolen identity refund fraud, Koskinen explained in prepared remarks for his address to the forum.

Any refund after the third will automatically be converted to a paper check and mailed to the address on the tax return, Koskinen told preparers. “We will send out notices to those taxpayers that their refunds are being mailed and they should expect to receive them in about four weeks from the time of mailing,” he said.

That’s a good start.  Perhaps next the IRS can flag multiple refunds being sent to the same address – like the 655 refunds to a single apartment in Lithuania.  Baby steps.  Like this:

The IRS also plans to end the practice of a small number of preparers who serve as banker to their clients or who take fees from the refunds, Koskinen said. “We’ve identified about 4,400 personal accounts held by tax preparers where multiple refunds were deposited,” the commissioner said. “We’re putting a stop to that, too.”

No doubt some of these are full service firms that do your taxes, collect your refund — and spend it for you.

 

William Perez, Divorce and Taxes.  “We take a look at tax planning principles for property settlements, alimony and child support.”

Howard Gleckman, A Payroll Tax Math Error Adds $5 Billion To The Deficit (TaxVox).  “But the current law for the self-employed allows the full deduction of 7.65 percent—not only for earnings below the Social Security cap but, remarkably, even for earnings subject only to the 1.45 percent Medicare tax.”

Kay Bell, State tax law changes — from gas to sales to businesses and even soccer — take effect July 1

 

taxanalystslogoDavid Brunori, A Revenue Department Behaving Badly (Tax Analysts Blog).  “Documents (except for taxpayer information of course) produced by the “government” belong to the citizens.”

Kelly Davis, Kansas: Repercussions of a Failing Experiment (Tax Justice Blog).  “But the Governor’s experiment now appears to be in meltdown mode: revenues for the last two months have come in way under projections and may leave the state short of the cash needed to pay its bills.”

Lyman Stone, Scott Eastman, Liz Emanuel, Tyler Dennis, Courtney Michaluk, Independence Day Brings Fireworks Taxes to Light (Tax Policy Bl0g).  Hey, Iowa, if they aren’t legal, it’s harder to tax them.

Janet Novack, U.S. Taxpayers With Secret Offshore Money Face New Risks And Options 

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: Iowa Deduction Finder — Insurance Premium Tax Deduction

Peter Reilly, Military Housing Allowance Much More Limited Than Clergy’s

TaxGrrrl, IRS Announces Shorter, Faster Application For Some Tax Exempt Organizations

Robert D. Flach, MORE INFO ON THE NEW IRS ANNUAL FILING SEASON PROGRAM.  “I still think in its current form it is stupid, and that very few tax preparers will actually ‘volunteer’.”

Robert is right.

 

Megan McArdle ponders the version of the email erasure story from Lois Lerner’s attorney:

This weekend, William Taylor III, Lerner’s lawyer, went on television and described Lerner’s experience. Lerner came in one morning in 2011, he said, turned on her computer and got a blue screen.

That interested me, because the description is quite specific. What he seems to be describing is the famed Microsoft Windows “blue screen of death.”

Well, because as I mentioned above, the Blue Screen of Death is an operating system error. The operating system lives on the hard drive. Which raises a question: If Lerner’s hard drive was so thoroughly malfunctioning that no one could even get the data off of it, how was it booting up far enough for the operating system to malfunction?

She comes up with some potential explanations — which mostly assume it didn’t quite happen the way the lawyer describes.

 

20140516-1John Hinderaker,  More on the IRS’s Illegal Destruction of Evidence

True the Vote’s brief points out that the first lawsuit alleging discriminatory targeting of conservative groups was filed by a pro-Israel group called Z Street, Inc., on August 25, 2010. On that date, at the very latest, the IRS had a legal duty to take measures to ensure that no emails, correspondence, memoranda, notes, or other evidence of any sort that could be relevant to the case was lost or destroyed…

But, according to IRS representatives who have testified before Congressional committees, the IRS ignored the law. Instead of making sure that relevant information was preserved, the IRS blithely continued erasing back-up email tapes every 90 days. Further, the IRS continued its policy of assigning each employee a ridiculously small space on an email server, and then authorizing employees (like Lois Lerner) to delete at will to keep space open. And, finally, when Lerner’s hard drive crashed ten months after the Z Street case was commenced, the IRS made no effort to preserve it, but rather, by its own account, recycled the hard drive in a business-as-usual manner.

Don’t try this at home, kids.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 419

 

You should never be to busy to file correct tax returns.  Appeals court upholds Beavers’ tax conviction.

 

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Tax Roundup, 6/27/14: IRS tries preparer regulation through the back door. And: why was Lerner at IRS?

Friday, June 27th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20130121-2IRS tries “voluntary” end run around the law.  The IRS yesterday announced that it doesn’t need no stinking law (IR-2014-75):

The Annual Filing Season Program will allow unenrolled return preparers to obtain a record of completion when they voluntarily complete a required amount of continuing education (CE), including a course in basic tax filing issues and updates, ethics and other federal tax law courses.

“This voluntary program will be a step to help protect taxpayers during the 2015 filing season,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. “About 60 percent of tax return preparers operate without any type of oversight or education requirements. Our program will give unenrolled return preparers a way to stay to up-to-date on tax laws and changes, which we believe will improve service to taxpayers.”

Tax return preparers who elect to participate in the program and receive a record of completion from the IRS will be included in a database on IRS.gov that will be available by January 2015 to help taxpayers determine return preparer qualifications.

The database will also contain information about practitioners with recognized credentials and higher levels of qualification and practice rights. These include attorneys, certified public accountants (CPAs), enrolled agents, enrolled retirement plan agents (ERPAs) and enrolled actuaries who are registered with the IRS.

This Koskinen isn't the IRS commissioner

This Koskinen isn’t the IRS commissioner

So the Commissioner is keeping a little list of his friends.  And if you aren’t on his list of friends, you are on his list of not-friends.  It’s obvious what is going on here.  Through PR and subtle or non-so-subtle IRS preference for those on the Friends List, they will make life unpleasant for the non-friends, encouraging them to submit to “voluntary” CPE, testing, and ultimately, IRS control.  The IRS is trying to achieve its preparer regulation, ruled illegal by the courts, through other means.  This eagerness to take on a new program that nobody wants must mean the IRS is adequately funded, and its cries for more resources can safely be ignored.

Other coverage:

IRS Offers Voluntary Tax Preparer Education Program (Accounting Today)

Adrienne Gonzalez, IRS Goes Ahead With Voluntary Tax Preparer Program Despite AICPA Objection (Going Concern)

Leslie Book, IRS Announces Voluntary Education Program For Return Preparers (Procedurally Taxing)

Robert D. Flach, IT’S JUST STUPID  “This program will do little to ‘encourage education and filing season readiness’. ”

 

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Why did Lois Lerner work at the IRS?

This question came to mind in discussing the Lerner emails with a reader, who noted how a Politico piece about the Grassley email chain revealed this week pointed out this high-level IRS leader’s evident lack of tax skills:

Former ex-IRS tax exempt division chief Marcus Owens said the email chain shows Lerner knew very little about tax law, as there would have been nothing wrong with Grassley and his wife attending such an event, so long as the income was reported.

“It is nothing that rises to the level of referral for examination,” Owens said.

It is a mystery.  Her Wikipedia biography shows that she was a cum laude graduate of Northeastern University and the Western New England College of Law.  She worked as a high-level attorney at the Federal Election Commission, but moved to IRS as “Director Rulings and Agreements” in the exempt organizations branch of the IRS.  She rose to Director of Exempt Organizations in 2006.

Her resume, then, is that of a bureaucrat, rather than a tax practitioner or specialist.  She apparently never practiced tax law before moving into her important policy position — important in the tax world, anyway.

This sort of thing may be common in the federal bureaucracy.  It’s likely that she got a raise for the move, or something.  But it seems that while you could take the girl out of the FEC, you couldn’t take the FEC out of the girl.  She took it upon herself to monitor the electoral process with the tools of the tax law.

Megan McArdle explains why that was a bad idea:

This exchange suggests that Lois Lerner not only didn’t have a good, basic grasp of the tax law she was supposed to be administering, but also viewed her job as an extension of her work at the Federal Election Commission.

That’s not what the IRS is for. The IRS is not given power over nonprofit status in order to root out electoral corruption or the appearance of it. It is given power over nonprofit status in order to make sure that the Treasury gets all the revenue to which it’s entitled

Unfortunately, politicians see the tax law as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy, and it’s unsurprising that an IRS bureaucrat would see it the same way.

Moreover, Lerner’s overbroad instincts also seemed to kick into high gear when Republican politicians were involved. Of course, such reports might well be survivor bias — Republicans are complaining about Lerner, while Democrats who also had run-ins with her may be keeping quiet for fear of fueling the fire. At this point, however, the fire is burning merrily on its own. If Democrats who encountered Lerner’s overzealous use of her powers are out there, they’d do well to come forward and tell their stories to reassure Americans that even if her actions were overbroad, they weren’t broadly partisan.

They would have emerged by now.  The stats, as we noted yesterday, demonstrate one-sided enforcement.

It’s unlikely that Ms. Lerner came to the IRS with the idea of using her position to harass the opposition.  She just happened to be in a position to do so when applications from groups she didn’t like — perhaps that she even saw as dangerous and wrong — came across her desk.  It’s possible that she did it entirely on her own.  And that’s the scariest thing — a bureaucracy that moves on its own to squash ungoodthinkers is much more dangerous than a top-down conspiracy.  It may be hard to replace an administration, but it’s almost impossible to replace a bureaucracy.

 

taxanalystslogoChristopher Bergin, The IRS Has Been Set Up (Tax Analysts Blog):

I don’t know if the IRS has been politicized. Until recently that possibility would have been unthinkable. But the potential of the 501(c)(4) rules to be a setup for the politicization of the IRS is enormous. You simply can’t have the tax collector refereeing the people who provide it with its budget. 

Christopher calls for the repeal of 501(c)(4).

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 414

Johnnie M. Walters, Ex-IRS Chief, Dies at 94 (New York Times):  “Johnnie M. Walters, a commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service under President Richard M. Nixon who left office after refusing to prosecute people on Nixon’s notorious “enemies list,” died on Tuesday at his home in Greenville, S.C. He was 94.”

Funny how nobody is doing that anymore.

 

Jason Dinesen, I Can’t Do Much to Help You Once the Transaction Is Completed.  “The point is: the time to ask for tax advice about something that will generate a massive tax bill is beforehand, not afterwards.”

Russ Fox, FBAR Deadline Is June 30th, but It’s Not a Midnight Deadline.  “My advice is simple: File the FBAR asap–it at all possible by Saturday.”

TaxGrrrl, Kentucky Fried Hoax: What Happens To The Cash?

Peter Reilly, Kuretski – Was Legal Dream Team Really Trying To Help The Taxpayers?

Jack Townsend, False Statements Crime Element of “Knowingly and Willfully” Requires Proving Knowledge that Making False Statement Is Illegal

Robert D. Flach brings the Friday Buzz!

 

This happened in 2008.  It's raining again.

This happened in 2008. It’s raining again.

 

Lyman Stone, Pennsylvania House of Representatives Passes Suspension of Tax Credits (Tax Policy Blog). “Most of these credits amount to narrow carve-outs for favored industries and firms, and thus their elimination would generally be good tax policy as a way to make the tax code more neutral.”

Richard Phillips, Clinton Family Finances Highlight Issues with Taxation of the Wealthy (Tax Justice Blog).

Scott Eastman, Tax Inversions are a Symptom, Corporate Tax Reform is the Cure (Tax Policy Blog).

Howard Gleckman, CRFB’s New Online Budget Simulator (TaxVox).  “Neither Congress nor the White House seem to care much about the budget deficit these days, but if you do, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget has created an updated online budget simulator that lets you try to get a handle on fiscal policy.”

 

The new Cavalcade of Risk is up at Worker’s Comp Insider.  Good stuff always at the blog world’s roundup of insurance and risk management — including Hank Stern on a potential diabetes breakthrough.

Oops. U.K. tax system errors mean 3.5 million unexpectedly owe (Kay Bell)

 

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Tax Roundup, 6/25/14: Check your mailbox edition. And: the Commissioner’s real goal.

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120511-2Ignore them and they will come anyway.  A Chicagoan tried to avoid IRS pursuit by the simple expedient of not picking up his mail.  The Tax Court told him yesterday that doesn’t work:

 On several occasions the U.S. Postal Service (Postal Service) attempted, albeit unsuccessfully, to deliver the 2006-2007 notice of deficiency to petitioner at the address of his Columbus Drive apartment. On at least two occasions the Postal Service left notices of attempted delivery of certified mail at that address. In those notices, the Postal Service informed petitioner that it had certified mail to deliver to him and that he had to sign a receipt for that mail before the Postal Service would deliver it to him.

The taxpayer never got around to doing so. Yet he still wanted to fight the deficiencies in Tax Court:

It is petitioner’s position that he is entitled under section 6330(c)(2)(B) to contest the underlying tax liability for his taxable year 2006. In support of that position, petitioner contends that although respondent mailed to him by certified mail, return receipt requested, the 2006-2007 notice of deficiency that was addressed to his Columbus Drive apartment, he did not receive that notice within the 90-day period during which he could have filed a petition with the Court with respect to that notice. In support of that contention, petitioner relies on his testimony at the partial trial in these cases. 

There’s a 90-day deadline to file with the Tax Court, starting with the receipt of the Notice of Deficiency.  The Tax Court enforces the deadline pretty strictly.  And you can’t extend the deadline just by ignoring your mail:

On the record before us, we hold that petitioner may not decline to retrieve his Postal Service mail, when he was reasonably able and had multiple opportunities to do so, and thereafter successfully contend that he did not receive for purposes of section 6330(c)(2)(B) the 2006-2007 notice of deficiency. On that record, we reject petitioner’s contention that he is entitled under that section to dispute the underlying tax liability for his taxable year 2006.

Nice try.

Cite: Onyango, 142 T.C. No. 24.

 

Paul Neiffer, Is Low Section 179 Causing Low Equipment Sales?

 

Mixed message.   From Tax Analysts ($link): “Taxpayers considering the IRS’s new streamlined filing compliance program need to think carefully about whether their actions were truly non-willful, because a certification that proves untrue could expose them to more charges from the Justice Department, Kathryn Keneally, former assistant attorney general for the DOJ Tax Division, said June 24.”

The Treasury just can’t quite get the hang of this.  What taxpayers need is bright-line guidance that lets them come into compliance, at least below a relatively-generous dollar threshold.  Instead they have to come in with their hands up, while the IRS reserves the right to open fire — to second guess their state of mind.  That’s not necessarily very comforting.

 

 

Rose Mary Woods checks her e-mail in the Nixon administration.

Rose Mary Woods checks her e-mail in the Nixon administration.

Howard GleckmanThe Real IRS Flap Is About Dark Money, Not Emails (TaxVox):

But get past the shouting and two very important issues remain on the table: The first is the IRS has been terribly managed for years and needs to be fixed. It’s easy to forget, but that’s why Koskinen is there.

The second is that the commissioner appears undeterred in his efforts to rewrite the rules for 501(c)(4) non-profits that are engaged in political activities. That seemingly obscure effort will have an enormous impact on future U.S. elections and the balance of political power in the U.S.

This is chilling.  And Mr. Gleckman seems to think it’s just an effort by a disintersted public servant to impose order on chaos:

Koskinen is under great pressure from liberal and conservative groups and from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to abandon the effort. Don’t for a minute think that the House’s proposed $300 million cut in the IRS budget, its endless requests for IRS documents on multiple subjects, and even the email hearings themselves are not in part an effort to sink—or at least slow–these regulations.

Yet, Koskinen has refused to blink.

If you think Koskinen isn’t a partisan operative at the IRS, you haven’t been paying attention.   All of the pressure to “reform” the (c)(4)s has come from the left.  And it’s clear from the Tea Party targeting that the IRS can’t be trusted to regulate political actors evenhandedly.  If Mr. Gleckman is right, Koskinen’s mission is not to help the IRS to recover from its scandalous practices, but to institutionalize them.

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 412.  About 40 links today, primarily on Commissioner Koskinen’s appearance before Congressional investigators and related missing e-mail developments.  It’s hard to imagine how this Commissioner could do a worse job at coming clean and improving IRS relationships with GOP congressional appropriators.

Jonathan Adler, IRS agrees to pay non-profit group $50,000 for unauthorized release of tax return.  But nobody will lose their job, and the $50,000 won’t come out of any individual perpetrator’s pocket.  In fact, the leaker gets to maintain his/her anonymity, and presumably employment too.  And even though it was an illegal, and presumably partisan, disclosure of taxpayer information, the Justice Department isn’t going to investigate.

TaxGrrrl, Lois Lerner And The Case Of The Missing Emails.  “Yes, that’s right: the IRS used the same backup strategy for its important data that I used to record my soap operas in college.”

Russ FoxKoskinen Channels His Inner Nixon. “The IRS continues to look hyper-partisan, and that’s not a good thing for anyone.”

The Hill, Archives official: IRS didn’t follow law on missing emails.   But Commissioner Koskinen says no apologies are in order, so stop bothering him.

 

No Walnut STAccounting Today, AICPA Says IRS Voluntary Tax Preparer Certification Program Is Unlawful:

The AICPA’s letter emphasizes the following points:

• First, no statute authorizes the proposed program;

• Second, the program will inevitably be viewed as an end-run around Loving v. IRS, (a federal court ruling rejecting an earlier IRS attempt to regulate tax return preparers);

• Third, the IRS has evidently concluded, in developing the proposed program, that it need not comply with the notice and comment requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act. This is incorrect; and

• Finally, the current proposal is arbitrary and capricious because it fails to address the problems presented by unethical tax return preparers, runs counter to evidence presented to the IRS, and will create market confusion.

Not that being illegal will bother them; see above.

 

Arnold Kling, In Our Hands.  Mr. Kling discusses his idea for replacing all means tested welfare programs like the Earned Income Credit with a universal voucher: “Keep in mind that under current policy, many low-income households face effective marginal tax rates of 100 percent or higher. That is, they are better off with something less than full-time, year-round work.”

 

David Brunori, A Bad Law Addressing a Bad Business Tax (Tax Analysts Blog)

Local option business taxes, whether imposed on income, gross receipts, or personal property, are terrible ways to raise revenue. Only 14 states authorize their use, and they raise a paltry sum compared with the property tax or even local option sales and income taxes. Virtually all the public finance experts who have studied the issue denounce their use.

Of course, Iowa has lots of these.

 

20120606-1Sydni Pierce, Congress, Take Note: More States Are Reforming Antiquated Fuel Taxes This Summer (Tax Justice Blog)

Andrew Lundeen, Obamacare Increases Marginal Tax Rate on Labor by Six Percentage Points (Tax Analysts Blog).   “In the case of the Affordable Care act, Mulligan is talking about implicit marginal tax rates, or ‘the extra taxes paid, and subsidies forgone, as the result of working.'”

 

Adrienne Gonzalez, Bernie Madoff’s Former Accountant Pleads Guilty But Clueless (Going Concern).  “Prosecutors say that Konigsberg didn’t intend to help defraud Madoff investors, but knowingly used fraudulently backdated trades provided by Mr. Madoff’s firm as he prepared tax returns for some clients’ investment account.”

 

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Tax Roundup, 6/16/14: The dog ate my email edition. And: mail those estimates!

Monday, June 16th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Mail your second quarter 1040 and 1041 estimates today! (Or pay them online).

 

Rose Mary Woods checks her e-mail in the Nixon administration.

Rose Mary Woods checks her e-mail in the Nixon administration.

If the IRS demanded your emails, and you said the computer “crashed” and ate them, they’d buy that, right?  

The IRS expects us to believe that they so monumentally incompetent at information technology that they can’t produce Lois Lerner’s emails from January 2009 through April 2011.  No backups?  No RAID duplication?  No way to reconstruct them out of the bad hard drive?

Even the best possible interpretation of this — taking the IRS at its word — is a damning indictment of the agency.  It would show that basic network hygiene used by the private sector since the last century still is too advanced for the biggest taxing agency in the world.

But you may be excused for suspecting evil instead of incompetence here.  Congressional investigators have been looking for these emails for months.  Evidence has been building of an interagency effort between the IRS and the Justice Department to shut down, and even prosecute, unfriendly organizations.  Now, suddenly, poof, no more emails.  I don’t buy it.

The IRS statement says “In the course of collecting and producing Ms. Lerner’s additional emails, the IRS determined her hard drive crashed in 2011.”  What email system does the IRS use where the emails live on individual hard drives, rather than an email server?  Do any of you readers use your PC as your email server?  If so, do you never back it up?

And if you buy the IRS story, then tell my why on earth this exceptionally inept agency should be responsible for administering the nation’s health insurance system through the ACA.  Or even the income tax, for that matter.

Sheryl Attkinson has some follow-up questions for the IRS:

Please provide a timeline of the crash and documentation covering when it was first discovered and by whom; when, how and by whom it was learned that materials were lost; the official documentation reporting the crash and federal data loss; documentation reflecting all attempts to recover the materials; and the remediation records documenting the fix. This material should include the names of all officials and technicians involved, as well as all internal communications about the matter.

Please provide all documents and emails that refer to the crash from the time that it happened through the IRS’ disclosure to Congress Friday that it had occurred.

Please provide the documents that show the computer crash and lost data were appropriately reported to the required entities including any contractor servicing the IRS. If the incident was not reported, please explain why.

Please provide a list summarizing what other data was irretrievably lost in the computer crash. If the loss involved any personal data, was the loss disclosed to those impacted? If not, why?

Please provide documentation reflecting any security analyses done to assess the impact of the crash and lost materials. If such analyses were not performed, why not?

Please provide documentation showing the steps taken to recover the material, and the names of all technicians who attempted the recovery.

Please explain why redundancies required for federal systems were either not used or were not effective in restoring the lost materials, and provide documentation showing how this shortfall has been remediated.

Please provide any documents reflecting an investigation into how the crash resulted in the irretrievable loss of federal data and what factors were found to be responsible for the existence of this situation.

For a phony scandal, it’s amazing how real they’re making it look.

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Other Coverage:

Russ Fox, The Two Year Gap. “Either the IRS is deliberately lying or they have the worst IT department and policies of any company, organization, or government entity in the world.”

Ron Fournier, Did The IRS Really Lose Lois Lerner’s Emails? Let a Special Prosecutor Find Them.  “The announcement came late Friday, a too-cute-by-half cliche of a PR strategy to mitigate backlash. ‘The IRS told Congress it cannot locate many of Lois Lerner’s emails prior to 2011 because her computer crashed during the summer of that year,’  The Associated Press reported.

Althouse, “Did The IRS Really Lose Lois Lerner’s Emails? Let a Special Prosecutor Find Them.”  “Give us a special prosecutor, because it’s not acceptable to tell us we’re supposed to believe this story of disappearing evidence….”

The Blaze, Veteran IT Professional Gives Six Reasons Why the IRS’ Claim That It ‘Lost’ Two Years of Lois Lerner’s Emails Is ‘Simply Not Feasible’

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 403, rounding up blog and big-media coverage.

Peter Reilly, Personal Goodwill Avoids Corporate Tax Exposure:

The IRS does not like the concept of “personal goodwill”, but courts have often approved it.  In the Tax Court decision in the case of Bross Trucking, the concept was confirmed again, helping to save the taxpayer from what appears to me to be a real overreach on the part of the IRS. 

An interesting case involving a group of family businesses.

 

Younkers ruins 20140610Robert D. Flach, FINE WHINE: WHY MUST WE PUT UP WITH LATE ARRIVING CORRECTED 1099-DIVs EACH TAX SEASON?

Kay Bell, A Father’s Day gift for single dads: 5 tax breaks

Jack Townsend, 11th Circuit Holds Clear and Convincing Evidence Required for Section 6701 Penalty; Can Reasoning be Extended to FBAR Willful Penalty?

Phil Hodgen, Maximum account value determination for trust beneficiaries for FinCen Form 114.   Useful information ahead of the June 30 FBAR deadline.

Andy Grewal, TEFRA Jurisdiction and Sham Partnerships — Again? (Procedurally Taxing).  A guest post by a University of Iowa law prof.

 

Howard Gleckman, The Strange Fruit of the House’s Bonus Depreciation Bill (TaxVox).  “If I had read the bill more carefully, I would have noticed that while it applied to fruit that grows on trees and vines, it inexplicably excluded fruit that grows on bushes. As a blueberry lover, I am shocked and outraged.”

TaxGrrrl, House Votes To Make Small Business Tax Break Permanent.  “The bill would make the [$500,000] cap retroactive to January 1, 2014.”

Scott Drenkard, Donald Sterling Might Not Be Able to Write Off $2.5 Million Fine as a Business Expense (Tax Policy Blog).

Going Concern, What’s a Day in the Life of a Typical Audit Intern?  You’ve been dying to know!

 

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Tax Roundup, 6/12/14: Tax Credits run for governor. And: bad day for IRS in CRP tax case?

Thursday, June 12th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120906-1Crony tax credits have become an issue in Iowa’s race for Governor, reports The Des Moines Register:

The Republican Governors Association is out today with another TV ad attacking Jack Hatch.

The new ad accuses Hatch of sponsoring legislation to increase the availability of development tax credit while applying for tax credits for a real-estate project in Des Moines.

“Jack, isn’t that a conflict of interest?” the narrator asks.

It’s true that Mr. Hatch has been a successful player in the tax credit game.  It may be the merest coincidence that an awful lot of tax credits go to political insiders like Mr. Hatch and the spouse of Governor Branstad’s opponent in his first election.  But that’s not the way to bet.

While I’m all for anything that spotlights the inherent corruption of targeted tax credits, the Republican Governors Association may be inadvertently bringing friendly fire uncomfortably close to its own man.  For starters, the Governor is a five-term incumbent. If the system is set up to be played by political insiders, the Governor has had plenty of time to do something about it.

More importantly, political insiders can benefit richly from crony tax credits without claiming them on their own tax returns.  They benefit by claiming credit for the “jobs” generated by well-connected businesses that play the system to get the tax credits.  The Governor has played this game tirelessly.  Just off the top of my head

The $80 million+ in tax breaks for fertilizer companies.

The sales tax giveaway to the NASCAR track in Newton.

The rich tax breaks for data centers.

MP branstad

Governor Branstad, pre-mustache

In deals like this, the politicians claim credit for the jobs “created,” with no regard whether the lucky recipients of the breaks would have behaved differently without them, or for the jobs lost by other companies who compete with the winners for resources and customers, or for the jobs that would have been created had the funds been left with taxpayers to use without direction from politicians.

So yes, Governor, by all means call down the artillery on crony tax credits.  Just be sure to keep your helmet on.

Related:

The joys of cronyism

LOCAL CPA FIRM VOWS TO SWALLOW PRIDE, ACCEPT $28 MILLION

Governor’s press conference praises construction of newest great pyramids

 

20130114-1Roger McEowen, Eighth Circuit Hears Arguments in CRP Self-Employment Tax Case. “It would appear that the oral argument went well for the taxpayer.” 

Jana Luttenegger,  IRS Releases Taxpayer Bill of Rights.  “ These rights have always existed, but now the IRS has put the rights together in a clear, understandable list to be distributed to taxpayers.”  If they’ve always existed, they sure haven’t always been respected.

Peter Reilly, Your Son The Lawyer Should Not Be Your Exchange Facilitator.  Peter talks about the case I mentioned earlier this week, including another issue I left out.

 

Tax Justice Blog, Reid-Paul “Transportation Funding Plan” is No Plan at All:

Instead of taking the obvious step of fixing the federal gas tax, Reid and Paul propose a repatriation tax holiday, which would give multinational corporations an extremely low tax rate on offshore profits they repatriate (profits they officially bring back to the United States). The idea is that corporations would bring to the United States offshore profits they otherwise would leave abroad, and the federal government could tax those profits (albeit at an extremely low rate) and put the revenue toward the transportation fund.

Yeah, not a real fix.

Scott Hodge, Likely “Solutions” to Highway Trust Fund Shortfall Violate Sound Tax Policy and User-Pays Principle (Tax Policy Blog)

 

No Walnut STAndrew Lundeen, Higher Marginal Tax Rates Won’t Improve the World (Tax Policy Blog). “The Upshot and Dave Chappelle may be right that for someone with a $100 million that next dollar might not means as much as the first dollar. But that money doesn’t sit collecting dust. It is invested in the broader economy.”

Howard Gleckman, Did Multinationals Use a Foreign Earnings Tax Holiday To Burnish Their Financials Rather Than Reduce Taxes? (TaxVox)

Keith Fogg, Supreme Court’s Decision on Monday in Arkison Could Impact Kuretski Case and Constitutionality of the Removal Clause for Tax Court Judges (Procedurally Taxing)

Jack Townsend, BDO Seidman Personnel Sentenced for B******t Tax Shelter Promotion 

Kay Bell, NBA beats NHL in this year’s jock tax championship 

 

TaxGrrrl, Waffle House Refuses To Allow Waitress To Keep $1,000 Tip   

 

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Tax Roundup, 6/9/14: The great Illinois privatized tax shakedown. And lots more!

Monday, June 9th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

The wedding was beautiful, and great fun.  Introducing the new married couple.

 

Illinois sealGreat moments in state taxation.  Tax Analysts has a disturbing story ($link) about how an Illinois law firm is using the “qui tam” recovery procedures of the state’s False Claims Act against out-of-state taxpayers.  In a “qui tam” proceeding, an outside party, known as a “relator,” can file a lawsuit alleging fraud against the state and then share in the recovery — up to 25%, according to the story.

And they actually may be hurting state tax collection efforts, according to the story:

“The cases have clearly interfered with the administration and enforcement of tax law and may have even ultimately cost the state money, though it’s impossible to quantify how much,” said Mark Dyckman, the Illinois Department of Revenue’s deputy general counsel for sales tax litigation.

The story says the firm involved “is responsible for 99 percent of the qui tam tax litigation in Illinois.”

The story says Illinois may encouraged the suits initially, apparently thinking it could get some easy money out of the deal.  In other states where the firm tried the same thing, state Attorneys General won dismissals of the initial suits, discouraging further efforts.  The firm is also incentivized by the ability of a relator to share in outsized false claim penalties:

Second, while the treble damages for back taxes under false claims acts naturally attract the most attention, [taxpayer attorney Jordan] Goodman said the civil penalty — generally $5,000 to $10,000 per false claim under the federal law and $5,500 to $11,000 per false claim under the Illinois statute — can be just as oppressive, depending on what counts as a false claim. If each monthly sales tax return is a false claim carrying a $10,000 penalty, and 12 returns are filed in one year, that’s a $120,000 penalty. If every failure to collect taxes on shipping and handling is a false claim, and the business averages 10 sales into the state per month for 120 false claims, that’s a $1.2 million penalty for the year, which can turn into $12 million for the 10-year period covered by the false claims act.

Wikipedia image of Tams

Wikipedia image of Tams

The story says that one tactic used by the Illinois law firm is to make out-of-state purchases over the internet, and then to file suits if no sales tax is collected.  As the law covering remote sales remains unclear, it’s difficult to consider these items “false claims.”  That’s especially true in suits in which the taxpayer either was following published guidance or an audit settlement with Illinois.

These cases have apparently been going on since 2002, and the legislature and the state have yet to stop what would appear to be a purely abusive and parasitic practice.  If there ever was a case for universal application of a “sauce for the gander” rule, in which a losing plaintiff had to pay the same amount of penalties asserted against the winning defendant, this would be it.

 

Alligator bait.  The New Orleans Advocate reports on a Film tax credit promoter sentenced to 70 months.  It’s remarkable what high quality entrepreneurs these state tax giveaways attract.

 

20130114-1The ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Education is setting up a “Tax Place” feature on its website.  They seek your input.

Paul Neiffer reminds us that FBAR Filing Deadline is Near

Peter Reilly, CPA Faces Prison For Letting Client Deduct Personal Expenses.  It makes you want to carefully consider the work you want to take on.

Russ Fox, Back to the Past: Poker Sites and FBARs. Poker Sites Are Again Reportable Foreign Financial Accounts.  More incomprehensible foreign tax enforcement.

 

Cara Griffith, Protecting Confidentiality When Information Is Exchanged Between Tax Authorities  (Tax Analysts Blog)

TaxGrrrl, As NBA Finals Continue, Tax Incentives Lure 76ers Into New Jersey   

 

 

20140321-3TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 396

Kyle Pomerleau, CTJ and U.S. PIRG Mislead with New Report on Corporate Taxes (Tax Policy Blog):  “USPIRG also doesn’t mention that their ideal corporate tax code has been tried in other countries with negative results. New Zealand attempted ending deferral as USPIRG suggested. The results were devastating to their economy.

Tax Justice Blog, Tax Foundation’s Dubious Attempt to Debunk Widely Known Truths about Corporate Tax Avoidance Is Smoke and Mirrors.  Never let the facts get in the way of what is “widely known.”

 

Howard Gleckman, Are Domestic Partnerships A Way For Heterosexual Couples To Avoid The Marriage Tax Penalty?   (TaxVox) This sort of thing makes makes me question the usefulness of “nudge” strategies to use the tax code to encourage behavior.  There are always perverse unintended consequences.

 

News from the Profession.  Public Accounting Firms, Ranked by CEO Hotness (Going Concern).  A tallest midget competition.

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Tax Roundup, 5/30/15: Antidumping edition. And: permanent bonus depreciation advances.

Friday, May 30th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20121120-2Iowa Public Radio, Can Employers Dump Workers On Health Exchanges? Yes, For A Price:

The latest tweak from the Internal Revenue Service essentially prohibits employers from giving workers tax-free subsidies to buy policies in the online public marketplaces created by the health law. The New York Times first reported the rule.

But the headline on the story, “I.R.S. Bars Employers From Dumping Workers Into Health Exchanges,” overstates the case. Nothing stops employers from canceling company plans and leaving workers to buy individual policies sold through the exchanges — as long as the companies pay the relevant taxes and penalties, said Christopher Condeluci, a Venable lawyer specializing in benefits and taxes. Those would vary according to a company’s size and circumstances.

The ACA requires employers with more than 50 “full-time equivalent” employees to provide “adequate” coverage.  The IRS says that subsidizing employees to use the ACA exchanges doesn’t work.  This, of course, is the same IRS that arbitrarily and unlawfully just waived the requirement in the first place through 2014, and for those with under 100 employees through 2015.  Some laws are more equal than others.

It’s fascinating that the Administration refers to the practice of sending employees to buy policies on the exchanges as “dumping.”  The exchanges are a centerpiece of Obamacare, touted as an important step in making affordable coverage available for everyone.  Suddenly they are a “dump.”  Obamacare fines individuals for not patronizing that very dump.

 

20130422-2Permanent bonus depreciation advances in House.  Tax Analysts reports  ($link, my emphasis)):

Camp said the extenders the committee considered had been renewed enough times that most of them have been or soon will have been extended for at least 10 years, the budget window period. “If we’ve extended something for 10 years, let’s call it what it is, [and] that’s permanent policy,” he said. “We shouldn’t have to raise taxes other places in the economy to keep current tax law.”

The costliest bill the committee approved was H.R. 4718, introduced by Ways and Means Committee member Patrick J. Tiberi, R-Ohio. That bill would permanently extend bonus depreciation, allowing businesses to immediately deduct 50 percent of qualified purchased property. The bill, passed on a 23-11 vote, would expand the definition of qualified property to include owner-occupied retail stores. It would lift restrictions to allow for more unused corporate alternative minimum tax credits, which businesses can claim in lieu of bonus depreciation, to be used for capital investment.

Expiring provisions are a lie.  Any extension of an “expiring” provision should be counted as permenent under budget rules, as they pretty much are.

Related: Dave Camp’s Great Bonus Depreciation Flip-Flop (Howard Gleckman, TaxVox);  Negative GDP Growth Illustrates the Need for Bonus Depreciation (Alan Cole, Tax Policy Blog)

 

Wind turbineOne of these is not like the other.  The Des Moines Register coverage of last night’s Iowa GOP Senate Primary debate has something I never expected to see in a story about a candidate for statewide office:

Whitaker stands out because he doesn’t support the Renewable Fuel Standard, or any tax breaks for any energy source. “If we don’t believe in mandates for health care, we shouldn’t believe in mandates as it relates to energy,” he said.

All other candidates in both parties genuflect to the Renewables Subsidy idol.  In Iowa, ethanol apostasy is rare; more typical is the GOP governor who is all about picking winners and losers, when the winners are an influential local constituency.

Related: Governor’s press conference praises construction of newest great pyramids.

 

The IRS needs to regulate these people to stamp out fraud.  “Tammy Dickinson, United States Attorney for the Western District of Missouri, announced today that six former employees of the Internal Revenue Service have pleaded guilty to receiving unemployment benefits while they worked at the agency.” (Department of Justice press release)

Robert D. Flach serves up your Friday Buzz.  “Who would have guessed that I would agree with a group of CPAs?”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 386

 

20140516-1

 

 

And now they’ve proved it.  A Minneapolis husband and wife who ran a website called imarriedanidiot.com were convicted last week on federal tax charges.” (TwinCities.com)

Across the road, of course.  Where are all the Chickens?  (Paul Neiffer)

News from the Profession.  This Big 4 Firm Just Ruined Selfies for Everyone (Going Concern)

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Tax Roundup, 5/28/14: Tax Fairy isn’t handicap-accessible. And: Why you should let your tax guy do the talking.

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014 by Joe Kristan


tax fairy
Audit defenders can’t defend themselves.  
There is something deep in our DNA that enables us to believe in the supernatural, at least when it comes to taxes. Otherwise sensible people act as if they believe in a Tax Fairy who can wave a magic wand to make taxes go away.  Operators offer themselves as intermediaries to the tax spirit world, taking real money to generate pretend tax breaks.

It had to take a real leap of faith to pay good money to the National Audit Defense Network.  Members of this Nevada group were convicted in Las Vegas yesterday of tax charges that included an implausible tax credit scheme.  They set up a “shopping” web site called Tax Break 2000 that was inaccessible to handicapped users.  They would then sell Tax Fairy adherents a “modification kit” to make the web site handicap-accessible for $10,475 — 20% down, and the rest payable on a promissory note “when they had no expectation that the customers would make payments on the promissory notes.”  They then told their clients that this generated a $5,000 tax credit.

How many Taxafarieans paid the $10,475 tithe?  According to the indictment, they sold 21,610 kits.  Assuming they collected 20% of the sales price, that grossed them $45,272,950.

Any attempt to commune with the Tax Fairy runs into snags.  The first big snag here was a letter from their own internal “dream team” of tax advisors telling them this wouldn’t work.  The indictment says the NADNers went opinion shopping and found accommodating attorneys who said it might work.  Good enough!

They had more difficulty clearing the next obstacle: a permanent injunction against selling Tax Fairy access.  But that’s the least of their problems now.

This case has attracted a little extra attention because of the involvement of a former NFL punter, who apparently decided to ignore his professional training and go for it.  When trick plays fail, they fail badly, and the participants now may face long prison terms.

And there is no tax fairy.

 

Wind turbineTony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Hot Assets And The Sale Of Partnership Interests

Kay Bell, Federal workers, including members of Congress and Treasury employees, owe Uncle Sam $3.3 billion in back taxes

No.  Does Warren Buffett Practice What He Preaches? (Paul Neiffer)  “The cost to Warren individually of raising his individual income tax bracket by 10% annually may cost him personally a couple of million or less, while his company saves over $400 million in tax by using energy tax credits.  I would make the trade-off any time.”

 

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 384

Joseph Thorndike, Bad Ideas Are Like Bad Pennies (Tax Analysts Blog).  He’s talking about private collection of IRS debts.  Considering that the IRS isn’t exactly blemish-free in its debt collection practices, I don’t share the objections to private collection of undisputed tax debts.

Joseph also raises this point: “But it’s also expensive to pander, since every dollar invested in IRS collection can return up to $20 in new revenue.”  I think that’s hugely unlikely as a marginal return, based on what I see in the field and the way the IRS misdeploys resources (preparer regulation, anyone?).

 

Not Senator Wyden

If there is something wrong with our tax exemption, then there is something wrong with America.  I won’t stand here while you badmouth our country!

David Brunori, Taxing Togas and Keggers (Tax Analysts Blog).  “States should consider ending the absurd practice of granting property tax exemptions to charitable organizations.”

Andrew Lundeen, The Economic Effects of Bonus Depreciation (Tax Policy Blog). “Permanently extending bonus depreciation would spur investment, lift wages, grow the economy, and increase federal revenue.”

Howard Gleckman, Turning Carbon Tax Theory Into Reality (TaxVox).  Don’t hold your breath for this to be enacted, even if it would keep that carbon in your lungs.

 

Do you ever wonder why practitioners like to do the talking when the IRS gets involved? Yes, by all means stand up for your rights when dealing with the IRS.  But there’s a line where you should stop.  Going Concern tells us of a Mr. Calcione who went way over the line:

Three days after the agent left the voicemail, Calcione left a couple voicemails of his own. One of the messages contained a threat made by Andrew Calcione that if the agent called him again he would show up at the agent’s home and torture the agent, then rape and kill his wife and injure his daughter while the agent watched, before killing the agent. A second message left by Calcione requested that Calcione disregard the first message, which Calcione said was left in error.

Oh, you didn’ t mean my wife and daughter?  Well, OK, then!

Mr. Calcione was convicted of threatening an IRS agent.  Whatever tax problems he had before, that voice mail made things much, much worse.

Related: Man Convicted Of Threatening To Assault & Kill IRS Agent, Family Over Audit Proceedings  (TaxGrrrl)

 

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Tax Roundup, 5/21/14: Practitioner Pitchforks and Torches edition. And: math remains hard!

Wednesday, May 21st, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140521-1The new identification rules for remote signatures aren’t going over well.   (See update below.)  At a CPE event yesterday former IRS Stakeholder Liaison Kristy Maitre outlined the new e-filing identity match requirement we are supposed to meet (now!  for extended 2013 returns!).  These include “third-party verification” of identities of our long-time clients if they don’t visit the office.  The ones that visit, we only need to see their papers.

The 250 or so practitioners present didn’t appreciate the joke at all.  They asked the obvious question: how do we even comply with this?  It’s not at all clear how we get “third-party verification.”  I can pretty much guarantee that nobody is complying with that requirement now, because few are aware of it, and the ones that are don’t know where to start.

While the requirements are supposed to be part of the IRS war against identity theft, this effort is like responding to the attack on Pearl Harbor by bombing Montreal.  Identity thieves don’t waltz into tax prep offices and pay us to prepare fraudulent refund claims.  They prefer TurboTax.

Yet, there may be a method to the madness, suggested by one practitioner.  What if some outfit is gearing up to provide third-party verification services — say, one of the national tax prep franchises?  And the IRS has quietly created their revenue stream with this absurd rule?  You might say this preparer is cynical; I say he’s been paying attention.

So let’s fight.  Kristy is collecting comments and questions to send to her erstwhile IRS colleagues to try to stop this nonsense.  Send your comments to ksmaitre@iastate.edu.  I believe the IRS will back off if we brandish the electronic torches and pitchforks.

Update, 11:30 a.m.  I received a call from an IRS representative this morning saying that they have been getting phone calls as a result of this post (well-done, readers!).  She tried to reassure me by telling me that the third-party verification doesn’t apply to in-person visits.  I knew that.  I told her that as I read the rules, there are either “in-person” or “remote” transactions, with no third category of, say, “I’ve worked with this client for many years and they’re fine.” She didn’t disagree, though she still thinks I’m overreacting.  She did say IRS field personnel are  “elevating” the issue and seeking “clarification” from the authors of these new rules, including what “authentication” means for in-person visits and what a “remote transaction” is that would require third-party verification.  Keep it up, folks!

Related:

Russ Fox, Yes, Mom, I Need to See Your ID

Jana Luttenegger, Updated E-Filing Requirements for Tax Preparers

Jason Dinesen, Hold the Phone on the IRS E-file Outrage Machine 

Me, Welcome back, loyal client. IRS says I have to verify that you aren’t a shape-shifting alien.

 


20140521-2TaxProf, 
The IRS Scandal, Day 377.

News from the Profession.  Crocodile Injured By Falling Circus Accountant in Freak Bus Accident (Going Concern)

Kay Bell, National Taxpayer Advocate joins fight to stop private debt collection of delinquent tax bills.  I’d rather she fight to keep the IRS from implementing its ridiculous e-file verification rules.

TaxGrrrl, Congress, Ignoring History, Considers Turning Over Tax Debts To Private Collection Agencies

Jim Maule, It Seems So Simple, But It’s Tax.  “People are increasingly aware that the chances of getting away with tax fraud are getting better each day.”

Missouri Tax Guy,  NO! The IRS did not call you first.

 

Tax Justice Blog, Legislation Introduced to Stop American Corporations from Pretending to Be Foreign Companies.  How about we just stop taxing them?

Kyle Pomerleau, Tom VanAntwerp, Interactive Map: Where do U.S. Multinational Corporations Report Foreign Taxable Income and Foreign Income Taxes Paid? (TaxPolicy Blog).  Holland does well, as does Canada.

Howard Gleckman, Tax Chauvinism: Who Cares Where a Firm is Incorporated?

So we are left with a sort of financial chauvinism. It is important to some politicians to be able to say that a company is a red-blooded American company. But when it comes to multinational firms in a global economy, why does that matter? 

Because, ‘Merica!

 

Andrew Mitchel now has some online tax quizzes for your amusement.  If they are too tough, the next item might restore your self-esteem.

 

20120905-1If you can’t answer these questions, taxes are the least of your problems.  Tackle these quizzlers (via Alex Taborrok):

1. Suppose you had $100 in a savings account and the interest rate was 2% per year. After 5 years, how much do you think you would have in the account if you left the money to grow.

More than $102. Exactly $102,. Less than $102? Do not know. Refuse to answer.

2. Imagine that the interest rate on your savings account was 1% per year and inflation was 2% per year. After 1 year, would you be able to buy.

More than, exactly the same as, or less than today with the money in this account? Do not know. Refuse to answer.

3. Do you think that the following statement is true or false? ‘Buying a single company stock usually provides a safer return than a stock mutual fund.’

T. F. Do not know. Refuse to answer.

I won’t give away the answers, but I shouldn’t have to.  Sadly, most people find these questions hard.  From Alex Taborrok:

Only about a third of Americans answer all three questions correctly (and that figure is inflated somewhat due to guessing). The Germans and Swiss do significantly better (~50% all 3 correct) on very similar questions but many other countries do much worse. In New Zealand only 24% answer all 3 questions correctly and in Russia it’s less than 5%.

At least that helps explain Vladimir Putin’s popularity.

 

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Tax Roundup, 5/9/14: Worst-ever edition. And: It’s Scandal Day 365!

Friday, May 9th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

I was grumpy yesterday when I noticed Tax Analysts correspondent @Meg_Shreve’s live-tweeting of a speech by Doug Shulman, the Worst IRS Commissioner Ever.  So I tweet-grumpted, adding “#worstcommissionerever (fixed)” to one of her posts — the “(fixed)” as a perhaps inadequate attempt to inform the Twitterverse that the tag was my addition, not hers (apologies to Meg Shreve).  That earned this response:

 

20140509-1

 

Ah, where to begin?  How about with identity theft?  Doug Shulman took office with a reputation as an information systems maven.  He then presided over an historic IT debacle.  Tax refund fraud — fundamentally a systems failure —  has let two-bit grifters like Rashia Wilson steal tens of billions of dollars in fraudulent refunds over the years.

This problem has been ramping up for years, and only now, with Shulman gone, is the IRS beginning to take effective action to prevent it.  My wife can’t go shopping in Chicago without me getting a call from the credit card company warning me of a suspicious transaction, but Doug Shulman’s IRS could send 655 refunds to the same apartment in Lithuania without batting an eye.

Rashia says "thanks, Commissioner!"

Rashia says “thanks, Commissioner!”

While the theft of taxpayer billions is outrageous enough, the inept treatment of ID theft victims makes it even worse.  Only after Doug Shulman left did the IRS even begin to get this right.

The Worst Commissioner Ever was just too darned busy to stop ID theft.  He was busy trying to increase IRS power over preparers with a useless, expensive and unilateral preparer regulation regime.  He reversed the longstanding IRS position that the agency had no such regulatory power, only to be unceremoniously slapped down by the courts.   In the meantime, the prospect of the regulations drove thousands of preparers out of the business, increasing taxpayer costs and driving many taxpayers to self-prepare — and surely causing some to fall out of the system altogether.  The IRS wasted enormous resources on this futile power grab — resources that might have been better-devoted, to, oh, maybe the fight against identity theft.

 

He was also busy shooting jaywalkers.  International tax enforcement is considered Doug Shulman’s greatest success — but there was no reason the pursuit of wealthy international money-launderers had to also terrorize American expatriates whose offenses were to commit everyday personal finance.  Many folks have been hit with ridiculous penalties for not filing FBAR reports that they had no idea existed.  These folks are often people who married overseas or moved out of the U.S. as children, but were presumptively treated as international money-launderers when they tried to come into the system, and were hit with enormous penalties — often when little or no tax had been avoided.

It’s hard to imagine that an agency that can find ways to simply wave away the ACA employer mandate couldn’t find a way to allow expats and individuals without criminal intent to come into the international reporting system without risking financial disaster.  The states that allow non-resident non-filers to come in by paying five years of back taxes provide an obvious model.

 

Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how big is legacy is.

Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how big is legacy is.

Then there is the scandal.  When Tea Party groups complained about absurd and abusive IRS information requests, sympathetic Congresscritters asked Doug Shulman if the IRS was targeting Tea Party groups.  The Worst Commissioner Ever testified before Congress that the IRS was doing nothing of the sort:

“There’s absolutely no targeting. This is the kind of back and forth that happens to people” who apply for tax-exempt status, Shulman said.

That statement, of course, became inoperative when the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration reported that the IRS was, in fact, picking on the Tea Party groups.  Subsequent revelations have shown that it was exactly a partisan attempt to fight anti-administration groups.  So Doug Shulman either was too lazy and ineffective to know what his own agency was doing, or he knew, or he didn’t care.  He destroyed the credibility of the agency as a nonpartisan enclave of competent technicians.

Now the party controlling the House of Representatives is on notice that the agency wants to see it lose.  That agency can hardly expect generous appropriations as long as that perception remains (and the new Commissioner has done nothing reassuring on that score).   This will damage the agency’s effectiveness for years — all because The Worst Commissioner Ever was unwilling or unable to run a professional, non-partisan agency.

This is a record of administrative ineptitude and negligence that is unbeaten.  No IRS commissioner has so squandered agency resources and reputation.  If another Commissioner has even come close, I’d sure like to know who it was.

 

Meanwhile, the TaxProf has reached a milestone: The IRS Scandal, Day 365.  The biggest item in this edition is the report that the IRS had not destroyed Tea Party donor lists — after saying it had — and that the IRS has audited 10% of Tea Party donors.  This is a staggering audit rate, if true, and is a tremendous scandal in itself if the IRS doesn’t come up with a good explanation.

TaxGrrrl, House Finds Lerner, Central Figure In Tax Exempt Scandal, In Contempt Of Congress

 

20140509-2Jana Luttenegger, Deadline Approaching to Avoid Losing Tax Exempt Status (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). Get those 990-series reports filed!

Trish McIntire, EFTPS – Inquiry PIN.  “The Inquiry PIN will allow taxpayers to check and make sure that their federal tax deposits have been made and catch a problem before it becomes a major issue.”  This should be used by all employers.

Peter Reilly, Former Tampa Bay Buccaneers Owner Scores Touchdown In Tax Court.  “It may seem odd to look at a case that ends up with a charitable deduction dis-allowance of nearly $4 million as a victory, but when you consider how taxpayers generally fare in easement cases it really is.”

Leslie Book, Tax Court Jurisdiction to Determine its Jurisdiction: Foreign Taxes and Credits (Procedurally Taxing)

Mindy Herzfeld, International Tax Trending (Tax Analysts Blog)

 

Richard Borean, Tax Freedom Day Arrives in Final Two States: Connecticut and New Jersey (Tax Policy Blog)

Howard Gleckman, Taxing Employer-Sponsored Insurance Would Hike Social Security Benefits But Boost Federal Coffers (TaxVox)

 

Kay Bell, IRS employee arrested after inadvertently following Obama daughters’ motorcade onto White House grounds.  Oops.

Tax Justice Blog, Déjà vu: Oklahoma Enacts Tax Cut Voters Don’t Want.  I’m not sure about the “don’t want” part.

Robert D. Flach has your Friday morning Buzz!

 

News from the Profession.  Deloitte CEO Prefers Traditional Photo Op Over Selfie  (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 5/2/14: Film credit trial remake edition. And: Senator Otter, taxwriter.

Friday, May 2nd, 2014 by Joe Kristan


harold
An Iowa appeals court this week threw out the conviction of TV-show producer Dennis Brouse
on charges arising out of the Iowa film tax credit scandal.  The court ruled 2-1 that unclear jury instructions rendered the guilty verdict untenable.  From the decision:

After examining the jury instruction and finding it so confusing, we conclude that it was not possible for the jury to find sufficient evidence to convict pursuant to a general verdict that implicated the joint criminal conduct instruction. 

The case was remanded to the trial court.  I believe the state can appeal this decision to the Iowa Supreme Court.  I am not sure whether the state can retry Mr. Brouse if the ruling stands.  The reversal would leave Wendy Weiner-Runge as the only person hit with serious prison time in the scandal.

In any case, the real offenders in this case will go free.  No charges will be filed against the legislators who voted overwhelmingly to create a cash-filled pinata for out-of-state filmmakers.  The Governor who was to oversee the program will never have to answer for appointing a former drugstore film clerk to run it.  The clerk’s immediate supervisor faces no charges for letting the clerk run wild, committing taxpayer dollars by the millions virtually without documentation or control.

The real crime is that the 150 legislative supergeniuses feel competent to take money from taxpayers and give it to people who convince them they will use it better.

Other coverage: KCCI.com

Cite: State v. Brouse, No. 12-1076  [3-1192]

 

 

 

Andrew Mitchel, 2014 First Quarter Published Expatriates – Second Highest Ever:

 

Chart by Andrew Mitchel LLC

Chart by Andrew Mitchel LLC

Considering how poorly the U.S. tax system treats Americans abroad, it’s no surprise.

 

Jason Dinesen, On Tax Refunds and “Not Owing Tax,” Part 1  “Just because you got a refund it doesn’t necessarily mean you didn’t owe taxes.”

Kay Bell, Tax moves to make in May 2014

Peter Reilly, IRS Chief Counsel Checks 1986 Committee Reports To Give Break On Foreclosed Real Estate   

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 358

Russ Fox, Once Again, Bring Me the Usual Suspects: 2014 Small Business Tax Index.  Iowa does poorly.

Robert D. Flach brings your Friday Buzz!

 

Kyle Pomerleau, It Takes 175 hours for a U.S. Business to Comply with U.S. Taxes (Tax Policy Blog).  For bigger businesses, that’s way low.

Howard Gleckman, The Tax Extenders: Yes, Virginia, They Really Are Tax Cuts (TaxVox).

 

 

Not Senator Wyden

Not Senator Wyden

 Senator Wyden, meet Animal House.

Otter: ” But you can’t hold a whole fraternity responsible for the behavior of a few, sick twisted individuals. For if you do, then shouldn’t we blame the whole fraternity system? And if the whole fraternity system is guilty, then isn’t this an indictment of our educational institutions in general? I put it to you, Greg – isn’t this an indictment of our entire American society? Well, you can do whatever you want to us, but we’re not going to sit here and listen to you badmouth the United States of America.”

Senator Ron Wyden:At the same time, the potential misconduct of a small group of IRS employees should not tarnish the overwhelming majority of hard working agency employees who do play by the rules.”

 

I did not have tax with that state, New York.  Bill Clinton: ‘I Thank God Every Day That Hillary and I Live in NY and Pay the Highest Aggregate Tax Rate in America’  (TaxProf)

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/25/14: Why the move to tax return selfies? And: Iowa’s unhappy high ranking.

Friday, April 25th, 2014 by Joe Kristan


Supply and demand curves

Supply and demand curves

IRS stats show more people are preparing their own returns, reports Tax Analysts ($link):

The IRS’s latest data, released April 11, show electronic filing from paid tax professionals fell 0.3 percent from the same time last year. That follows a 1.8 percent drop in April 2013, and a 1.7 percent drop in April 2012. By contrast, the IRS said, self-prepared e-filing of returns rose 4.5 percent through April 11 compared with last year, 3.1 percent in April 2013, and 5 percent in April 2012.

It seems like an odd trend.  It’s not like the tax law is getting any easier.  One possibility raised in the story is that it’s those wacky youngsters:

 Self-preparation may be a response to a younger generation’s ease with computers and software, said [retired Enrolled Agent Sandra] Martin. “That’s more of a permanent reason why people aren’t using preparers,” she said.

She also raises a much less logical possibility:

Martin said the IRS’s inability to regulate return preparers makes matters worse. Taxpayers are not only uncertain about the qualifications of their preparers, she said; some are afraid, haunted by stories of fraudulent preparers ripping off return filers and deciding the do-it-yourself path may be safest.

I think the failed IRS preparer regulation power grab is a big part of the cause, but not for the reasons cited by Ms. Martin.  As Dan Alban, slayer of the preparer regulations, testified before the U.S. Senate taxwriting committee:

In fact, IRS data released last summer shows a dramatic drop in the number of tax preparers in recent years — a sudden loss of more than 200,000 preparers from 2010 to 2012 — following the recent imposition of a series of burdensome IRS regulations on preparers (the e – file mandate and the Return Preparer Initiative, which included both the PTIN registration requirement and RTRP licensing)

If your preparer gets out of the business, maybe you will stop using a preparer.  With fewer preparers, the law of supply and demand predicts that costs will rise.  As costs rise, consumers seek substitutes.  It’s what I predicted back in 2010:

Rather than pay the increased costs, some taxpayers will stop getting help on their returns altogether and either self-prepare or drop out of the system. These dropouts certainly won’t see improved service, though the regulators will never admit responsibility for that.

Supply and demand: it’s not just a good idea, it’s the law!

 

Supply and Demand

Lyman Stone, Joseph Henchman, Richard BoreanTop State Income Tax Rates in 2014 (Tax Policy Blog):

20140425-1

The colors on the map get darker as the rates get higher.  You’ll notice that Iowa’s 8.98% top rate gives it quite the purple tan.  It’s misleading, in that the effective rate is closer to 6% taking deductiblility of federal taxes into account; that would give Iowa a more lovely lavender tint, like Missouri and Louisiana.  Yet Iowa refuses to build the federal deductibility into lower rates.  The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan would address that.

 

Christopher BerginThe IRS and the Tax System: Integrity and Fairness for Whom? (Tax Analysts Blog):

The IRS’s mission statement couldn’t be clearer:

    Provide America’s taxpayers top quality service by helping them understand and meet their tax responsibilities and enforce the law with integrity and fairness to all.

If some of the tax cops aren’t playing by the rules – and getting bonuses for it – how does that provide us taxpayers “top quality service” and help us understand and meet our tax responsibilities? The two most important words in this mission statement are “integrity” and “fairness.” The one thing largely missing from our tax code is fairness. And the one thing now beginning to disappear from the agency charged with administering that tax code is integrity.   

Nah.  Compliance is for the peons, not the overlords.

 

Howard GleckmanLen Burman’s Brief for a Health Care VAT:

Len, the director of Tax Policy Center (and, thus, my boss), argues that a dedicated—and fully transparent–health care VAT would increase public support for efforts to slow the growth of medical costs. That’s because the VAT would rise, for all to see, with increases in government health spending.

I have another idea: let’s sever the link between employment and healthcare, authorize interstate sales of high-deductible health insurance, and have people pay for routine care out-of-pocket.  We don’t have to resort to a VAT to keep prices down for, say, beer and groceries — or for non-covered health costs, like LASIX procedures.  Removing the layers between consumer and payment just might work for other health costs too.  Seeing increase in your spending from your own pocketbook is a lot better motivator to reduce costs than watching government budget numbers.

 

Gene Steurle, Dave Camp’s Tax Reform Could Kill Community Foundations:

The proposal would effectively eliminate most donor advised funds (DAFs), the major source of revenues to community foundations, so they could no longer provide long-term support for local and regional charitable activities. Instead, those funds would need to pay out all their assets over a period of five years.

Iowa has a special tax credit for gifts to community foundations, which is often oversubscribed.

 

 

20140411-1Kay Bell, Doctors are target of an income tax fraud scheme; the rest of us need to watch out for a new e-file phishing attempt

TaxGrrrl, Payback Is Forever: Tax Refund Offset Law Remains On The Books 

Or anybody else.  Piketty’s Tax Hikes Won’t Help the Middle Class (Megan McArdle)

Tax Justice Blog, Trend Toward Higher Gas Taxes Continues in the States

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 351

Robert D. Flach brings the Friday Buzz!

 

Going Concern, Now We’re Creatively Interpreting Sarbanes-Oxley to Include Fish.  Well, the whole thing has always been fishy.

Keith Fogg, Collection of Restitution Payments by the IRS (Procedurally Taxing)

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/23/14: The Tax Fairy isn’t named “VEBA.” And: frivolous IRS notices!

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

tax fairyThe Tax Fairy, that fickle goddess of painless massive tax reduction, is often sought in the misty fens of the welfare benefit sections of the tax law.  A U.S. District Court in California has deprived the Tax Fairy’s believers of one guide for their hunt.

CPA Ramesh Sarva and Kenneth Elliot led Tax Fairy seekers to Section 419, which provides for VEBAs — “Voluntary Employee Beneficiary Association” plans.  Properly operated, VEBAs enable employers to make deductible contributions to a plan that buys insurance for employees.

A company associated with Mr. Sarva and Mr. Elliot, Sea Nine, told employers that they could use VEBAs to get around the tax law rules against deducting most life insurance premiums.  Their customers deducted contributions to VEBAs and used them to buy whole-life insurance policies with high cash value accumulation on the business owners’ lives.  The owners then borrowed the cash values.  The purported result was a deduction, followed by tax-free access to the deducted cash via borrowing cash values.

Tax Fairy guides can always find willing customers: “…small business owners with high net worth (often doctors with small but lucrative medical practices),” according to the IRS complaint. It has not gone well for the Tax Fairy adherents:

Sarva has successfully marketed at least 33 separate VEBAs plans to a variety of small business owners.  All of these participants have been or are currently being audited by the IRS.  13 of these participant audits have been completed and have resulted in total tax adjustments of $3,500,519.

In other words, it doesn’t work.  The IRS warned people off of such plans as early as 1995, and the scheme was firmly shot down by a U.S. Court of Appeals in 2002 in the Neonatology Assoc. P.A. case.  In fact, Neonatology  was a Sea Nine client.  Undaunted, Sea Nine kept selling the idea, selling the plans through “a network of affiliated third parties” including “independent certified publica accountants (“CPA”) and financial planners.”   At least they did until yesterday, when they consented to a permanent injunction yesterday against further Tax Fairy hunts.

Sea Nine had clients all over the place; the complaint lists clients in California, Florida, Alabama, and Hawaii, all with big IRS exam adjustments.

A side note: This is another example of why preparer regulation will be little use in keeping practitioners on the straight and narrow.  The defendant was a CPA and as such faced much stricter credentialing than anything contemplated by the IRS.  Yet he continued to sell these plans for years after it should have been obvious that they didn’t work.

The Moral?  There is no Tax Fairy, and just because somebody has gotten away with something for a long time doesn’t mean they’ve found her.  Also: you can make somebody take a test.  You can make them somebody take CPE.  But you can’t make a bumbler competent or a scammer honest.

 

20130419-1Russ FoxIRS Prematurely Asking for Money:

A few years ago, the IRS routinely sent notices to taxpayers who filed tax returns prior to April 15th but didn’t pay their taxes until April 15th. After complaints from taxpayers and tax professionals, the IRS supposedly stopped this practice. Unfortunately, they’ve started it up again.

Another illustration of why we need a “sauce for the gander” rule that would require the IRS to pay a penalty to taxpayers when it takes such frivolous positions, same as a frivolous taxpayer would pay to IRS.

 

TaxProf, TIGTA: IRS Gave $1 Million in Cash Bonuses to 1,100 Employees Who Owe Back Taxes.  Trust me, they won’t do that for you.

Lyman Stone, More Film Tax Incentives Not a Solution for California (Tax Policy Bl0g).  No, not for California, but certainly for its filmmakers, fixers and middlemen.

Howard Gleckman, Should Congress Curb Donor Advised Funds?  They are a much more convenient and cost-effective than their alternative, private foundations, so Congress can be expected to put a stop to that.

 

Jim Maule, When It’s Too Late to Change One’s (Tax) Story

Kay Bell, Rough roads ahead as Highway Trust Fund runs out of money

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 349

Joseph Thorndike, It’s Good to Be the (Ex) President. But It Wasn’t Always. (Tax Analysts Blog).  “Until 1959, retiring chief executives got precisely nothing in the way of retirement benefits: no Secret Service protection, no administrative support, and certainly no money.”

News from the Profession.  McGladrey’s Latest PCAOB Inspection Reveals McGladrey Is Not Grant Thornton (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/21/14: Clearing the wreckage edition. And: Tax Court penalty abuse.

Monday, April 21st, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140330-2So I took a five-day weekend.  I needed the sleep, and to see something besides the office, my bed, and my commuting route.  So now to clear the debris of the last few weeks from my desk, and my email inbox.

And I come back to see perhaps the dumbest thing ever to come out of the Tax Court.  Janet Novack reports:

“Taxpayers rely on IRS guidance at their own peril,” Judge Joseph W. Nega wrote in an order entered  on April 15th —an order denying a motion that he reconsider his earlier decision to penalize tax lawyer Alvan L. Bobrow for making an IRA rollover move that IRS Publication 590,  Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs), says is allowed.

Which is more astounding: he IRS decision to seek penalties against a taxpayer for following IRS guidance, or the Tax Court going along?  A great deal of what we do as professionals, and what taxpayers do, is in reliance on IRS guidance, because often that’s all there is to go on.  If you can get hit with a penalty for following IRS guidance if the IRS changes its mind, we’re all avoiding disaster only as long as the IRS is in a good mood.

This unwittingly goes to the heart of the IRS non-enforcement of the Obamacare employer mandate. The statute provides that the penalty tax on those with 50 or more employees starts this year if they fail to provide specified health insurance.  Nothing in the statute provides otherwise.  The only thing standing between all these employers and massive penalties is IRS guidance — y0u know, the guidance that Judge Nega just said taxpayers rely on “at their own peril.”

The whole Tax Court should reconsider this order.  If they decide that something that stupid really is the law, Congress should reverse with legislation providing that taxpayers relying on written IRS guidance should never be penalized for it.

 

20130419-1Megan McArdle kindly linked to me last week in You Can’t Fight the IRS — specifically, to Tax season tip: when you owe and can’t pay.  She added some thoughtful commentary, including:

 There are basically three types of tax trouble. There is “I was underwithheld at work because my salary changed over the course of the year but didn’t realize it” or “I’m a freelancer or small-business owner, and I forgot to put away enough money for taxes, or I incorrectly estimated what my tax bill would be.” Then there is “I am a small-business owner or otherwise self-employed, and I am on the brink of financial collapse; the money with which I hoped to pay the taxes had to go to keep my creditors (barely) at bay.” And, of course, though I hope this is not you, there is “I have been cheating on my taxes.”

She notes that different troubles require different solutions.

Thanks to her link, and to one from Instapundit to the same post, last week was the busiest around here all year.  My thanks to them, and to everyone who takes the time to link here.  You rock my little world.  If you ever want to link to just a piece of a Tax Roundup, you can do so if it starts in blue bold letters, like the words “Megan McArdle” at the beginning of this segment.

 

While I was too busy to do Tax Roundups at the end of tax season, I missed some excellent Bozo Tax Tips from Russ Fox, including Bozo Tax Tip #1: The Eternal Hobby Loss

 

Greg Mankiw,Transitory Income and the One Percent:

It turns out that 12 percent of the population will find themselves in the top 1 percent of the income distribution for at least one year. What’s more, 39 percent of Americans will spend a year in the top 5 percent of the income distribution, 56 percent will find themselves in the top 10 percent, and a whopping 73 percent will spend a year in the top 20 percent of the income distribution….  

-Quoting a NY Times article by Mark Rank

Occupy… yourselves!

 

Jason Dinesen, Another Tax Season Down — 2014 Tax Season Recap 

Paul Neiffer, Another Tax Season Bites the Dust.  “This year was actually much easier on myself and I think most of my compatriots since we did not have Congress passing a tax bill on the last day of the year to mess up the IRS computers (although the computers have other issues to deal with).”

TaxGrrrl, IRS Reports Tax Filing Numbers As Expected, Issues Statement On Refund Delays 

Robert D. Flach, THAT WAS THE TAX SEASON THAT WAS.  “43 down – 7 to go!”  I hope to stop before 43, myself.  Robert is tougher than I am.

In case you missed it, you can see my April 15 interview with local TV station KCCI here.

 

 

Locust Street, Des Moines

Locust Street, Des Moines

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Tax Planning For Mergers And Acquisitions, Part I.  “…if we spend the time necessary to uncover and understand our clients’ non-tax and tax goals, we will typically find that choosing an ideal transaction structure is largely a process of elimination, and when the dust settles, there will often be only one option that works.”

Peter Reilly, Sawyer Taxi Heirs Midcoast Fortrend Deal – Could Have Been Worse.  It involves a C corporation attempting to have its cake while eating it too, by paying stock-deal tax on an asset sale.

Christopher Bergin, Tax Day – It Just Isn’t Fair (Tax Analysts Blog)  “I suppose the only good news is that in the last several days, there have been dozens of items in the news reporting that the IRS is doing fewer audits.”

Tax Justice Blog, Partners in Crime? New GAO Report Shows that Large Corporate Partnerships Can Operate Without Fear of Audits

Kyle Pomerleau, Why Many People are Wrong about Executive Pay and the Corporate Tax Code.  “A neutral tax code that properly defines business income would place no restriction on how much a business can deduct in compensation.”

Howard Gleckman, If Congress Lets Firms Expense Investments, It Should Take Away Their Interest Deduction.  Fine, if you let them deduct dividends.

 

Going Concern, Utah Man Discovers Liberty Tax Not as Effective as Maury Povich in Determining Paternity.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/4/14: Your Honor, nobody follows that law! And: extenders advance.

Friday, April 4th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120801-2Maybe that wasn’t the best argument, under the circumstances.  Things went badly for a California man yesterday who tried to tell the Tax Court how things work in the real world.

The man had claimed $5,309 in vehicle expenses for his real estate sales business.  Vehicle and travel expenses are subject to the special rules of Section 274, which requires corroborating records of the amount, time, place and business purpose of travel expenses.  The judge found the taxpayer’s evidence wanting (my emphasis):

Petitioner provided his 2009 Mileage Chart and Itemized Categories documents, which appear to be reconstructions asserting the places he traveled to for business and the vehicle expenses he incurred in 2009. Petitioner, however, failed to provide any corroborating receipts or other records that substantiated the statements made in these two documents. Moreover, neither document identifies a business purpose for each trip, and both fail to show mileage. (While the Itemized Categories does have a handwritten note of “mileage for 2009 11,135″, this note alone does not substantiate the mileage of each trip or show how the mileage was allocated between business and personal use.) Additionally, the 2009 Mileage Chart provides a log for only three weeks for 2009 and fails to show the amount of each trip expense. Because petitioners failed to substantiate the claimed expenses as required by section 274(d), the vehicle expense deduction must be disallowed.

The IRS asserted negligence penalties for claiming an undocumented deduction.  The taxpayer tried to tell the judge that nobody does that stuff:

Petitioner did not argue reasonable cause or good faith. Instead, petitioner argued at trial that no one keeps records in accordance with the “IRS code”.

Well, OK, then, screw Section 274!  Well, no:

That argument is unpersuasive, and the section 6662(a) penalty will be sustained.

The IRS is serious about documenting business miles.  If you have them, keep a log, a calendar, or use a smart-phone app to record the time, place, cost and business purposes of your travels as you go.  If “no one keeps records in accordance with the ‘IRS code,'” no one is going to be happy with the results when they get audited.

Cite: Chapin, T.C. Summ Op. 2014-31

 

20130113-3Tax Extenders Legislation Advances in Senate (Accounting today):

 The Senate Finance Committee voted to revive almost all of the 55 tax breaks that expired Dec. 31, providing benefits for wind energy, U.S.-based multinational corporations and motor sports track owners.

Motor sports track owners have lots of friends in high places.

It’s not just motor sports lobbyists who did will in the Finance Committee.  Almost all
“expired” provisions of this lobbyist right-to-work vehicle were renewed, including the renewable fuel credits.  The only expiring provisions that actually expire are the credit for energy-efficient appliances and a provison for oil refinery property, so there remains some lobbying to do.

But wait, there’s more!  Tax Analysts reports ($link) that this Christmas in April bill includes a provision to “expand the research credit to allow passthroughs with no income tax liability to apply the credit, up to $250,000, to their payroll tax liability.”  It also would renew the reduction of the S corporation built-in gain tax “recognition period” at five years through 2015.

While the House still hasn’t acted on any of this, the passage of all of this stuff on a bipartisan basis would seem to indicate that something like this is likely to pass.  Still, Kay Bell thinks the House tax leadership may be reluctant to follow the Senate’s lead.

The reason Congress pretends these provisions are “temporary” is that under their rules, Congress can pretend that they will only cost as much as they will cost before they are renewed again, regardless of the probability that they will be renewed forever.  It’s the kind of accounting that would get us thrown in jail if we tried it with the IRS or SEC, but it’s just another Thursday in Congress.

Link: “Summary of Modified Chairman’s Mark.”

 

20091010-2.JPGKristy Maitre, E-Filed Return Rejected at Deadline? Don’t Panic

Paul Neiffer, Patronage Dividend Notices Can Be Sent by Email or Posted to a Website

Jason Dinesen, Accounting for the Work Opportunity Credit on an Iowa Tax Return 

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): T Is For Tip Income   

Leslie Book, ACA and Victims of Domestic Abuse (Procedurally Taxing)

Russ Fox, Yes, Online Poker Players Must Pay Taxes

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 330

William Perez, State and Local Tax Burdens as a Percentage of Income for 2011

Lyman Stone, Missouri Senate Passes Problematic Income Tax Cut Plan (Tax Policy Blog).  “Missouri’s state Senate this week passed a $621 million tax cut including a 0.5 percentage point income tax reduction and a special carveout to deduct up to 25 percent of business income.”

Howard Gleckman, Two Ways to Fix the Corporate Income Tax: Internationalize it or Kill It. (TaxVox).  I vote “kill.”

 

There’s a new Cavalcade of Risk up!  At Insurance Writer. Don’t miss Insureblog’s contribution about how those making health care policy don’t know what they’re talking about.

 

20120906-1Corporate Welfare Watch:

Iowa city prepares to give mystery company millions. (Foxnews.com)  “West Des Moines city officials have cued up $36 million in local and state tax incentives for a company, but won’t tell its citizens who that company is.”

Iowa senator calls BS on attempt to limit tax credits for fertilizer plant (Watchdog.org)

Iowa View: From wind to solar, clean power is good for Iowa (Joe Bolkcom, Mike Breitbach).  Green corporate welfare is still corporate welfare.

 

News from the Profession: Deloitte Declares Weekends Are Not For Working, Unless You Are Working (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/2/14: CPA Revenge edition! And more.

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140330-1Mutually assured destruction.  Accounting firm breakups can generate bad feelings.  Bad feelings can generate bad ideas — like filing bogus 1099’s on your erstwhile colleagues.  That went badly for an Ohioan in a U.S. District Court case reported in today’s Tax Notes ($link). 

When Waldman, Pitcher and Co. broke up, it wasn’t amicable. Lawrence Waldman felt ill-used by departing partners Kenneth Pitcher  and Michael Enders.  Some background from the District Court judge:

This case arises from the acrimonious break-up of the successful accounting firm Waldman, Pitcher, and Co., P.S.C. The individual parties in the present case were formerly partners in that firm. The break-up has spawned numerous related lawsuits, various audits by the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”), numerous complaints of improper conduct to various professional oversight groups, and protracted contentious litigation of the present case.

Mr. Waldman apparently attempted to enlist the IRS in his fight, using an assignment of uncollected receivables in the break-up agreement (footnotes and other references omitted):

In January 2010, Waldman & Co. issued 1099-MISC forms to Pitcher and Enders personally for tax year 2009, for non-employee compensation in the amount of $111,535.00 for Pitcher and $13,260.00 for Enders. It is undisputed that Waldman and his company had not collected any of the AR/WIP money reflected on those 1099 forms (doc. no. 134, ¶¶ 18-19). Waldman was admittedly angry at Pitcher and Enders and has repeatedly characterized their departure as effectively “stealing” two million dollars from him. As a prominent and experienced CPA, Waldman was familiar with the matching program of the IRS and knew that issuing these 1099s to Pitcher and Enders personally would likely result in IRS audits of their personal income tax returns. Waldman & Co. benefitted by taking a corresponding tax deduction for the reported amounts.

The unhappy 1099 recipients fought back:

In February and March of 2010, Pitcher and Enders complained to the IRS’s Office of Professional Responsibility (“OPR”) that Waldman had issued 1099s containing information that Waldman knew to be inaccurate. They asserted that Waldman had done this “to exact a revenge that he couldn’t otherwise exact during our negotiations.” They filed similar complaints with the Accountancy Board of Ohio and Ohio Society of CPAs . Those groups declined to take disciplinary action against Waldman.

20120509-1It then got even uglier:

In February 2011, Waldman & Co. issued “corrected” 2009 1099s to the plaintiffs, reflecting “zero” for their nonemployee compensation. At the same time, he issued “corrected” W-2s to Pitcher and Enders reflecting increased amounts in Box 1 . For Pitcher, an additional $199,290.00 of reported income was included, reflecting the $111,535.00 for the accounts receivable assigned to KPE, $27,755 for the amount paid to KPE by Waldman & Co., and $60,000.00 for attorney fees paid by Waldman & Co. to plaintiffs’ attorneys… For Enders, an additional $13,260.00 was included, consisting of $13,260.00 for the accounts receivable assigned to KPE. Waldman & Co. took a tax deduction for the increased amounts listed on the corrected W-2s, even though such returns indicated that no federal income taxes had been withheld.

I suppose if you are going to make up compensation on W-2s, you may as well be consistent and deduct the pretend expense.

Much litigation later, the District Court ruled for the departing accountants Pitcher and Enders:

Given his education, knowledge, and business experience as a CPA, [Mr. Waldman] could not have reasonably believed that these information returns were proper to file. He filed these information returns “willfully” in order to obtain tax benefits and harass the plaintiffs. Despite having “settled” a previous lawsuit over the plaintiffs’ departure from the firm, Waldman was dissatisfied and stubbornly believed the plaintiffs had “stolen” two million dollars from him by leaving his firm with clients. In taking on the role of whistleblower, he deliberately misused the IRS reporting system.

A lot of good it did them.  They were each awarded $15,000 in damages, but not attorney fees:

In light of the unusually hostile litigation history between the parties, the Court observes that plaintiffs have certainly played a significant role in creating the bitter circumstances of this case. This case has also been marked by needlessly contentious discovery battles, repetitive briefing, and unfortunate personal attacks. In view of the animosity between the parties, the Court in its discretion declines to award attorneys’ fees to the plaintiffs. The Court is aware that, absent such an award, this may be a Pyrrhic victory for plaintiffs. Nonetheless, the Court is convinced that this is a just result under the unusual circumstances of this case.

It’s hard to believe that the plaintiffs came out ahead on this, especially when their time is taken into account.

The Moral: breaking up is hard to do, even for accountants.

Cite: Kenneth B. Pitcher et al. v. Lawrence Waldman et al., DC-SD Ohio, No. 1:11-cv-00148

 

20140307-1Jason Dinesen, Life After DOMA: Estate Tax   

Kay Bell, No April Fools’ joke: No capital gains taxes for some investors

William Perez, Extended Time for Choosing When to Deduct Colorado Flooding Losses

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): R Is For Royalties   

Leslie Book, What is a Fair CDP Hearing: Courts Push Back on IRS

 

William McBride, French Economist Wants Top Tax Rate of 80 Percent to Fix Inequality (Tax Policy Blog).  No, it’s not an April Fools joke, and some people who should know better take this serously.  The “French economist” is Thomas Picketty, who is big into the whole “inequality” hand-waving being used to distract us from our real problems.   The post illustrates the folly of the whole war on millionaires with this chart:

20140402-1

He could have added that an increasingly progressive tax system has coincided with increasing inequality.

 

Howard Gleckman, House Republicans Punt on Tax Reform (TaxVox): “…it effectively turns its back on the tax reform plan drafted by Dave Camp, the GOP chairman of the House Ways & Means Committee.”

Tax Justice Blog, ITEP Predicts Illinois Tax Reform Debate…and Then Puts Crystal Ball Away

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 328

Name that Party!, tax edition.  Instapundit has a recurring gag poking fun at news stories of corrupt politicians whose political affiliation is left mysteriously unstated.  Here’s an example from the tax world: Gary councilman sentenced to prison.

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/1/14: Two weeks to go edition. And: neglected spouses!

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014 by Joe Kristan


4868
April 15 is two weeks from today.  You should already be well along the way in getting your taxes done.  If you aren’t,  you need to get to work – and you should be pondering an extension.

Even an extension isn’t a free lunch.  As Trish McIntire explains below, extensions extend the filing deadline, not the payment deadline, so you need to have at least an idea of your current tax situation even to extend.

Start with your 2012 return.  Make sure you have all of the items you reported on that return — W-2s, K-1s, 1099s.  Then think through what might have changed since last year.  New kid?  New spouse?  Lose an old spouse?  Won the lottery?

Then pencil out a return, or hurry down to your preparer.  If your preparer tells you to extend, don’t fight it.  An extended return is not a “red flag” to the IRS.  And when figuring out how much to pay with your Form 4868, round up.  This time of year, it seems most surprises are the bad kind, so assume the worst.

 

20120511-2If you want to know what does work as a red flag for the IRS, the Tax Court yesterday had a good example:

Petitioner’s 2010 Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, was prepared by H and R Block. On Schedule C, Profit or Loss From Business, petitioner reported gross income of $1,274, office expense of $142, and car and truck expenses of $17,978, for a net loss of $16,846.

A schedule C with just a little income and a big loss caused mostly by car and truck expenses probably goes straight to the “audit me” bin, because the IRS knows that many taxpayers are like this one:

Although petitioner provided his 2009-10 mileage log, he nevertheless failed to provide any corroborating receipts or other records that substantiated the statements made in the log. Petitioner’s mileage log did not address the business purpose of each trip. Guessing as to where he may have gone in 2010, petitioner added the places of business travel to his log in 2012. The log was thus not contemporaneous, and the reconstruction was not reliable.

If you want to take car deductions, you need to keep track of them as you go, in a log, a calendar, or a smart-phone app.  Otherwise you, like the taxpayer in this case, won’t stand much of a chance against the IRS.

Cite: Houchin, T.C. Summ. Op. 2014-29.

 

20140401-1William Perez, Retroactive Charitable Donations for Typhoon Haiyan Relief:

Taxpayers can take a deduction on their 2013 tax return for cash donations made between March 26, 2014, and April 14, 2014, to charities providing disaster relief to areas impacted by Typhoon Haiyan.

Normally, charitable donations can be deducted only if the donation is made by the end of the year. But the recently enacted Philippines Charitable Giving Assistance Act (HR 3771) gives taxpayers the option of deducting donations for Typhoon Haiyan relief on their 2013 tax returns.

William explains what you need to do to claim the retroactive deduction.

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): Q Is For QDRO

Trish McIntireThe Annual Extension Post:

So what if you can’t get your return done in time to file by then? You can file an extension. It can be done electronically or by filing a paper Form 4868 by April 15th. And it does have to be postmarked or electronically filed by April 15th. After that time, the extension won’t help you.

Remember, an extended return does not attract IRS attention; a late or erroneous return does.

 

Kay Bell, America’s pastimes: Baseball, ballpark proposals and taxes

 

Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp Won’t Seek Reelection (Accounting Today).  That can’t be a good sign for his misconceived tax reform plan.

Jeremy Scott, Fair Shot for Everyone’ Contains Details for No One (Tax Analysts Blog):

Setting a new low for lack of detail and specificity, Senate Democrats unveiled their “Fair Shot for Everyone” agenda last week. Only loosely a set of real proposals, the agenda is merely a series of talking points designed to distract voters from President Obama’s lagging approval numbers and the continuing unpopularity of the Affordable Care Act.

Not a glowing review.

Howard Gleckman, Should Tax Reform Be Sold on Values Instead of Economics?

 

20120906-1Paul Brennan, In Iowa, your taxes help corporations not pay theirs (Iowa Watchdog.org):

Of course, $950,000 isn’t much more than chicken feed to a company like Tyson, which posted $583 million in profits in 2013. It also doesn’t compare with the tens of millions of tax dollars the state paid out to big companies through the Research Activities Credit last year.

But it is probably enough to leave tax payers feel well and truly plucked.

Nobody notices a few missing feathers.

Des Moines Register, Branstad will sign Iowa Speedway tax break in Newton ceremony Wednesday.  Because NASCAR has better lobbyists than you do.

Tax Justice Blog, State News Quick Hits: State Lawmakers Not Getting the Message

 

BitcoinAlan Cole, Bitcoin’s IRS Troubles (Tax Policy Blog:

The price of the virtual currency Bitcoin has fallen to about $461 from a closing price of $586 last Monday. This decline of about 21% came in the wake of an IRS ruling that net gains from Bitcoin transactions will be taxed as capital gains.

Nobody wants a Schedule D item for every purchase.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 328.  April Fools edition, unfortunately.

News from the Profession: The Forgotten Spouses of Public Accounting (Going Concern).  I’m sure mine is around here somewhere.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/26/14: Using Bitcoins regularly will get you a really long Form 8949. And: underpants!

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014 by Joe Kristan


Bitcoin
Bitcoins may act like money, but IRS says they aren’t.  
The IRS yesterday announced how that it will treat Bitcoin “virtual currency” as property, rather than currency, for tax purposes.  Notice 2014-21 lays out the IRS treatment of Bitcoin and similar virtual money.  Some key points:

- As property, gains and losses on Bitcoin are normally capital gains and losses, unless the taxpayer is a dealer in Bitcoins.  That means losses are limited to capital gains plus $3,000 for individuals.  This contrasts with currency transactions, which normally generate ordinary income and loss under Section 988.

– Transactions in virtual currency will normally generate gains and losses:

If the fair market value of property received in exchange for virtual currency exceeds the taxpayer’s adjusted basis of the virtual currency, the taxpayer has taxable gain. The taxpayer has a loss if the fair market value of the property received is less than the adjusted basis of the virtual currency.

That makes using Bitcoins a hassle for taxpayers who try to follow the law.  Everytime you buy something with Bitcoin, you will have a capital gain or loss, depending on fluctuations in the Bitcoin market.  Imagine if you had to record a little capital gain or loss based on the currency markets anytime you bought anything with cash.  If you use Bitcoins every day you’ll have a horrifying Form 8949 to report all of your gains and losses.

– The basis in virtual currency is its value on date of receipt, if you acquire it in a transaction.  That same value is the amount you use to compute income if you are paid in virtual currency

They point out the obvious:  “A taxpayer who receives virtual currency as payment for goods or services must, in computing gross income, include the fair market value of the virtual currency, measured in U.S. dollars, as of the date that the virtual currency was received.” Also, payments in virtual currency are subject to information reporting, same as cash.

– Virtual currency “miners” generate ordinary income.  If they do it as a trade or business, it’s subject to self-employment tax.

The TaxProf has more; Accounting Today also has coverage.  Peter Reilly has Bitcoins Not Tax Fairy Dust – Second Life Still A Tax Haven?, wisely noting that the virtual currency isn’t generated by the Tax Fairy.  And TaxGrrrl weighs in with IRS Says Bitcoin, Other Convertible Virtual Currency To Be Taxed Like Stock .

 

Ashlea Ebeling, Supreme Court Says FICA Tax Due On Severance Pay:

What the Supreme Court decision means for employers is that what had long been the case –severance pay is subject to FICA tax—remains the case. And for employees who are laid off, it means that they will continue to get a little less in “take-home” severance because it’s dinged for their share of FICA tax.

It seemed like a reach to say otherwise, but now it’s not even that.

 

 

A hard-working fictional student.

A hard-working fictional student.

O. Kay Henderson, Legislators ponder tax credit for student loan payments.  A truly awful idea.  This credit doesn’t encourage getting higher education; it encourages borrowing to pay for higher education.  As an unintended but obvious consequence, it discourages saving to pay for college — there’s no tax credit for foregoing current consumption to pay for college later.  It’s stunning that lawmakers actually want to encourage more student debt when many students already are entering a brutal job market with crushing loan obligations.

Joseph Henchman has two posts at Tax Policy Blog that should be read together: Wisconsin Approves Income Tax Reduction, Business Tax Reforms and Who Would Pay a Higher Illinois Income Tax?  Not the folks that move to Wisconsin, for sure.

 

Jason Dinesen, More on the 0.9% Medicare Tax and Iowa Tax Returns

Paul Neiffer, Schedule F Reporting Update:

I got some feedback on my previous post on Tax Reform and low Schedule F reporting of income. Several sources of farm income does not show up on a Schedule F. This includes many common sales of farm assets such as breeding stock and equipment. Most of the expenses associated with this income is deducted on Schedule F, however when these assets are sold, none of the gains appears on Schedule F.  Rather, this income is usually reported on Form 4797.

That still doesn’t change the fact that these simple farmers play the cash method like a violin to achieve tax results other businesses can only dream of.

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Demystifying The Deduction Rules For Accrued Liabilities   

William Perez, Identity Theft and Your Income Taxes

Kay Bell, IRS gives Colorado flood victims until Oct. 15 to file 2012 or 2013 tax returns claiming disaster losses

Janet Novack, Gotcha! Tax Court Penalizes IRA Rollover That IRS Publication Says Is Allowed   

 

David Brunori, Hang On to Your Wallets (Tax Analysts Blog)

Howard Gleckman, Dave Camp’s Plan for the Expired Tax Provisions: An Almost-Good Idea (TaxVox)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 321

Tax Justice Blog, State News Quick Hits: To Cut or Not to Cut?

 

Joseph ThorndikeRaising Taxes on the Rich Won’t Balance the Budget — But It’s Still Important (Tax Analysts Blog):

 The modern American fiscal state is predicated on a bargain. During World War II, lawmakers were forced to expand the personal income tax to help pay for the fighting. Over the course of just a few years, they added millions of middle-class Americans to the tax rolls for the first time, transforming the income tax from a rich man’s burden to a middle-class millstone. In return, however, these same lawmakers offered the middle class an implicit (and sometimes nearly explicit) guarantee — rich people would be asked to pony up, too.

Cool story.  Let’s see how that works nowadays:

Top 1 pays more than bottom 90

Chart by Tax Foundation

So now the “rich” aren’t paying their “fair share,” they’re picking up most of the tab.  How does it work if you break it down further?

20131030-2

So not only do “the rich” pay their share of the freight, they pay a lot more than their share of earnings.  And when you take government benefits into account, the whole “fair share” argument is tough to support:

givers and takers

Chart by Tax Foundation

I don’t buy Joseph’s “social contract” thinking.  The whole emphasis on inequality being peddled by the administration is a diversion, an attempt to change the subject from the manifest failures of Obamacare and foreign policy blundering.  No matter how hard they hit “the rich,” or how bad doing so is for the overall economy, there is never a point where the politicians will say the rich are being hit enough.

To the extent “inequality” persists, it’s clearly not a direct function of the tax code or government spending.  Politicians, though, find it useful to encourage the belief that they can spend on whatever pleases the crowd by just by making the rich pay their “fair share” — as if they weren’t already.  It’s the flip side of the widespread belief that the government can just balance the budget by cutting foreign aid.   It’s just an attempt to fool the gullible long enough to win another election.

 

Going Concern, Thrift Shops Issue Specific Guidance on Deduction Amounts for Used Underpants.  I didn’t know there was a deduction for toxic waste.

 

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