Posts Tagged ‘Jack Townsend’

Tax Roundup, 3/16/15: Corporation returns are due today! And: IRS plays a cruel joke on 2011 non-filers.

Monday, March 16th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20130415-1It’s March 16. That means calendar-year corporation and S corporation returns are due today. Failure to file on time can be expensive. If you are filing or extending today, protect yourself by e-filing. If you must paper file, use Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested, to document timely filing. If you can’t get to the post office before it closes, you can go to the FedEx or UPS stores, but make sure you use the right Authorized Private Delivery Service and send it to the proper service center street address, as private services can’t deliver to the service center post office box addresses.

 

Flickr image courtesy Sean MacEntee under Creative Commons license

Flickr image courtesy Sean MacEntee under Creative Commons license

Hah! Fooled you! The IRS last week issued a press release: IRS Has Refunds Totaling $1 Billion for People Who Have Not Filed a 2011 Federal Income Tax Return.

If you haven’t filed your 2011 return yet and you want to claim your refund, you’re in for a nasty surprise: you’re probably already too late.

Section 6511 of the Internal Revenue Code (NOT the “IRS Code.” Stop that!) says (my emphasis):

Claim for credit or refund of an overpayment of any tax imposed by this title in respect of which tax the taxpayer is required to file a return shall be filed by the taxpayer within 3 years from the time the return was filed or 2 years from the time the tax was paid, whichever of such periods expires the later, or if no return was filed by the taxpayer, within 2 years from the time the tax was paid. 

That means for most nonfilers, it’s too late to get that 2011 refund, and it’s 2012 refunds that expire on April 15.

Don’t believe me? Then believe Robert Wood

If you pay estimated taxes or have tax withholding on your paycheck but fail to file a return, you generally have only two years (not three) to try to get it back.  Suppose you make tax payments (by withholding or estimated tax payments) but haven’t filed tax returns (shame on you!) for three or four years? When you file those long-past-due returns, overpayments in one year may not offset underpayments in another.

This is why it is an awful idea to fall behind on filing. If you have a refund coming, it dies in two years, but if you owe and don’t file, the statute of limitations never starts, and the IRS can come after you anytime. If you have refunds coming for some years, but owe on others, you don’t get to offset the expired refunds against the amounts you owe. Heads they win, tails you lose.

I wonder if they do high-fives at the IRS Service Centers when people file their 2011 returns looking to cash in on that $1 billion.

Related: Kay Bell, April 15, 2015, is deadline for unclaimed 2011 tax refunds

 

You mean that wasn’t a guitar mass at 2 a.m.? Tax Exempt Church Turns Out To Be A Night Club (Robert Wood).

 

W2TaxGrrrl, Understanding Your Forms: W-2, Wage & Tax Statement

Kristine Tidgren, Proving That Loan Was a Gift Requires Evidence (ISU-CALT). If it’s documented as a loan and the “lender” dies, it will be hard to convince the heirs that you weren’t supposed to pay it back.

Annette Nellen, Busy Season Updates – TPR and ACA. Some practical thoughts on this tax season’s biggest new challenges.

Jason Dinesen, Financing a Small Business, Part 4 of 5: Don’t Spend Money Just to Get Tax Deductions. A disappointing amount of this happens right at year-end.

Jim Maule, Who’s to Blame for Tax Fraud?  “As to the first point, that tax software is not the reason for tax fraud, I agree.”

Russ Fox, Foreign Earned Income Exclusion Gets a Vegas Preparer in Hot Water

Jack Townsend, Sentencing of Ex-Casino Owner, Nevada Businessman and Former NFL Player for Fraudulent Tax Scheme

 

I went to a hockey game yesterday, and a wedding broke out:

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There was a pretty good fight, too. Not involving the couple, I’ll hasten to add.

 

William McBride, Critics of Rubio-Lee Tax Reform Are Way Off the Mark (Tax Policy Blog):

In sum, there are many reasons to think the Rubio-Lee tax plan, or something similar, would have tremendous growth effects. The Tax Foundation’s macroeconomic tax model finds that the plan is indeed extremely pro-growth, while raising the after-tax incomes of families up and down the scale.

While critics may challenge the magnitude of these findings, given the current state of the economy and middle-class wages, this is a serious plan that should spur an honest debate over how best to overhaul our dysfunctional federal tax code.

He addresses doubters like William Gale.

 

Jennifer DePaul, Michigan House Kills Film Tax Credit, Florida Lawmakers Look to Revamp Theirs (Tax Analysts, $link):

Bill sponsor Rep. Dan Lauwers (R) said the film industry has “sapped the state’s budget without creating promised full-time jobs.”

“For every dollar of taxpayer money we have invested into film subsidies, the state has gotten 10 cents in return from that venture,” Lauwers said in a statement. “There are so many more worthwhile uses we can put that money toward.”

It’s good to see a state legislator grasp the concept of opportunity costs. Florida lawmakers apparently didn’t get the memo.

Jared Walczak, Film Tax Credits on the Chopping Block in Massachusetts (Tax Policy Blog)

 

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IJReview, New Tax Scam: That ‘IRS Agent’ Calling and Threatening You For Your Money Is a Fake.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 676The IRS Scandal, Day 675The IRS Scandal, Day 674. This one, quoting Roger Wood, tells you why the IRS will never be trustworthy under its current commissioner:

After the targeting scandal had been underway for over a year, Mr. Koskinen testified that recovery efforts had been thorough, but the tapes and emails just couldn’t be found. As if to goad Republicans, he said that millions in taxpayer money was spent looking. Over 250 IRS employees spent 100,000 hours, costing taxpayers at least $14 million. However, the Treasury Inspector General has revealed that the IT people at the IRS say no one even asked them to recover the emails.

A new commissioner isn’t sufficient to make the IRS trustworthy, but it is necessary.

 

Caleb Newquist, PwC Gave Former Ways & Means Chairman Dave Camp a Job. (Going Concern) It may be tax season, but I suspect he’s not going to be looking at any 1040s.

Peter Reilly, Looks Like No Charitable Deduction For Gifts To Steak And You Know Day. No, not baked potatoes.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/13/15: Making the ultimate sacrifice to tax administration. And: Tax Sadist Tourism!

Friday, March 13th, 2015 by Joe Kristan
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:SPA51928.JPG#/media/File:SPA51928.JPG

“SPA51928″ by Jan Leineberg – Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons –

Maybe I should leave my office door open. A tax office official in Finland who died at his desk was not found by his colleagues for two days (BBC, via the TaxProf):

The man in his 60s died last Tuesday while checking tax returns, but no-one realised he was dead until Thursday.

The head of personnel at the office in the Finnish capital, Helsinki, said the man’s closest colleagues had been out at meetings when he died.

He said everyone at the tax office was feeling dreadful – and procedures would have to be reviewed.

Procedures? Like what? I can see the memo now:

To: All Employees

From: Pekka Raanta, HR director

Re: New Procedures

The recent unfortunate incident involving our dear colleague highlights a need for new procedures for preventing a recurrence of the incident. The presence of unauthorized dead in the office poses both safety and administrative issues.

To ensure early deduction of deaths among our colleagues, we will initiate the following MANDATORY daily procedures.

1. The office manager is to begin each day by kicking all employees. The receptionist will kick the office manager. Should they not respond, please complete form HR-6-MORT.

2. At 10 am and 2 pm each day, we will have a roll call. THIS IS IMPORTANT. Please do not answer the roll for an absent colleague, as this could inadvertenly conceal a death.

3. Buddy system. You will be assigned a “death buddy” by the H.R. Department. You and your death buddy will be responsible for continuous respiration monitoring. Should you go on break or to the restroom, IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO SECURE A SUBSTITUTE. You are also responsible for making mutually satisfactory arrangements to vacation together.

4. ALL EMPLOYEES are required to attend training to enable you to identify dead colleagues. Warning signs such as unusually low productivity and wearing the same outfit for consecutive days will be covered. We realize that it can be difficult to distiguish between the productivity of the dead and the normally-functioning, but there are important signs to look for.

Pihla will complete our colleague’s final time report. Please charge the final two days to “diversity training.” 

I wonder if there is a Purple Heart for tax officials who die at their desks. TaxGrrrl has more on this important story.

 

Foggy Friday at Principal Park. Opening day looms in the fog, April 17!

Foggy Friday at Principal Park. Opening day looms in the fog, April 17!

Russ Fox reminds us that Corporate Tax Deadline is Monday, March 16th and Form 1042 Filing Deadline is Monday, March 16th. Form 1042 reports most foreign withholding, except for partner withholding.

 

Jack Townsend, Judge Posner Confronts a Crackpot in a Tax Crimes Case. “The point is, Judge Posner entertains.”

Jim Maule, Moving? Let the IRS Know. “The lesson is undeniable. Taxpayers who move need to send a change of address notice to the IRS.”

Peter Lowy covers the same case as Prof. Maule in Gyorgy v Comm’r Tees Up Important Procedural issues at Procedurally Taxing.

 

Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

Robert Wood, Fake IRS Agent Scam Targets Public, Even Feds, While Identity Theft Tax Fraud Is Rampant. “Senate testimony shows just how serious fraudsters are at tax time, and just how easy it is for them to get your tax refund.”

Tom Giovanetti,, Blame the IRS and Congress, not software, for tax fraud (The Hill)

Responsibility falls squarely at the feet of the IRS to enforce existing law but ultimately to Congress, as it’s within Congress’s power to reform and simplify programs and restructure administrator incentives to identify and prosecute fraud.

That’s why it’s shameful to see Congress pass the buck and attempt to pin the blame for tax fraud on . . . tax preparation software. That’s right—according to some in Congress, apparently TurboTax is to blame.

Blaming TurboTax for the way the IRS sends billions to thieves every year is like blaming GM for a bank robbery when a Chevy was used as the getaway car.

 

Peter Reilly, Jury Finds Kent Hovind Guilty Of Contempt Of Court No Verdict On Fraud Charges. More on the sago of the founder of the young earth creationist theme park.

 

20130316-1Kyle Pomerleau, Irish Business Leader Calls for Income Tax Reform:

It may be surprising to Americans to hear that Ireland has pretty high taxes. We usually hear about Ireland’s tax system in the context of its corporate income tax rate, which sits a low 12.5 percent, half the average rate of the OECD. We are led to believe that Ireland is a low-tax country in general.

In reality, Ireland’s tax code has some of the highest marginal tax rates, especially on income, in the OECD.

I did not know that.

 

Robert Goulder, Reading Between the Lines (Tax Analysts Blog). “Reading between the lines, we can surmise that conservatives in Congress are now trying to decide which is worse: Camp’s revenue raisers or a federal consumption tax.”

Kay Bell, Old online sales tax bill resurrected in new Senate

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 673. My high school classmate got pushed around by Lois Lerner in her FEC days, and Politico can’t be bothered to care.

Carl Davis, Nine States and Counting Have Raised the Gas Tax Since 2013 (Tax Justice Blog)

G. William Hoagland, Dynamic Scoring Forum: Overblown Concerns? (TaxVox)

 

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Tony Nitti, House Bill Would Provide Tax Deduction For Gym Membership; Shake Weight. I wonder how long it would take to start qualifying gyms specializing in 12-ounce curls to tap into this?

Alberto Mingardi, Greece and tax sadist tourism (EconLog):

The Greek government apparently announced that it wants to hire part timers as “undercover agents to grab out tax evaders”. Tourists, students and housewives could work armed with wireless devices to catch shopkeepers and service providers who do not issue receipts when they sell goods and services.

The application of the concept to tourists potentially opens up a new whole kind of business: sadistic tourism. Syriza regularly portrays Germans as evil people that want to make the poor Greek suffer: why not turning that into a profitable line of activity for the government? Come to Greece. Ouzo, great sea, beautiful landscapes, moussaka, and you’ll have the pleasure to force dirty little shopkeepers to pay their dues to the government!

If the Treasury Employees Union has a travel office, this could be a popular offering.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/11/15: The $195 pass-through timely-filing incentive. And: taxing your neighbor may just send him your retailers.

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

7004 cornerExtend your corporations! The deadline for corporation returns looms. This year it’s March 16, as the usual March 15 deadline is on a Sunday.

The need to file or extend C corporation returns by Monday should be obvious. A failure to file penalty starts 5% of any underpayment, up to 25%, and 100% of the corporate tax is due by March 15 even when you extend.

Failing to meet an S corporation deadline can be even more expensive. How can that be? After all, S corporations don’t usually pay tax. What’s the big deal?

Blame Congress, which has used S corporation late-filing penalties as pay-fors for tax breaks. Congress has now made the penalty $195 per month, Per K-1. So an S corporation return with ten shareholders that is one day late racks up a $1,950 penalty. A S corporations can have up to 100 shareholders — and more when family members own shared – you can see that the numbers can get big in a hurry.

Missing filing deadlines has other bad consequences. You lose the ability to make automatic accounting method changes for the late year, for example; this can be costly, especially if you have lots of depreciable assets. You also lose the ability to 20130415-1make many other elections that can only be made on a timely-filed return. And, of course, you increase the risk of audit. While extended returns don’t increase audit risk, late filings certainly do.

Extensions can be obtained automatically on Form 7004, which can be filed electronically. If you must paper file, go Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested, to prove timely filing.

 

 

David Brunori is, as usual, wise in his post Local Sales Taxes are Poor Revenue Options (Tax Analysts Blog). “I think the biggest problem with local option sales taxes is that they afford politicians the ability to export tax burdens.”

I think it might be more accurate to say that it deludes politicians into thinking they can export tax burdens. Over time, the effect is to export retail into the next jurisdiction that doesn’t impose the local option tax. Anyone who has observed the outward march of retail to the suburbs over the last century or so, and the death of the first generation of malls that sucked the retail out of down at the hands of newer malls, knows retail can move. But I’m sure that the localities that drive out their retailers with a local sales tax will try to bribe them back with TIF financing.

 

IMG_0603Jack Townsend, TRAC Publishes Statistics on Tax and Tax-Related Prosecutions. “Year after year, April consistently has the greatest number of criminal prosecutions as a result of IRS investigations — two-thirds or more higher than those seen in January.”

I’m pretty sure that’s that’s designed to encourage the rest of us.

 

William Perez, Deducting Health Insurance Premiums When You’re Self-Employed. The nice thing is that when you qualify, this is an “above-the-line” deduction; you don’t have to itemize.

Paul Neiffer, IRS Provides Guidance on Repair Regulations. “Last week, the IRS actually provided some very good practical Q&A guidance on these Regulations that should provide great comfort to many of our tax preparers and farmers.  I wish that this guidance had been provided several months ago, but it is better late than never.”

Peter Reilly, IRS Busts In Las Vegas Tip Case. “I really think the Service would have been better off if they had settled with Mr. Sabolic rather than setting this precedent and encouraging more tipped employees to drop out of the program.”

 

Annette Nellen covers Use Tax Lookup Tables, which are handy for those good citizens who actually pay their use taxes on mail-order purchases.

Jana Luttenegger Weiler talks about Financial Literacy at Tax Time (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Jason Dinesen shares his Tax Season Tunes: 2015. He’s a Gordon Lightfoot fan. I’m more Punch Brothers and, of course, Fleeting Suns.

Jim Maule, Tax Courses and Food. “At the risk of seeming crude, the idea of tax law making someone want to eat strikes me as the opposite of reality.” Something to drink, I can definitely see.

 

Richard Borean, Annual Release of “Facts & Figures: How Does Your State Compare?” (Tax Policy Blog). This is a wonderful resource, putting summary information from all of the states, including rates, per-capita tax burdens, business tax climate rankings, and much other data all in one place.

 

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Robert Wood, Feds Launch Internet Sales Tax Again, So Better Click While You Can. I think he’s against the “Marketplace Fairness” bill.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 671. This is interesting:

In September 2014, during a House Oversight Committee hearing on the Lerner e-mails, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said it’s policy not to use personal e-mail.

“One of the things we’re doing is making sure everybody understands that you cannot use your e-mail for IRS business,” he said. “That’s been a policy; we need to reinforce that.”

Say what you will about Lois Lerner, she didn’t set up LoisLerneremail.com.

 

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You don’t say. Improving Deficit Numbers Don’t Make Obama a Deficit Hawk (Jeremy Scott, Tax Analysts Blog) “The CBO’s new baselines will undoubtedly be touted by President Obama as showing that he is keeping his promise to shrink the deficit, but those who think the president is a deficit hawk should note that the smallest deficit projected during this administration ($462 billion in 2017) is still larger than the deficit he inherited ($458 billion in 2008).”

Howard Gleckman, Watch What You Wish For: Dynamic Scoring Creates More Issues for the GOP (TaxVox)

Caleb Newquist, Accounting Programs, Ranked (Going Concern). None of UNI, Iowa State or Iowa are listed in the U.S. News top 10. That makes it obviously wrong.

Kay Bell, Tourists, students to act as tax spies for Greek government. Greece cements its hold on the title of laughingstock of public finance.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/9/15: The dark side is very powerful. And: conventional unwisdom, unwise candidacies.

Monday, March 9th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20130419-1Christopher Bergin asks Has the IRS Truly Moved to the Dark Side?

Anyone who reads my posts knows that I have always given the IRS the benefit of the doubt in its dealing with exemption applications from conservative political organizations (which is what they are in every way but technically). I have not accused the IRS of influencing the political process. I’ve argued that it simply screwed up, albeit in a bad way, noting that stupidity is not a crime.

But now “criminal activity” has been raised. And not in a casual way, but in an official way.

The IRS’s response to this latest accusation came in a lame statement issued February 27 that essentially says it’s the inspector general’s “responsibility” to look into all this. For those of us old enough to remember the TV show Hogan’s Heroes, that is the equivalent of Sergeant Shultz saying, “I know nothing.”

Except it’s not funny.

If you’ve lost Christopher Bergin, you’ve lost Middle Arlington. You’ve also lost the “no scandal here” argument.

 

20150120-1Conventional unwisdomThe Des Moines Register’s Joel Aschbrenner is doing some excellent work on the new convention center hotel that Polk County and the City of Des Moines are helping to fund.

Researchers: Convention hotels rarely fulfill promises: “‘In a great many cases his forecasts have proven to be off, in some cases wildly off,’ Sanders said.”

Who is at risk if hotel under-performs?

The city has offered a $5 million loan guarantee that will come into play three to five years after opening when the hotel refinances its mortgages, Assistant City Manager Matt Anderson said. Hotels often refinance after they build a customer base and stabilize their business, he said.

If the hotel is under-performing due to lower-than-expected occupancy levels or room rates, or if interest rates have spiked up, refinancing would be more expensive and the city would have to cover the difference.

East Village hotel plan loses one floor: “The developer of a hotel and apartment project that will cover an entire East Village block says the hotel is being scaled back in part because of competition from downtown’s proposed convention hotel.”

The City of Des Moines has been pleading poverty. It runs revenue cameras to pick the pockets of random travelers committing the crime of not quite stopping before turning right on red at an empty intersection. It has collected illegal taxes and fought against refunds all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Yet it thinks it has the resources to help finance a hotel. That has to be terrific news to all of the other hotels downtown.

This isn’t the first time Des Moines has put money in a private downtown business. That hasn’t gone entirely smoothly.

 

Peter Reilly, 1099-C From Out Of The Blue? Don’t Ignore It! Fight It! Peter reminds us that just because somebody issues a 1o99-C saying there was debt forgiveness income doesn’t make it so.

Russ Fox, You Have to Have an Unreimbursed Loss to Claim a Casualty Loss

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2015): C Is For Commuting Expenses and D Is For Disability Income.

Kay Bell, No day off for tax advice: March’s first weekly tip round-up

Jack Townsend, Certifying Non-Willflness for Streamlined – The Risk. More on the puzzle palace of IRS offshore account enforcement.

Patrick Thomas, Inability to Correctly Calculate CSED – Confusion Leads to Unlawful Results (Procedurally Taxing).

It is a basic concept of law that once a statute of limitation has passed, no action barred by the statute may take place. Yet, as noted in the National Taxpayer Advocate’s 2014 Annual Report, the IRS often engages in forced collection action after the Collection Statute Expiration Date (CSED) has passed.

I’ll just note that the IRS is pretty good about not issuing refunds when the statute has passed.

 

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David Henderson, Rubio-Lee Isn’t Great:

Co-blogger Scott Sumner, over at his TheMoneyIllusion blog, has a post titled “Rubio-Lee is great, so why not make it even greater?”

I don’t agree that Rubio-Lee is great. It has many good features and Scott has listed pretty much all of them, so I won’t repeat them here. It has a feature, that I’ll mention shortly, that is a major negative.

Unfortunately, Scott didn’t mention the worst aspect of Rubio-Lee: the huge tax credits.

 

Tony Nitti, Reviewing The Rubio-Lee Proposal For Tax Reform

 

Hank Stern, Another day, Another CoOp Snafu (Insureblog):

Thanks to a heads’ up from FoIB Josh Archambault, we have this little gem:“The Minuteman Health Inc. Co-op in Massachusetts got more than $156 million and covered only 1,822 people – over $86,000 per enrollee.”But wait, that’s not all!

“HealthyCT Inc. Co-op in Connecticut got more than $128 million and covered only 6,094 people – more than $21,000 per enrollee.”

If that doesn’t give you the warm fuzzies, I have no idea what will.

At least they haven’t gone belly-up, unlike Iowa’s CoOportunity Co-op.
Alan Cole, CRS Report: Medical Device Tax Burden Falls On Consumers (Tax Policy Blog). “Don’t worry, the consumers will ultimately be hit with the tax, and they’ll just have to deal with it because they need their pacemakers!”
Annette Nellen, Obamacare confusion – real and made up. “The current system is too complex, confusing, inequitable, expensive, – and, not providing health care commensurate with the costs.”

Accounting Today, Cover Charge: How the ACA Is Affecting Fees. Spoiler: it’s not lowering them.

 

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Robert Wood, First Win Lottery, Then Defend Suits By Ticket Sellers, Co-Workers, Relatives

Adrienne Gonzalez, To Whom It May Going Concern: My CPA Is Locked Up and They Won’t Let Her Out. (Going Concern). Sometimes imprisonment is a sign to reconsider your choice of preparer.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 669Day 668Day 667

Former IRS Commissioner Mark Everson is running for president. The Washington Post reports that he is running as a Republican on a platform of “bold tax reform.

After leaving the IRS, he took a job as CEO of The American Red Cross. That went badly: “The president and CEO of The American Red Cross (ARC) is out after less than six months – involved in an inappropriate relationship with a female subordinate.”

It seems like a long shot. Perhaps he looked at the scandals surrounding the presumptive Democratic nominee and her husband and concluded that was the path to an unopposed nomination.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/6/15: Crime Watch Edition. Rashia, still 21.

Friday, March 6th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

It’s the time of the year when exasperated taxpayers and preparers are tempted to say, “bugger all this, I’m going to go for the gusto and cheat on my taxes!” That’s when it’s useful to look in on an old friend of the Tax Update to see how well that’s going.

Rashia says "thanks, Commissioner!"

Rashia says “thanks, Commissioner!”

Let’s look in on Rashia Wilson, who proclaimed herself (on Facebook!) the “Queen of IRS Tax Fraud.” Her reign was cut short by federal identity theft tax refund charges, resulting in a 21-year sentence. And with federal sentences, you have to serve at least 90% of the time.

Ms. Wilson naturally was unhappy with this judicial lèse-majesté, so she appealed, citing procedural irregularities. The trial judge was ordered to reconsider. On further review, the call on the field stands. 21 years.  Robert Wood has more.

Iowa has tax ID fraud too. While South Florida may be the kingdom of tax refund fraud, it has colonies everywhere. Even in Iowa: Cedar Rapids woman charged with filing false tax returns (KWWL.com):

The United States Department of Justice says 33-year-old Gwendolyn Murray is charged with twelve counts of filing false claims for tax refunds, seven counts of theft of government property, and two counts of aggravated identity theft.­ The indictment containing the charges was unsealed on Tuesday.

It is alleged that Murray filed 12 fraudulent tax returns in 2012 and 2013 using other people’s names. She received refunds on seven of those tax returns. The court also alleges that Murray stole the identities of two people.

It’s good to prosecute ID thieves, but it’s far better to keep them from thieving. It’s eye-opening that 7 of the 12 alleged attempts allegedly succeeded. Criminals aren’t known for their impulse control or their ability to anticipate long-term consequences. If they see somebody get a bunch of cash just from keying in some numbers on a computer, they’re going to want some of that bling themselves, and they aren’t going to ponder the likelihood of a prison sentence first.  The IRS is pretty much leaving the door unlocked and the cash register open.

 

Megan McArdle says the culture of “getting a big refund” is part of the problem in Fewer Tax Refunds, Fewer Scams:

If all returns were submitted at the same time, and refunds were held until they could be cross-checked against the IRS’s copies of W-2s and 1099s, then this sort of fraud wouldn’t work very well; the IRS would know it had two returns and could start the process of figuring out which one was fraudulent before it mailed the check. But we love our early refunds, and people often count on getting that check as early as possible.

She offers wise advice:

However, there’s one thing you personally can do to fight tax fraud, and that’s make sure that you don’t give the government more money than you have to. You should never get excited about a tax refund; all it means is that you gave the government a substantial interest-free loan by withholding too much tax throughout the year. You should aim for your refund to be as small as possible — ideally, zero.

A system that sends $21 billion annually to fraudsters — and that number is rising rapidly — can’t continue forever. Part of this will be a technological fix.  My wife can’t buy a dress at Nordstrom in Chicago without triggering phone calls from two credit card companies.  Meanwhile, the IRS happily wires wads of cash to Rashia. One would hope the IRS could learn something from Visa and Discover.

But the IRS is bad at technology, so part of the fix will have to be slower (and ideally, smaller) refunds. This could include lower penalty thresholds for underpayments so that taxpayers will be more willing to risk owing a bit on April 15 — perhaps combined with withholding tables that leave taxpayers owing a bit, rather than getting refunds.

 

What else can you do to protect yourself? 

  • Be careful with your tax information. Never divulge your bank account or credit card info to strangers over the phone.
  • Assume any unexpected call from a tax agency is a scam.
  • Don’t send copies of 1099s and W-2s as e-mail attachments to your preparer, and don’t email a pdf of your 1040 to a loan officer. That leaves your information exposed.
  • When you transmit confidential information, use strong encryption, or better yet upload it via a secure file transfer site, like the FileDrop system we use at Roth & Company.

 

 

20150105-2Peter Reilly, IRS Grossly Unqualified To Make Determinations About Software Related Exempt Applications. The IRS is grossly unqualified for any number of things that Congress gives it to do. Just a very few that come immediately to mind:

– Determining what is “qualified research” for the research credit.

– Determining the energy properties of “green fuels” for the biofuel subsidies.

– Running the nation’s healthcare insurance finance system.

– Policing political speech by tax-exempt organizations.

An outfit that can’t keep two-bit grifters from cashing in billions in tax refunds annually shouldn’t be looking for new things to do.

 

Kay Bell, Tax identity thief mistakenly sends fake refund to real filer. The police don’t spend their days chasing geniuses.

Jack Townsend, More on Light Sentencing for Offshore Account Tax Crimes.

 

Russ Fox provides a valuable service with Online Gambling Addresses Updated for 2015. Taxpayers with offshore online gambling accounts are required to report them on the “FBAR” report of foreign financial accounts (Form 114). The FBAR requires a street address for the account, and these can be hard to find for gambling websites.

William Perez offers advice on how to Communicate Effectively with Your Tax Preparer. We aren’t always the best company this time of year. Come prepared, be efficient, and you can leave our office before we do something bizarre. Other than what we do for a living, of course.

Jason Dinesen, Marriage in the Tax Code, Part 3: Big Changes in 1917

Jim Maule, The IRS and the Taxpayer: Both Wrong. “The taxpayer argued that because the distribution from the IRA was less than the his investment in the IRA, it should be treated as a return of investment. The IRS argued that the entire distribution should be included in the taxpayer’s gross income. The Tax Court concluded that both the taxpayer and the IRS were wrong.”

 

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Kyle Pomerleau, The Rubio-Lee Plan Would be Good for Everyone, Especially Low Income Earners (Tax Policy Blog):

If you take all the pieces of the Rubio-Lee tax plan together, it actually produces the largest increase in after-tax income for the lowest income earners, not the highest.

According to our analysis, the bottom decile of taxpayers will see an increase in after-tax income of 44.2 percent, a percentage increase in income nearly four times larger than the top 1 percent’s increase in after-tax income. But the plan doesn’t just increase the after-tax income of the top and the bottom. All taxpayers will see higher after-tax incomes due to this plan.

The Rubio-Lee plan, with its elimination of the double corporate tax and its business rate reductions, is the most promising tax reform plan to surface in a long time. But its opponents can never see wisdom in anything that benefits “the rich,” even when it benefits everyone else.

 

Renu Zaretsky, Expensive Plans, ACA Developments, and Exercises in Futility. Today’s TaxVox roundup has links to folks hating on Rubio-Lee, Spanish film tax credits, and more.

Patrick Smith, Supreme Court’s Direct Marketing Case May Have Great Significance in Anti-Injunction Act Cases (Procedurally Taxing)

 

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Spring will come!

 

 

Cara Griffith, The Use of Big Data in Auditing (Tax Analysts Blog). “For state auditors, big data (like other types of data) could be used to better evaluate and select taxpayers for audit.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, 666

 

Why would he want a job with less power? Former IRS Commissioner Mark Everson To Run For President. Yes, Of The United States (Tony Nitti)

Culture Corner. A Tax Shelter Board Game Is a Thing That Exists (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/2/15: Thawing Iowa’s frosty business tax climate. And: film credit post-production!

Monday, March 2nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
Iowa's business tax climate, illustrated

Iowa’s business tax climate, illustrated

Baby steps towards fixing Iowa’s business tax climate. At IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record’s Business Professionals’ Blog, I discuss some easy steps to make Iowa’s tax climate a little less frosty, along with a few slightly harder ones.

The real easy:

– Eliminate the Iowa individual and corporation alternative minimum tax.

– Have Iowa’s tax law automatically conform to federal changes.

– Tie Iowa return due dates to federal due dates for all returns.

The slightly harder:

– Encourage or require “composite” returns or withholding for pass-through non-resident taxpayers.

– Repeal the deductibility of federal taxes by building the tax advantages into lower tax rates.

– Repeal refundable and transferable business tax credits.

None of this takes the place of a real Iowa tax reform along the lines of the Tax Update Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan, but you have to start somewhere. My next IowaBiz piece will attempt to put some more meat on the bones of the Quick and Dirty plan.

 

The Iowa Film Tax Credit Program is dead, but the lawsuits linger. A disappointed filmmaker wanted more taxpayer money, but the Iowa Supreme Court ruled that the Department of Economic Development had the final say over what expenses would qualify. Ghost Player, L.L.C. and CH Investors, L.L.C. vs Iowa (Sup. Ct. Iowa, No. 14-0339)

 

Kristine Tidgren, March 2 Deadline Extended for Farmers Waiting for 1095-A. Farmers that file by March 1 (today this year, because March 1 was on a Sunday) do not have to pay estimated taxes. “In a last-minute announcement, the IRS has declared that farmers waiting for a corrected 1095-A will have until April 15 to file their returns and pay their taxes. If they file Form 2210-F along with their return, the penalty for failure to pay quarterly estimated tax will be waived.”

Russ Fox, It Was the Sisterly Thing To Do. “Three Wisconsin sisters allegedly decided that tax fraud and identity theft should stay in the family. They’ve been accused of filing 2,000 phony returns by the Wisconsin Department of Revenue.

 

 

Jack Townsend, DOJ Tax Tough Talk About the Violating Trust Fund Tax Withholding and Payment Obligations. It seems that the IRS has become more willing to try to jail employers who fail to pay withholding; this post discusses how it can become a criminal issue. You can’t argue with this: “The solid advice is to withhold, account for and pay over to the IRS.”

William Perez explains The Key Benefits of Health Savings Accounts. “Contributions are tax-deductible when going into the HSA. And distributions can be tax-free when coming out the HSA.”

Jason Dinesen, Financing a Small Business, Part 3 of 5: Tell Your Accountant Before You Spend the Money

Kay Bell, Lions, lambs, warning Ides and luck all apply to March taxes. “Are you a tax lion, aggressively hunting down tax breaks? Or are you a tax lamb, cowering before the complicated Internal Revenue Code?”

Leslie Book, US v Clarke Remand: Allegations of Bad Faith Still Face A High Hurdle (Procedurally Taxing). “The case involved allegations of retaliatory summons issuance following a failure to extend (for a third time) the statute of limitations and allegations that the summons was a way to avoid discovery limitations in a Tax Court TEFRA proceeding that was commenced after the summons was issued.”

Bob Vineyard, Solyndra-care (InsureBlog). While Iowa’s ACA co-op, CoOpportunity, was the first one to collapse, it might not be the last.

 

Liz Malm, Richard Borean, How Does Your State Sales Tax See That Blue and Black (or White and Gold) Dress? (Tax Policy Blog):

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Robert Wood, Finally, Suing IRS Over All Those Emails. “IRS attorneys said the back-up system would be too onerous to search. Yet in recent testimony, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration said IRS tech employees told them that IRS management never asked for the tapes.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 660Day 661Day 662. It appears that Commissioner Koskinen is putting the same effort at getting to the bottom of the Tea Party harrassment that Vladimir Putin is putting into finding Boris Nemtsov’s killer.

 

Richard Phillips, Netflix is a Real-Life Frank Underwood When it Comes to Tax Breaks (Tax Justice Blog)

Eric Todor, What if We Funded Public Education Like Affordable Care Act Health Insurance? (TaxVox). “Both seek to promote a form of universal or near-universal coverage – K-12 education for all and mandated health insurance for many. But they go about it in very different ways: one makes government subsidies explicit and the other makes much of them disappear, at least in the budgetary and political sense.”

 

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Peter Reilly, Will Christian Soldiers Be On The Streets Of Pensacola As Kent Hovind Goes To Trial? Peter covers the latest developments in the strange and sad case of the guy who had the “Young Earth Creationist” theme park devoted to the idea that humans and dinosaurs co-existed.

 De gustibus non est disputandum. Form 1040: An Unappreciated Work of Art. (Christopher Bergin, practitioner of dark arts for Tax Analysts).

News from the Profession. Florida Man Drives Porsche on Sidewalk to Make a Point, Gets Arrested. (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern). When Grandma started doing that, we took away her keys.

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/27/15: Bartender beats barrister in Tax Court. And more!

Friday, February 27th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20120511-2Bartender or barrister, you need to keep good records.  A Nevada bartender, arguing his own case against an IRS attorney, defeated the IRS in Tax Court yesterday. He did it by keeping records.

The IRS said the taxpayer understated his tip income, and it used a generic tip model to assess additional tax. The bartender argued that the IRS model didn’t reflect what happened at the casino where he worked, and that he had the records to prove it:

Petitioner testified about how his bar was set up and what a shift was like during the years at issue. He stated that his bar had only six stools and that customers would often sit at the stools playing poker for several hours and receive several comped drinks as a result. He testified that the only time his bar would be busy was when there was a big convention and then most of the drink sales tips would be on company credit cards rather than cash. He described the difficult [*15] economic times that Las Vegas faced during the years at issue and how his business had decreased as a result.

Petitioner also testified about the typical tipping behavior of his patrons. Most of his drinks served were comps, and he testified that customers rarely tipped on comp drinks and that if they did they might “throw [him] a buck or two” after several hours of sitting at his bar receiving the comped drinks. Petitioner additionally testified that college kids and foreigners rarely tipped.

And the records:

Petitioner argues that he has met his burden because he complied with the recordkeeping requirements of section 6001 and section 31.6053-4(a)(1), Employment Tax Regs., having kept detailed, contemporaneous daily logs which are substantially accurate. Petitioner routinely recorded the amounts of his cash and charge tips on slips of paper at the end of each shift. Petitioner kept these logs and produced them to respondent and at trial.

20130903-1The IRS tried to nit-pick the records, but Judge Kerrigan was satisfied:

Respondent argues that petitioner was not tipped in exact dollar amounts. Petitioner testified credibly that when he was tipped with change he would put the change in a glass jar to be mixed in with the other tips. When he would periodically cash out the change jar, he would give the change to the cashiers who cashed him out at the end of the shift. He also testified that when he cashed out daily his charged tips receipt, he would give the cashiers any change that was generated by those tips. We find petitioner’s explanation credible and do not find the logs inadequate merely because the amounts are recorded in whole numbers.

I think the important lesson here is that he generated the records every day, and that he was able to produce them to the judge. Contrast that with a recent decision involving a Mrs. Hall, an attorney deducting travel expenses:

Mrs. Hall did not maintain a contemporaneous mileage log. Mr. Katz testified that he based the number of miles driven on discussions with Mrs. Hall. Mr. Katz claimed that he reviewed documentation in order to determine the number of miles driven. The documentation that Mr. Hall and Mrs. Hall offered into evidence to substantiate the number of miles driven consisted of seven parking receipts, an equipment lease, a help wanted advertisement, a phone message slip, and a few other documents. The evidence they submitted does not demonstrate that Mrs. Hall incurred mileage expenses in amounts greater than those respondent allowed in the notice of deficiency.

Citations:

Sabolic, T.C. Memo 2015-32

Hall, T.C. Memo 2014-171

 

TaxGrrrl, Opting Out Of The Obamacare Tax: What Happens If You Don’t Pay?. Oddly, the IRS can’t use most of its collection tools to collect the individual mandate. The advance premium clawback is a different story.

Russ Fox, 10 = 2500 ?. “On Monday, I mailed a Tax Organizer to a client here in Las Vegas; she’s about ten miles from where I am. I also mailed a completed tax return to a client in South Carolina. Both will be received today.”

Annette Nellen talks about Taxes Around the World.

Kay Bell, Survey says tax refunds going into savings, paying off debt

Jack Townsend covers Key points of Article on ABA Webcast on Offshore Accounts

 

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Robert Wood, New IRS Scandal Hearings Reveal 32,000 More Emails, Possible Criminal Activity:

But in what was the most disturbing revelation, House Member attendees were told that the IRS had not even asked for the backup tapes when the ‘hard drive crash’ excuse was first used. That contradicted the prior testimony of IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. He had testified to the effect that recovery efforts had been thorough, and that the tapes couldn’t be accessed.

Do you believe the Commissioner when he says he needs more money?

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 659.

 

Don Boudreaux links: Dick Carpenter and Larry Salzman, in this new publication from the Institute for Justice, explain how the I.R.S. helps to fuel in the U.S. the uncivilized banana-republic terror that is civil asset forfeiture. (Cafe Hayek)

Jim Maule, Testing Tax Knowledge.

According to a report on a recent NerdWallet survey, “[m]ost American adults get an ‘F’ in understanding income tax basics.”

It would be fun to require members of Congress and candidates for that office to take this survey, or one like it. I cannot imagine the outcome would be any better than that achieved by the 1,015 survey takers.

Nor can I.

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Andrew Lundeen, Corporate Tax Cuts Increase Federal Revenue in the Long Run (Tax Policy Blog):

It’s important to note that this increase in revenue would be in the long run, after the economy has fully adjusted (probably about 10 years in the future). In the early years, federal revenue would fall before investment and growth pick up fully as the economy adjusts to a better tax system.

However, tax policy—all public policy, in fact—should be made with a focus on the long-term.

Unfortunately, politicians buy our votes with our money in the short-term.

 

Joseph Thorndike, Hey, It Could Happen! The Optimist’s Case for Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog). ” It will result from a transparent, flexible, and bipartisan bill drafting process; from strategic use of congressional staff to test the waters of controversial proposals; from skillful deployment of transition rules and other minor bill changes to win support from rank-and-file members of Congress; and from streamlined or fast-track debate procedures.”

 

Renu Zaretsky, The Internet, Drug Profits, and Sacrifice. The TaxVox headline roundup covers the uncertain tax effects of the “net neutrality” power grab.

Kristine Tidgren, Iowa Fuel Excise Tax Set to Increase 10 Cents on Sunday (ISU-CALT)

Matt Gardner, Is the Starz Network Series “Spartacus” a Jobs Creator? (Tax Justice Blog). I’m sure it helped create lots of work for film tax credit middlemen and fixers.

 

I bet the judge gave him a stern talking-to. Bow Man Sentenced for Fraud, Tax Evasion.(Concord Patch).

Caleb Newquist, Actually, Everyone Knows That Having Two Monitors Is Super Boss. (Going Concern).

Only two?

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Tax Roundup, 2/25/15: Iowa gas tax boost goes to Governor. And: an appointment with Sauron.

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

IMG_1284Both houses of the Iowa General Assembly approved a 10-cent per gallon gas tax increase yesterday. The Des Moines Register reports:

The fuel tax increase has had strong support from a coalition representing farm groups, business organizations and local government officials. Iowa Farm Bureau members flooded the Capitol last week to lobby legislators to encourage a vote in favor of the gas tax increase. They contended better roads are crucial to the state’s economy and that gas taxes — 20 percent of which are paid by out-of-state motorists — offered the best solution.

The legislation was opposed by Iowans for Tax Relief and Americans for Prosperity, a conservative advocacy group, as well as truck stop operators and convenience store owners who worry retailers on Iowa’s borders will lose business to competitors in neighboring states. Opponents suggested lawmakers needed to better prioritize state spending, and proposed tapping revenues from the state’s general fund to pay for highway projects.

While I think gas taxes are a good way to pay for roads — they put the cost on the users — I am unconvinced that the state uses the funds wisely. By ramming the bill through committee by stacking it with yes votes, the legislature leadership made sure such concerns would not be addressed.

I expect the Governor to sign the bill. The legislature wouldn’t have gone through the trouble if they had any doubt. I have predicted that his approval of a gas tax increase means he won’t run for another term. But I also predicted the gas tax wouldn’t pass.

Somewhat related: Jim Maule, So Who Should Pay for Roads?

 

IMG_0543Why not exempt everyone? Tax Analysts reports ($link) that taxpayers who have filed returns based on incorrect ACA 1095-A forms will not have to pay any additional tax based on the corrected forms:

Tax return filers who purchased health insurance from federal marketplaces set up under the Affordable Care Act and who then filed tax returns based on erroneous information contained in Forms 1095-A will not need to file amended returns with the IRS to stay compliant, the Treasury Department said in a February 24 statement.

“The IRS will not pursue the collection of any additional taxes from these individuals based on updated information in the corrected [1095-A] forms,” the Treasury statement said.

It’s yet another example of the IRS making up rules for Obamacare when its flaws become too obvious. I’m not one to complain when the IRS fails to enforce a dumb tax, but does anybody think the IRS would be as understanding for, say, failing to amend based on a corrected K-1?

Related: Robert Wood, Wrong Obamacare Form Tax Filers Get Relief From IRS. “Unfortunately, the 750,000 people who were sent erroneous form but who haven’t yet filed their taxes are being told to wait until the corrected forms arrive in March.”

 

TaxGrrrl, IRS Testing Taxpayer Appointments At Some Taxpayer Assistance Centers. Why appointments?

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Tax season is saved! Majority of Taxpayers with Obamacare Premium Tax Credits Need to Pay Back Portion (Accounting Today). I’m sure that’s popular.

Howard Gleckman, So Far, Affordable Care Act Users Are Managing Tax Filing, Many Uninsured May Use New Enrollment Period (TaxVox)

Jason Dinesen, Is Iowa Filing Status Tied to Federal Filing Status When You’re Married?

Annette Nellen explains Bitcoin transaction reporting. If you use Bitcoins regularly, you’ll need a bigger tax return.

Kay Bell, New York city, state lawmakers seek pet adoption tax credit. Not every problem is a tax problem, folks.

Leslie Book, Taxpayer Rights: A Look Back to Congressional Testimony of Michael Saltzman and Nina Olson

Jack Townsend, Cono Namorato to Be DOJ Tax AAG.

 

Enjoying a short Des Moines winter commute.

Snow warning today!

 

Scott Drenkard, Utah Is Eyeing An E-Cigarette Tax, But Its Reasoning Is Faulty (Tax Policy Blog). States have a pretty sweet deal with the tobacco devil, getting a cut of tobacco revenues. They hate the idea of e-cigs cuttting into that.

 

David Brunori, Sorry Folks — Clothes Should Be Taxable (Tax Analysts Blog):

The sales tax should fall on all final personal consumption. Everything you buy, be it tangible personal property or services, should be subject to the tax. Such a broad base minimizes economic distortions, allows for overall lower rates, and makes both administration and compliance easier.

But it minimizes the opportunities for legislators to do favors for friends.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 657

 

Caleb Newquist, Accountants vs. Lawyers: A Pointless Debate (Going Concern). “A lawyer and an accountant walk into a bar. Everyone else in the bar doesn’t care.”

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/13/15: Gas tax advances, tax system declines.

Friday, February 13th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today visitors: click here for the post on the updated auto depreciation limits.

 

IMG_1284It looks more likely that I was wrong in predicting no gas tax increase. Subcommittees in both the House and Senate Ways and Means committees approved a 10-cent per gallon increase this week, advancing the increase to the full committes. KCRG.com reports:

A group of top lawmakers from both parties and Gov. Terry Branstad have proposed the 10-cent gas tax increase, which is expected to generate more than $200 million annually.

Supporters say the gas tax is the most fair and equitable way to generate funds for road construction.

At least it looks like my backup bet — that a gas tax increase would indicate that Governor Branstad won’t run for another term — is looking better.

 

taxanalystslogoChristopher Bergin, Reform What? (Tax Analysts Blog). It has a great teaser line: “Yes, it sure is fun thinking about tax reform. And doing nothing about it could be fun as well. We might get to watch this colossal structure collapse soon.”

Christopher goes on to explain:

But all this talk has me thinking about other things, too. Which tax system will we reform – or at least start with? Should it be the one most of us are struggling to comply with -– the one that about half of us “regular” taxpayers still have to pay taxes under? You know, the one with deductions for charitable contributions that we’d make anyway — the one that discriminates between people who own a house and rent a house. The one that’s so confusing, many of us just turn our taxes over to a paid preparer or a paid-for program to figure out. Let’s not forget that if you’re doing well under this tax system, you win a prize: the alternative minimum tax (which is sort of a booby prize).

Or maybe we should start by reforming the IRS, which has become so broke and inept that it can’t afford to help your grandmother find the line on her Form 1040 for the dependents she can no longer claim. That’s the agency that is also supposed to enforce the law so that none of us “regular” taxpayers are the true suckers in all this. (How’s that working out for you?)

Lots of that sort of cheerful stuff. In some ways the system is already collapsing before our eyes. A system that wires $21 billion annually to thieves — and it’s getting worse quickly — isn’t built to last.

 

Des Moines Register, 16 companies claim 82 percent of Iowa’s R&D tax credits. “In all, 265 companies claimed about $51 million in credits for research and development last year, the report shows. Of that, 16 companies claimed $42.1 million.”

My coverage of the story from yesterday is here: The Federal $21 billion thief subsidy; the Iowa $37 million corporation subsidy.

 

William Perez, If You Drive for Uber, Lyft or Sidecar, These Tax Tips are Just for You

20150105-2Kay Bell, IRS drops some features in latest app upgrade

Jim Maule, Self-Employment Income Not Offset by NOL Carryforward

Carl Smith, The Eight Circuit Gives Both Sides a Hard Time on What is a “Separate Return” for Section 6013(b) Purposes (Procedurally Taxing). ” Does the limit on changing from a “separate return” to an MFJ return after filing a Tax Court petition only apply where a taxpayer initially filed an MFS return (as the taxpayer argues), or does it also apply where a taxpayer initially filed a “single” or HOH return (as the government argues)?”

Robert Wood, Nine Habits of Exceptionally Tax-Averse People. Numbers 5 and 6 are key.

TaxGrrrl, Are You Insured? Obamacare Deadline Quickly Approaching

Tony Nitti, Republicans, Democrats Agree On Tax Issue; Winter Storm Warning Issued For Hell. Tony, gang truces are more common than you’d think.

Jack Townsend, Structuring 20150119-1Forfeitures Again in the News (my emphasis):

After taking considerable heat on which we reported before, the IRS has hunkered back to a policy that generally (that’s a fuzz word) will allow seizure only where the IRS has proof of illegal income.  So, under the new law, generally the innocents (meaning those without illegal income) can intentionally violate the structuring law without being subject forfeiture and presumably without being subject to structuring prosecution. It seems to me that Congress should change the law rather than have the IRS not enforce the law as Congress wrote it or to signal to citizens that they can violate the law with impunity so long as they do use illegal funds.

I think Jack gives too much credit to the IRS, as if they have only been taking money when there was “intentional” structuring. The news reports have shown there are plenty of reasons to make deposits before you have $10,000 on hand, including insurance policy restrictions and the common sense idea that you don’t leave too much cash sitting around. But IRS didn’t inquire as to whether there was any actual intent to keep deposits low; they just took the money.

While the IRS has plenty to answer for in its seizure policy, I agree that Congress is just as guilty, passing laws allowing asset seizures without barely a nod at due process and without a hearing.

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 645

Amber Erickson of Tax Justice Blog boldly makes The Case for Keeping the Medical Device Tax,

Health insurance providers, pharmaceutical companies, and the medical device industry are all expected to gain from the ACA by earning greater profits as more people enter the healthcare marketplace. The tax is intended to reciprocate those benefits by tacking on a small flat rate to a firm’s revenue.

But that tax is only on the medical deveisces, not “health insurance providers,” the big winner, and not on pharmaceuticals. It really isn’t on the device industry; it is on the people who need them.

 

Eric Cedarwell, Senator Bernie Sanders’s New Deal for America (Tax Policy Blog).

 Inspired by Roosevelt’s New Deal in many regards, Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) recently outlined his vision for America, featuring expansionary government spending policies. A major federal jobs program, a hike in the minimum wage to at least $15, expansion of Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, increased regulation of Wall Street, and protectionist trade policies are examples of initiatives Sanders emphasized. However, Sen. Sanders provided little information on how he might finance his vision.

In other words, a reprise of the policies that put the “great” in the Great Depression.

Howard Gleckman, Lawmakers Talk Tax Reform But Keep Pushing New Tax Subsidies (TaxVox). Of course they do.

 

Caleb Newquist, When Is the Right Time to Start Your Own Accounting Firm? (Going Concern). December 19, 1990 worked for us. I think it was about 8:30 am.

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Tax Roundup, 2/11/15: Iowa Code Conformity, America’s more selective appeal, and your tax dollars at work in the $1 DVD bin.

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

IMG_1284The Iowa Code Conformity bill goes to the Governor. The Iowa House yesterday approved the Senate-passed bill, SF 126, to update Iowa’s 2014 tax law for the federal “Extender” legislation approved in December. Iowa will conform to the federal legislation, including the $500,000 Section 179 limit, but will not adopt the federal bonus depreciation.

The Governor is expected to sign the bill.

 

Our appeal is just getting more selective. 2014 – More Expatriations Than Ever (Andrew Mitchel):

Today the Treasury Department published the names of individuals who renounced their U.S. citizenship or terminated their long-term U.S. residency (“expatriated”) during the fourth quarter of 2014. 

The number of published expatriates for the quarter was 1,062 (second highest quarter ever), bringing the total number of published expatriates in 2014 to 3,415.  The total for the year breaks last year’s record number of 2,999 published expatriates. The number of expatriates for 2014 is a 14% increase over 2013.  

Chart by Andrew Mitchel LLC

Chart by Andrew Mitchel LLC

Expatriation is often an inconvenient and expensive process. The willingness of so many to go through the hassle is disgraceful evidence of the burden the “shoot the jaywalker” penalties of the foreign account reporting rules and FATCA impose — on top of America’s unique worldwide taxation regime.

Related: Thousands Renounce U.S. Citizenship Hitting New Record, Not Just Over Taxes (Robert Wood)

 

haroldYour tax dollars at work in HollywoodWhen Sony’s emails were hacked, the companies executives were embarrassed by the emails complaining about “spoiled brat” starlets and other insider dish that was exposed. But Tax Analysts’ Brian Bardwell shows that the state legislators who have approved taxpayer funding around the country for filmmakers also have plenty to be embarrassed about. From the subscriber-only story:

While the broader topic of film incentives comes up daily, it appears that top executives — at Sony, at least — are not usually involved in finding credits for individual projects, but when they are, it may be because the film is unlikely to bring in enough money to justify producing it without a government subsidy.

In other words, taxpayers are financing the marginal direct-to-DVD projects for Hollywood. That comes as no surprise to those of us who followed Iowa’s disastrous Film Tax Credit story. In a story line right out of “The Producers,” inflated expense claims allowed awful films to be made without the need to ever get a paying customer — the sale of the resulting transferable tax credits covered the expenses and generated a profit — not counting the attorney fees and jail time, of course.

 

Kay Bell, Tax fraud concerns in Minnesota, Connecticut & now Florida:

“The personally identifiable information apparently hacked at Anthem is exactly what tax fraud thieves use to make false refund claims that appear to be legitimate,” said Department of Revenue Services Commissioner Kevin Sullivan. Sullivan is suggesting that residents beat tax ID thieves to the punch.

Great.

 

Peter Reilly, Breaking – Repair Regs – AICPA Says Help On The Way – Maybe. “The only thing that I find really encouraging about the AICPA announcement is that I can show it to my partners and justify my wait and see approach, which now apparently has the imprimatur of the AICPA.”

TaxGrrrl, UNRETIREMENT. “The Social Security and tax laws hold hidden traps and rewards for the growing army of well-off folks who just keep on working.”

Leslie Book, Congress Considering Procedural Legislation (Procedurally Taxing).

Jack Towensend, Judge Jed Rakoff Reviews Brandon Garrett’s Book on Too Big to Jail: How Prosecutors Compromise with Corporations

 

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David Brunori, It’s Time to End Property Tax Exemptions — for Everyone (Tax Analysts Blog).

City governments are usually looking for payments in lieu of taxes rather than ending exemptions. And the nonprofits — particularly universities and hospitals — tenaciously oppose paying. To be sure, some municipalities and exempt organizations have reached a compromise on payments in lieu of taxes, particularly in Boston. But in the vast majority of the nation, universities, nonprofit hospitals, and property owned by religious organizations are exempt from tax.

I propose we end those exemptions. First, let’s be honest — if you narrow the tax base by exempting some property, everyone else pays more. So in Brunswick, Maine, people and businesses pay more property taxes because Bowdoin College doesn’t. And sometimes they pay a lot more.

Sometimes it can be confusing. Des Moines officials will freely complain about the big hospitals not paying property taxes, but they lacked enthusiasm when the two big non-profit hospitals in town opened new hospitals in the suburbs.

 

Scott Drenkard, Richard Borean, How Many Cigarettes Are Smuggled Into Your State Each Year? (Tax Policy Blog). A lot more since they jacked up the cigarette tax a few years ago.

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The threat of lost cigarette revenue is the real reason state officials are so horrified by the vaporous health risks of e-cigarettes.

 

Renu Zaretsky, Tax Preferences, Investigations, and Settlements. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers Senator Hatch on tax reform, financial supergenius Bernie Sanders on Social Security, and more Swiss bank tax troubles.

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown 2/10: Semi-Encouraging News (Tax Justice Blog)

Joseph Thorndike, When It Comes to Tax Reform, History Tells Us What Might Happen – And Why It Probably Won’t (Tax Analysts Blog). “The 1986 reform happened not because it was wise and prudent and necessary, but because it worked politically. And even then, only barely.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 643

 

News from the Profession. The Annual Close: The Year in Adverse Accounting Jokes (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/4/15: Backlashes, Blood and Dollar Bills Edition.

Wednesday, February 4th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

IMG_1236It’s a busy, snowy day, so just links.

Robert Wood, Obamacare Tax Filing Backlash: There Will Be Blood:

This year for the first time, the Affordable Care Act has created a trickier tax season. It is more expensive, as virtually all Americans filing tax returns will have to consider the law’s impact. There will be confusion and many mistakes. 

Well, there are always the “repair regs” to cheer us up.

 

William Perez, Should Married Couples File Taxes Separately? Joint returns usually get a lower tax on the same income, but joint returns stick you with any snakes hiding in your spouse’s return.

Kay Bell, Tax moves to make in February 2015

Jason Dinesen, Glossary: Varnum Ruling. “Whenever you see or hear reference to the Varnum Ruling in Iowa, it’s referring to the 2009 decision by the Iowa Supreme Court that legalized same-gender marriage in Iowa.”

IMG_2535Jack Townsend reports on the ABA Tax Section Meeting Developments on Streamlined Disclosures. “The IRS representative said that the IRS will not issue additional guidance on the meaning of willfulness in the streamlined program.”

Leslie Book, Tooting Our Own Horn and Remembering Janet Spragens and the Needs of Low Income Taxpayers (Procedurally Taxing). P.T. contributor Keith Fogg received the ABA Tax Section  Spragens Pro Bono Award for “‘outstanding and sustained achievements in pro bono activities’ in tax law.”  Congratulations!

 

David Brunori, Ignoring the People in Nevada (Tax Analysts Blog):

The state apparently needs money, and the governor is proposing to increase a “fee” on businesses. Specifically, Sandoval is calling for an increase in the state business license fee based on a business’s gross revenue. The current fee is $250 and is justified to cover the administrative costs of registering and regulating business enterprises. Most states have these fees, and they are usually nothing more than small nuisances. But Sandoval would like to impose the fee based on the amount of gross income — not profit — earned by state businesses.

Many folks have moved from California to Nevada to get away from ridiculous taxes. I don’t see the attraction of imitating California like this.

 

IMG_0940TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 636

Joseph Thorndike, Obama Abandons the Gas Tax – Just Like Everyone Else (Tax Analysts Blog):

The Obama plan would break with the long tradition of using gas taxes to pay for roads (and some mass transit, as conservatives are quick to point out). Over the decades, this tradition has served the nation well, funding the construction and maintenance of the interstate highway system, among other things. And it has assigned the cost of building all those roads to the people and businesses that actually use them.

Funny, I thought the 2009 “stimulus” fixed all the roads.

Kyle Pomerleau, Obama Budget would Increase Top Marginal Capital Gains Tax Rate in California to 37.2 percent. Of course, it’s worse than that, as capital gains normally have already been taxed once.

Renu Zaretsky, Taxed Reactions and Revenue Rules. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers Treasury Secretary Jack Lew’s dislike of pass-through entities and John Koskinen’s “what scandal, give me money!” testimony before the Senate Finance Committee.

Amber Erickson, Obama’s Progressive Plan to Simplify and Expand Education Tax Credits (Tax Justice Blog). Subsidies for higher education have led to $60,000 annual tuition. What do you think more subsidies will do?

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Career Corner. How to be More or Less Happy as an Accountant. (Jennifer, Going Concern)

TaxGrrrl, Texas Man Arrested After Attempt To Pay Taxes With Dollar Bills. I hope he brings pennies next time.

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Tax Roundup, 1/29/15: Iowans, fill ’em up now. And: lessons from the Obama Sec. 529 retreat.

Thursday, January 29th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

dimeFill me up. ‘Overall consensus’ toward 10-cent hike in state gas tax O. Kay Henderson reports:

 Key legislators say a 10-cent increase in the state gas tax has a good chance of passing the legislature in February and going into effect as early as March.

“I think the overall consensus is to go 10 cents now…We’re so far behind that we need to implement it right away,” Senator Tod Bowman, a Democrat from Maquoketa who is chairman of the Senate Transportation Committee, said this morning.

At the opening of this session of the General Assembly, I guessed that there would be no gas tax boost. It’s looking more likely every day that I was wrong. I asked a few legislators and lobbyists about it when I attended the Iowa ABI Legislative Reception, and they all said a 10-cent gas tax boost was a done deal.

That would test my alternative forecast – that if there was a gas tax boost, it meant Governor Branstad will not run for a seventh term.

 

csi logoAlan Cole, President’s Plan to Tax 529s Was Not a Distraction (Tax Policy Blog):

While the issue was, perhaps, a distraction from the administration’s priorities on community college, it was not at all a distraction from the administration’s priorities on tax policy. It is deeply philosophically consistent with virtually every tax policy proposal, proposed or enacted, from the administration.

The administration’s proposals all tend to follow a particular blueprint for tax policy: simply put, that when Americans save by investing in some kind of asset, that they should be taxed at ordinary income rates on both the initial value of the asset and all the future returns on the asset. (For example, with 529 plans, the initial investment is taxed, and the Obama Administration’s proposal is to tax the returns as well.) This view is mistaken, in that a financial asset’s value is precisely in its future returns. The value of the financial asset, then, is taxed twice. 

The difference here is that the administration has dressed up its tax grabs by saying only “the rich” would have to pay. That’s never really true, but it was so obviously wrong here that even the President’s allies couldn’t support it with a straight face.

 

IRAJoseph Thorndike, What Obama’s 529 Flip-Flop Says About Your Roth IRA (Tax Analysts Blog):

The bursting of the 529 trial balloon should serve as an object lesson for anyone hoping to rein in other tax preferences. In particular, proposals to scale back Roth IRAs – popular among liberal analysts – seem hopeless in the extreme.

I think the dumbest thing was pairing the elimination of a tool to enable people to save for education costs with the unwise “free” community college proposal. That was pretty much saying those who want to pay their own way through college without government grants are chumps.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 630. It has become an issue in the hearings for the Attorney General nominee.

 

Jason Dinesen, What I’m Asking My Clients Regarding the ACA. Pretty much what we are asking our clients.

TaxGrrrl, Form 3115 Adds Confusion & Cost – But May Be Required For 2015. “Since there’s no user fee – and virtually no risk – I tend to agree with those who suggest that businesses owning real and/or tangible property err on the side of caution and file form 3115 to obtain automatic consent.”

Robert Wood, Missing A Form 1099? Why You Shouldn’t Ask For It “Nevertheless, if you don’t receive a Form 1099 you expect, don’t ask for it. Just report the income.”

Tony Nitti, Super Bowl XLIX Tax Tale Of The Tape: Who Ya’ Got? Meh. My football rooting interest ended in Seattle. But for socially-awkward tax nerds (but I repeat myself) who are going to Super Bowl gatherings, Tony has a lifeline.

 

20140512-1Peter Reilly, Don’t Use The IRS To Address Koch Political Spending. Whether it’s Tom Steyer, George Soros, or the Brothers Who Must Not Be Named, the government has no business telling them what causes they can fund.

Russ Fox, Caesars Wins Round One: Chicago, not Delaware. Caesars Entertainment’s bankruptcy litigation, that is.

Carl Smith, Unpublished CDP Orders Dwarf Post-trial Bench Opinions in Uncounted Tax Court Rulings (Procedurally Taxing). Insight on what Tax Court judges do that those of us who don’t do that sort of litigation for a living don’t see.

Jack Townsend, Unreported Offshore Accounts Remains on IRS Dirty Dozen” List

Kay Bell, Illinois shoppers to start paying state sales tax on Amazon purchases on Feb. 1; federal online tax bill still stalled

 

Tax Trials: Georgia Tax Tribunal Rules that Electric Utility’s Machinery and Equipment Used in Transmission and Distribution System Not Exempt from Georgia Sales & Use Tax. Bad tax policy all over. Business inputs should not be subject to sales tax.

Cara Griffith, Tax Appeal Reform May Be a Possibility in Washington State (Tax Analysts Blog)

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David Brunori, Regressive Taxes Are Neither New Nor Good (Tax Analysts Blog): “States should also broaden the sales tax base to tax things rich folks buy, while lowering the tax rates on the things the poor consume the most. But the rich will remain rich.”

Steven Rosenthal, Is Obama Closing Retirement Savings Loopholes or Just Curbing Congress’ Generosity? (TaxVox). How about another choice – he’s just looking to increase taxes on “the rich” any way he can get away with?

Richard Phillips, Congress Should Pass the Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act to Combat International Tax Avoidance. (Tax Justice Blog). I have a better idea: a less onerous tax system that would make international tax avoidance less attractive.

 

Career Corner. The Public Accountant’s Definitive Guide to Disclosure of Past Convictions (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

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Tax Roundup, 1/28/15: President scurries away from plan to tax college savings. And: more hard-hitting journalism!

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

csi logoAccounting Today reports: Obama Said to Drop Proposal to Repeal 529 College Tax Break. Good.

This was perhaps the most obnoxious of the proposals in the President’s budget, and that’s saying something. Promoting “free” community college tuition, while punishing those who actually save for college to avoid government loans, is a model of awful incentives and policy.

I can’t let pass this item from the Accounting Today report (my emphasis):

The administration’s quick retreat on the proposal emphasizes the difficulty of changing popular tax breaks, even in ways that lower the overall tax burden.

Yes, hard-hitting journalism in the form of making excuses for the President. It what way does repealing the exclusion for Section 529 plan withdrawals from taxation help “lower the overall tax burden?” The CBO estimates the President’s proposals would increase taxes by over $1 trillion over ten years.

Speaking of hard hitting journalism, we have this from the Des Moines Register today:

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For those who no longer take the print edition, be assured that this important story is also available to internet readers.

Related: Annette Nellen, President Obama’s 2015 Tax Proposals

 

William Perez, Tips for Green Card Holders and Immigrants Who are Filing a US Tax Return. “Being a resident for tax purposes doesn’t necessarily mean you actually live here full time. As long as you have a green card, for example, you are responsible for reporting and paying tax on your worldwide income.”

Jason Dinesen, Iowa Trust Fund Tax Credit for 2014 Tax Returns. $15 per person this year.

Kay Bell, New IRS Form 1095-A among tax docs that are on their way. ACA adds a new wrinkle to this year’s filings.

Robert D. Flach, OBAMACARE AND 2014 TAX RETURNS

 

1099misc2014TaxGrrrl, Where Are My Tax Forms? Due Dates For Forms W-2, 1099, 1098 & More. Including a reminder that K-1s from S corporations, partnerships and trusts are not due when 1099s and W-2s are.

Leslie Book, Thumbs Up on No Income Even When IRS Serves up 1099 DIV: Ebert v Commissioner (Procedurally Taxing)

Robert Wood, Disagree With An IRS Form 1099? Here’s What To Do. “What happens if the issuer won’t cooperate?”

 

Jim Maule on The Taxation of Egg Donations. “The Court’s conclusion makes sense, and not simply because it reaches the conclusion I advocated for reasons I suggested relying on cases on which I relied.”

Russ Fox, One Good Crime Deserved Another:

Let’s say you’re involved in a 20-year scheme that has successfully evaded millions of dollars in payroll and income taxes for your largest client. However, you’ve only had minor profits from the scheme. So why not embezzle millions of dollars from that client?

Russ offers some pretty good reasons why not.

 

cooportunity logoHank Stern, CoOpportunity assumes room temp (InsureBlog). More on the demise of Iowa’s sole SHOP provider, set up with millions in government grants and loans. Underwriting is hard.

Jack Townsend asks Why the Lenient Sentencing for Offshore Account Tax Crimes. “But, from my perspective, it seems to me that one can fairly question the notion that commission of tax crimes via offshore accounts is any less blameworthy — i.e., punishable — than commission of tax crimes in other contexts.”

 

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Kyle Pomerleau, Richard Borean, Pass-through Businesses Account for More than $1.6 Trillion of Payroll (Tax Policy Blog):

Today, Pass-through businesses pay a significant role in the United States Economy. They account for 95 percent of all businesses, more than 60 percent of all business income, and more than 50 percent of all employment.

These are businesses taxed on owner 1040s. Remember that when politicians want to raise rates on “the rich” even more — they are hammering employers when they do this.

Richard Auxier, Pitching, Defense, and State Tax Policy (TaxVox): “So is Max Scherzer saving money in DC? Yes. Are the District’s tax laws a big reason why he signed with the Nationals? I doubt it.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 629

News from the Profession. Jilted Girlfriend Has Totally Had It With Cheap Accountant Boyfriend and His Stupid Spreadsheet (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/26/15: Is Iowa 2014 tax season in jeopordy? And: how “trust fund tax” encourages trusts.

Monday, January 26th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today visitors: Here is the accounting method post mentioned by “in the blogs.”

 

20130117-1Uh-oh. Is there a holdup on passing the annual “conformity” bill at the statehouse? This from Republican State Senator Bill Anderson in the Sioux City Journal is a bad sign:

Senate Democrats are playing politics with the issue. The Department of Revenue is recommending accountants tell clients to delay filing their taxes until a decision is made. Senate Democrats’ indecisiveness to pass legislation in a timely manner creates uncertainty for taxpayers and tax professionals, preventing them from filing returns.

I had not heard there was any difficulty here. I hope it’s not serious, but I will be watching it more closely now.

This is another example of why Iowa should have a “floating conformity” rule. I don’t understand why they can’t say they will automatically adopt federal extender changes. If they want to leave out bonus depreciation, that could be done with language excluding that from the automatic conformity. We shouldn’t have to go into February without knowing what the state tax law is for the prior year.

 

Janet Novack, Obama Attack On “Trust Fund Loophole” Could Increase Tax Advantage Of Trusts. “Without step-up, there would, for example, be an even greater tax advantage to putting assets that are likely to explode in value—such as founders’ stock in a hot start-up—into an irrevocable trust for children or grandchildren.”

 

Kay Bell, Capital gains gain in income reporting, but tax hike unlikely

Jack Townsend, Fifth Circuit Rejects Attempt on Direct Appeal to Withdraw Guilty Plea in False Claims Conspiracy Case

Jim Maule, No Agreement? No Alimony Deduction. In divorce, paperwork is everything.

Robert Wood, 10 Crazy Sounding Tax Deductions IRS Says Are Legit. My favorite is “free beer.”

20130607-2Anthony Nitti, IRS Futher Limits Deductions For State-Legal Marijuana Facilities:

Most notably, Section 280E provides that “no deduction is allowed for any amount incurred in a business that consists of trafficking in controlled substances.” Because marijuana finds itself on Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act, the IRS has the ammunition necessary to deny the deductions of any facility that sells the drug.

And it does. Regularly.

I hope nobody really believes this actually prevents any drug crimes. What it does is add a crushing tax debt that helps ensure that anybody who gets involved in drug traffic can never reform and become a productive member of society.

 

Robert Goulder, Should the Mayor of London Pay U.S. Taxes? (Tax Analysts Blog):

True, there are tax treaty protections at play and foreign tax credits available. But the point of the story isn’t double taxation; it’s jurisdictional overreach. Many will argue that a citizenship-based tax regime is unfair and heavy-handed.

The U.S. is the only country that does it. Oh, Eritrea, too.

Stephen Olsen, The Gift that Keeps on Taking–Does Section 6324(b) Limit Gift Tax to the Value of the Gift or Can the IRS Take More? (Procedurally Taxing)

 

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

Alan Cole, The IRS Has Too Many Responsibilities (Tax Policy Blog):

On one hand, the IRS’s basic responsibilities have gotten less onerous over the years. More and more taxpayers file electronically, which means that everything just zips straight into the IRS’s computer system with little need for human oversight. This should mean that the IRS really doesn’t need to grow, and if anything it could stand to shrink.

But on the other hand, the IRS has been overloaded with all sorts of additional responsibilities. It’s acting as an extension of the Department of Health and Human Services in enforcing the Affordable Care Act. It’s acting as an extension of the Federal Election Commission and regulating political speech (an authority it has perhaps not used so well.) It’s acting as an extension of the Department of Energy with its residential energy credits, and it’s acting as an extension of the Department of Education in offering deductions and credits for teachers and students. It has to figure out who has health insurance and who has children and where the children live. It even has to try to get data from foreign banks, due to the complexity of our worldwide system of taxation. The more arbitrary things find their way into the tax code, the more verification systems the IRS has to put in place.

These are only a few of the non-revenue responsibilities dumped on the IRS that uses the tax law as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Beyond the bottle opener and the screwdriver, every gadget you add makes it harder to use it as a knife, and now we have a Swiss Army Knife the size of a railcar.

 

20140919-2Gretchen Tegeler, Benefits and Costs of DARTing Forward  (IowaBiz.com), on the troubling financial structure behind Des Moines’ public tansportaiton:

Despite a nearly 20 percent increase in ridership over this period, there has been no associated increase in fare-based revenue.  If more millennials are riding the bus, why aren’t we seeing an increase in operating revenue?  The absence of growth in operating revenue suggests that all of the recent improvements in service and ridership have been funded by non-users, i.e. from increases in property taxes.  Are we okay with this model? How far should we go with it?

Maybe if they had to rely more on farebox revenue, they would spend less on things like the downtown Palace of Transit.

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 627

Glenn Reynolds, Middle-class Savings Like Blood in the Water. Paying for “free” college and student loan subsidies by taking money out of the pockets of those who save for college sets up a strange incentive structure.

Megan McArdle, Uncle Sam Is Coming After Your Savings. They need it to buy you “free” stuff.

 

Career Corner. The Public Accountant’s Definitive Guide to Disclosure of Past Convictions (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/22/15: Business-only tax reform: do-able, or doomed? And: Are Iowa taxes all that bad?

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
paul ryan

Paul Ryan

Business-only tax reform? Tax Analysts reports ($link) that the chief taxwriter in the GOP-controlled House is exploring tax reform ideas with the Obama administration:

As Republican taxwriters look for a way to advance tax reform in the face of White House ambivalence, House Ways and Means Committee Chair Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said he would explore a business-only compromise with the Obama administration, as long as it includes passthroughs.

“I’d like to think that there is perhaps an area for common ground there,” Ryan said on Fox News January 20 after President Obama’s State of the Union address. “We’re going to try to explore it and see if we can find something.”

Ryan said Obama’s recent tax proposals, which involve increasing capital gains taxes and implementing a tax on financial institutions to pay for new and expanded middle-income tax incentives, as well as new spending programs, show he is disinterested in comprehensive reform.

I think “as long as it includes passthoughs” is absolutely the right approach. I also think it will be fatal to the reform effort. A majority of businesses and business income is taxed on 1040s as a result of the increased popularity of passthrough structures like S corporations and limited liability companies.

Source: The Tax Foundation

Source: The Tax Foundation

Any tax reform effort worthy of the name would bring down rates in exchange for a broader base. As the President seems firmly committed to ever-higher rates on “the rich,” I don’t see how this can happen.

 

Is Iowa’s business tax climate really that bad? (Me, IowaBiz.com). Is Iowa ready for tax reform? Ready or not, it’s overdue for it:

Even after all of the explaining, the Tax Foundation’s main points remain true. Iowa’s corporation tax rate is the highest in the U.S. (even taking the deduction for federal income taxes into account). In fact, it is the highest in the developed world. Our individual tax rate is high, even considering the federal tax deduction. All of the special breaks make Iowa’s income tax very complex. And while Iowa has many tax credits, they are often narrowly tailored and require consulting and string-pulling to obtain. Many small businesses don’t qualify for the wonderful tax breaks, but they still have to pay their accountants to comply with the resulting complex and confusing tax system.

If Iowa's income tax were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s income tax were a car, it would look like this.

The post begins an exploration of Iowa tax reform options I will be running at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record’s Business Professional’s Blog. While longtime readers know my fondness for massive changes to the Iowa tax system, I will also be exploring changes on the margin that would improve and simplify Iowa’s tax system in its existing structure that might be easier to pass.

 

David Brunori, Bad State Tax Ideas Abound – Nebraska, Virginia, and Missouri (Tax Analysts Blog):

Special taxes — those on narrow bases — should be imposed sparingly and only for good reason. The best reason is to pay for externalities. But unlike, say, cigarettes, 99 percent of gun purchases produce no externalities. So they should not be subject to special taxes — unless you really hate guns, gun owners, and the guys from Duck Dynasty.

Not every problem is a tax problem.

 

Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

TaxGrrrl, Taxpayers Urged To Be On ‘High Alert’ For Fraud During Filing Season:

This week, the Treasury Inspector General for Taxpayer Administration (TIGTA) issued a reminder to taxpayers to beware of scammers making calls claiming to represent the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The scam, which heated up last year, has continued to plague taxpayers.

If you aren’t expecting a call from the IRS, it’s not the IRS.

 

William Perez, Understanding Form W-2, the Annual Wage and Tax statement

Robert Wood, 10 Surprising Items IRS Says To Report On Your Taxes. As a listicle, it will probably generate traffic to crush Forbes’ servers.

Tax Trials, Fourth Circuit Affirms the Tax Court on Conservation Easement Donation.  “In the end, the Fourth Circuit held that while the conservation purpose of the easement was perpetual, the use restriction on the’ real property is not in perpetuity because the taxpayers could remove land from the defined parcel and replace it with other land.”

Robert D. Flach, ONE WAY RETIREES ARE SCREWED ON THE NJ-1040.

Keith Fogg, How Long Does a CDP Case Toll the Statute of Limitations on Collection? (Procedurally Taxing)

Peter Reilly, Bitter CPA Fight Good For Attorneys And Nobody Else. The U.S. Sixth Circuit picks up the tale of one of the worst accounting firm breakups I’ve come across.

Jack Townsend, USAO SDNY Announces Another Offshore Account Client Plea

 

20141201-1Glenn Hubbard, Obama’s Bad Economic Ideas (Via the TaxProf): “Piling up child tax credits and subsidies for health care over narrow household income ranges, as the president proposes, leads to high rates of taxation on earnings from work as assistance is phased out.” In other words, a poverty trap.

Kay Bell, Obama’s ‘won both’ elections State of the Union quip, Republicans’ many responses to the speech (and gibe)

 

The Tax Policy Blog has lots on the Presidents’ doomed tax proposals:

Kyle Pomerleau, Andrew Lundeen, The Basics of President Obama’s State of the Union Tax Plan

Scott A. Hodge, Michael SchuylerWhat Dynamic Analysis Tells Us About the President’s Tax Hike on Capital Gains and Dividends

Stephen J. Entin, President Obama’s Capital Gains Tax Proposals: Bad for the Economy and the Budget

 

TaxVox is also flooding the SOTU zone:

William Gale, David John, Retirement Security a Priority in the 2015 State of the Union

Gene Steuerle, President Obama’s Middle-Class Tax Message in the State of the Union

William Gale, Adjusting the President’s Capital Gains Proposal

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 623. Today’s installment features an e-mail where scandal figure Lois Lerner shows she’s well aware her unit was under suspicion, and was desparately discouraging further inquiry.

Matt Gardner, Adobe Products’ Acrobatic Tax-Dodging Skills (Tax Justice Blog). I would read that as “skills in meeting their fiduciary duty towards their shareholders.”

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/20/2015: What’s with the accounting method changes? And: foot kissing + tax evasion = double trouble.

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

3115-2009If your business return seems extra thick this year, it could be a result of an “accounting method change” application — Form 3115 — buried in it.

The tax law requires taxpayers to get IRS permission to change a “method of accounting.” Without getting into all of the tedious details, and with great oversimplification, a “method of accounting” occurs when the way you account for something on your tax return affects the timing of income or expense, but not the total amount over time. In other words, it’s temporary vs. permanent differences.

Of course timing is everything in tax planning, and the IRS doesn’t want you to change accounting methods willy-nilly. The IRS doesn’t have the time to consider every accounting method change, though, so it publishes a long list of “automatic” method changes annually. This year’s list is in Rev. Proc. 2015-14.

This year will see more Forms 3115 than usual as a result of the so-called “repair regulations” that are effective for 2014 returns. These rules distinguish between “repair” expenses, which can be deducted, and “improvements,” which have to be capitalized and depreciated.

20140925-2The repair regulations have provisions that let taxpayers treat their building components — HVAC, roofs, elevators, etc — as separate items under these rules. Their effect is to permit deductions for some costs that may have been trapped in the depreciable cost of the building. That makes the automatic method change under these rules (Rev. Proc. 2014-17) a good deal, as it can provide a catch-up deduction for prior capitalized costs. Many returns will also include a method change (Rev. Proc. 2014-16) to reflect updated rules for deducting or capitalizing “materials and supplies.”

Automatic method changes are a good thing; if you have a method change that isn’t automatic, special IRS permission is required, and it doesn’t come cheap. But even an automatic change isn’t free, especially if your preparer has to go through old repair records to determine the catch-up deduction. But if you have significant depreciable real property, it’s probably worth the effort.

 

Russ Fox, Former Mayor (and Current CPA) Learns of Tax Fraud, Joins the Conspiracy

Now, let’s assume you’re a tax professional and you learn that a company is withholding payroll taxes and not paying them to the IRS. Would you:
(a) Tell them that the taxes aren’t being paid, that’s violating the law, and you need to fix this (which could include setting up payment plans with the IRS and Minnesota, or just paying the withheld funds);
(b) Tell them that if they don’t start remitting the withheld funds that he would need to quit the engagement; or
(c) Join the conspiracy. 

An accountant from Stillwater, Minnesota — who happened to also be the Mayor — chose poorly.

 

20121120-2Hank Stern, Counting down the ObamaTax:

Many (most?) folks believe that the tax is a mere $95 this year and, for some people, this may well be the case. But it’s actually just a minimum; the actual rate (this year) is 1% of income:

TurboTax, an online tax service, estimated that the average penalty for lacking health insurance in 2014 will be $301.”

A common misconception.

Robert Wood, Beware Obamacare When Filing Taxes This Year. A roundup of the individual mandate penalty and the net investment income tax.

 

Annette Nellen, Due diligence for preparing 1040s for 2014:

What’s new for due diligence for 2014 individual tax returns?  Virtual currency, Affordable Care Act, FBAR, Airbnb rentals, for sure.  Also, the typical charitable contributions, mortgage interest and 1099-K review.  The biggest new item for 2014 will the new line asking if the individual had health coverage for the year.

More work doesn’t come free. The post lists to a longer article about preparer “due diligence” this tax season.

 

Tim Todd, Tax Court Adopts Functional Test to Define “Bank”. “In sum, the Tax Court held that Moneygram satisfied neither the Staunton functional test nor the § 581 test because it failed to receive deposits, make loans, and was not regarded as a bank by any state or federal regulator. Consequently, Moneygram was not entitled to the reported bad debt deductions of the partial or wholly worthless asset-backed securities.”

Jason Dinesen, A Brief History of Marriage in the Tax Code, Part 2: Taxes in 1913.

 

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Understanding Partnership Distributions, Part 1. “As you will see, the regime governing partnership distributions is drastically different from the one governing corporate distributions.”

TaxGrrrl, Fun With Taxes: Tax Haiku 2015. How about this:

 insure worker health?

Better not reimburse it

That is expensive.

 Kay Bell, Martin Luther King Jr. Day lessons via “Selma” & “Glory”

Mitch Maahs, IRS Announces New Standard Mileage Rates (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

 

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Robert D. Flach, BO SOTU PLANS TO INCREASE TAX ON THE “WEALTHY”. ” BO’s tax proposals, both to help the middle class and punish the wealthy, will never pass in the Republican controlled Congress.”

Matt Gardner, President Obama Takes on the Capital Gains Tax Inequity with New Proposals. By making it worse, of course, though not to hear Mr. Gardner tell it.

Renu Zaretsky, To Build a Better Tax Code, You Could Follow the Money.  The TaxVox headline roundup is heavy on the President’s proposals.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 621. This edition cites Stephen Moore’s Op-ed: “Congress needs to hold the IRS accountable and demand the firing of Mr. Kostiken because he has he admitted openly he can’t do his job.”  Unfortunately, the President who hired him thinks he is doing his job, which is to be a partisan scandal goalie.

 

The headline that wins the internet: Foot Kissing Chiropractor Sentenced for Bribing IRS Agent (Jack Townsend)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/14/15: Education credits to delay refunds? And: it’s not volunteering when you’re paid.

Wednesday, January 14th, 2015 by Joe Kristan
Kristy Maitre

Kristy Maitre

If your tax refund this year seems to take forever to arrive, education credits might be involved. The invaluable Kristy Maitre, former IRS Stakeholder Liaison and now with the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation, has leaned that the IRS may delay refunds on returns claiming the “American Opportunity Credit.” From an e-mail she has distributed:

If your client is getting the American Opportunity Credit this year you need to be aware of a possible “refund hold” on the credit to verify attendance at the college. At this time we “assume” only that part of the refund will be held and the other part of refund not related to the American Opportunity Credit will be released.

At this time we are not sure who this will impact, IRS appears to want to keep it a BIG secret. Our concern is that the tax preparer will be blamed for the delay of the refund and overall it would make the preparer look bad as well as having to deal with an upset client due to the issue. I was able to find some criteria in a new IRM, but we need more information from IRS.

Your client should be  informed by IRS of the reason the refund is being held and that once the 1098-T from the accredited institution is verified the refund will be released,  or they will receive a Letter 4800C to inform them if further documentation is required to allow the education credit…

The AOTC is a “refundable” credit; if the credit exceeds the tax computed, the IRS will pay you the excess. Given the high incidence of refund fraud involving refundable credits like the AOTC, it’s understandable that the IRS would want to verify eligibility before issuing a refund.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

Unfortunately, this verification will come from matching 1098-Ts issued by colleges and universities. These forms, which purport to show tuition paid, are notoriously unreliable. The inevitable matching errors will leave some taxpayers trying to get their refunds fixed well into the summer.

This highlights the unwisdom of using the tax law as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy. It’s hard enough to get taxable income right. Congress also assigns IRS education policy, health care, social welfare, industrial policy, campaign finance regulation, you name it. Like with the Swiss Army Knife, you can only add so many functions before you make it bad at being a knife.

 

This Koskinen isn't the IRS commissioner

This Koskinen isn’t the IRS commissioner

Commissioner Koskinen wants us to blame cuts in his budget for tax refund delays. In a memo to IRS employees, he outlines the dire effects of the cuts in his agency budget, including:

Delays in refunds for some taxpayers. People who file paper tax returns could wait an extra week — or possibly longer — to see their refund. Taxpayers with errors or questions on their returns that require additional manual review will also face delays.

It’s foolish of Congress to pile work onto the IRS and then cut its budget. That said, Mr. Koskinen has brought a lot of this on himself with his combative and tone-deaf response to the Tea Party scandal.

Also, there’s a bit of the Washington Monument Strategy in his memo, by making cuts in areas that inflict pain on taxpayers. I would be more convinced that the IRS is really committed to making taxpayer service a priority if his list of budget adjustments included sending to the field, or laying off, the hundreds of full-time IRS employees who do only union work. He would be more convincing if he said the “voluntary” preparer regulation initiative was on ice until funding improves. Instead, the Commissioner puts the National Treasury Employees Union and his own power grab ahead of processing refunds.

 

No Walnut STVolunteering. I don’t think that word means what you think it means. From Governor Branstad’s 2015 Condition of the State address:

 In addition, I am offering legislation creating the Student Debt Reorganization Tax Credit. This tax credit allows individuals to volunteer for worthy causes within Iowa’s communities and in exchange have contributions made toward their student debt.

There is so much wrong with this, beyond the idea that it’s “volunteering” when you get paid for it. It’s one more random addition to an already ridiculous mishmash of distortive and unwise education subsidies. It’s one more incentive for students to take on debt they can’t otherwise afford. And it misplaces human capital from productive for-profit enterprise to the black hole of the government and non-profit sector.

Iowa Form 148 already lists 32 different tax credits. The Governor thinks adding some more is the solution to Iowa’s problems. I think the credits are a big part of the problem, as they help make the Iowa tax law the complex high-rate mess that it is.

 

William Perez, How Soon Can We Begin Filing Tax Returns?

Kay Bell, Reducing your 2014 tax bill using exemptions, deductions

Jason Dinesen, H&R Block Doesn’t Really Have ACA “Specialists” On Staff. A bold charge, but a convincing one.

Peter Reilly, Can Walgreen Stance On Property Tax Hurt Income Tax Position Of 1031 Investors? Thoughts on getting too cute in analyzing the value of a real estate interest.

Leslie Book, Can IRS Change Taxpayers from Procrastinators to Payors By Drafting Letters that Make Taxpayers Feel Bad? (Procedurally Taxing). Usually people feel bad when they get a letter that says “notice of levy,” but that’s not what he’s talking about.

Robert Wood, Citizenship Renunciation Fee Hiked 422%, And You Can’t Come Back

Jack Townsend, Another UBS Depositor Sentence; Consideration of the Role of Potential Deportation

 

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David Brunori, Using the Poor for Fixing the Roads (Tax Analysts Blog):

The Michigan Legislature passed a bill that would significantly increase the state’s earned income tax credit. Some 800,000 Michigan families will see tax relief. I think that is a good thing. But the change won’t go into effect unless voters approve a sales tax increase from 6 percent to 7 percent.

I don’t share David’s enthusiasm for the EITC, but I do appreciate the absurdity of the sales tax link.

Kyle Pomerleau, Representative Van Hollen Releases New $1.2 Trillion Tax Plan.  “Unfortunately, most of Representative Van Hollen’s tax plan would move the U.S. further away from having a competitive, modern tax code.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 615. This installment covers a Tea Party group that has been waiting five years for Lois Lerner’s old office to approve their exemption application.

 

Career Corner. Age and accounting as a second career (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/31/14: Last minute tax moves: losses, gifts, and… weddings? Timing is everything!

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140608_2So.  2014 is down to its last few hours. What can we do today to make April 15, 2015 a little happier? Well, maybe less bad. It’s asking too much of one day to fix a year’s worth of tax problems, but today might still make a difference. A few things you can do yet today:

– Sell stocks at a loss to offset capital gains. It’s the trade date that counts in determining when a loss is incurred (except on a short sale). That means if you have incurred capital gains in 2014, you can sell loss stocks today and reduce your taxable gains for the year. Most individuals can deduct capital losses on a 1040 to the extent of your gains, plus $3,000. To the extent you fail to offset capital gains with the losses sitting in your portfolio, you are paying taxes voluntarilyJust make sure you make the trade in a taxable account and don’t repurchase the losers for 30 days.

– Consider making your state 4th quarter estimated tax payment today (and your federal payment, if you are an Iowan). Don’t do this rashly, as alternative minimum tax can make this a bad move for some taxpayers. Also, time value considerations can make this a bad move. But in the right circumstances, you can save a lot in April by getting your payment in the mail today.

– Make a charitable gift today, if you are so inclined. Gifts (and other deductions) paid with a credit card today are deductible, even if the credit card isn’t paid off until next year. Checks postmarked today are deductible this year. If you don’t know where to make your gifts, I have some suggestions; if you don’t like those, TaxGrrrl has some others.

– And if you are fanatical about tax planning, and someone else, you can change your marital status today. Your marital status on December 31 is your status for the whole year, as far as the IRS is concerned. But if you are seriously considering this, you definitely need to bring someone else into the discussion.

 

20120511-2A Tax Court Case yesterday shows how important year-end timing can beA Minnesota couple paid $2,150.85 of community college tuition for their daughter’s Spring 2011 semester on December 28, 2010. That normally would have qualified for an American Opportunity Tax Credit of about $2,037 — a dollar-for-dollar reduction fo their 2011 taxes. But they were four days too soon.

Tax Court Judge Marvel explains (my emphasis):

Generally, the American opportunity credit is allowed only when payment is made in the same year that the academic period begins. Sec. 1.25A-5(e)(1), Income Tax Regs. For cash method taxpayers, such as petitioners, qualified education expenses are treated as paid in the year in which the expenses are actually paid.

Because the semester didn’t begin until 2011, the 2010 payment didn’t count. Judge Marvel explains that close isn’t close enough:

We realize that the statutory requirements may seem to work a harsh result in a case such as this where a four-day delay in making the December 28, 2010, payment would have engendered a different result. However, the Court must apply the statute as written and follow the accompanying regulations when consistent therewith.

The Moral? When it comes to tax planning, the difference between December 31 and January 1 is one year, not one day. If timing matters, be sure to get on the right side of the line, and be sure you can document your timing. If you are mailing a big check, go Certified mail, return receipt requested, and save that postmark.

Cite: Ferm, T.C. Summ. Op. 2014-115.

 

If Iowa's income tax were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s income tax were a car, it would look like this.

Iowa rated 8th worst small business environment. The Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council has ranked the entrepreneurial environment of the 50 states. Iowa does poorly:

Iowa is the nation’s number one producer of corn. Unfortunately, it’s costly policy climate works against production from free enterprise and entrepreneurship in general. Iowa ranks 43rd in terms of its public policy climate for entrepreneurship and small business among the 50 states, according the 2014 “Small Business Policy Index.” While Iowa’s entrepreneurs, businesses, investors and workers benefit from fairly low crime rate and a low level of government debt, there are many negatives, such as high individual capital gains taxes; very high corporate income and capital gains taxes; high unemployment taxes; and a high level of government spending.

While I think overall Iowa is better than 43rd, our awful tax environment hurts. Our system of high rates with dozens of carve-out credits for the well-advised and well-connected works great for insiders, but not so well for the rest of us. Maybe 2015 will be the year Iowa considers serious tax reform, like The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.

 

Kay Bell, Donating and deducting a car

Jack Townsend, Reasonable Doubt and Jury Nullification

Jason Dinesen lists his Top 5 Blog Posts of 2014. My favorite is his #5, Having a Side Business in Multi-Level Marketing Doesn’t Make Personal Expenses Deductible

Tony Nitti warns us of Five Traps To Avoid When Deducting Mortgage Interest

Robert D Flach shares: MY NEW YEAR’S EVE TRADITIONS: “I type W-2s and 1099s.” Don’t get too wild, Robert!

Me, IRS issues Applicable Federal Rates (AFR) for January 2015

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G. Brint Ryan, Who’s Afraid of the IRS? When Business Fights Back Against Government Overreach and Wins (Procedurally Taxing)

Annette Nellen,State taxes and bitcoin

Robert Wood, No Mickey Mouse Taxes On Jim Harbaugh’s $48M Michigan Deal And 49ers Exit. “Jim Harbaugh’s 49ers contract may be history, but his $48M Michigan deal has tax components that you might not expect.”

 

Howard Gleckman, Taxes, Charitable Gifts, the ACA, and Ineffective Deadlines (TaxVox).  “Scrambling to make a last-minute charitable donation to beat the New Year’s Eve deadline for a 2014 tax deduction? Take a deep breath and ask yourself, ‘Why am I going through this craziness now?'”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 601

 

Post-sequester commuting.

Not excited about all the wild New Years Eve hoopla? Maybe you prefer a more low-key celebration, like the one Robert D. Flach relates in MY NEW YEAR’S EVE TRADITIONS:

Every year during the day on New Year’s Eve I do the same thing I do during the day on Christmas Eve – I type W-2s and 1099s.

Live it up, Robert!

 

And Happy New Year to all of you Tax Update readers! This is it for 2014 here.  See you next week, and next year.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/29/14: Why AMT matters in year-end planning. And: Laffering it up.

Monday, December 29th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today visitors! Click here to find the capital gains planning item from “In the Blogs.”

IMG_1944How AMT can make prepaying state and local taxes a false move. Prepaying state and local taxes is a venerable year-end tax planning move. It can also be a costly one, thanks to the Alternative Minimum Tax. If you are in AMT this year — perhaps thanks to a big non-recurring capital gain — but you won’t be next year, prepaying your state and local taxes might result in your taxes actually being much higher over the two-year period.

An example involving a fictional Iowa married couple shows how this works. The couple has one earner with $150,000 in self-employment earnings in 2014 and 2015. In 2014 the couple generates $300,000 in a one-time capital gain.

If the couple prepays their 2014 state tax on the capital gain, they get a federal tax benefit of precisely zero in 2014; the capital gain causes them to be in AMT whatever they do because the capital gain rates are the same for AMT and regular tax.

In 2015, the couple has no AMT on their $150,000 of self-employment income. Nor do they have AMT even after paying both their 2014 Iowa balance due and their 2015 Iowa estimates. My projection software comes up with these numbers (yes, oversimplified, but the concepts hold):

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This shows that prepaying the taxes would be a $6,043 mistake for the couple.

There are cases where prepaying state taxes makes sense. There are also cases where AMT makes doing so a blunder. Make sure you run the numbers before you mail that check.

 

In case you missed it over the holidays, central Iowa’s only SHOP marketplace insurance provider was taken over by Iowa’s insurance regulators last week.  Read about it here.

 

Younkers ruins 20140610William Perez offers A First Look at ABLE Savings Accounts. These accounts, included in this month’s “extender” bill, allow Section 529-like benefits for accounts set up to pay disability costs.

Robert D. Flach, THE CLOCK IS TICKING. For 2014 Qualified Charitable Distributions from IRAs.

Mitch Maahs, Summary of the Tax Extenders in the Tax Increase Prevention Act (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Kay Bell, Look out for phishing scam from fake Treasury Secretary

Jack Townsend, Tax Return Preparers Convicted of Conspiracy and Failure to File FBARs. They chose badly.

Cara Griffith, Crowdfunding and State Taxation (Tax Analysts Blog). Is Kickstarter funding taxable income or taxable sales?

Tim Todd, 4th Cir. Rejects Conservation Easement with Substitution Provision

Peter Reilly, Phantom Mares And Real Trucks Don’t Make For A Winning Horse Loss Tax Case. Plus, it’s really hard to find good phantom breeding studs.

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Renu Zaretsky, Will Tax Reforming Be Forgot and Never Brought to Mind? This TaxVox headline roundup covers the Kansas struggles with careless tax reform, among other things.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 599

 

Stephen MooreThe Laffer Curve turns 40: the legacy of a controversial idea:

To punctuate his point, he grabbed a pen and a cloth cocktail napkin and drew a chart showing that when tax rates get too high, they penalize work and investment and can actually lead to revenue losses for the government. Four years later, that napkin became immortalized as “the Laffer Curve”…

Laffer Curve, via Wikipedia

Laffer Curve, via Wikipedia

The idea that tax rates can become so high that they actually reduce net revenue shouldn’t be controversial. If you have a 100% tax rate on an activity, you will avoid that activity, or at least letting the government know about it. Of course, a zero rate will also generate no tax revenue. The revenue-maximizing rate is somewhere in between.

Unfortunately, some people on the right have taken this point and jumped to the conclusion that tax cuts will always cause such increased taxable activity that tax revenues will increase. That’s as much a fallacy as left-side assumptions that increasing taxes can never be economically-harmful or revenue-reducing.

The real issues should be identifying the point at which the harms to economic activity and to revenues occur. It seems likely that the economically-damaging rate is lower than the revenue-maximizing rate, as Megan McArdle discusses here. These points have to differ for different kinds of tax. A 30% income tax rate might not be very destructive to economic activity, but a 30% sales tax would hurt, and a 30% gross receipts tax would be ruinous. The results also differ for state and federal taxes, given how much easier it is for activity to to move between states than between countries.

All this, of course, ignores the obvious question of how much revenue the government needs in the first place. I would argue that a well-run government limited to its proper sphere wouldn’t have to ask these questions all the time.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/19/14: What to do when capital gain tax is voluntary. And: no signature yet.

Friday, December 19th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Programming note: The Tax Update will be taking a long weekend. Back Wednesday.

The President hasn’t signed the extender bill yet. Everyone says he will sign HR 5771, but a lot of taxpayers will feel better when its official.  You can frantically refresh the Whitehouse.gov “Signed Legislation” page to watch for it.

 

Flickr Image courtesy donjd2 under Creative Commons License.

Flickr Image courtesy donjd2 under Creative Commons License.

So you cashed out some stock market gains this year. That makes it a good year to cash out your losers too. Capital losses can be deducted on individual returns to the extent of capital gains, plus $3,000.  That means if you have some unrealized losses on other investments, paying tax is optional to that extent.

If you don’t want to volunteer to pay those extra capital gain taxes, here are some tips for deducting your investment losses:

The loss has to be realized in a taxable account. Selling a loser in an IRA or 401(k) plan doesn’t give you a deductible loss.

-Be sure the trades are executed no later than December 31. For long positions, the trade date controls.

-If you have a loss on a short sale, the settlement date has to be no later than December 31.

-You can’t buy the same stock within either 30 days before the sale or 30 days afterwards. If you do, the “wash sale” rules disallow your loss. The IRS says this rule applies even if your loss is in a taxable account and your gain is in a non-taxable IRA.

Related: Topic 409 – Capital Gains and Losses (IRS.gov)

 

20120906-1Robert Wood, Ranking Facebook, Boris Johnson, Google On Taxes (Diplomatically Please). Well, Boris Johnson is the only one who doesn’t collect corporate welfare from me via the State of Iowa.

Kay Bell, Good news: the 2015 tax-filing season will start on timeBad news: It will be pretty miserable for IRS and taxpayers. Whee.

Jack Townsend, The Rub Between Restitution Assessed as a Tax and a Deficiency

Jim Maule, Code Size Claim Shrinks But Not Enough. The code is bad enough. There’s no need to exaggerate.

Peter Reilly, First Circuit Loss For Transgender Prisoner May Have Positive Tax Implications For Others. Peter can find tax implications in places I wouldn’t have thought to look.

Robert D. Flach gets us Buzzing into the big holiday week.

 

20120702-2Kristopher Hauswirth has been pondering the Farm Bill:

Commodity producers with the resources and/or level of sophistication to confidently optimize their farm bill decisions least need the safety net. While the smallest and/or least sophisticated producers will have to stumble into positive outcomes, if they benefit at all.

The greatest beneficiaries of this law are the people who have serve no public interest in benefitting from a program of this nature. They are the people and entities that create the system, unlock the riddle, and administer the program: lobbyists, lawmakers, attorneys, accountants, and government agencies.

So it’s pretty much like the tax law, then.

 

William McBride, New Research Shows Multinational Corporations Have No Tax Advantage Over Domestics (Tax Policy Blog). “The study calls into question policy makers’ emphasis on international “profit shifting,” including the elaborate efforts by the OECD and rich-country governments to crack down on MNCs exclusively.”

William Gale, Magical Thinking on Tax Reform (TaxVox). “Tax reform is important but policy makers and the public should not be misled about its true trade-offs. Unfortunately, the benefits of reform are more modest than its backers sometimes claim and its costs are often higher.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 589

 

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Clint Stretch, Did Next Year’s Holiday Gift Shopping Just Get Easier? (Tax Analysts Blog). “President Obama’s move to normalize relations with Cuba may add Cuban cigars and Cuban rum to next year’s holiday gift possibilities.”

Sebastian Johnson, What to Buy the Discerning Policy Wonk in Your Life: The ITEP/CTJ Holiday Gift-Giving Guide. The Tax Shelter Coloring Book!

Career Corner. Be Social, Don’t Skip the Party, and Other Redundant Holiday Party Advice (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern). “Now, let’s talk about alcohol. Just because you can get blitzed on Fireball shots doesn’t mean you should.”

 

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