Posts Tagged ‘Jana Luttenegger’

Tax Roundup, 8/3/15: Due date scramble edition, with extendable FBARs!

Monday, August 3rd, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150803-1Highway bill scrambles business return due dates. A “short term highway funding bill” (HR 22) has switched some tax return filing due dates from what they have been pretty much forever. The bill, signed last week by the President, responds to complaints that K-1s are arriving too late by accelerating the partnership return due date and delaying C corporation due dates — with one bizarre exception.

The changes, which take effect for years beginning after December 31, 2015:

1065 (Partnership) returns: Currently due April 15, or 3 1/2 months after year-end, with a five-month extension. The new due date is March 15 (or 2 1/2 months after year-end), with a six-month extension.

1120 (C corporation) returns: Currently due March 15, or 2 1/2 months after year-end, with a six-month extension available. The new law makes the due date April 15 (or 3 1/2 months after year-end), with a six-month extension. Except, weirdly, for C corporations with a June 30 year-end, which retain the old deadlines through 2025.

FBAR (form 114) reports of foreign financial accounts. These have been due on June 30, with no extension available. They will be due on April 15, but with a six-month extension available.

1041 (estate and trust income tax) returns retain their April 15 due date, but their extension period is shortened from six months to 5 1/2 months.

It’s not entirely clear yet how this will work. I hope the FBARs will be considered automatically extended if the 1040 or other return is extended, to help avoid paperwork foot-faults.

The bill is an empty gesture to 1040 filers who get frustrated waiting on K-1s. They won’t get issued any faster. K-1s aren’t delayed because people are sitting around waiting for the due date. They are delayed because the tax law is hard, businesses can be complex, and it takes time to get the work done. On top of that, everybody is on a calendar year, thanks to Congress, so the professionals are trying to get all the returns completed at the same time.

All this means is that more partnership returns will be extended. It won’t get the K-1s out any sooner. The only way to change that is to simplify the tax law and to once again enable pass-throughs to have tax years ending on dates other than December 31.

Additional coverage:

Robert Wood: Many IRS Tax Return Due Dates Just Changed, FBARs Too

Russ Fox, Deadline Changes for 2016 Tax Returns and 2016 FBAR. “It is unclear whether a separate extension for the FBAR will need to be filed. The reference to Treasury Regulation 1.6081-5 is for the automatic two-month extension of time to file for those residing outside the United States, so it appears those who do so reside will have a June 15th deadline for filing the FBAR (with a four-month extension available until October 15th).”

Kay Bell, Highway bill drives home some new tax laws

Paul Neiffer, Tax Return Due Date Changes and Other Items. “For estates required to file an estate tax return, they will now be required to report to the IRS basis information for all assets included in the estate.”

Kyle Pomerleau, Senate Approves Three-Month Highway Trust Fund Extension (Tax Policy Blog).

 

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Congratulations to TaxGrrrl Kelly Phillips Erb. She has ditched tax practice to write on taxes full-time for Forbes.com. Well done!

William Perez, Every State’s Sales Tax Holiday for 2015

Jason Dinesen, New Nebraska Guidance on Same-Sex Marriage and Taxes

Matt McKinney, Do equal, 50/50 shareholders owe each other fiduciary duties? (IowaBiz.com)

Annette Nellen, Importance of lease terms for desired results. “If you want a particular tax result, be sure the lease agreement supports that result.”

Jana Luttenegger Weiler, NFL Decides to Give up Tax-Exempt Status (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

 

David Brunori, Michigan’s Wrongheaded Approach to Tax Policy. (Tax Analysts Blog):

Advocates of raising corporate taxes are assuming that people will want to stick it to corporate fat-cat shareholders. This is right out of the ‘‘tax the rich and give to the poor’’ playbook. Except in this case, proponents want to tax the rich and give it to construction contractors.

They want to tax the rich to give it to their friends — and that doesn’t mean the poor.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 816

 

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Peter Reilly, Judicial Watch Reveals That They Read Tax Blogs At IRS:

At the time Joe Kristan thought that the IRS was wrong to raise the issue and that Senators were right to call the Service to account about it. And this is the part of the document dump that I found most interesting.  Paul Caron summarized Joe’s post  and that was apparently printed out numerous times at the IRS as there are multiple copies in the document dump.

The IRS reads the Tax Update, so you should too!

 

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Tax Roundup, 6/1/15: Trusts, but verify. And lots more!

Monday, June 1st, 2015 by Joe Kristan

tack shelterTrust not flaky trusts. There’s a sort of folk belief that the rich and the sophisticated skip out of income taxes through clever use of trusts. That’s not true; trust income is taxed either to the trust owners, their beneficiaries, or to the trusts themselves — and at high effective rates. The 39.6% top rate that kicks in for unmarried individuals at $413,200 applies starting at $12,300 for trusts.

Still, this folk belief creates a market of gullible people who want to be like the sophisticated kids that don’t pay taxes. Where there’s a market, someone will attempt to meet the demand. That can go badly.

It went very badly for two westerners last week. From a Department of Justice press release:

Joseph Ruben Hill aka Joe Hill, 56, and Lucille Kathleen Hill aka Kathy Hill, 58, both of Cheyenne, Wyoming, and Gloria Jean Reeder, 68, of Sedona, Arizona, were convicted on charges of conspiracy to defraud the United States and obstructing a grand jury investigation following a three-week trial. In July 2014, Joe Hill, Kathy Hill and Reeder were indicted for conspiring to defraud the United States by promoting and using a sham trust scheme. Joe Hill and Reeder were also indicted for conspiring to obstruct the grand jury investigation in the District of Wyoming by causing individuals to withhold records required to be produced by federal grand jury subpoenas.

What were they selling?

Essentially, the scheme involved assigning income to the trust by using a bank account in the trust’s name that was opened with a false federal tax identification number. The Hills, Reeder, and many other CCG clients who testified during the trial used the CCG trusts to conceal income and assets from the IRS.

All of their customers can count on thorough and painful IRS exams.

 

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Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Did you miss the last holiday in May? Friday was 529 Day (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). “A recent Forbes article discussing the so-called holiday reported two-thirds of Americans are unfamiliar with 529 Plans.”

Hank Stern, The Flip Side of Halbig/King/Burntwell. “But there’s another side to this, one which has thus far gone unremarked: is there a potential upside to folks whose subsidies go away? (Insureblog)

William Perez, Identity Theft Statistics from the Latest TIGTA Report

Annette Nellen, Should Sales Tax Deduction Be Made Permanent? House Says Yes

Kay Bell, Are we tax sheep? A U.K. collection effort says ‘yes’:

These psychologists, anthropologists and other observers of human nature suggested that a couple of lines be added to tax collection letters:

“The great majority of people in your local area pay their tax on time. Most people with a debt like yours have paid it by now.”

It worked.

I’m sure this approach has its limits, but it contains an important insight: people will pay their taxes if they think other people do. But if they feel other people get away with not paying, they’ll stop. Nobody likes to be a chump.

Jack Townsend, New IRS FBAR Penalty Guidance

Jim Maule, Can Anyone Do Business Without Tax Subsidies? Most of us have to — which is a powerful case against giving special favors to the well-connected and well-lobbied.

Andy GrewalThe Un-Precedented Tax Court: Summary Opinions (Procedurally Taxing). “It’s a bit strange to pretend that a judicial opinion does not exist…”

Peter Reilly, Structuring – First Kent Hovind – Now Dennis Hastert. The IRS has overreached in its structuring seizures, but keeping deposits under $10,000 in order to avoid the reporting rules for large tax transactions is still illegal. Bank personnel are trained to report suspected structuring. If you do it consistently, your chances of getting caught approach 100%.

Robert Wood, 20 Year Old Oral Agreement To Split Lottery Winnings Is Upheld. Still, it’s always better to get things in writing.

TaxGrrrl, Man’s Tax Refund Seized For Parking Tickets On Car He Never Owned. This sort of injustice is inevitable when the tax law is drafted into service for non-tax chores.

Russ Fox, I’m Shocked, Shocked! That a Chicago Attorney may have Committed Tax Evasion Related to Corruption. Eddie Vrdolyak may be involved.

 

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Tony Nitti, Rick Santorum Announces A Second Run For President: A Look At His Tax Plan. Mr. Santorum is slightly more likely to be president than I am.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 753The IRS Scandal, Day 752The IRS Scandal, Day 751. I like this from Day 752: “The job of the IRS should be to collect taxes, fairly and efficiently. Since the income tax was enacted in 1913, however, the IRS has appropriated to itself—sometimes on its own, sometimes with congressional blessing—the right to make political judgments about groups of citizens. That is the central failure revealed by this scandal.”

 

Scott Drenkard, How Tax Reform Could Help Stabilize the Housing System (Tax Policy Blog):

Removing the impediment to saving baked into the tax code, then, has real impacts on real people. It helps people save for down payments on homes, or to put money toward education. Perhaps, if pared with a reduction in policies meant to artificially reduce down payments, tax reform could be an important component to stabilizing the housing market.

No-down-payment means you’re betting someone else’s money.

 

Richard Phillips, Martin O’Malley’s Record on Taxes is Progressive (Tax Policy Blog). That means he likes to raise them.

News from the Profession. Madoff Auditor Better at Cooperating Than Auditing, Won’t Serve Time (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

There will be no leftovers at the putlucks. Indiana Marijuana Church Granted Tax-Exempt Status, Plans ‘Call To Worship’ When Members Will Light Up (TaxProf).

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/30/15: A Year After the Fire Edition. And: Can fraud be accidental?

Monday, March 30th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Friends, if your 1040 information isn’t in by now, you’re getting extended. 

It’s been a year since the old Younkers Building burned down. It was kitty-corner from our office at 7th and Walnut in Des Moines. Here is what it looked like a year ago:

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And here is the site yesterday:

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The remaining portion of the site is called the Wilkins Building. The old Younkers store was actually three buildings built at different times and connected as one store. The part that didn’t burn down was built about 20 years after the part that was obliterated.

The building was being remodeled into apartments, and the work was well along when the fire broke out in the wee hours. The sprinkler system had not been turned on, and the building went up too quickly for the fire department to do more than keep it from spreading.

The developers intend to remodel the remaining portion as apartments, retail and a restaurant. Seventh Avenue is again open, providing easy access to our office, but Walnut remains closed indefinitely.

Related:

Sunday Morning Skywalks.

Goodbye, Younkers Building.

A VISIT(ATION) TO DOWNTOWN YOUNKERS

DOWNTOWN YOUNKERS PICTURES

 

20150326-2No, you’re not. Two headlines from my Google news feed: Are you accidentally committing tax fraud? And 5 ways you’re accidentally committing tax fraud.

You don’t commit tax fraud “accidentally.” You don’t have to tell yourself “hey, I’ll commit me some fraud” to be a fraudster. But for something to rise to the level of fraud, it has to be more than an accident.

For example, accidentally leaving a $50 1099 off a return isn’t fraud. “Accidentally” omitting one for $1 million just might be, as it’s harder to accidentally forget you made that much.

 

This may be the most depressing tax case I’ve ever seen. From MyFox8.com:

The Parsons are guilty of accepting benefits from the government – benefits intended for Erica – even though Erica was no longer with them.

Erica had gone missing late in 2011, but her disappearance was not reported for nearly two years.

The adoptive mother received 10 years, and the father 8, from a judge convinced they killed their adoptive daughter after years of abuse and covered up the crime to keep collecting her government benefits — on which they failed to pay taxes.

 


tileTaxGrrrl, 
9 Tournament & Tax Tips On The Road To The Final Four. “Betting on the Final Four? Here are a few tax and tournament tips to keep in mind.”

Kay Bell, Some Final Four teams could suffer under seat tax proposal. A proposal to reduce deductions for contributions that get you good seats at the game.

William Perez, What Is the Alternative Minimum Tax?

Jana Luttenegger Weiler, 529A ABLE Account Guidance (Sort Of….) (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). “The ABLE Act will amend Section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code to create a tax-free savings account for certain individuals who had significant disabilities before turning age 26.”

Jason Dinesen, Marriage in the Tax Code, Part 5: Examples of Taxes in 1920

 

Peter Reilly, Nay Nay We Won’t Pay – Evaders, Protesters and Resisters Versus IRS. “Deliberately not paying your taxes violates the law, so I don’t want to imply that there is an “official” correct way to do it.”

Bob Nadler, Who Won the Sanchez Case? (Procedurally Taxing). “In Sanchez, the taxpayer sought innocent spouse relief in the Tax Court and lost her case because the Court held no joint return was filed.  But the underlying assessment of a joint tax may have been erroneous.  If the assessment is found to be invalid the taxpayer will probably have no tax liability.”

 

Jack Townsend, Third Circuit Affirms Sentence Based on PSR Calculation of Tax Loss In Excess of Stipulated Tax Loss in Plea Agreement. Just because you admit evading one amount of tax doesn’t mean the judge can’t be convinced you evaded more.

No, it’s not. Next question. FATCA Repeal Efforts Just Failed, But Is It A Good Law? (Robert Wood):

FATCA’s massive and systemic overkill is great and vastly expensive. It is an elephant gun aimed at mosquitoes. And it has damaged the lives of over 7 million Americans abroad. Many can no longer open or maintain bank accounts where they live, get mortgages, or run their local businesses or households without difficulty. Many institutions around the world simple will not–perhaps cannot–open and maintain accounts for Americans, financial pariahs.

Its supporters say that international tax evasion justifies it, but like so many laws claiming good intentions, it has horrendous unintended (but easily foreseeable) consequences. Its complexity makes offenders out of ordinary citizens committing personal finance abroad, and its attempt to export U.S. tax enforcement invites other countries to do the same here.

 

Younkers Tea Room in its last week.

Younkers Tea Room in its last week.

Joseph Henchman, Nevada Governor Attacks Tax Foundation Report:

The proposal replaces Nevada’s current $200-flat business license fee with a tiered gross receipts tax.

Governor Sandoval quickly responded with a statement calling our report “utterly irresponsible, intellectually dishonest, and built on erroneous assumptions.” His ally Senator Michael Roberson added that our report “is nothing more than a disingenuous hatchet-job.”

The disappointing ad hominems from Governor Sandoval and Senator Roberson cloud the serious issues raised in our impartial analysis:

  • The BLF proposal has 67 revenue ranges for each of 27 industry categories, totaling 1,811 possible tax brackets.

  • BLF taxpayers will face absurdly high marginal tax rates, reaching over 13 million percent and likely distorting business decisions.

  • If the BLF tax burden were calculated in terms of a state corporate income tax, rates would range wildly from 0.2 percent to a punitive 77 percent.

  • Tax-motivated business restructuring would harm Nevada business competitiveness, and the punitive rate on the railroad industry likely violates federal law.

  • The tax rates for each industry were calculated using Texas data from a single year, which is not representative of Nevada’s economy.

  • The revenue estimates are probably overstated, which will lead to a revenue scramble when the tax underperforms.

Gross receipts and gross profits taxes have an inherent flaw: you can have large gross receipts or gross margins, but still have a net loss after expenses. Nevada doesn’t have an income tax. The politicians seem to want one in the worst way, and they are trying to get one that way.

 

Younkers elevator

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day690The IRS Scandal, Day 689The IRS Scandal, Day 688

Len Burman, Do Senators Lee and Rubio Have a Secret Plan to Help Poor Families?

 

Russ Fox begins his annual listing of bad tax ideas with Bozo Tax Tip #10: Email Your Social Security Number. Please, don’t. And don’t sent tax documents with your identifying information as an email attachment. Identity fraud is easy enough without helping the fraudsters that way.

News from the Profession. Deloitte University Is a Cruise Ship Without Swimsuits (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

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Tax Roundup, 3/11/15: The $195 pass-through timely-filing incentive. And: taxing your neighbor may just send him your retailers.

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

7004 cornerExtend your corporations! The deadline for corporation returns looms. This year it’s March 16, as the usual March 15 deadline is on a Sunday.

The need to file or extend C corporation returns by Monday should be obvious. A failure to file penalty starts 5% of any underpayment, up to 25%, and 100% of the corporate tax is due by March 15 even when you extend.

Failing to meet an S corporation deadline can be even more expensive. How can that be? After all, S corporations don’t usually pay tax. What’s the big deal?

Blame Congress, which has used S corporation late-filing penalties as pay-fors for tax breaks. Congress has now made the penalty $195 per month, Per K-1. So an S corporation return with ten shareholders that is one day late racks up a $1,950 penalty. A S corporations can have up to 100 shareholders — and more when family members own shared – you can see that the numbers can get big in a hurry.

Missing filing deadlines has other bad consequences. You lose the ability to make automatic accounting method changes for the late year, for example; this can be costly, especially if you have lots of depreciable assets. You also lose the ability to 20130415-1make many other elections that can only be made on a timely-filed return. And, of course, you increase the risk of audit. While extended returns don’t increase audit risk, late filings certainly do.

Extensions can be obtained automatically on Form 7004, which can be filed electronically. If you must paper file, go Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested, to prove timely filing.

 

 

David Brunori is, as usual, wise in his post Local Sales Taxes are Poor Revenue Options (Tax Analysts Blog). “I think the biggest problem with local option sales taxes is that they afford politicians the ability to export tax burdens.”

I think it might be more accurate to say that it deludes politicians into thinking they can export tax burdens. Over time, the effect is to export retail into the next jurisdiction that doesn’t impose the local option tax. Anyone who has observed the outward march of retail to the suburbs over the last century or so, and the death of the first generation of malls that sucked the retail out of down at the hands of newer malls, knows retail can move. But I’m sure that the localities that drive out their retailers with a local sales tax will try to bribe them back with TIF financing.

 

IMG_0603Jack Townsend, TRAC Publishes Statistics on Tax and Tax-Related Prosecutions. “Year after year, April consistently has the greatest number of criminal prosecutions as a result of IRS investigations — two-thirds or more higher than those seen in January.”

I’m pretty sure that’s that’s designed to encourage the rest of us.

 

William Perez, Deducting Health Insurance Premiums When You’re Self-Employed. The nice thing is that when you qualify, this is an “above-the-line” deduction; you don’t have to itemize.

Paul Neiffer, IRS Provides Guidance on Repair Regulations. “Last week, the IRS actually provided some very good practical Q&A guidance on these Regulations that should provide great comfort to many of our tax preparers and farmers.  I wish that this guidance had been provided several months ago, but it is better late than never.”

Peter Reilly, IRS Busts In Las Vegas Tip Case. “I really think the Service would have been better off if they had settled with Mr. Sabolic rather than setting this precedent and encouraging more tipped employees to drop out of the program.”

 

Annette Nellen covers Use Tax Lookup Tables, which are handy for those good citizens who actually pay their use taxes on mail-order purchases.

Jana Luttenegger Weiler talks about Financial Literacy at Tax Time (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Jason Dinesen shares his Tax Season Tunes: 2015. He’s a Gordon Lightfoot fan. I’m more Punch Brothers and, of course, Fleeting Suns.

Jim Maule, Tax Courses and Food. “At the risk of seeming crude, the idea of tax law making someone want to eat strikes me as the opposite of reality.” Something to drink, I can definitely see.

 

Richard Borean, Annual Release of “Facts & Figures: How Does Your State Compare?” (Tax Policy Blog). This is a wonderful resource, putting summary information from all of the states, including rates, per-capita tax burdens, business tax climate rankings, and much other data all in one place.

 

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Robert Wood, Feds Launch Internet Sales Tax Again, So Better Click While You Can. I think he’s against the “Marketplace Fairness” bill.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 671. This is interesting:

In September 2014, during a House Oversight Committee hearing on the Lerner e-mails, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said it’s policy not to use personal e-mail.

“One of the things we’re doing is making sure everybody understands that you cannot use your e-mail for IRS business,” he said. “That’s been a policy; we need to reinforce that.”

Say what you will about Lois Lerner, she didn’t set up LoisLerneremail.com.

 

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You don’t say. Improving Deficit Numbers Don’t Make Obama a Deficit Hawk (Jeremy Scott, Tax Analysts Blog) “The CBO’s new baselines will undoubtedly be touted by President Obama as showing that he is keeping his promise to shrink the deficit, but those who think the president is a deficit hawk should note that the smallest deficit projected during this administration ($462 billion in 2017) is still larger than the deficit he inherited ($458 billion in 2008).”

Howard Gleckman, Watch What You Wish For: Dynamic Scoring Creates More Issues for the GOP (TaxVox)

Caleb Newquist, Accounting Programs, Ranked (Going Concern). None of UNI, Iowa State or Iowa are listed in the U.S. News top 10. That makes it obviously wrong.

Kay Bell, Tourists, students to act as tax spies for Greek government. Greece cements its hold on the title of laughingstock of public finance.

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/16/15: Titanic saved! Well, except for the iceberg thing. Or, the regs are dead, long live the repair regs!

Monday, February 16th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20140925-2So is the tax season saved? The IRS gave us a big “never mind” Friday afternoon with the issuance of Rev. Proc. 2015-20, letting taxpayers of the hook for countless Forms 3115 under the “repair regs.”

The main points:

“Small” trades or businesses — those with either average 3-year gross receipts under $10 million or assets under $10 million — can adopt the most common methods under the repair regulations without having to file an accounting method change. In fact, the Rev. Proc. requires no special statement or disclosure to adopt the new methods.

The “Small” tests are based on the size of the “trade or business,” not the size of the taxpayer. This means taxpayers who exceed these limits may still qualify if their component “trades or businesses” qualify.

Taxpayers may pay a price for not filing a 3115. If you skip the 3115 for the common method changes, you aren’t allowed to get the most lucrative one – the “late partial disposition election” for real estate and machinery improvements. This is the one Peter Reilly notes as having the potential to generate “biblical” deductions. That means if you want to claim this biblical deductions for any trade or business, you need to file the most common method changes for all of them, regardless of whether they qualify otherwise under Rev. Proc. 2015-20

For the details of the new rules, I have two dedicated posts:

IRS drops “Form 3115″ requirement for smaller taxpayers under tangible property rules, and

List of Rev. Proc. 2015-20 method changes.

No Walnut STPeter Reilly says John Koskinen Saves Tax Season With Form 3115 Relief For Small Business. Well sure.  Except maybe for the entirely out-of-control epidemic of identity theft refund fraud, the continuing confusion and almost certain widespread inicidence of the new individual mandate penalty, the sticker shock that millions will face when they recompute their ACA exchange plan tax credits, and the financial disaster looming for small businesses for the horrible crime of reimbursing employee health insurance. But other than that, yes, it’s all hunky-dory.

Other Coverage: 

Russ Fox, IRS Announces Small Business Relief for Form 3115 (Property Regulation Issue)

Tony Nitti, Repair Regulation Relief: What Does It Really Mean? (Not As Much As You Think):

You don’t have to file a Form 3115. But remember, the three safe harbors that we started with 4,000 words ago — the $5,000/$500 de minimus, small building, and routine maintenance exceptions — are annual elections that apply only on a go forward basis. These still must be attached to the returns.

Paul Neiffer, You Don’t Need to File Those Form 3115s After All

 

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William Perez has Your Helpful Guide to Capital Gains Tax Rates and Losses

Jason Dinesen, Handling Franchise Fees on a Tax Return. He gives an example involving a $5,000 franchise fee: “The $5,000 franchise fee is considered an asset. The $5,000 is deducted over 180 months (15 years). This is true even though the franchise agreement is only 5 years long.”

Annette Nellen, Taxable income of a marijuana business. That’s pretty much the same as gross income.

Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Facebook Allows Users to Designate “Legacy Contact”

Kay Bell, 5 things to check when hiring a tax preparer

Stephen Olsen has his newest Summary Opinions, rounding up recent developments in tax procedure (Procedurally Taxing).

"Boris Johnson -opening bell at NASDAQ-14Sept2009-3c cropped" by Boris_Johnson_-opening_bell_at_NASDAQ-14Sept2009-3c.jpg: *Boris Johnson -opening bell at NASDAQ-14Sept2009.jpg: Think Londonderivative work: Snowmanradio (talk)derivative work: Off2riorob (talk) - Boris_Johnson_-opening_bell_at_NASDAQ-14Sept2009-3c.jpg. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Boris_Johnson_-opening_bell_at_NASDAQ-14Sept2009-3c_cropped.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Boris_Johnson_-opening_bell_at_NASDAQ-14Sept2009-3c_cropped.jpg

Via Wikipedia.

Robert Wood, Savvy London Mayor Boris Johnson Paid IRS, Is Now Renouncing U.S. Citizenship. Considering what it costs him, it’s not surprising.

TaxGrrrl, Filing As Single Or Married: When ‘It’s Complicated’ Isn’t A Choice On Your Tax Return. As a filing status, that is.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 648

Renu Zaretsky, No Hitting the Brakes for Tax Breaks… Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers early movement on extending the “expiring tax provisions.”  Remember, they only got extended through the end of last year. Also links to discussions on Section 529 deductions, tax reform, and the romantic side of spreadsheets.

 

News from the Profession. Nearly Half of Accountants Surveyed Hooked Up With a Colleague (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/2/15: Film trial sequel ends badly for a main character. And: Iowa conformity bills advance.

Monday, February 2nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
Dennis Brouse

Dennis Brouse

They got him for the trailer. The filmmaker who got more transferable tax credits under the Iowa film tax credit program than anyone else was convicted Friday of first degree fraud with respect to the program. From the Des Moines Register:

Dennis Brouse, 64, could face up to 10 years in prison at a sentencing hearing scheduled for March 23. Brouse owned Changing Horses Productions, a company that received $9 million in tax credits from the scandal-ridden Iowa Film Office. Brouse starred in the company’s main series, “Saddle Up With Dennis Brouse.”

Prosecutors claim Brouse bought a 38-foot camper trailer from an elderly couple, Wayne and Shirley Weese, for $10,500 in cash. But prosecutors charged that Brouse claimed the trailer cost twice that much in a statement for tax credits that he turned in to the state.

The State Auditor’s Report on the program reported that Changing Horses claimed 50% tax credits for many other doubtful items. For example, they claimed a $1 million value for a “sponsorship” awarded to a feed company that had refused to sign a document with that value on the grounds that it was “grossly overvalued.” This enabled the company to get tax credits that likely were more than 100% of the money spent in Iowa by the filmmaker.

Mr. Brouse had a prior conviction on charges related to the film program overturned, and his attorney says he will appeal this conviction.

While Iowa’s film credit program was spectacularly mismanaged, it was only one extreme example of the unwisdom of the state legislature attempting to manage Iowa’s economy via the tax law.

 

Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

Iowa conformity bills advance The bill to update Iowa’s income tax to reflect the December federal “extenders” bill cleared both the House and Senate taxwriting committees. I think than means the bills won’t be delayed, and we can get on with Iowa’s tax season. Both bills conform for pretty much everything in the federal tax law, including the increased Section 179 deduction, but do not conform to federal bonus depreciation.

 

Dahls checks outThe central Iowa grocery chain was broken up Friday in a bankruptcy liquidation. Seven stores will re-open under another name.

Perhaps the greatest victims of the failure are longtime Dahls employees who owned the company through their Employee Stock Ownership Plan. They get nothing, or close to it.

Iowa passed a special break for sales of companies to ESOPs in 2012. Proponents pointed to the employee ownership of Dahl’s major competitor, Hy-Vee, in support of the bill.

The Dahls example shows a dark side of employee ownership — the way it concentrates a large portion of employee retirement assets in a single vulnerable asset.

 

Jason Dinesen, Do I Have to Have Form 1095-A Before I Can File? “Yes, you need the Form 1095-A if you got premiums through an insurance exchange.”

William Perez, Need More Time? How to File for a Tax Extension with the IRS

20150105-1Jim Maule, When Is A Building Placed in Service? “Because the taxpayer presented undisputed evidence that certificates of occupancy had been issued, that the buildings were substantially complete, and that the buildings were fully functionally to house the shelving and merchandise, they had been placed in service within the required time period.”

Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Sharing Financial Responsibility at Tax Time (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). “Whatever your situation, it is important to keep good records so that someone else can pick up where you left off, if needed.

Kay Bell, Is Belichick’s coaching style like tax avoidance or tax evasion?

Paul Neiffer, $500,000 Permanent Section 179 Could be Coming Soon! “The House Ways and Means Committee is expected to vote on seven expired tax provisions on February 4, including making permanent Section 179 expensing at the $500,000 level.” Given the politics involved, I’m not holding my breath.

Robert Wood: Receipts Rule IRS Keeps Quiet: They’re Optional. Well, sometimes they aren’t optional, and they always help.

TaxGrrrl, Salaries, Ads & Security: What’s The Real Cost Of Super Bowl XLIX?

Russ Fox, This Never Works…:

Patrick White is the owner of R & L Construction in Yonkers, New York. He liked his home and he liked to gamble. There’s nothing wrong with that. He took payroll taxes withheld from his business and used that money for his homes and for gambling. There’s a lot wrong with that, especially when it totals $3,758,000. Mr. White pleaded guilty to one count of failing to pay over payroll taxes to the government. He’ll be sentenced in May.

Russ throws in some good advice about using EFTPS.

Robert D. Flach regales us with THE TWELVE DAYS OF TAX SEASON

Stephen Olsen, “Summary Opinions for 1/6/15-1/23/15” (Procedurally Taxing). News from the tax procedure world.

 

IMG_0543Christopher Bergin, Robin Hood and Other Fables (Tax Analysts Blog):

When it comes to taxation, President Obama has his own particular points of view. He may use terms such as “middle-class economy” or say things like “the rich can pay a little more,” but at the core he views the tax system as either a mechanism that helps the rich hang on to their ill-gotten gains or as a “honey pot” to fund his political ideas and base. It’s all politics. And that’s why we will see no progress – regarding the gas tax, taxation of businesses, or any other kind of real tax reform – until there has been a change in administrations.

In fact, the major lesson we’ve learned from this latest episode is that when it comes to of tax reform, the Obama administration has the “tinnyist” of tin ears. Whether the merry men and women at the White House believe that section 529 tuition savings plans benefit the ”rich,” they should know that when American voters actually recognize and identify with a tax break by its code section number (in this case, 529), be careful — very, very careful. You usually can’t sneak a fast one into the tax code when taxpayers know the section by number.

Hard to argue with this.

 

Arnold Kling, 529: Popular != Good Policy. “529 plans subsidize affluent people for doing what they would have done anyway–send their kids to exclusive, high-priced colleges.” Maybe, but it still is better than rewarding borrowing by subsidizing it.

Howard Gleckman, Obama’s Failure to Kill 529 Plans May Say Less About Tax Reform Than You Think (TaxVox). “But the survival of these education subsidies does not mean that a rate-cuts-for-base-broadening swap will never be possible.”

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 634

Matt Gardner, Facebook’s Record-Setting Stock-Option Tax Break (Tax Justice Blog). 595 words on the evils of the deduction for stock option compensation without one word noting that every dollar of “phantom” deduction for the issuing corporation is also a dollar of “phantom” income to the employees — and usually at higher rates than the corporation pays.

Scott Drenkard, Gov. Kasich’s Plan May Be A Tax Cut, But It’s Still Poor Policy. (Tax Policy Blog) “Unfortunately, the plan which is set to be announced next Monday by Governor Kasich isn’t going to address any of these problems and will probably make them worse.”

 

Career Corner. You Should Take a Nap This Afternoon Because Science (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/10/14: Extender bill lives, permanent charitable extender bill doesn’t. And: don’t just buy it; install it!

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

lizard20140826Whither the extender bill? HR 5771, the bill to extend retroactively through the end of this month the 55 or so tax breaks that expired at the end of 2013, has been “placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar.” That means it appears to be proceeding to a vote, though I find nothing on when that will happen. Tax Analysts reports ($link) that outgoing Senate Majority Leader Reid says he will take up the extender bill ” after finishing work on a defense authorization bill and a government funding measure.”

Meanwhile, the President has threatened to veto a separate attempt to permanently extend three charitable breaks in the extender bill, including the break for IRA contributions. While that’s bad for those breaks, it implies that the White House will not oppose HR 5771’s one-year extension.

 

20130422-2Because it looks as though the “extender” bill will clear the Senate, taxpayers looking to add fixed assets have extra incentive to get it done this year. The bill extends through 2014 — and only through 2014 — the $500,000 limit on Section 179 deductions and 50% bonus depreciation. These breaks allow taxpayers to deduct over half (bonus depreciation) or all (Section 179) of the cost of fixed assets that are otherwise capitalized, with their deductions spread over 3 to 20 years.

Taxpayers should remember that it’s not enough to order or pay for a new asset by the end of 2014 to qualify for these breaks. The asset has to be “placed in service” by year end.

A Tax Court case from last December drives home the point, where a taxpayer lost an $11 million bonus depreciation deduction in 2003 because an asset bought at year-end wasn’t “placed in service” on time.  Judge Holmes takes up the story:

On December 30, 2003, an insurance salesman named Michael Brown1 took ownership of a $22 million plane in Portland, Oregon. He flew from there to Seattle to Chicago — he says for business meetings — and then back to Portland. Brown says these flights put the plane in service in 2003, and entitle him to a giant bonus-depreciation allowance. But a few days later he had the plane flown to a plant in Illinois where it underwent additional modifications that were completed about a month later.

The IRS argued that the need for modifications meant the airplane wasn’t “placed in service” before year end. The taxpayer argued that the airplane was “fully functional” as purchased, and therefore was “placed in service” when acquired and used for its first flight on December 30, 2003. The court agreed with the IRS:

While acknowledging in his briefs that those modifications made the Challenger “more valuable to him” and allowed him to “more comfortably conduct business” as a passenger, he says they have “nothing to do with the Challenger’s assigned function of transporting him for his business.” The problem is that this posttrial framing just doesn’t square with the trial testimony, in which Brown testified that those two modifications were “needed” and “required”. We therefore find that the Challenger simply was not available for its intended use on a regular basis until those modifications were installed in 2004. Brown thus didn’t place the Challenger in service in 2003 and can’t take bonus depreciation on it that year.

A new asset doesn’t actually have to be used during the year to be “placed in service,” but it has to be ready to go. A new machine should be on the floor and hooked up, not just in a crate on the dock, or in a trailer on the way in, if you want to depreciate it. If the new asset is a vehicle, you need to take delivery to get the deduction. If the asset is a farm building, it needs to be assembled and in place, not in boxes on the ground.

Cite: Brown, T.C. Memo 2013-275

 

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The TaxProf reports on a new Treasury Inspector General report, TIGTA: IRS Has 25-30% Error Rate In Refundable Child Tax Credits, Mistakenly Pays $6-7 Billion:

The IRS has continually rated the risk of improper ACTC payments as low. However, TIGTA’s assessment of the potential for ACTC improper payments indicates the ACTC improper payment rate is similar to that of the EITC. Using IRS data, TIGTA estimates the potential ACTC improper payment rate for Fiscal Year 2013 is between 25.2 percent and 30.5 percent, with potential ACTC improper payments totaling between $5.9 billion and $7.1 billion. In addition, IRS enforcement data show the root causes of improper ACTC payments are similar to those of the EITC.

So at least 1/4 of the credit is claimed fraudulently or illegally. This is one of the provisions the President insists be made permanent as a price for permanently extending business provisions. He killed the permanent extender compromise when it didn’t also make the child credit permanent.

 

Wind turbineIowa Public Radio reports Grassley Wants Wind Tax Credit to Go Further. He should read Bryan Caplan’s review, The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels: We Owe Civilization to Fossil Fuels. “And despite decades of government favoritism, alternative fuels have yet to deliver.”

 

Peter Reilly, Seventh Circuit Will Not Let Tax Protester Blame His Lawyer For Conviction:

James Stuart thought that Peter Hendrickson had “cracked the code” – the Internal Revenue Code, that is. Joe Kristan would characterize it as finding the tax fairy – that magical sprite who make your taxes go away painlessly while your sucker friends send checks to the tax man.   

It’s always fun to be named-checked by a Forbes blogger.

Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Tax Tips for Gifts to Charity (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).

Robert D. Flach, DONOR ADVISED FUNDS. For at least 99.99% of taxpayers, these are far better than setting up a private foundation.

Kay Bell, Sen. Tom Coburn’s parting gift: a tax code decoder

Paul Neiffer, Watch Your Crop Insurance Form 1099s This Year

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About EAs, #2: We Don’t Work for the IRS

Brad Ridlehoover, The Grinch That Stole Their Reasonable Cause… (Procedurally Taxing)

Tim Todd, IRS Erred in Making Notice of Tax Lien a Condition to Installment Agreement

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 580. Lois Lerner appears to have been scheming to sic the Justice Department on the Tea Partiers as early as 2010, according to newly-unearthed e-mails.

 

Howard Gleckman asks Why Does Congress Pay For Some Tax Cuts and Not Others? (TaxVox). “It can’t be the merits of the recipients. By now, TaxVox readers know that the expired tax breaks included such worthies as preferences for race horse owners, Puerto Rican rum manufacturers, and TV and film producers.”

Eric Cederwall asks What is the Simplest Tax System? (Tax Policy Blog). “Normative economics aside, a per-person tax is one of the most economically efficient taxes for raising revenue.”  Not happening, though.

 

Adrienne Gonzalez, Kids These Days Trust the IRS More Than Olds Do (Going Concern). Like Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy, they’ll figure it out eventually.

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Tax Roundup, 11/6/14: You pretend to complete the form, we’ll pretend to care. And: election mania!

Thursday, November 6th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today visitorsthe godawful link you seek is here.

 

20120905-1Don’t worry about getting it right, just make it look good. IRS personnel trying to appease angry practitioners at an AICPA Tax Division gathering had some strange and annoying things to say yesterday.

Practitioners are upset at the IRS insistence on Form 3115 accounting method change applications with 2014 returns from everyone moving into compliance with the new rules on repair and capitalization costs.  Tax Analysts reports ($link):

Participants in the tax methods and periods panel at the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants fall Tax Division meeting in Washington said that some taxpayers don’t want to pay the high costs associated with going through years’ worth of records to calculate a precise section 481(a) adjustment required under the final regulations (T.D. 9636). The cost of that level of compliance could be more than the entire cost of preparing their returns, practitioners said, adding that the taxpayers are considering filing their method changes with corresponding section 481(a) adjustments of zero.

The piece cites Scott Dinwiddie, special counsel, IRS Office of Associate Chief Counsel (Income Tax and Accounting):

Taxpayers were taking aggressive positions, so the government didn’t want to provide an across-the-board cutoff in the final regulations, he said. Instead, it required 481(a) adjustments as a way to allow field agents to examine taxpayers’ aggressive positions, he said.

So because some taxpayers were taking positions you didn’t like, you want to require everyone to do a bunch of wasteful and meaningless busy work during our busiest time of the year. Got it.

Dinwiddie said that, barring a situation in which the taxpayer has taken aggressive positions in the past or has in no way applied a proper capitalization method, the IRS is unlikely to have much interest in examining a taxpayer’s section 481(a) adjustment now.

So we pretend to file an accurate Form 3115, and they pretend to care. Well, you have to admit that considering the budget and enforcement restraints on the IRS, this approach is… absolutely insane. Taxpayers have to pay for a bunch of nonsense compliance, and the IRS doesn’t care whether it’s right. The IRS still has to incur processing costs. I’d love to see the IRS cost-benefit worksheets on this one.

 

20120810-1The TaxProf has a roundup of observations on the whether tax reform can happen in the new Congress, including this from William Gale:

It is a good bet that the new Republican Congress will continue to talk about tax reform. That is safe ground for Republicans generally. And, of course, seemingly impossible things do sometimes happen. But I wouldn’t bet on tax reform. 

A wise non-bet.

 

TaxGrrrl, What Matters Most When It Comes To Tax Reform? Hint: It’s Not Control Of Congress:

What is interesting, however, is that most of the significant tax policy changes in the modern era are more closely tied to the length of presidential terms. Every president has a budget – and an agenda – but real shifts in rates and policies tend to happen during a second term (or en route to a second term) no matter which party is in control. 

I don’t expect it to happen this time.

 

Scott Drenkard, What Do the 2014 Midterm Election Results Mean for State Tax Policy? “My prediction is that this means that taxes will be one of the biggest, if not the biggest issue in state policy next legislative session, and that tax reform will become even more of a bipartisan issue.”  I’m afraid that’s not true here in Iowa.

Russ Fox, Nevada Goes Deep Red. “Do you remember 1928? Well, that was the last time Nevada had a Republican governor, a Republican State Assembly, a Republican State Senate, and Republicans holding all major statewide offices.”

Paul Neiffer, A Christmas Present?! “They will meet over the next six weeks or so and around Christmas time we will get the final tax package.”

 

 

20120702-2Arnold Kling’s characteristically wise observation on the election results:

Conventional wisdom is that, relatively speaking, Democrats have a structural advantage in Presidential elections, because those elections attract more turnout. In other words, they do much better among disengaged voters. One could spin this positively for the Democrats, saying that they get support from the weaker segments of society. One could spin this negatively and say that they rely on a segment of the electorate that is poorly informed and easily bamboozled, which I believe is the case. The counter to that would be that Republicans also rely on a segment of the electorate that is poorly informed and easily bamboozled, which I also believe is the case.

While I don’t agree with all of what he says, the whole post is brief and well worth reading. So is this from Don Boudreaux:

I advise freedom-loving and free-market-appreciating Americans (of which I am unashamedly one) to be good Tullockians about the results of yesterday’s landslide wins for the G.O.P.  The Republicans who won those elections are, after all, politicians – and it is the rare politician, of whatever party, who reliably puts principle above personal interest.  As a rule, politicians are untrustworthy, duplicitous, and cowardly; they are people who have an unusually powerful craving for power and fame; and the successful among them typically posses an unusual talent for camouflaging their craving for power and fame as a saintly calling to ‘serve the people.’

Pretty much. But some are less bad than others, enough so that I do bother to vote.

Renu Zaretsky, Don’t Call It a Comeback… Yet.  The TaxVox headline roundup is full of post-election links, including news of Berkeley, California, passing an idiotic soda tax. When they start taxing mocha lattes, I’ll believe they’re such taxes are about public health than moral vanity.

 

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And some folks are actually talking about things other than the election:

Jana Luttenegger, Even Startups Need to Have the Conversation (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).

Jason Dinesen tells us A Little Bit About Sole Proprietorships, Part 1

William Perez, Dividends: Taxes and Reporting

Robert D. Flach recounts EXPLAINING MORTGAGE INTEREST AND INVESTMENT INTEREST FOR A CLIENT

Jim Maule discusses how Mortgage Loan Modification Can Imperil Interest Deduction

Stephen Olsen at Procedurally Taxing as a new round of Summary Opinions., with links to news from the world of tax procedure.

Jack Townsend, The Honorable Jed Rakoff on Why Innocent People Plead Guilty. He quotes Judge Rakoff: “…the guidelines, like the mandatory minimums, provide prosecutors with weapons to bludgeon defendants into effectively coerced plea bargains.”

Kay Bell, 5 tax record keeping questions … and answers!

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 546

News from the Profession. McGladrey Reminds Audit Staff to Stay Billable This Busy Season (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/3/14: Elections tomorrow; good riddance. And: $3,000 unmentionables!

Monday, November 3rd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20121006-1Tomorrow is Election Day. Good Riddance.  Tomorrow ends the current Festival of Democracy. Because I share Arnold Kling’s view of election seasons as “brutal assaults on reason,” I look forward to it ending.

However unreasoning, elections do affect policy. Some of the tax policy issues in play this year:

Is it better to give that to receive? Iowa’s incumbent Governor Branstad is an avid distributor of corporate welfare tax credits. His challenger is an avid recipient. If the polls are to be believed, it is truly better to give than to receive.

What about the extenders? We practitioners just want to have a tax law for Christmas, or sooner, so a tax season that we already expect to be bad won’t be just godawful. It’s not clear whether a Republican takeover of the Senate will affect the timing of the extender bill, but it is possible that it might spur the incumbent Democratic leadership into action to pass bills more to their liking than they would see from their successors.

What about federal tax reform? The 1986 tax reforms were passed by a Congress led by one party and signed by a president of the other party. The possibility of this happening if the Senate goes Republican seems absurdly small.

What about Iowa Tax Reform? Iowa once again is in the bottom 10 in having a bad business tax climate. A Republican takeover of the Iowa Senate would make serious tax reform efforts possible. It wouldn’t make it likely, though, given the Governor’s affinity for giving away tax credits.

Whatever the results, I predict that politicians will continue to give away tax credits to businesses that will proceed to do what they were going to do anyway; the politicians will then claim credit for the jobs they “create.”  Other politicians will say that there is nothing wrong with spending money that taking more from “the rich” won’t cure.

So vote away, if you are so inclined. But don’t count on any big changes as a result.

 

Flickr image courtesy David Goehring under Creative Commons license

Flickr image courtesy David Goehring under Creative Commons license

Jack Townsend, IRS and FinCEN Form 8300 and Geographic Targeting Order: “Recently, FinCEN issued a Geographic Targeting Order, here, imposing additional reporting and recordkeeping requirements on a relatively small (but apparently financially active) area of Los Angeles, California.”

Very strange, to me. The order imposes special rules on accepting cash for a wide variety of businesses in part of L.A. I didn’t know there was such a rule. I wonder how they are letting all of these stores — including “lingerie stores” — know they suddenly have a new reporting obligation if somebody spends $3,000 in cash there.  And I wonder who spends $3,000 on lingerie.

 

 

The Des Moines Register adds to the coverage of the seizure of cash from an Arnolds Park, Iowa restaurant owner.

Robert D. Flach, TO EXTEND, OR NOT TO EXTEND. THAT IS THE QUESTION. “If a tax benefit is appropriate it should be permanent – except in response to serious natural disasters, the idiots in Congress should never enact temporary tax measures.”

Amen, Brother Robert.

 

William Perez, Investing in or Spending Bitcoin? Learn about the Tax Implications

 

harvestPaul Neiffer, IRS Announces Various Inflation Adjusted Items:

Last night I rode in the combine in Northeastern Iowa from about 7 pm to about 2:30 am.  We cut about 10,000 bushels of corn with a John Deere S680 and I must admit there is something therapeutic about seeing corn come into the combine and then get dumped into the grain cart. 

Take 10,000 bushels and call me in the morning.

 

Annette Nellen, Damages: Deductible?

It’s a fact of life that businesses get sued. Even if they win, there are legal and related fees. What if they lose and have to pay compensatory and perhaps also punitive damages? Perhaps also some fines to the government?  What is deductible for tax purposes? A recent case from the First Circuit Court dealt with an action involving the False Claims Act with total damages of just over $486 million!

I don’t think generally one sort of damages should be more tax-beneficial than another. The income tax should base should measure capacity to pay taxes, not moral fiber or good citizenship.

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Jana Luttenegger, More 2015 Tax Numbers Released, Including Tax Brackets (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

 

Keith Fogg, Promoting, Not Discouraging, Tax Compliance (Procedurally Taxing). “Don’t we want to introduce our young citizens into a tax system that is rational and just? The current model does precisely the opposite.”

Kay Bell’s “Don’t Mess with Taxes” is sporting a new look. Go read Best states for business tend to have no or low taxes and check it out.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 543

 

tax fairyRuss Fox, Perhaps She’ll Cover the Guilty Plea in the Second Edition:

Her book, The Prosperity Principles: Secrets to Developing and Maintaining Generational Wealth, notes that business should be run, “…where everything you can do can be deducted from your reportable income as a business expense.”

That’s just another way of saying that there is a Tax Fairy. There is no Tax Fairy.

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/27/14: IRS visits Arnolds Park restaurant, tips itself.

Monday, October 27th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120703-2IRS Commissioner Koskinen likes to say there is nothing wrong with the IRS that a bigger budget can’t cure. A story out of Arnolds Park, Iowa might cause one to question that. The New York Times reports:

For almost 40 years, Carole Hinders has dished out Mexican specialties at her modest cash-only restaurant. For just as long, she deposited the earnings at a small bank branch a block away — until last year, when two tax agents knocked on her door and informed her that they had seized her checking account, almost $33,000.

The Internal Revenue Service agents did not accuse Ms. Hinders of money laundering or cheating on her taxes — in fact, she has not been charged with any crime. Instead, the money was seized solely because she had deposited less than $10,000 at a time, which they viewed as an attempt to avoid triggering a required government report.

Banks are required to report “suspicious” deposits under $10,000 because they might be done to evade a required IRS filing. As they get in trouble for non-reporting, they are likely to overreport. And in these cases, that’s all the IRS required before stealing the cash. The victims have legal recourse, but it requires them to sue the federal government, owner of the largest law firm in the world; legal bills routinely run into tens of thousands of dollars.

So, without any evidence, or even suspicion, of a crime, the IRS uses some of its allegedly precious and constrained enforcement resources to steal money from a little Iowa restaurant. The story cites other cash seizure nightmares. One involved an Army sergeant saving for his daughters’ education. Others involved legitimate but cash-intensive businesses.

If this is what the IRS accomplishes with insufficient resources, imagine how much they could steal with full funding.

(via Instapundit)

Related:

Tax Justice Blog,  New Movie Aims to Scare Public by Depicting IRS as Jack-Booted Thugs. Where would anybody get that idea?

Dan Mitchell, Another Example of Government Thuggery – and another Reason Why Decent and Moral People Are Libertarians

Russ Fox, SARs Leading to Forfeiture: The IRS Oversteps

 

20141027-2Jason Dinesen, How Non-Residents or Part-Year Residents Report Federal Refunds on Iowa Tax Returns. One more complication from Iowa’s deduction for federal taxes.

Robert D. Flach, DON’T TRY TO BUY A HOUSE OR CONDO WITH ONLY 5% DOWN!. And don’t try to subsidize that either.

William Perez, Self-Employed Retirement Plans, “If you have self-employment income, then you can take a tax deduction for contributions you make to a SEP, SIMPLE, or a solo 401(k) retirement plan.”

Tony Nitti, The Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2014: #9-Tax Court Further Muddies The ‘Dealer Versus Investor’ Issue

 

TaxGrrrl, Fundraising Campaign Ends For ‘Ebola Free’ Nurse, Donors Encouraged To Contribute To Charity

Jana Luttenegger, 2015 Retirement Plan Limits Announced (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Paul Neiffer, 2015 Social Security Wage Base Increases to $118,500

Kay Bell, 6 year-end tax tips for small businesses

Stephen Olsen, Summary Opinions (Procedurally Taxing). Recent cases on whistleblowers, interest abatement, and art valuation.

 

 

Andrew Mitchel, 2014 Third Quarter Published Expatriates – Third Highest Ever. FATCA and the IRS holy war on Americans abroad takes its toll.

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 536

 

David Brunori on the inherently corrupt nature of corporate welfare tax incentives, like those so popular with Iowa politicians ($link):

I have no doubt there are more instances of companies contributing to politicians and getting economic development payouts. I’m not naïve. Corporations donate money to governors and lawmakers and expect a return on their investment. While the governors cited above were Republican, corporations and business interests don’t discriminate. Indeed, Lockheed Martin donated lots of money to Democratic governors.

We likely won’t find a smoking gun e-mail reading, “Dear Governor, your check is in the mail, please process my multimillion-dollar handout. Your friend, CEO.” Politicians and business leaders are too smart for that. But growing evidence of tax incentives being granted by politicians who receive money should give everyone pause. It’s unlikely to be a coincidence.

But, jobs! For the middlemen, fixers and lobbyists, anyway.

 

Joseph Henchman, Michigan Senate Advances Film Tax Credit Extension Bill (Tax Policy Blog). Because Detroit has no greater need than to give money to Hollywood.

 

News from the Profession. Meet the Guy Who Prefers Falafel Over PwC (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 9/4/14: IOU? No basis for you! And: IRS may say TANSTAAFL.

Thursday, September 4th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120801-2Partner IOUs fail to increase basis.  Just like S corporation shareholders, partners in a partnership can only deduct their share of the entity’s losses to the extent they have basis.  Like S corporation owners, partner basis starts with the basis of property and the amount of cash contributed to the partnership; it is increased by the owner’s share of taxable and tax-exempt income, and is reduced by expenses and distributions.

In a Tax Court case yesterday, partners”contributed” IOU from themselves to the partnership, VisionMonitor Software LLC.; the partners then used the amounts of the IOUs as basis for deducting losses.

Unfortunately for the partners, that doesn’t work.  Judge Holmes explains (minor editing by me):

VisionMonitor argues that the notes in this case, like the assumption of debt in Gefen, were necessary to persuade a third party to kick in more funding to a cash-strapped partnership. But unlike the partner in Gefen, neither Mantor nor Smith were guaranteeing a preexisting partnership debt to a third party. And they did not directly assume any of VisionMonitor’s outside liabilities — these notes are their liability to VisionMonitor, not an assumption or guaranty of VisionMonitor’s debt to a third party…  And there’s also no evidence that Mantor or Smith were personally obliged under the VisionMonitor partnership agreement to contribute a fixed amount for a specific, preexisting partnership liability.

Unlike S corporation shareholders, partners can get basis for debt owed by a partnership to third parties — for example, by providing a guarantee to a third-party lender (watch out for the “at-risk” rules).  But the court held that writing an IOU, by itself, doesn’t rise to the level of creating debt basis for the partner:

 Here… the partners each have no adjusted basis in the notes, and until they are paid, the notes are only a contractual obligation to their partnership. Mantor made a payment under his notes only in 2010, and the record has no evidence that Smith ever did. We therefore find that Mantor’s and Smith’s bases in their promissory notes during the 2007 and 2008 tax years were zero and, accordingly, that VisionMonitor’s basis in the contributed notes was also zero.

As it always does, the IRS tried to stick the partners with a 20% “accuracy-related” penalty. Judge Holmes wisely declined, holding that they relied reasonably on oral advice from their tax man, a Mr. Sympson:

We have little problem in finding that VisionMonitor actually relied on Sympson’s advice — his conclusion that the notes were additions to VisionMonitor’s capital (and the capital accounts of Smith and Mantor) was set out on the company’s returns. And we have little trouble in finding that this reliance was in good faith. In a case like this one — where VisionMonitor secured Smith and Mantor’s promises to increase their personal risk alongside their promise to extend their personal credit to the firm’s vendors — advice from a longtime tax adviser that this increased Smith’s and Mantor’s bases would seem reasonable to Mantor.

This is the sort of standard that the Tax Court should apply.  Taxes are hard — that’s why people hire out their tax work.  If they are open with their tax advisor, and they don’t have reason to think the tax advisor is incompetent, they shouldn’t get hammered with penalties just because the advisor makes a mistake. After all, the IRS makes mistakes too.

The Moral: If you want to get basis in your partnership without putting in cash, you need to get third party debt allocated to you in a way that makes you at-risk.  And: when things get complicated, if you are open with your preparer and follow the advice given, IRS penalties are not automatic.

Cite: VisionMonitor Software LLC, T.C. Memo 2014-182.

Related: How much K-1 loss can I deduct? Start with your basis.

 

TANSTAAFL. (There Aint) No Such Thing As A Free Lunch: IRS Mulls Tax On Employee Meals. (TaxGrrrl)  Just because you can make a theoretical argument that something is taxable doesn’t mean you should tax it.

 

20130121-2So you think regulation of preparers by IRS will stop fraud?  IRS Employee Accused Of Tax Fraud.  If they can’t keep themselves honest, they aren’t likely to prevent preparer cheating. Of course, preparer regulation isn’t about stopping fraud or improving tax compliance. It’s about grabbing power and helping well-placed friends.  Russ Fox has more.

 

Jana Luttenegger, Tax Court Ruling on Frequent Flyer Miles as Income (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Kay Bell, Tax differences between home repairs & home improvements.  It can make a big difference when you sell.

Robert D. Flach tells you WHAT TO ASK A TAX PRO

Jack Townsend, Proof Beyond a Reasonable Doubt – Ramblings

 

David Brunori, Business Pays a Lot of State and Local Taxes (Tax Analysts Blog):

COST recently released its 12th edition of the report. And it continues to influence the state tax debate as much today as it did in 2002. The new report says that businesses paid $671 billion in state and local taxes in 2013, up about 4 percent over the previous year. But business taxes accounted for 45 percent of all state and local taxes.

I note that the amount of tax paid by “business” is deceptive. Businesses do not pay taxes; people pay taxes. And every dime of the $671 billion was paid by some combination of shareholder, owner, employee, customer, or supplier. Those on the left desperately want the burden to fall on shareholders. But there is growing evidence that in a global economy, the burden falls on employees. 

And if it does fall on shareholders, remember that pension funds are also shareholders.

 

20140801-2Lyman Stone, Governor Rick Scott Offers Mixed Bag of Tax Proposals for Florida (Tax Policy Blog). “Governor Scott’s tax proposals offer meaningful improvements in some areas like cell phone and corporate income taxes. But on other issues like the property tax cap, it’s not clear whether or how the plan will work; on sales tax holidays, the proposed “tax cut” would actually make the tax code more complicated and distortionary, while creating little or no economic growth.”

Yes.  Next Question?  Is It Time to Repeal The Corporate Income Tax? (Howard Gleckman, TaxVox) “This view acknowledges that roughly 10 million businesses already have engaged in self-help tax reform by organizing themselves as pass-through firms (where owners at taxed as individuals but bypass the corporate tax entirely).”

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 483

 

News from the Profession.  Ladies Still Need Entire Panels Made Up of Dudes to Talk About Ladies in the Profession (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)  “Don’t worry, ladies, the guys are ON IT.”

 

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Tax Roundup, 7/28/14: Out of the Wilderness edition.

Monday, July 28th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Joe K as Ted KI’m back from the Philmont Scout Ranch.  81 rough and hilly miles in 10 days, not counting wrong turns, and all but about 12 with full pack.  The remainder were side trips up mountains.

It was a memorable and wonderful experience, even though I don’t intend to repeat it anytime soon.  I went with a great crew (including my younger son), and a skilled and wise adult “co-advisor,” so mostly I just got to enjoy the scenery and work on my new Unabomber Cowboy look.  I got a bunch of New Mexico mountain flora and fauna photos, many of which will be used as decoration on the Tax Roundups in the coming weeks.

I missed some tax stuff, which I will try to catch up on over the next few days.  I especially need to ponder the implications of the Halbig decision by the D.C. Circuit, striking down tax credits for Obamacare, and, perhaps, the employer and individual mandates for non-exchange state residents.

For the record, I had to clear my spam filter of 50,852 assuredly wonderful comments, and another 128 that got through the spambox for moderation. If you made a non-spam comment that I deleted, I’m sorry.  With so much spam, I have to take the spam filter’s word for it.

Today’s roundup will be abbreviated, as I still have to dig out from the usual post-vacation accumulation of chores.

 

20140728-1Roger McEowen, D.C. Circuit Says IRS Illegally Created Obamacare Tax; Fourth Circuit Sees No Evil.  “The D.C. Circuit’s decision relieves millions of persons from the penalty tax under I.R.C. Sec. 36B that the Congress did not state were subject to the tax.  Most assuredly, the government will ask the full court to hear reconsider the decision.”

TaxGrrrl, Courts Issue Conflicting Rulings On Obamacare Tax Credits: Which One Got It Right?   

William Perez, List of Sales Tax Holidays in 2014.  Iowa’s is this weekend.

Jana Luttenegger, Change in One-Per-Year Rollover Rules on IRA (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Peter Reilly, Pulling IRS Into Your Business Dispute Might Not Be Such A Good Idea.  No kidding.

Robert D. Flach just keeps Buzzing!

 

Christopher Bergin, Inversion Diversion (Tax Analysts Blog):

There’s a lot more wrong with the tax system than corporate inversions. But that’s not the point. With all that’s going on in the world, when President Obama jumps on the anti-inversion bandwagon, it will give the official seal of approval to inversions as this summer’s red herring.  

The talk of corporations making tax moves as “deserters” is repulsive — as if their only duty is to generate revenue for Uncle Sam, without regards to their owners and customers.

Howard Gleckman, The Bring Jobs Home Act Won’t (TaxVox)

Joshua Miller, Richard Borean, Higher Education Tax Credits are a Windfall for Universities.  Of course they are.  You didn’t think they were for students, did you?

Accounting Today,  Former IRS Employee Arrested in Identity Theft Ring.  How do people think IRS regulation of preparers will stop fraud when IRS employment doesn’t.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 445

News from the Profession.  This Complete Idiot Cheated on the Open Book Ethics Exam, Ratted Self Out. (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 7/3/2014: Interested generosity edition. And: cheap smokes!

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140703-2If you wouldn’t have gotten the cash if you had kept your clothes on, it may not be a gift.  A “professional adult entertainer” was convicted on tax charges in Sioux Falls last week.  She apparently treated cash thrust upon her in performance as nontaxable gifts, according to the Associated Press writeup. Gifts are good to receive for many reasons, not least because they are not taxable income.  Of course the tax law is pretty strict about what it takes to be a gift, or we would all be working for nontaxable holiday bonuses.   The jury instructions in the case explain what it takes for something to be a gift:

The practical test of whether income is a gift is whether it was received gratuitously and in exchange for nothing.  Where the person transferring the money did not act from any sense of generosity, but rather to secure goods, services, or some other such benefit for himself or for another, there is no gift.

I wonder if it ever struck the professional adult entertainer that while men eagerly stuffed dollars into her garter on stage, they seldom stuffed cash into the elastic of her sweats at the local Hy-Vee.  It must have occurred to her that there was some connection with what she was wearing, or not, on stage and the generosity of her admirers.  If it didn’t before, it probably has now.  Sentencing is set for September.

Liz Emmanuel, Richard Borean, State Cigarette Tax Rates in 2014. (Tax Policy Blog):

20140703-1   Life is good for Missouri cigarette dealers on the Iowa border.   20120531-2

Robert D. Flach brings your Friday Buzz on Thursday in honor of Independence Day.

Jana Luttenegger, New Simplified Application Form for Small Nonprofits and UPDATE: Form 1023 EZ Released for Small Nonprofits (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Tax Trials, IRS Offers New Streamlined Procedures & Reduced Penalties for Foreign Accounts

Trish McIntire, Why E-file a Tax Return…

TaxGrrrl, Money Literally Flying At World Cup: Is It A Clever Attempt At Tax Avoidance?  Strange soccer doings in Ghana.

Jim Maule gets his Tax Myth series underway with The IRS Enacted the Internal Revenue Code and If It’s Not Cash, It’s Not Income.  It always bugs me when congresscritters talk about the “IRS Code.”  It strikes me as sneaky blame-shifting by the perpetrators.

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: Patient-Centered Outcomes Trust Fund Fee – An Exercise in Bureaucratic Futility

Kay Bell, Fitness enthusiasts exercised over D.C.’s new yoga sales tax

 

 

Cara Griffith, Censorship in New Hampshire? (Tax Analysts Blog):

The DRA can be opposed to the website all it wants. That does not give it the right to monitor it or demand modifications to its content. Yet the DRA is going one step further. It is attempting not only to prohibit the use and publication of information about its general policies, but to impose criminal penalties on the publication of truthful information about a matter of public concern.

It sounds like The New Hampshire Department of Revenue Administration badly needs some exemplary firings.

 

20130912-1Lyman Stone, Happy July 2! 14 States Exempt Flags from Their Sales Taxes (Tax Policy Blog).

Roberton Williams, President Obama’s FY 2015 Budget (TaxVox). “Most of the president’s tax proposals have appeared in previous budgets, but he added four new ones this year. TPC delves into those additions in a separate analysis that accompanies the distributional estimates.” None of them will be enacted during the remainder of the Obama presidency.

 

That would be “zero.”  41 Million July 4th Travelers Would Have a Nicer Trip if Corporations Paid Their Fair Share (Steve Wamhoff, Tax Justice Blog).  Why zero? Scott Sumner explains that “There should be no corporate income taxes, which represent triple taxation of wage income.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 420

Has the NHL lost its focus?  Hockey aiming to tighten tax loophole

Have a great Independence Day!

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Tax Roundup, 6/12/14: Tax Credits run for governor. And: bad day for IRS in CRP tax case?

Thursday, June 12th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120906-1Crony tax credits have become an issue in Iowa’s race for Governor, reports The Des Moines Register:

The Republican Governors Association is out today with another TV ad attacking Jack Hatch.

The new ad accuses Hatch of sponsoring legislation to increase the availability of development tax credit while applying for tax credits for a real-estate project in Des Moines.

“Jack, isn’t that a conflict of interest?” the narrator asks.

It’s true that Mr. Hatch has been a successful player in the tax credit game.  It may be the merest coincidence that an awful lot of tax credits go to political insiders like Mr. Hatch and the spouse of Governor Branstad’s opponent in his first election.  But that’s not the way to bet.

While I’m all for anything that spotlights the inherent corruption of targeted tax credits, the Republican Governors Association may be inadvertently bringing friendly fire uncomfortably close to its own man.  For starters, the Governor is a five-term incumbent. If the system is set up to be played by political insiders, the Governor has had plenty of time to do something about it.

More importantly, political insiders can benefit richly from crony tax credits without claiming them on their own tax returns.  They benefit by claiming credit for the “jobs” generated by well-connected businesses that play the system to get the tax credits.  The Governor has played this game tirelessly.  Just off the top of my head

The $80 million+ in tax breaks for fertilizer companies.

The sales tax giveaway to the NASCAR track in Newton.

The rich tax breaks for data centers.

MP branstad

Governor Branstad, pre-mustache

In deals like this, the politicians claim credit for the jobs “created,” with no regard whether the lucky recipients of the breaks would have behaved differently without them, or for the jobs lost by other companies who compete with the winners for resources and customers, or for the jobs that would have been created had the funds been left with taxpayers to use without direction from politicians.

So yes, Governor, by all means call down the artillery on crony tax credits.  Just be sure to keep your helmet on.

Related:

The joys of cronyism

LOCAL CPA FIRM VOWS TO SWALLOW PRIDE, ACCEPT $28 MILLION

Governor’s press conference praises construction of newest great pyramids

 

20130114-1Roger McEowen, Eighth Circuit Hears Arguments in CRP Self-Employment Tax Case. “It would appear that the oral argument went well for the taxpayer.” 

Jana Luttenegger,  IRS Releases Taxpayer Bill of Rights.  “ These rights have always existed, but now the IRS has put the rights together in a clear, understandable list to be distributed to taxpayers.”  If they’ve always existed, they sure haven’t always been respected.

Peter Reilly, Your Son The Lawyer Should Not Be Your Exchange Facilitator.  Peter talks about the case I mentioned earlier this week, including another issue I left out.

 

Tax Justice Blog, Reid-Paul “Transportation Funding Plan” is No Plan at All:

Instead of taking the obvious step of fixing the federal gas tax, Reid and Paul propose a repatriation tax holiday, which would give multinational corporations an extremely low tax rate on offshore profits they repatriate (profits they officially bring back to the United States). The idea is that corporations would bring to the United States offshore profits they otherwise would leave abroad, and the federal government could tax those profits (albeit at an extremely low rate) and put the revenue toward the transportation fund.

Yeah, not a real fix.

Scott Hodge, Likely “Solutions” to Highway Trust Fund Shortfall Violate Sound Tax Policy and User-Pays Principle (Tax Policy Blog)

 

No Walnut STAndrew Lundeen, Higher Marginal Tax Rates Won’t Improve the World (Tax Policy Blog). “The Upshot and Dave Chappelle may be right that for someone with a $100 million that next dollar might not means as much as the first dollar. But that money doesn’t sit collecting dust. It is invested in the broader economy.”

Howard Gleckman, Did Multinationals Use a Foreign Earnings Tax Holiday To Burnish Their Financials Rather Than Reduce Taxes? (TaxVox)

Keith Fogg, Supreme Court’s Decision on Monday in Arkison Could Impact Kuretski Case and Constitutionality of the Removal Clause for Tax Court Judges (Procedurally Taxing)

Jack Townsend, BDO Seidman Personnel Sentenced for B******t Tax Shelter Promotion 

Kay Bell, NBA beats NHL in this year’s jock tax championship 

 

TaxGrrrl, Waffle House Refuses To Allow Waitress To Keep $1,000 Tip   

 

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Tax Roundup, 5/21/14: Practitioner Pitchforks and Torches edition. And: math remains hard!

Wednesday, May 21st, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140521-1The new identification rules for remote signatures aren’t going over well.   (See update below.)  At a CPE event yesterday former IRS Stakeholder Liaison Kristy Maitre outlined the new e-filing identity match requirement we are supposed to meet (now!  for extended 2013 returns!).  These include “third-party verification” of identities of our long-time clients if they don’t visit the office.  The ones that visit, we only need to see their papers.

The 250 or so practitioners present didn’t appreciate the joke at all.  They asked the obvious question: how do we even comply with this?  It’s not at all clear how we get “third-party verification.”  I can pretty much guarantee that nobody is complying with that requirement now, because few are aware of it, and the ones that are don’t know where to start.

While the requirements are supposed to be part of the IRS war against identity theft, this effort is like responding to the attack on Pearl Harbor by bombing Montreal.  Identity thieves don’t waltz into tax prep offices and pay us to prepare fraudulent refund claims.  They prefer TurboTax.

Yet, there may be a method to the madness, suggested by one practitioner.  What if some outfit is gearing up to provide third-party verification services — say, one of the national tax prep franchises?  And the IRS has quietly created their revenue stream with this absurd rule?  You might say this preparer is cynical; I say he’s been paying attention.

So let’s fight.  Kristy is collecting comments and questions to send to her erstwhile IRS colleagues to try to stop this nonsense.  Send your comments to ksmaitre@iastate.edu.  I believe the IRS will back off if we brandish the electronic torches and pitchforks.

Update, 11:30 a.m.  I received a call from an IRS representative this morning saying that they have been getting phone calls as a result of this post (well-done, readers!).  She tried to reassure me by telling me that the third-party verification doesn’t apply to in-person visits.  I knew that.  I told her that as I read the rules, there are either “in-person” or “remote” transactions, with no third category of, say, “I’ve worked with this client for many years and they’re fine.” She didn’t disagree, though she still thinks I’m overreacting.  She did say IRS field personnel are  “elevating” the issue and seeking “clarification” from the authors of these new rules, including what “authentication” means for in-person visits and what a “remote transaction” is that would require third-party verification.  Keep it up, folks!

Related:

Russ Fox, Yes, Mom, I Need to See Your ID

Jana Luttenegger, Updated E-Filing Requirements for Tax Preparers

Jason Dinesen, Hold the Phone on the IRS E-file Outrage Machine 

Me, Welcome back, loyal client. IRS says I have to verify that you aren’t a shape-shifting alien.

 


20140521-2TaxProf, 
The IRS Scandal, Day 377.

News from the Profession.  Crocodile Injured By Falling Circus Accountant in Freak Bus Accident (Going Concern)

Kay Bell, National Taxpayer Advocate joins fight to stop private debt collection of delinquent tax bills.  I’d rather she fight to keep the IRS from implementing its ridiculous e-file verification rules.

TaxGrrrl, Congress, Ignoring History, Considers Turning Over Tax Debts To Private Collection Agencies

Jim Maule, It Seems So Simple, But It’s Tax.  “People are increasingly aware that the chances of getting away with tax fraud are getting better each day.”

Missouri Tax Guy,  NO! The IRS did not call you first.

 

Tax Justice Blog, Legislation Introduced to Stop American Corporations from Pretending to Be Foreign Companies.  How about we just stop taxing them?

Kyle Pomerleau, Tom VanAntwerp, Interactive Map: Where do U.S. Multinational Corporations Report Foreign Taxable Income and Foreign Income Taxes Paid? (TaxPolicy Blog).  Holland does well, as does Canada.

Howard Gleckman, Tax Chauvinism: Who Cares Where a Firm is Incorporated?

So we are left with a sort of financial chauvinism. It is important to some politicians to be able to say that a company is a red-blooded American company. But when it comes to multinational firms in a global economy, why does that matter? 

Because, ‘Merica!

 

Andrew Mitchel now has some online tax quizzes for your amusement.  If they are too tough, the next item might restore your self-esteem.

 

20120905-1If you can’t answer these questions, taxes are the least of your problems.  Tackle these quizzlers (via Alex Taborrok):

1. Suppose you had $100 in a savings account and the interest rate was 2% per year. After 5 years, how much do you think you would have in the account if you left the money to grow.

More than $102. Exactly $102,. Less than $102? Do not know. Refuse to answer.

2. Imagine that the interest rate on your savings account was 1% per year and inflation was 2% per year. After 1 year, would you be able to buy.

More than, exactly the same as, or less than today with the money in this account? Do not know. Refuse to answer.

3. Do you think that the following statement is true or false? ‘Buying a single company stock usually provides a safer return than a stock mutual fund.’

T. F. Do not know. Refuse to answer.

I won’t give away the answers, but I shouldn’t have to.  Sadly, most people find these questions hard.  From Alex Taborrok:

Only about a third of Americans answer all three questions correctly (and that figure is inflated somewhat due to guessing). The Germans and Swiss do significantly better (~50% all 3 correct) on very similar questions but many other countries do much worse. In New Zealand only 24% answer all 3 questions correctly and in Russia it’s less than 5%.

At least that helps explain Vladimir Putin’s popularity.

 

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Tax Roundup, 5/14/14: Earned income credits, still busted. And: extenders advance.

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

Nope.  Still busted.  From WashingtonExaminer.com comes an update on what some call America’s most successful anti-poverty program:

The Treasury Department has released its latest report  on the fight against widespread fraud in the Earned Income Tax Credit program. The problem is, fraud is still winning. And there’s not even much of a fight.

“The Internal Revenue Service continues to make little progress in reducing improper payments of Earned Income Tax Credits,” a press release from Treasury’s inspector general for Tax Administration says. “The IRS estimates that 22 to 26 percent of EITC payments were issued improperly in Fiscal Year 2013. The dollar value of these improper payments was estimated to be between $13.3 billion and $15.6 billion.”

Wait.  Didn’t the President sign a bill in 2010 to fix all this?

The new report found that the IRS is simply ignoring the requirements of a law called the Improper Payments Elimination and Recovery Act, signed by President Obama in 2010, which requires the IRS to set fraud-control targets and keep improper payments below ten percent of all Earned Income Tax Credit payouts.

Whatever the EITC does to help the working poor, it is a boon to the Grifter-American community.  Fraudulent EITC claims are a staple of ID theft fraud and low-tech tax cheating in general.

It’s worth noting that the high rate of improper EITC payouts has not gone down in spite of the ever-increasing IRS requirements for preparers who issue returns claiming the credits.  This should give pause to folks who think IRS preparer regulations will stop fraud, though it won’t.

It’s also notable that Iowa recently increased its piggyback EITC to 15% of the federal credit — increasing the annual cost of the credit by an estimated $35 million.  Assuming Iowans are just as honest as other Americans, that means about $8 million of additional stimulus to the Iowa grifter economy.

Finally, the phase-out of the EITC functions as a hidden high marginal tax rate on the program’s intended beneficiaries, the working poor.  The effective marginal rate in Iowa exceeds 50% at some income levels.  Combined with other income-based phase-outs, the EITC becomes a poverty trap.

 

Related: Arnold Kling,  SNEP and the EITC. “My priors, which I think are supported by the research cited by Salam, is that trying to use a program like the EITC for social engineering is a mug’s game.”

 

 

Extenders advance in Senate.  Tax Analysts reports ($link)

Legislation that would extend for two years nearly all the tax provisions that expired at the end of 2013 cleared a procedural hurdle in the Senate May 13.

Senators voted 96 to 3 to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to H.R. 3474, a bill to exempt from the Affordable Care Act’s employer mandate employees with healthcare coverage through the Veterans Benefits Administration or through the military healthcare program TRICARE.

The bill is the legislative vehicle for the tax extenders. It will be amended to include the text of the Expiring Provisions Improvement Reform and Efficiency (EXPIRE) Act of 2014 (S. 2260) and likely that of the Tax Technical Corrections Act of 2014 (S. 2261), both of which the Senate Finance Committee passed April 3 via voice vote.

The bill that passes will probably look much like the Senate bill.  The House has advanced bills to make some of the perpetually-expiring provisions permanent, but the President, pretending that they won’t get passed every year anyway, says permanent extension is fiscally irresponsible.

Among the provisions to be extended yet again, mostly through 2015, are the research credit, new markets credits, wind and biofuel credits, bonus depreciation, and increased Sec. 179 deductions.  The five-year built-in gain tax recognition period is also extended through 2015.

Related: TaxGrrrl, Senate Moves Forward To Extend Tax Breaks For 2014

 

20120906-1O. Kay HendersonKnoxville Raceway ceremony for state tax break of up to $2 million:

Governor Terry Branstad went to Knoxville today to sign a bill into law that gives the Knoxville Raceway a state tax break to help finance improvements at the track.

“This is a great facility,” Branstad told Radio Iowa during a telephone interview right after the event. “Last year, in 2013, they attracted 211,000 visitors, so it’s a big tourism attraction and it’s a good investment and it’s great for the state to partner with the community for a project of this magnitude.”

Here’s how that partnership works: the racetrack will charge sales tax to its customers, and keep the money.  Only two other businesses are special enough to get this sweet deal.  Tough luck for the rest of us who don’t have the good connections and lobbyists.

 

Walnut st flowersJana Luttenegger, Updated E-Filing Requirements for Tax Preparers (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).  “The handbook is not exactly clear.

Jason Dinesen, Things Tax Preparers Say: S-Corporation Compensation.  “But too many business owners — and their accountants — treat S-corps like a magic wand that can just make taxes disappear completely.”

Kay Bell, IRS fight to regulate tax preparers officially over…for now

Peter Reilly, Can Somebody Explain Tax Shelters To Thomas Piketty?  In the unlikely event that the Piketty recommendations are ever enacted, Peter notes that “there will be a renaissance of shelter activity.”  Peter provides a “Cliff Notes” summary of this year’s big forgettable book I’ll never read, which I appreciate.  Also: Peter uses the tax-law-as-Swiss Army Knife analogy that I am so fond of.

Robert D. Flach, STILL MORE CLIENTS SCREWED BY THE TAX CODE.  “The list of taxpayers screwed by our current Tax Code is not a short one.  Today I add taxpayers with gambling winnings.”

 

20130110-2Howard Gleckman, How “Dead Men” Fiscal Policy Is Paralyzing Government (TaxVox).  He reviews a new book, Dead Men Ruling, by Gene Steurle:

“We are left with a budget for a declining nation,” Gene writes, “that invests ever-less in our future…and a broken government that presides over archaic, inefficient, and inequitable spending and tax programs.”

All this has happened due to a confluence of two unhappy trends: The first is what the late conservative writer Jude Wanniski memorably described almost four decades ago as the “Two-Santa Theory.”

The Santas are the two parties, each of whom pick our pockets to fill our stockings.

 

Alan Cole, The Simple Case for Tax Neutrality (Tax Policy Blog).  “When states give preferential rates of sales tax to certain goods, the most visible result is the legal bonanza that follows from trying to re-categorize goods into the preferred groupings. ”

David Brunori, Repealing the Property Tax Is an Asinine Idea (Tax Analysts Blog). “Public finance experts are almost unanimous in their belief that the property tax is the ideal way to fund local government services… Most importantly, the property tax ensures local political control.”

William McBride, What is Investment and How Do We Get More of It? (Tax Policy Blog).  “Full expensing for all investment, according to our analysis, would increase the capital stock by 16 percent and grow GDP by more than 5 percent.”

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 370

News from the Profession.  AICPA Tackling the Important Issue of Male CPAs Wanting It All (Going Concern). 

 

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Tax Roundup, 5/9/14: Worst-ever edition. And: It’s Scandal Day 365!

Friday, May 9th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

I was grumpy yesterday when I noticed Tax Analysts correspondent @Meg_Shreve’s live-tweeting of a speech by Doug Shulman, the Worst IRS Commissioner Ever.  So I tweet-grumpted, adding “#worstcommissionerever (fixed)” to one of her posts — the “(fixed)” as a perhaps inadequate attempt to inform the Twitterverse that the tag was my addition, not hers (apologies to Meg Shreve).  That earned this response:

 

20140509-1

 

Ah, where to begin?  How about with identity theft?  Doug Shulman took office with a reputation as an information systems maven.  He then presided over an historic IT debacle.  Tax refund fraud — fundamentally a systems failure —  has let two-bit grifters like Rashia Wilson steal tens of billions of dollars in fraudulent refunds over the years.

This problem has been ramping up for years, and only now, with Shulman gone, is the IRS beginning to take effective action to prevent it.  My wife can’t go shopping in Chicago without me getting a call from the credit card company warning me of a suspicious transaction, but Doug Shulman’s IRS could send 655 refunds to the same apartment in Lithuania without batting an eye.

Rashia says "thanks, Commissioner!"

Rashia says “thanks, Commissioner!”

While the theft of taxpayer billions is outrageous enough, the inept treatment of ID theft victims makes it even worse.  Only after Doug Shulman left did the IRS even begin to get this right.

The Worst Commissioner Ever was just too darned busy to stop ID theft.  He was busy trying to increase IRS power over preparers with a useless, expensive and unilateral preparer regulation regime.  He reversed the longstanding IRS position that the agency had no such regulatory power, only to be unceremoniously slapped down by the courts.   In the meantime, the prospect of the regulations drove thousands of preparers out of the business, increasing taxpayer costs and driving many taxpayers to self-prepare — and surely causing some to fall out of the system altogether.  The IRS wasted enormous resources on this futile power grab — resources that might have been better-devoted, to, oh, maybe the fight against identity theft.

 

He was also busy shooting jaywalkers.  International tax enforcement is considered Doug Shulman’s greatest success — but there was no reason the pursuit of wealthy international money-launderers had to also terrorize American expatriates whose offenses were to commit everyday personal finance.  Many folks have been hit with ridiculous penalties for not filing FBAR reports that they had no idea existed.  These folks are often people who married overseas or moved out of the U.S. as children, but were presumptively treated as international money-launderers when they tried to come into the system, and were hit with enormous penalties — often when little or no tax had been avoided.

It’s hard to imagine that an agency that can find ways to simply wave away the ACA employer mandate couldn’t find a way to allow expats and individuals without criminal intent to come into the international reporting system without risking financial disaster.  The states that allow non-resident non-filers to come in by paying five years of back taxes provide an obvious model.

 

Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how big is legacy is.

Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how big is legacy is.

Then there is the scandal.  When Tea Party groups complained about absurd and abusive IRS information requests, sympathetic Congresscritters asked Doug Shulman if the IRS was targeting Tea Party groups.  The Worst Commissioner Ever testified before Congress that the IRS was doing nothing of the sort:

“There’s absolutely no targeting. This is the kind of back and forth that happens to people” who apply for tax-exempt status, Shulman said.

That statement, of course, became inoperative when the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration reported that the IRS was, in fact, picking on the Tea Party groups.  Subsequent revelations have shown that it was exactly a partisan attempt to fight anti-administration groups.  So Doug Shulman either was too lazy and ineffective to know what his own agency was doing, or he knew, or he didn’t care.  He destroyed the credibility of the agency as a nonpartisan enclave of competent technicians.

Now the party controlling the House of Representatives is on notice that the agency wants to see it lose.  That agency can hardly expect generous appropriations as long as that perception remains (and the new Commissioner has done nothing reassuring on that score).   This will damage the agency’s effectiveness for years — all because The Worst Commissioner Ever was unwilling or unable to run a professional, non-partisan agency.

This is a record of administrative ineptitude and negligence that is unbeaten.  No IRS commissioner has so squandered agency resources and reputation.  If another Commissioner has even come close, I’d sure like to know who it was.

 

Meanwhile, the TaxProf has reached a milestone: The IRS Scandal, Day 365.  The biggest item in this edition is the report that the IRS had not destroyed Tea Party donor lists — after saying it had — and that the IRS has audited 10% of Tea Party donors.  This is a staggering audit rate, if true, and is a tremendous scandal in itself if the IRS doesn’t come up with a good explanation.

TaxGrrrl, House Finds Lerner, Central Figure In Tax Exempt Scandal, In Contempt Of Congress

 

20140509-2Jana Luttenegger, Deadline Approaching to Avoid Losing Tax Exempt Status (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). Get those 990-series reports filed!

Trish McIntire, EFTPS – Inquiry PIN.  “The Inquiry PIN will allow taxpayers to check and make sure that their federal tax deposits have been made and catch a problem before it becomes a major issue.”  This should be used by all employers.

Peter Reilly, Former Tampa Bay Buccaneers Owner Scores Touchdown In Tax Court.  “It may seem odd to look at a case that ends up with a charitable deduction dis-allowance of nearly $4 million as a victory, but when you consider how taxpayers generally fare in easement cases it really is.”

Leslie Book, Tax Court Jurisdiction to Determine its Jurisdiction: Foreign Taxes and Credits (Procedurally Taxing)

Mindy Herzfeld, International Tax Trending (Tax Analysts Blog)

 

Richard Borean, Tax Freedom Day Arrives in Final Two States: Connecticut and New Jersey (Tax Policy Blog)

Howard Gleckman, Taxing Employer-Sponsored Insurance Would Hike Social Security Benefits But Boost Federal Coffers (TaxVox)

 

Kay Bell, IRS employee arrested after inadvertently following Obama daughters’ motorcade onto White House grounds.  Oops.

Tax Justice Blog, Déjà vu: Oklahoma Enacts Tax Cut Voters Don’t Want.  I’m not sure about the “don’t want” part.

Robert D. Flach has your Friday morning Buzz!

 

News from the Profession.  Deloitte CEO Prefers Traditional Photo Op Over Selfie  (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/22/14: $418,000 per-job edition! And: AGI and farm subsidies.

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120906-1Iowa Watchdog reports Iowa to give Microsoft millions in exchange for 86 jobs:

The West Des Moines City Council on March 24 approved asking the IEDA to award Project Alluvion $18 million in sales tax rebates, the maximum amount possible under the IEDA’s High Quality Jobs Program.

Neither the city nor the IEDA questioned why Microsoft, which had $24.5 billion in revenue and $8 billion in profits in the most recent fiscal quarter, needed taxpayers’ support to build its data center.

By the time the new data center opens for business, Microsoft will have received from the state and the city more than $418,000 for each of the 86 jobs it says it will create.

There’s a good argument that businesses shouldn’t have to pay sales taxes on their purchases. There’s no good argument that only businesses who know how to pull strings in city hall and at the statehouses should be able to avoid sales tax on their inputs.  Yet that’s what Iowa’s “economic development” policy is all about: special deals for special friends.  The rest of you suckers without lobbyists and pull, pay up!

Related: LOCAL CPA FIRM VOWS TO SWALLOW PRIDE, ACCEPT $28 MILLION

Tax Justice Blog, State News Quick Hits: Tax Breaks for Expensive Artwork and Apple Inc.

microsoft-apple

 

Roger McEowen, Farm Service Agency Adjusted Gross Income Calculation Could Influence Choice of Entity:

Beginning with the 2014 crop year, producers whose average adjusted gross income (AGI) exceeds $900,000 are not eligible to receive payments or benefits from most programs administered by FSA and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Previous AGI provisions distinguishing between farm and non-farm AGI are no longer utilized.  Average AGI for crop year 2014, for example, will be based on a producer’s AGI from 2010, 2011 and 2012.

This is an incentive for business owners receiving substantial farm subsidies to use C corporations, which don’t increase AGI, at least not immediately.  But C corporations do increase the effective tax rate on business income for most people who have enough AGI to worry about this problem.  It would be a lot easier to get rid of the subsidies and let farmers just grow what the market demands.

 

Yesterday was the national commemoration of The Tax Foundation’s Tax Freedom Day.   Not surprisingly, it’s later than last year.

Tax Freedom Day is “the day when the nation as a whole has earned enough money to pay its total tax bill for year.”  It varies by state.  Iowa’s day was April 13.  Connecticut and New Jersey will be the last states to finish paying their tax bill, on May 9.

Tax Freedom Day 2014 Map_0

 

TaxProf, GAO: IRS Audits 1% of Big Partnerships, 27% of Big Corporations

Jeremy Scott, The Misleading Debate About the Corporate Income Tax (Tax Analysts Blog):

Congress must consider passthroughs when discussing business tax reform. You can’t complain about high U.S. corporate tax rates or declining corporate tax revenues without looking at how the shift to passthrough entities is affecting the U.S. tax system. Passthrough reform is just as critical as corporate reform, even if it doesn’t receive nearly as much attention in congressional speeches or front-page news stories.

It won’t happen until the inane quest to hammer “the rich” is decisively rejected in tax policy debates  — because with pass-throughs, taxing “the rich” means taxing away employment.  Yet the same high-tax redistribution schemes have led to disaster over and over are enjoying a new vogue among people who just can’t stand other people having more money.

 

20140321-3Jack Townsend, GE Ducks Any Penalty for Its (BS) Tax Shelter — For Now 

Brian Mahany, Is the IRS Whistleblower Program a Failure?

TaxGrrrl, Higher Or Lower: How Do You Think Your U.S. Tax Burden Compares To Other Countries?   

Steven Rosenthal, A Flash Tax for the Flash Boys (TaxVox).  Never mind that high-frequency traders make for more efficient markets and lower transaction costs for other traders.  We need to screw up the capital markets even more.

Annette Nellen, Tax Day – April 15, 2014 – It Can Be Easier.  It sure could be.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 348

 

William Perez, Obamas, Bidens Release 2013 Tax Returns.  I still say they should have had to prepare them by themselves in a live webcast — as should all congresscritters.

Russ Fox, If You Can’t Get the Refund, Why Not File Some Liens?  After all, it is a foolish and futile gesture, so go for it!

Peter Reilly, Court Approves Tax Sale Of New Mexico Property For Less Than 1% Of Its Value.  Peter sheds light on the sleazy practice of what amounts to stealing property to pay petty amounts of tax.

Jason Dinesen, On Schedule C’s and Setting Rates.  If your 1040 is really a business return, you can’t expect to pay the same as a 1040A filer.   In many ways Schedule C’s are harder, because they rarely have a balance sheet to provide a reality check.

 

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Robert D. Flach’s Buzz is Back!  Welcome back, Robert!

Kay Bell, How are you spending your federal tax refund?

Jana Luttenegger, Are You Curious How Your Tax Dollars Were Spent? (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

News you can use.  Timely Filing a Tax Court Petition from Prison (Carl Smith, Procedurally Taxing)

Breaking!  Millennials Don’t Like Grunt Work, Says Millennial Grunt (Going Concern).  Hey Millennials, the rest of us aren’t so crazy about it either.  That’s why they have to pay us to do it.

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/7/14: Where’s my K-1? And why you should e-file that extension.

Monday, April 7th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

1040 2013The deadline for 2013 1040s is a week from tomorrow, so we may as well start our annual Filing Season Tips feature.  

Many folks arrive here with a search engine query that goes something like “why don’t I have my K-1, should the partnership go to jail?”  A quick reminder of what a K-1 does, and why they often arrive late in the tax season.

K-1s come from partnerships, S corporations and trusts.  Partnerships and S corporation businesses don’t pay the tax on their income.  The income is instead taxed on your 1040.  They have to compute their own taxable income first — as you might imagine, a more complex process than doing the average 1040.  They then have to sort the income into a bunch of different bins so that all the pieces end up on the right spot on the owner 1040s.  The K-1 is best understood as the collection bins for your shares of the various pieces of the business’ income and expense items.

Furthermore, many businesses and trusts that issue K-1s are awaiting K-1s of their own.  Even if they have their own tax information ready, if the business is still waiting on a K-1, it can’t issue yours.

But, but! Aren’t K-1s supposed to be out by January 1?  You’re thinking of 1099s.  K-1s are due with the S corporation returns (March 15) or the partnership returns (April 15), but they can be, and often are, extended to as late as September 15 — legally.

So what to do?  If you don’t have your K-1 yet, try to at least get an idea of what the income will be, and extend your own return accordingly.  It’s always better to extend than to amend.

This is the first 2014 filing season tip — come back for one each day through April 15!

 

Russ Fox, Bozo Tax Tip #6: Just Don’t File

 

e-file logoKristy Maitre, IRS Change in Extension Processing Makes E-Filing That Extension Critical.

The campus could take up to 6 weeks to process a [paper] extension, and it will not show up on the transcript until processed. With that time delay, it is helpful to have the acknowledgement of an e-filed extension.

With the delay in processing of the extensions, remember if you file a return within that 6 week timeframe, it may not show the extension on the module, and your client could get a penalty for filing late if there is a balance due. This will also have an impact on refund returns if they are later picked up for audit, a balance due results, and the extension was not processed properly.

And why, if you do paper file, you shouldn’t bundle extensions for your family or clients to save postage.

TaxGrrrl, Not Ready To File Your Taxes? Don’t Stress Out, File For Extension 

William Perez, Federal Tax Relief for Victims of Washington State Mudslide and Flooding

Jana Luttenegger, DIY Will is a ‘Cautionary Tale’ (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). “As a result, two of Ann’s nieces received property that it appears clearly from the will and attempted amendment was meant for Ann’s brother instead.”

 

20140321-3Kay Bell, 3 popular refundable tax credits: Are they worth it?  Good question, and no.

Peter Reilly, Easement Valuations Not So Easy Anymore

Keith Fogg, Reliance on Counsel to Avoid Tax Liability.  (Procedurally Taxing).  Not likely to work.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 333.  Featuring the Washington Post “fact checker” calling shenanigans on IRS Commissioner Koskinen for denying that IRS had “targeted” Tea Party groups.  It’s safe to say Mr. Koskinen has botched his entrance.

Andrew Lundeen, Senate Finance Committee Passes $85 Billion Tax Extenders Bill (Tax Policy Blog)

20121120-2Tax Justice Blog, Five Key Tax Facts About Healthcare Reform.  Ones they like that I despise: “Only two percent of Americans will pay the tax penalty for not having insurance and  “95 percent of the tax increases included to pay for health reform apply solely to businesses or married couples making over $250,000 and single people making over $200,000.”

This attitude is exactly what is awful about the TJB mindset.  No matter how fickle, arbitrary,   unworkable or economically harmful a tax is — and the Obamacare taxes are all of those — we’re supposed to be OK with them as long as they apply only to “the rich.”  Carried to the logical conclusion, it would be just fine to execute the 1-percenters, confiscate their property, and sell their families into slavery — it only affects the rich anyway, and they don’t count.

 

Arnold Kling has a little reminder for folks hung up on inequality, quoting Lawrence Kotlikoff:

The US fiscal gap now stands at an estimated $205 trillion, or 10.3 percent of all future US GDP. Closing this gap is imperative, and requires a fiscal adjustment of an immediate and permanent 37 percent reduction in spending (apart from servicing official debt), an immediate and permanent 57 percent increase in all federal taxes, or some combination of the two. The necessary size of this adjustment increases the longer it is put off.

And remember, the rich guy isn’t picking up the tab.

 

O. Kay Henderson, No traction for increasing state gas tax.  Not happening this year, apparently.

 

haroldJennifer Carr at Tax Analysts has a good summary of the research as to the economic effect of state film tax credits:

The film industry and lawmakers doubtless believe that film credits are a great deal for everyone involved — and that would be fantastic if it were true — but the most credible studies don’t reflect that.

Her article (unfortunately available only to State Tax Notes subscribers) discusses the funky analysis that film credit boosters use to justify the subsidies.  The boosters like to overstate the tourism effects of films and assume fantastical “multiplier” effects of film spending.  They also ignore opportunity costs — assuming that if the taxpayer money was not spent on Hollywood, it would just crawl in a hole and die.

 

Career Corner.  Crime May Not Pay But Whistleblowing Certainly Does (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/31/14: A little fire won’t stop us!

Monday, March 31st, 2014 by Joe Kristan

There was a little disruption around the Tax Update neighborhood over the weekend.  The 115 year-old Younkers Building, kitty-corner from our quarters in The Financial Center, burned over the weekend.  It was being renovated into apartments and shops when it caught fire early Saturday morning.  Here’s how it looked yesterday from one of our conference rooms:

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While our neighbors in Hub Tower and the EMC Building are closed today, Roth & Company is open for business.  If you need to visit us, you have to enter on the Mulberry Street side; the Walnut side is closed by police order.  You can still reach the parking garage, but you have to come from Mulberry and turn north onto the little stub of Seventh Street left open to allow garage access (it’s normally one-way, Southbound, but it’s one-way northbound until they can re-open Seventh Street, and that doesn’t seem likely for awhile).  We are cut off from the skywalk system, for now. (Update, 8:54: we have Skywalks!  Both to Hub Tower and the EMC building).

Other Tax Update coverage:

Sunday Morning Skywalks.

Goodbye, Younkers Building.

A VISIT(ATION) TO DOWNTOWN YOUNKERS

DOWNTOWN YOUNKERS PICTURES

And some sound advice from Brian Gongol: “Make sure you have an offsite, offline backup of your critical work and personal files. You never know when a catastrophe will strike.”

Roger McEowen, U.S. Tax Court Deals Blow to IRS on Application of Passive Loss Rules to Trusts: “The case represents a complete rejection of the IRS position that trust aren’t “individuals” for passive loss purposes and the notion that only the trustee acting in the capacity of trustee can satisfy the test.”

William Perez, April 1st Deadline to Take Required Minimum Distributions for 2013:

Individuals who reached age 70 and a half years old in 2013 are required to begin withdrawing funds from their tax-deferred retirement plans no later than April 1, 2014. This applies to traditional individual retirement accounts (IRAs) and employer-based retirement accounts, such as a section 401(k), 403(b) or 457 plan.

You can get hit with a 50% excise tax on the required distribution amount if you fail to take it.

Jana Luttenegger, FICA Taxes on Severance Payments (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Kay Bell, Selfies used as tax claim documentation, audit defense.  Not a bad idea.

 

20131206-1Arden Dale, A New Reason to Hoard Assets (WSJ):

In particular, taxpayers are taking advantage of a tax break known as the “step-up in basis,” in which the cost basis of a house, stock or other asset is determined by its current market price rather than when the deceased person acquired it.

Heirs get the step-up when they inherit the asset, and it can save them a lot in capital-gains taxes when they sell.

Gift recipients get only the donor’s basis, while the basis of inherited property is the value at the date of death.  Now that couples can die with over $10 million without incurring estate tax, it often makes tax sense to hold low-basis assets until death so heirs can dispose of them without incurring capital gains taxes.

 

Greg Mankiw,  The Growth of Pass-Through Entities:

Over the past few decades, there has been an amazing shift in how businesses are taxed.  See the figure below, which is from CBO.  Businesses are more and more taxed as pass-through entities, where the income shows up on personal tax returns rather than on corporate returns.  (Here is an article discussing how the mutual giant Fidelity recently switched from one form to the other.)

This phenomenon complicates the interpretation of tax return data.  For example, when one looks at the growth of the 1 percent, or the 0.1 percent, in the Piketty-Saez data, that growth is likely exaggerated because some income is merely being shifted from corporate returns. I don’t know how much.  If someone has already quantified the magnitude of this effect, please email me the answer. If not, someone should write that paper.

This is clearly true.  While I can’t quantify the effect on inequality statistics, it has to make a difference, now that a majority of business income is reported on 1040s:

Source: The Tax Foundation

Source: The Tax Foundation

In 1980, corporate returns reported about 2/3 of all business income; by 2010, the Form 1120-share of business income was down to about 43%.

 

Lyman Stone, Maryland Threatens to Confiscate “House of Cards” Set (Tax Policy Blog).  “High taxes and big incentives don’t seem to be working very well in Maryland right now.”  They should follow Iowa’s example and limit filmmaker subsidies to three hots and a cot.

BitcoinMegan McArdle, The IRS Takes a Bite Out of Bitcoin

Annette Nellen, Guidance on taxation of virtual currency

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 326

Tax Justice Blog, Grover Norquist cares a lot about Tennessee taxes. You should too.

Renu Zaretsky, Tax Reform, Tax Expenditures, and Kevin Spacey (TaxVox).  A roundup of tax headlines.

Jack Townsend, Tenth Circuit Opinion on Mens Rea for Tax Obstruction – What Does Unlawful Mean?

 

The Critical Question.  Am I a Hypocrite on Preparer Regulation?  (Jason Dinesen): 

I oppose regulation of tax preparers. But yet, I will tout my own licensing at the expense of an unlicensed preparer if the situation presents itself.

But nobody makes Jason do this, and if somebody wants to pay less for an unlicensed preparer, Jason isn’t preventing that.  If he replaced “but yet, I will” with “I prefer to,” it would be correct.

 

News from the Profession.  Per Criminal, PwC is Preferred Audit Firm for Criminals (Going Concern)

 

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