Posts Tagged ‘Jason Diensen’

Tax Roundup, 2/22/2013: Why California refugees might not choose Iowa. And: to C or not to C?

Friday, February 22nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

 

Enjoying a short Des Moines winter commute.

Enjoying a short winter commute in bicycle-friendly Des Moines.

We aren’t scaring them.  Governor Branstad is making a trip to California to poach some businesses from the failing Golden State.  He’s not scaring one Californian:

Iowa’s top state personal income tax rate is 8.98 percent, compared to 13.3 percent in California. Probably not enough of an improvement to lure millionaires from Pacific Palisades to Dubuque. By contrast, Texas offers zero percent.

The top state corporate income tax rate is 12.5 percent in Iowa, 8.84 percent in California and zero percent in Texas.

Earlier this year, Branstad said he would no longer pursue getting rid of Iowa’s corporate and personal income taxes. Instead, he’s going to focus on cutting property taxes.

Well, California’s property taxes already are fairly low thanks to Proposition 13. Although property prices here are triple those in Iowa and most other states because of our severe restrictions on building.

Bottom line: Iowa doesn’t offer enough incentives to attract many businesses and people to leave California. The Hawkeye State is the Golden State with bad weather.

Ouch.  Well, Iowa’s solvent, too, unlike California, which is a fiscal disaster.  We also have short commutes.  Still, he makes a valid point: it’s not enough to compete with a basket case like California.  Golden State refugees have plenty of places to choose from, many of which have better taxes, better weather, or both.  I have no thoughts on fixing the weather, but The Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan would take care of the tax problems.  With no corporate tax and a 4% individual rate, combined with good employees, education and quality of life, we’d see some Californians.

 

To C or not to C?  The Wall Street Journal reports that taxpayers are revisiting whether to operate businesses as C corporations or pass-through entities.  C corporations face a top rate of 35%, where individuals have top rates over 42% as a result of the ill-concieved fiscal cliff and Obamacare tax increases.  From the article:

“Even though on the surface you’re looking at 35% versus 39.6%, it’s a deceptive comparison,” says Robert W. Wood, a tax lawyer with Wood LLP in San Francisco. “There may be a slight short-term advantage in C-Corporations, but there are a number of negative long-term implications that would outweigh short-term benefit.”

For example, C-Corporation profits can be double-taxed. In addition to the corporate tax on profits, owners also would owe personal taxes on any money they take out of the company as dividends. The double tax kicks in when a business is sold, too.

Another potential problem is that a firm that switches from an S-Corporation generally has to remain a C-Corporation for at least five years. 

At current rates, a switch to C corporation format is probably still unwise, if tempting, because of the double tax issue.  You might have lower tax up front, but getting the money out involves either paying a second tax on the dividends or expensive tax gymnastics, often involving renting to a corporation or potentially “excessive” compensation.  C corporations are the Roach Motels of the tax world: they’re a lot easier to check into than check out of.  But if there is a significant reduction in corporation rates, the current tax savings will be enough to tip the balance for many taxpayers to C corporation status, double tax or no.

Hat tip: TaxProf Blog.

 

When Will Tax Complexity Cause a Collapse? (Jason Dinesen). 

The tax code, as most everyone knows and acknowledges, is ridiculously complex and getting more complex all the time.

When will the complexity cause the system to collapse? And what, exactly, will collapse?

I think it would require a combination of things to “collapse” the tax law.  If the perception becomes widespread that it is impossible to comply with the tax law without unreasonable effort, or the rates get intolerably high, and technical advances allow for cash transfers and banking that the government can’t trace, then the game is over.

Tax Analysts is having a conference today on whether, after 100 years, the income tax has run its race.

Elizabeth Malm, Holy Smokes! Washington Loses $376 Million to Cigarette Tax Evasion in 2012.  Many states have raised tobacco taxes to a point where smuggling becomes attractive.

 

Howard Gleckman, Congress May Not Rewrite the Tax Code in 2013, But It Could Make It Simpler (TaxVox).  If you can’t do everything, you might still do something.

Kay Bell, Education tax credit form, already pushed into February, now causing filer confusion and more delays in processing

Peter Reilly,  Bill Romanowski’s Tax Court Loss Not A Typical Horse Case.  We covered it here yesterday.

TaxGrrrl, About Those Leaked Wal-Mart Emails… Is IRS To Blame For Sluggish Sales?  Are tax refund delays stopping consumer spending?

Teaching by bad example, Nebraska-style.  I examine the tax troubles of a prairie-town lawyer.

 

Jim Maule, How Tax Falsehoods Get Fertilized.  That “70,000-page tax code” really bugs him.

Want to raise the minimum wage?  Then apply it to your interns, Congresscritters. (Donald Boudreaux).

Don’t bug Robert D. Flach with requests for free tax help.

 

It’s probably how he meets girls too.  Berlusconi & The Lure of Tax Refunds (Robert Goulder, Tax.com).

CPA exam tip: Calm Down, This CPA Exam Practice Question Isn’t as Dirty as You Think (Going Concern)

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