Posts Tagged ‘Jason Dinesen’

Tax Roundup, 1/29/15: Iowans, fill ‘em up now. And: lessons from the Obama Sec. 529 retreat.

Thursday, January 29th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

dimeFill me up. ‘Overall consensus’ toward 10-cent hike in state gas tax O. Kay Henderson reports:

 Key legislators say a 10-cent increase in the state gas tax has a good chance of passing the legislature in February and going into effect as early as March.

“I think the overall consensus is to go 10 cents now…We’re so far behind that we need to implement it right away,” Senator Tod Bowman, a Democrat from Maquoketa who is chairman of the Senate Transportation Committee, said this morning.

At the opening of this session of the General Assembly, I guessed that there would be no gas tax boost. It’s looking more likely every day that I was wrong. I asked a few legislators and lobbyists about it when I attended the Iowa ABI Legislative Reception, and they all said a 10-cent gas tax boost was a done deal.

That would test my alternative forecast – that if there was a gas tax boost, it meant Governor Branstad will not run for a seventh term.

 

csi logoAlan Cole, President’s Plan to Tax 529s Was Not a Distraction (Tax Policy Blog):

While the issue was, perhaps, a distraction from the administration’s priorities on community college, it was not at all a distraction from the administration’s priorities on tax policy. It is deeply philosophically consistent with virtually every tax policy proposal, proposed or enacted, from the administration.

The administration’s proposals all tend to follow a particular blueprint for tax policy: simply put, that when Americans save by investing in some kind of asset, that they should be taxed at ordinary income rates on both the initial value of the asset and all the future returns on the asset. (For example, with 529 plans, the initial investment is taxed, and the Obama Administration’s proposal is to tax the returns as well.) This view is mistaken, in that a financial asset’s value is precisely in its future returns. The value of the financial asset, then, is taxed twice. 

The difference here is that the administration has dressed up its tax grabs by saying only “the rich” would have to pay. That’s never really true, but it was so obviously wrong here that even the President’s allies couldn’t support it with a straight face.

 

IRAJoseph Thorndike, What Obama’s 529 Flip-Flop Says About Your Roth IRA (Tax Analysts Blog):

The bursting of the 529 trial balloon should serve as an object lesson for anyone hoping to rein in other tax preferences. In particular, proposals to scale back Roth IRAs – popular among liberal analysts – seem hopeless in the extreme.

I think the dumbest thing was pairing the elimination of a tool to enable people to save for education costs with the unwise “free” community college proposal. That was pretty much saying those who want to pay their own way through college without government grants are chumps.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 630. It has become an issue in the hearings for the Attorney General nominee.

 

Jason Dinesen, What I’m Asking My Clients Regarding the ACA. Pretty much what we are asking our clients.

TaxGrrrl, Form 3115 Adds Confusion & Cost – But May Be Required For 2015. “Since there’s no user fee – and virtually no risk – I tend to agree with those who suggest that businesses owning real and/or tangible property err on the side of caution and file form 3115 to obtain automatic consent.”

Robert Wood, Missing A Form 1099? Why You Shouldn’t Ask For It “Nevertheless, if you don’t receive a Form 1099 you expect, don’t ask for it. Just report the income.”

Tony Nitti, Super Bowl XLIX Tax Tale Of The Tape: Who Ya’ Got? Meh. My football rooting interest ended in Seattle. But for socially-awkward tax nerds (but I repeat myself) who are going to Super Bowl gatherings, Tony has a lifeline.

 

20140512-1Peter Reilly, Don’t Use The IRS To Address Koch Political Spending. Whether it’s Tom Steyer, George Soros, or the Brothers Who Must Not Be Named, the government has no business telling them what causes they can fund.

Russ Fox, Caesars Wins Round One: Chicago, not Delaware. Caesars Entertainment’s bankruptcy litigation, that is.

Carl Smith, Unpublished CDP Orders Dwarf Post-trial Bench Opinions in Uncounted Tax Court Rulings (Procedurally Taxing). Insight on what Tax Court judges do that those of us who don’t do that sort of litigation for a living don’t see.

Jack Townsend, Unreported Offshore Accounts Remains on IRS Dirty Dozen” List

Kay Bell, Illinois shoppers to start paying state sales tax on Amazon purchases on Feb. 1; federal online tax bill still stalled

 

Tax Trials: Georgia Tax Tribunal Rules that Electric Utility’s Machinery and Equipment Used in Transmission and Distribution System Not Exempt from Georgia Sales & Use Tax. Bad tax policy all over. Business inputs should not be subject to sales tax.

Cara Griffith, Tax Appeal Reform May Be a Possibility in Washington State (Tax Analysts Blog)

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David Brunori, Regressive Taxes Are Neither New Nor Good (Tax Analysts Blog): “States should also broaden the sales tax base to tax things rich folks buy, while lowering the tax rates on the things the poor consume the most. But the rich will remain rich.”

Steven Rosenthal, Is Obama Closing Retirement Savings Loopholes or Just Curbing Congress’ Generosity? (TaxVox). How about another choice – he’s just looking to increase taxes on “the rich” any way he can get away with?

Richard Phillips, Congress Should Pass the Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act to Combat International Tax Avoidance. (Tax Justice Blog). I have a better idea: a less onerous tax system that would make international tax avoidance less attractive.

 

Career Corner. The Public Accountant’s Definitive Guide to Disclosure of Past Convictions (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

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Tax Roundup, 1/23/2015: Egg donor compensation taxable payment for services. Meanwhile, kidney donor compensation is a felony.

Friday, January 23rd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
"White-&-Brown-Eggs" by Evan-Amos - Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

“White-&-Brown-Eggs” by Evan-Amos – Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

The big news in the tax world today is a Tax Court case ruling that payments to an egg donor were compensation for services. The case turned on the language of the contract of between the egg donor and the agency that procured the eggs. Tax Court Judge Holmes ruled that the payments were not excludible as payments for physical damages because there was no tort claim involved.

There are plenty of places you can read more details on this case, including Russ Fox and Tony Nitti. The TaxProf has a roundup.

So there is an organized and legal market for donor eggs, which, if all goes well, turn into an entire new human. That’s a good thing. But if an agency paid you for one of your kidneys to save the life of an already-born child on the kidney donor list, they would face a $50,000 fine and five years in prison under the Gore-Hatch National Organ Transplant Act of 1984.

The National Kidney Foundation reports that 12 people die daily waiting for a donor kidney, and that 4,453 died waiting for a kidney transplant in 2013.  It’s a felony to save any of those lives by buying a kidney from a healthy, willing and fully-informed seller. Meanwhile, nobody dies waiting for a donated egg.

Cite: Perez, 144 T.C. No. 4

Related: The Case for Paying Organ Donors (Sally Satel)

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Richard Borean, More than Half of all Private Sector Workers are Employed by Pass-through Businesses:

53.7% of Iowans work for pass-through businesses taxed on 1040s.

53.7% of Iowans work for pass-through businesses taxed on 1040s.

“Pass-through” income is income earned by S corporations and partnerships, including LLCs. This income is taxed on 1040s. Those who favor ever-increasing individual taxation of “the rich” by definition favor increasing the tax on employment.

 

buzz20140923Robert D. Flach has your Friday Buzz, including thoughts on avoiding scammers claiming to be from IRS and on Wal-Mart’s cash tax refund program: “My advice – avoid this program.”

Kay Bell, IRS gets $1.3 million for Darryl Strawberry’s Mets annuity

Paul Neiffer, IRS Scammers Net $14 Million from 3,000 Victims. If the e-mail says it’s from the IRS, it’s not. If you aren’t expecting a call from the IRS, the caller isn’t from the IRS.

Jason Dinesen, Ridiculous IRS Situations I’ve Recently Dealt With. A continuing series.

Leslie Book, Tax Court Addresses Verification Requirement in Trust Fund CDP Case (Procedurally Taxing)

Robert Wood, Washington Nationals $210M Pitching Contract For Max Scherzer Is About Taxes. “The Home Rule Act prohibits the District from imposing a commuter tax on non-residents.”

Peter ReillyExclusive – Kent Hovind Claims Congressmen Are Looking Into His Case. All you could possibly want to know about the case of the guy who thinks the Flintstones was actually a documentary series.

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Robert Goulder, Reading the Tea Leaves: China’s Jurisdictional Tax Claims (Tax Analysts Blog). Contrary to some reports, even Communist China doesn’t plan to tax worldwide income of non-resident Chinese. The U.S. stands alone in doing that.

Howard Gleckman, A Look at the Territorial Tax Systems in Four Countries Finds No Magic Bullets (TaxVox). No magic beans, either, I’ll bet.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 624

 

Career Corner. Here Are Just a Few Questions You’ll Be Asked in a Big 4 Interview (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/20/2015: What’s with the accounting method changes? And: foot kissing + tax evasion = double trouble.

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

3115-2009If your business return seems extra thick this year, it could be a result of an “accounting method change” application — Form 3115 — buried in it.

The tax law requires taxpayers to get IRS permission to change a “method of accounting.” Without getting into all of the tedious details, and with great oversimplification, a “method of accounting” occurs when the way you account for something on your tax return affects the timing of income or expense, but not the total amount over time. In other words, it’s temporary vs. permanent differences.

Of course timing is everything in tax planning, and the IRS doesn’t want you to change accounting methods willy-nilly. The IRS doesn’t have the time to consider every accounting method change, though, so it publishes a long list of “automatic” method changes annually. This year’s list is in Rev. Proc. 2015-14.

This year will see more Forms 3115 than usual as a result of the so-called “repair regulations” that are effective for 2014 returns. These rules distinguish between “repair” expenses, which can be deducted, and “improvements,” which have to be capitalized and depreciated.

20140925-2The repair regulations have provisions that let taxpayers treat their building components — HVAC, roofs, elevators, etc — as separate items under these rules. Their effect is to permit deductions for some costs that may have been trapped in the depreciable cost of the building. That makes the automatic method change under these rules (Rev. Proc. 2014-17) a good deal, as it can provide a catch-up deduction for prior capitalized costs. Many returns will also include a method change (Rev. Proc. 2014-16) to reflect updated rules for deducting or capitalizing “materials and supplies.”

Automatic method changes are a good thing; if you have a method change that isn’t automatic, special IRS permission is required, and it doesn’t come cheap. But even an automatic change isn’t free, especially if your preparer has to go through old repair records to determine the catch-up deduction. But if you have significant depreciable real property, it’s probably worth the effort.

 

Russ Fox, Former Mayor (and Current CPA) Learns of Tax Fraud, Joins the Conspiracy

Now, let’s assume you’re a tax professional and you learn that a company is withholding payroll taxes and not paying them to the IRS. Would you:
(a) Tell them that the taxes aren’t being paid, that’s violating the law, and you need to fix this (which could include setting up payment plans with the IRS and Minnesota, or just paying the withheld funds);
(b) Tell them that if they don’t start remitting the withheld funds that he would need to quit the engagement; or
(c) Join the conspiracy. 

An accountant from Stillwater, Minnesota — who happened to also be the Mayor — chose poorly.

 

20121120-2Hank Stern, Counting down the ObamaTax:

Many (most?) folks believe that the tax is a mere $95 this year and, for some people, this may well be the case. But it’s actually just a minimum; the actual rate (this year) is 1% of income:

TurboTax, an online tax service, estimated that the average penalty for lacking health insurance in 2014 will be $301.”

A common misconception.

Robert Wood, Beware Obamacare When Filing Taxes This Year. A roundup of the individual mandate penalty and the net investment income tax.

 

Annette Nellen, Due diligence for preparing 1040s for 2014:

What’s new for due diligence for 2014 individual tax returns?  Virtual currency, Affordable Care Act, FBAR, Airbnb rentals, for sure.  Also, the typical charitable contributions, mortgage interest and 1099-K review.  The biggest new item for 2014 will the new line asking if the individual had health coverage for the year.

More work doesn’t come free. The post lists to a longer article about preparer “due diligence” this tax season.

 

Tim Todd, Tax Court Adopts Functional Test to Define “Bank”. “In sum, the Tax Court held that Moneygram satisfied neither the Staunton functional test nor the § 581 test because it failed to receive deposits, make loans, and was not regarded as a bank by any state or federal regulator. Consequently, Moneygram was not entitled to the reported bad debt deductions of the partial or wholly worthless asset-backed securities.”

Jason Dinesen, A Brief History of Marriage in the Tax Code, Part 2: Taxes in 1913.

 

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Understanding Partnership Distributions, Part 1. “As you will see, the regime governing partnership distributions is drastically different from the one governing corporate distributions.”

TaxGrrrl, Fun With Taxes: Tax Haiku 2015. How about this:

 insure worker health?

Better not reimburse it

That is expensive.

 Kay Bell, Martin Luther King Jr. Day lessons via “Selma” & “Glory”

Mitch Maahs, IRS Announces New Standard Mileage Rates (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

 

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Robert D. Flach, BO SOTU PLANS TO INCREASE TAX ON THE “WEALTHY”. ” BO’s tax proposals, both to help the middle class and punish the wealthy, will never pass in the Republican controlled Congress.”

Matt Gardner, President Obama Takes on the Capital Gains Tax Inequity with New Proposals. By making it worse, of course, though not to hear Mr. Gardner tell it.

Renu Zaretsky, To Build a Better Tax Code, You Could Follow the Money.  The TaxVox headline roundup is heavy on the President’s proposals.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 621. This edition cites Stephen Moore’s Op-ed: “Congress needs to hold the IRS accountable and demand the firing of Mr. Kostiken because he has he admitted openly he can’t do his job.”  Unfortunately, the President who hired him thinks he is doing his job, which is to be a partisan scandal goalie.

 

The headline that wins the internet: Foot Kissing Chiropractor Sentenced for Bribing IRS Agent (Jack Townsend)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/15/15: Taxpayer Advocate rips offshore account enforcement, recommends fixes to Congress.

Thursday, January 15th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today Readershere is the post on the 2015 Iowa legislative session outlook.

 

Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

Still shooting jaywalkers. National Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson has submitted her Annual Report to Congress, and she rips the IRS offshore compliance program. Among the “most serious problems” noted in the report is “Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Programs Undermined the Law and Violate Taxpayer Rights.”

The report says the IRS routinely stretches the penalties for “willful” violations of foreign reporting requirements to inadvertent violations, interprets its own guidelines whimsically and unfairly, and makes a practice of hammering small violators disproportionately.  The report also criticizes the IRS practice of denying relief for taxpayers who came in from the cold early when it later started applying reduced penalties.

The report includes one awful example of the IRS treating an apartment owned by the taxpayer as a foreign financial account for purposes of computing the penalty for late reporting:

Example : An IRS employee took the position that a taxpayer’s foreign apartment must be included in the “offshore penalty” base solely because the taxpayer filed returns reporting income from the apartment between two and fifteen months late—after receipt of foreign information reporting documents relating to inherited property. The employee concluded the delay in filing returns meant that the apartment was related to tax noncompliance. Under the 2011 OVDI FAQ 35, “[t]he offshore penalty is intended to apply to all of the taxpayer’s offshore holdings that are related in any way to tax noncompliance.” FAQ 35 defines tax noncompliance as follows:

“Tax noncompliance includes failure to report income from the assets, as well as failure to pay U.S. tax that was due with respect to the funds used to acquire the asset.”

The taxpayer timely overpaid her taxes and reported the income from the apartment (albeit on late-filed returns), and the apartment was not acquired with untaxed funds. Thus, the IRS employee’s unreviewable determination to include the apartment in the offshore penalty base appears to contradict FAQ 35.

This indicates an IRS practice of shooting jaywalkers so that it can slap real international tax cheats on the wrists. Especially unrepresented jaywalkers:

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These penalties – $2,202 average penalty for an average $268 tax understatement for the smallest accounts – are unconscionable. I defy anyone to say otherwise. Well, anyone who doesn’t work for IRS.

It also indicates that taxpayers who oped out of the voluntary disclosure program got better results — which is a harsh indictment of the way the “voluntary” program treats taxpayers.

The report does praise recent changes to IRS practice, but slams the IRS for not applying them retroactively.  The report also recommends that Congress ease up on offshore penalties, including eliminating the penalties when the taxpayer resides in the same country as the foreign account. This would be incredibly useful, eliminating the penalty for committing personal finance while living abroad.

I would go further and make the U.S. tax system territorial for non-residents, to eliminate absurd spectacles like the IRS going after the U.S.-born Mayor of London for capital gains on the sale of his home in London.

Related coverage: 

Robert Wood, National Taxpayer Advocate Slams IRS Offshore Programs & FBAR Penalties, Demands Change

TaxGrrrl, Taxpayer Advocate IDs Most Serious Problems For Taxpayers: Unacceptably Low Levels Of Service Tops List

 

20150115-2Kay Bell, It’s a new year, but time for final 2014 estimated tax payment

Russ Fox, Waiting for Godot. ” If you’re going to call the IRS, expect very lengthy hold times; yesterday I was on hold for 101 minutes before speaking with an IRS representative. I expect the hold times to get far worse as we head into Tax Season.”

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About EAs, #5: EAs are the Only Pros Required to Take Tax CPE.

Robert D. Flach, WTF IS AN EA?  Wednesday Tax Forum is an EA?

Tim Todd, Unsubordinated Mortgage Prevents Charitable Deduction for Conservation Easement

Iowa Public Radio, Tax Time Gets New Ritual: Proof Of Health Insurance.

 

Alan Cole, Financial Transactions Are A Very Poor Tax Base (Tax Policy Blog):

Simply put, financial transactions are a very poor tax base. For one thing, it results in “pyramiding:” taxing the same economic activity many times. For another, economists generally think of trades as highly-valuable activity that benefits both parties, given that they both agreed to the deal. Taxing trade itself results in a kind of “lock-in” effect where people hold on to the things they have, whether or not they’re the best people to actually be holding on to them.

He also notes the social value of the ability to easily sell financial assets, one that would be damaged by a transaction tax.

Howard Gleckman, Gale and DeLong Debate: Is the Budget Deficit Even a Problem? (TaxVox).

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Cara Griffith, Illinois Lawsuit Challenges Tax Credit Program for Encouraging Job Retention (Tax Analysts Blog). “But the interesting question this lawsuit raises is whether job creation and job retention should be treated as equal for purposes of a tax credit.” Yes, they should all get no tax credits.

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown 1/12: When Your Mouth Writes a Check Your State Can’t Cash (Tax Justice Blog)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 616

Career Corner. The Happiest Lawyers Are Tax Lawyers  (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/14/15: Education credits to delay refunds? And: it’s not volunteering when you’re paid.

Wednesday, January 14th, 2015 by Joe Kristan
Kristy Maitre

Kristy Maitre

If your tax refund this year seems to take forever to arrive, education credits might be involved. The invaluable Kristy Maitre, former IRS Stakeholder Liaison and now with the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation, has leaned that the IRS may delay refunds on returns claiming the “American Opportunity Credit.” From an e-mail she has distributed:

If your client is getting the American Opportunity Credit this year you need to be aware of a possible “refund hold” on the credit to verify attendance at the college. At this time we “assume” only that part of the refund will be held and the other part of refund not related to the American Opportunity Credit will be released.

At this time we are not sure who this will impact, IRS appears to want to keep it a BIG secret. Our concern is that the tax preparer will be blamed for the delay of the refund and overall it would make the preparer look bad as well as having to deal with an upset client due to the issue. I was able to find some criteria in a new IRM, but we need more information from IRS.

Your client should be  informed by IRS of the reason the refund is being held and that once the 1098-T from the accredited institution is verified the refund will be released,  or they will receive a Letter 4800C to inform them if further documentation is required to allow the education credit…

The AOTC is a “refundable” credit; if the credit exceeds the tax computed, the IRS will pay you the excess. Given the high incidence of refund fraud involving refundable credits like the AOTC, it’s understandable that the IRS would want to verify eligibility before issuing a refund.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

Unfortunately, this verification will come from matching 1098-Ts issued by colleges and universities. These forms, which purport to show tuition paid, are notoriously unreliable. The inevitable matching errors will leave some taxpayers trying to get their refunds fixed well into the summer.

This highlights the unwisdom of using the tax law as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy. It’s hard enough to get taxable income right. Congress also assigns IRS education policy, health care, social welfare, industrial policy, campaign finance regulation, you name it. Like with the Swiss Army Knife, you can only add so many functions before you make it bad at being a knife.

 

This Koskinen isn't the IRS commissioner

This Koskinen isn’t the IRS commissioner

Commissioner Koskinen wants us to blame cuts in his budget for tax refund delays. In a memo to IRS employees, he outlines the dire effects of the cuts in his agency budget, including:

Delays in refunds for some taxpayers. People who file paper tax returns could wait an extra week — or possibly longer — to see their refund. Taxpayers with errors or questions on their returns that require additional manual review will also face delays.

It’s foolish of Congress to pile work onto the IRS and then cut its budget. That said, Mr. Koskinen has brought a lot of this on himself with his combative and tone-deaf response to the Tea Party scandal.

Also, there’s a bit of the Washington Monument Strategy in his memo, by making cuts in areas that inflict pain on taxpayers. I would be more convinced that the IRS is really committed to making taxpayer service a priority if his list of budget adjustments included sending to the field, or laying off, the hundreds of full-time IRS employees who do only union work. He would be more convincing if he said the “voluntary” preparer regulation initiative was on ice until funding improves. Instead, the Commissioner puts the National Treasury Employees Union and his own power grab ahead of processing refunds.

 

No Walnut STVolunteering. I don’t think that word means what you think it means. From Governor Branstad’s 2015 Condition of the State address:

 In addition, I am offering legislation creating the Student Debt Reorganization Tax Credit. This tax credit allows individuals to volunteer for worthy causes within Iowa’s communities and in exchange have contributions made toward their student debt.

There is so much wrong with this, beyond the idea that it’s “volunteering” when you get paid for it. It’s one more random addition to an already ridiculous mishmash of distortive and unwise education subsidies. It’s one more incentive for students to take on debt they can’t otherwise afford. And it misplaces human capital from productive for-profit enterprise to the black hole of the government and non-profit sector.

Iowa Form 148 already lists 32 different tax credits. The Governor thinks adding some more is the solution to Iowa’s problems. I think the credits are a big part of the problem, as they help make the Iowa tax law the complex high-rate mess that it is.

 

William Perez, How Soon Can We Begin Filing Tax Returns?

Kay Bell, Reducing your 2014 tax bill using exemptions, deductions

Jason Dinesen, H&R Block Doesn’t Really Have ACA “Specialists” On Staff. A bold charge, but a convincing one.

Peter Reilly, Can Walgreen Stance On Property Tax Hurt Income Tax Position Of 1031 Investors? Thoughts on getting too cute in analyzing the value of a real estate interest.

Leslie Book, Can IRS Change Taxpayers from Procrastinators to Payors By Drafting Letters that Make Taxpayers Feel Bad? (Procedurally Taxing). Usually people feel bad when they get a letter that says “notice of levy,” but that’s not what he’s talking about.

Robert Wood, Citizenship Renunciation Fee Hiked 422%, And You Can’t Come Back

Jack Townsend, Another UBS Depositor Sentence; Consideration of the Role of Potential Deportation

 

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David Brunori, Using the Poor for Fixing the Roads (Tax Analysts Blog):

The Michigan Legislature passed a bill that would significantly increase the state’s earned income tax credit. Some 800,000 Michigan families will see tax relief. I think that is a good thing. But the change won’t go into effect unless voters approve a sales tax increase from 6 percent to 7 percent.

I don’t share David’s enthusiasm for the EITC, but I do appreciate the absurdity of the sales tax link.

Kyle Pomerleau, Representative Van Hollen Releases New $1.2 Trillion Tax Plan.  “Unfortunately, most of Representative Van Hollen’s tax plan would move the U.S. further away from having a competitive, modern tax code.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 615. This installment covers a Tea Party group that has been waiting five years for Lois Lerner’s old office to approve their exemption application.

 

Career Corner. Age and accounting as a second career (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/7/15: Resolve to monitor your payroll taxes this year. And: searching for gray.

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

EFTPSIf you’re an employer, here’s a new year’s resolution: “I will verify that my tax payments have been made on time every payroll by logging into EFTPS.”

The customers of Riverside, California payroll service Paycare are wishing they had made and kept that resolution. From The Press Enterprise:

The co-owner of a Riverside-based payroll service, Paycare, Inc., pleaded guilty Monday to failure to pay federal payroll taxes and embezzlement from a federally-funded program, the Internal Revenue Service reported.

Scott Willsea, 56, entered the guilty plea in federal court before U.S. District Judge Manuel L. Real, according to a press release from IRS spokeswoman Linda Lowery.

Willsea allegedly prepared quarterly payroll taxes for 15 different client companies in the 2009 and 2010 tax years, including All Mission Indian Housing Authority and Of One Mind, LLC, and failed to account for or pay the full amount of tax owed to the IRS by each company.

The IRS and the states want those payroll taxes; after all, they issue refunds to the employees based on the reported withholdings, paid or not. If your payroll provider steals your payroll taxes, you have to pay them again. That can ruin a struggling business,and cripple a strong one.

That’s why employers who use a payroll service should still log onto their accounts with the Electronic Federal Tax Payroll System to verify that the payments have been made. If you do payroll taxes in-house, it’s good financial hygiene to do the same thing.

It’s also a reason for extra due diligence if you consider a “professional employer organization” to meet your payroll needs. These outfits pay your payroll taxes under their own account, and you can’t use EFTPS to monitor your payments. That can work out badly.

 

FranceflagAndrew Mitchel, A Reminder for Green Card Holders Living Outside the U.S.:

U.S. lawful permanent residents (“green card holders”) who live outside the U.S. continue to be subject to U.S. tax on their worldwide income until the green card has been revoked or has been administratively or judicially determined to have been abandoned. 

Sad and true.

 

Jason Dinesen, Sorry, But There Really Isn’t a “Gray Area” for Most Taxpayers to Push:

NEWSFLASH: for the vast majority of taxpayers, there is no gray area to be pushed.

Your income is whatever your W-2 says it is.

Your deductions are whatever they are. Mortgage, property taxes, charitable, car registration. I suppose there could be a gray area if someone is claiming employee business expenses. But even then, those expenses are not likely to end up being deductible anyway.

No matter what the H & R Block commercials say, there is no magic wand that a tax preparer can wave to make a bigger tax refund appear.

Absolutely true. And if a preparer boasts otherwise, it’s likely that there is a perfectly bad explanation.

 

20141231-1Tim Todd, Late Tax Return Precludes Bankruptcy Discharge. One more reason to file timely.

Russ Fox, Varagiannis Gets 15 Months for Tax Evasion. In Nevada, pimping is OK, but only if you pay your income taxes.

Robert D. Flach has word of ANOTHER UNTRUE TAX EMAIL making the rounds. You mean we can’t trust spam emails? Next thing you’ll tell me that people post things on Facebook that aren’t precisely true.

 

Joseph Thorndike, Planned Disasters Are Here to Stay – and Probably the Only Hope for Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog).

All in all, it seems likely that the new GOP majority will need to gin up some potent crises if they hope to get anything done over the next two years.

I would think we have plenty of crises to go around already.

 

Kay Bell, Tax reform is part of new GOP Congress’ agenda

 

David Brunori is full of wisdom today in Want Bad Tax Policy? Here’s a Blueprint (Tax Analysts Bl0g):

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee recently released his proposed budget. It illustrates a lot of what is wrong with tax policy in the states. The governor wants to raise taxes by $1.4 billion over the next two years. Conservatives may think this is terrible — and it is. But the problem is how Inslee wants to raise the new revenue. He wants to impose a 7 percent capital gains tax on a narrow band of Washington residents. Specifically, he wants to impose the tax on the earnings sales of stocks, bonds, and other assets above $25,000 for individuals and $50,000 for those filing jointly. It would affect “only” an estimated 32,000 people who live in Washington.

Keep in mind that this is a state without an income tax. Certainly not a way to encourage their population of tech millionaires to stick around.

Also:

Inslee is also proposing a new excise tax on e-cigarettes and vapor products at 95 percent of the taxable sales price. Yes, 95 percent of the taxable sales price. If the government cared about the health of the poor, it would be subsidizing e-cigarettes.

States hate the idea of losing their tobacco revenue stream.

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Andrew Lundeen, Kansas Would Have Benefited from Dynamic Scoring (Tax Policy Blog):

The tax cuts didn’t pay for themselves. Instead, they left Kansas was left with a hole in the budget. (You can read about what Kansas could have done better here and here.)

This isn’t because individual tax cuts are bad for the economy; they’re just expensive. If the governor had used dynamic scoring, he would have known this.

Iowa has a lot of room to improve its tax system, but they could always screw it up even worse.

 

Howard Gleckman offers Nine Tax Stories to Watch in 2015 (TaxVox), including this:

Tax extenders: They are, after a resurrection of two weeks, once again expired. This is tiresome to even write about, but the best bet is Congress will once again delay action on these 50-plus tax breaks until at least next fall, when the budget wars are likely to come to a head. After that, well, don’t ever bet against another short-term extension.

Yuk.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 608Peter Reilly is featured.

 

Robert Wood, Taxman Is Funny In UK, Why Not IRS? Must not be in the budget.

Career Corner. Skip the Shout Outs and Other Helpful Farewell Email Advice (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern). “Quitting your job is a part of life in public accounting. Unless you’re one of those sick, carrot-chasing freaks sticking around until partner, that is.”

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/5/15: Early year-end planning edition. And: too cold for a film credit trial?

Monday, January 5th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today “In the Blogs” visitors: the tax and AMT article is here. You may also be interested in these thoughts on when prepaying tax is unwise, even without AMT.

 

20150105-1Now that you’re done with 2014 year-end tax planning, let’s get started on 2015. Procrastination is as human as liking sugar and shiny things. It’s natural to get serious about anything right at the deadline, whether it’s homework or tax planning.

But it’s often wiser to get started early. That’s especially true when looking at contributions to tax-advantaged savings accounts. You should look to fund these as soon as you can, rather than putting them off to the last minute. The sooner you fund your 2015 IRA, your Health Savings Account, or your Section 529 education savings account, the sooner your funds are earning their return tax-free.

So if you have the funds on hand, here’s a new year’s resolution to keep today — fully fund your tax-advantaged savings accounts. Your limits for 2015:

Contributions can not exceed the amount necessary to provide for the qualified education expenses of the beneficiary. If you contribute to a 529 plan, however, be aware that there may be gift tax consequences if your contributions, plus any other gifts, to a particular beneficiary exceed $14,000 during the year.

Taxpayers filing in Iowa can deduct their contributions to the College Savings Iowa Section 529 plan up to $3,163 per beneficiary, per donor on their Iowa income tax return. A married couple funding plans for their two children can therefore deduct up to $12,652 in 2015 CSI contributions.

 

Enjoying a short Des Moines winter commute.

Too cold for a film tax credit trial? A strange development in the Iowa Film Credit scandal, reported by the Des Moines Register:

A new fraud trial for a Nebraska filmmaker accused of using a fake purchase agreement to get tax credits should be delayed because two elderly witnesses have left Iowa for the winter, according to a prosecutor handling the case.

Yes, it’s cold here. We’re supposed to get a snowstorm today, and it’s supposed to be 1 on Wednesday. For a high temperature. And I can’t say I have a great deal of sympathy for somebody who got millions in tax credit money.

But a criminal trial is serious business, and the film scandal has been going since 2009. The prosecution says the witness is worried that he might fall. I think arrangements can be made to get him safely from the car.

What’s the case about?

Dennis Brouse, 64, has been waiting for a second trial after judges on the Iowa Court of Appeals overturned a felony fraud conviction against him in April. Brouse’s company, Changing Horses Productions, received $9 million in tax credits from Iowa’s scandal-ridden film tax credit program.

Brouse faces a single fraud charge and potentially a prison sentence, stemming from the purchase of a 38-foot camper trailer he bought from Prole couple Wayne and Shirley Weese. Prosecutors say Brouse paid the couple $10,500 in cash for the trailer, but he claimed it cost twice that amount in a statement for tax credits given to the Iowa Film Office.

The state auditor’s report on the Iowa Film Office showed a lot of creative accounting for Changing Horses, including the claim of a $1 million expense for non-cash “sponsorship” considerations. I am guessing that they are going after the trailer case because there are e-mails from the Iowa Department of Revenue blessing the “in-kind” expense concept. I’m pretty sure that there is no such endorsement of doubling expenditures.

 

Roger McEowen, Top 10 Agricultural Law and Taxation Developments of 2014 (ISU-CALT). The impact of Obamacare is #1.

20121120-2Alan Cole rings in the new year with New Year, New Individual Mandate Penalty and New Year, New Employer Mandate (Tax Policy Blog). What new individual mandate penalty?

However, it’s also worth remembering that the penalty will be doubled (or more than doubled) for 2015. 2014’s penalty is $95 or 1% of your household income, whichever is higher. 2015’s penalty is $325 or 2% of your household income, whichever comes higher.

And the employer mandate? It’s the penalty on taxpayers with 100 or more “full-time equivalent” employees. A blog post can’t really do it justice:

The IRS has issued a truly epic 56-question FAQ to help explain the even-more-epic final regulations for the employer shared responsibility provision. In case you are wondering, those final regulations total to over seventy thousand words – similar in size to the novel Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.

It will get more epic if the Supreme Court rules that the individual tax credit only applies in the 14 states that have established their own ACA exchanges. The employer mandate only applies if an employee has qualified for the credit, and the individual mandate penalty will not apply to taxpayers whose insurance becomes “unaffordable” if the credits go away.

 

Robert Wood, Think Filing Taxes Was Tough Before Obamacare? Just Wait. “This year for the first time, the Affordable Care Act has created a trickier tax season. It is more expensive too, as virtually all Americans filing tax returns will have to consider the law’s impact on them and their taxes.”

Annette Nellen, ACA – Affordability of health insurance and age

William Perez, Directory of tax extensions for each state

Russ Fox, 1099 Time (2015 Version). “It’s time for businesses to send out their annual information returns.”

 

Kay Bell, Cigarettes are a bigger state tax target than booze. I think that explains the hostility of state governments to e-cigs.

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About EAs, #4: The SEE Isn’t a Tax Prep Exam

Peter Reilly, IRS Revokes Exempt Status Of Faux Veterans Groups

 

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Renu Zaretsky, Cap and Trade Plans, Tax Deadlines, and Rate Drops. The TaxVox headline roundup covers gas taxes, dynamic scoring, and an insane plan in Washington state for a state-only “cap and trade” carbon program.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 606

News from the Profession: Celebrate the New Year with Accounting Salaries Charted by Company Type, Role, Service Line and More (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/31/14: Last minute tax moves: losses, gifts, and… weddings? Timing is everything!

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140608_2So.  2014 is down to its last few hours. What can we do today to make April 15, 2015 a little happier? Well, maybe less bad. It’s asking too much of one day to fix a year’s worth of tax problems, but today might still make a difference. A few things you can do yet today:

– Sell stocks at a loss to offset capital gains. It’s the trade date that counts in determining when a loss is incurred (except on a short sale). That means if you have incurred capital gains in 2014, you can sell loss stocks today and reduce your taxable gains for the year. Most individuals can deduct capital losses on a 1040 to the extent of your gains, plus $3,000. To the extent you fail to offset capital gains with the losses sitting in your portfolio, you are paying taxes voluntarilyJust make sure you make the trade in a taxable account and don’t repurchase the losers for 30 days.

– Consider making your state 4th quarter estimated tax payment today (and your federal payment, if you are an Iowan). Don’t do this rashly, as alternative minimum tax can make this a bad move for some taxpayers. Also, time value considerations can make this a bad move. But in the right circumstances, you can save a lot in April by getting your payment in the mail today.

- Make a charitable gift today, if you are so inclined. Gifts (and other deductions) paid with a credit card today are deductible, even if the credit card isn’t paid off until next year. Checks postmarked today are deductible this year. If you don’t know where to make your gifts, I have some suggestions; if you don’t like those, TaxGrrrl has some others.

- And if you are fanatical about tax planning, and someone else, you can change your marital status today. Your marital status on December 31 is your status for the whole year, as far as the IRS is concerned. But if you are seriously considering this, you definitely need to bring someone else into the discussion.

 

20120511-2A Tax Court Case yesterday shows how important year-end timing can beA Minnesota couple paid $2,150.85 of community college tuition for their daughter’s Spring 2011 semester on December 28, 2010. That normally would have qualified for an American Opportunity Tax Credit of about $2,037 — a dollar-for-dollar reduction fo their 2011 taxes. But they were four days too soon.

Tax Court Judge Marvel explains (my emphasis):

Generally, the American opportunity credit is allowed only when payment is made in the same year that the academic period begins. Sec. 1.25A-5(e)(1), Income Tax Regs. For cash method taxpayers, such as petitioners, qualified education expenses are treated as paid in the year in which the expenses are actually paid.

Because the semester didn’t begin until 2011, the 2010 payment didn’t count. Judge Marvel explains that close isn’t close enough:

We realize that the statutory requirements may seem to work a harsh result in a case such as this where a four-day delay in making the December 28, 2010, payment would have engendered a different result. However, the Court must apply the statute as written and follow the accompanying regulations when consistent therewith.

The Moral? When it comes to tax planning, the difference between December 31 and January 1 is one year, not one day. If timing matters, be sure to get on the right side of the line, and be sure you can document your timing. If you are mailing a big check, go Certified mail, return receipt requested, and save that postmark.

Cite: Ferm, T.C. Summ. Op. 2014-115.

 

If Iowa's income tax were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s income tax were a car, it would look like this.

Iowa rated 8th worst small business environment. The Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council has ranked the entrepreneurial environment of the 50 states. Iowa does poorly:

Iowa is the nation’s number one producer of corn. Unfortunately, it’s costly policy climate works against production from free enterprise and entrepreneurship in general. Iowa ranks 43rd in terms of its public policy climate for entrepreneurship and small business among the 50 states, according the 2014 “Small Business Policy Index.” While Iowa’s entrepreneurs, businesses, investors and workers benefit from fairly low crime rate and a low level of government debt, there are many negatives, such as high individual capital gains taxes; very high corporate income and capital gains taxes; high unemployment taxes; and a high level of government spending.

While I think overall Iowa is better than 43rd, our awful tax environment hurts. Our system of high rates with dozens of carve-out credits for the well-advised and well-connected works great for insiders, but not so well for the rest of us. Maybe 2015 will be the year Iowa considers serious tax reform, like The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.

 

Kay Bell, Donating and deducting a car

Jack Townsend, Reasonable Doubt and Jury Nullification

Jason Dinesen lists his Top 5 Blog Posts of 2014. My favorite is his #5, Having a Side Business in Multi-Level Marketing Doesn’t Make Personal Expenses Deductible

Tony Nitti warns us of Five Traps To Avoid When Deducting Mortgage Interest

Robert D Flach shares: MY NEW YEAR’S EVE TRADITIONS: “I type W-2s and 1099s.” Don’t get too wild, Robert!

Me, IRS issues Applicable Federal Rates (AFR) for January 2015

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G. Brint Ryan, Who’s Afraid of the IRS? When Business Fights Back Against Government Overreach and Wins (Procedurally Taxing)

Annette Nellen,State taxes and bitcoin

Robert Wood, No Mickey Mouse Taxes On Jim Harbaugh’s $48M Michigan Deal And 49ers Exit. “Jim Harbaugh’s 49ers contract may be history, but his $48M Michigan deal has tax components that you might not expect.”

 

Howard Gleckman, Taxes, Charitable Gifts, the ACA, and Ineffective Deadlines (TaxVox).  “Scrambling to make a last-minute charitable donation to beat the New Year’s Eve deadline for a 2014 tax deduction? Take a deep breath and ask yourself, ‘Why am I going through this craziness now?'”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 601

 

Post-sequester commuting.

Not excited about all the wild New Years Eve hoopla? Maybe you prefer a more low-key celebration, like the one Robert D. Flach relates in MY NEW YEAR’S EVE TRADITIONS:

Every year during the day on New Year’s Eve I do the same thing I do during the day on Christmas Eve – I type W-2s and 1099s.

Live it up, Robert!

 

And Happy New Year to all of you Tax Update readers! This is it for 2014 here.  See you next week, and next year.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/24/14: Giving season edition! How to give, avoiding traps, and suggestions for the perplexed.

Wednesday, December 24th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

The extender bill was signed while I was away, as you have probably figured out already. While the extenders remain awful policy, at least we go into the year-end knowing what the tax law is. We should be grateful for our presents; even a lump of coal can help keep us warm.

Related: Kristine Tidgren, Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014 Revives Tax Breaks, But Only for 2014Paul Neiffer, It’s Official.

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Tax tips for the giving seasonAs the business week winds down early on Christmas Eve, many taxpayers find themselves feeling generous to charity. Here are some things to keep in mind as you go about your charitable gifting

Gifts of appreciated long-term capital gain property are often the most tax-efficient. Such gifts, done properly, give you a full fair market value deduction without ever taxing you on the appreciation. If you are not gifting publicly-traded securities, however, appraisal requirements for gifts over $5,000, and just the paperwork that may be involved in transferring ownership, may make it impossible to complete such a gift this year.

Even gifts of traded securities can be hard to pull off this late in the year. You have to get the securities into the donee’s brokerage account by the close of business December 31. I’ve seen attempts to get this done fail more than once. It is especially troublesome in dealing with small or unsophisticated charities, who might not even have a brokerage account available to use.

Congress renewed the IRA break in the extender bill, but it needs to happen by December 31, and there are some restrictions. The IRS explains:

  • If you are an IRA owner age 70½ or older you have until Dec. 31 to make a qualified charitable distribution, or QCD.
  • A QCD is direct transfer of part or all of your IRA distributions to an eligible charity. You may transfer up to $100,000 per year.
  • You may exclude the distributed amounts from your income. You can claim this benefit regardless of whether you itemize your deductions. If you do exclude the QCD from your income, you can’t also deduct it as a charitable contribution on Schedule A if you do itemize.
  • You can count your QCDs in determining whether you meet the IRA’s required minimum distribution.
  • The provision had expired at the end of 2013. The new law is retroactive for 2014. This means any eligible QCD in 2014 will qualify.
  • Not all charities are eligible. For example, donor-advised funds and supporting organizations are not eligible recipients.

If you want to give cash, the “mailbox rule” applies. The postmark date controls whether a mailed check is deductible this year.  If you don’t care to take chances, a gift by credit card is deductible in the year the credit card is charged, even if the credit card bill isn’t paid until next year.

If you give any charity a gift over of $250 or more, you need to insist on a written receipt declaring that you received no value for your contribution — or disclosing the amount of any value. No receipt, no deduction.

Of course, your gift has to go to an actual charity to be deductible. The IRS list of qualified Section 501(c)(3) organizations can help you make sure your intended donee qualifies.

If you feel generous, but don’t know what to do, I humbly submit for your consideration a few worthy organizations I donate to:

salvation armySalvation ArmyThey take care of many of the most needy and down-and-out with very little leakage to internal bureaucracy.

Institute for JusticeThis organization shut down the IRS preparer regulation power grab, winning a battle all good-thinking people considered hopeless and frivolous. They made the IRS give back the money they stole from the owner of a little restaurant in Arnolds Park, Iowa while forcing a change in their abusive use of their cash account seizure powers. They also support the little guy when the government abuses its eminent domain powers on behalf of the powerful and well-connected.

Tax FoundationThese guys do wonderful work in helping to form better tax policy. While it is difficult to get politicians to make tax policy for everyone, rather than just the well-lobbied, their 2014 successes in North Carolina, Indiana, Michigan and New York show that the good guys win sometimes.

ISU Center for Agricultural Law and TaxationRoger, Kristine, Kristy and Tiffany do great work helping keep the taxpayers and tax preparers of Iowa in compliance and out of trouble. If you use them, like I do, you should help them out.

 

William PerezQualified Charitable Distributions

Peter Reilly, The Wheels On The Easement Void The Deduction

 

 

20131209-1TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 594. This edition covers the new report by the House Oversight Committee on the scandal.

There is a lot to the report, which I hope to spend more time on. The item that jumps out at me is that 2011 IRS assessments of gift taxes on contributions to 501(c)(4) organizations were no accident, but were instead part of the IRS effort to fight conservative 501(c)(4) organizations.  The Wall Street Journal reports:

The then-IRS commissioner, Doug Shulman, denied at the time that the IRS was making a broad effort to assess gift tax on donors to such tax-exempt groups, which are formed under section 501(c)(4) of the tax code. Mr. Shulman said in a May 2011 letter to lawmakers that the audits were initiated by a single IRS employee and were “not part of any broader effort to look at donations” to these organizations.

The new report from GOP lawmakers says that “although the IRS denied any broader attempt to tax gifts to 501(c)(4) groups, “internal documents suggest otherwise.” It notes that in May 2011, an attorney in the IRS chief counsel’s office wrote to his superiors that the “plan is to elevate the issue of asserting gift tax on donors to 501(c)(4) organizations,” and seek a decision from the commissioner and the IRS chief counsel.

It’s clear that Shulman at best didn’t care enough to learn the truth before testifying. At worst he gave false information on purpose. Either answer burnishes his crown as Worst Commissioner Ever.

Related: Can political contributions really be taxable gifts?

 

Grimm tidings. A Congressman pleads guilty to tax fraud involving a restaurant he owned. From the New York Times:

Michael G. Grimm, the Republican representing New York’s 11th Congressional District, who carried the burden of a 20-count federal indictment to a landslide re-election in November, pleaded guilty on Tuesday to a single felony charge of tax fraud.

Representative Grimm said he had no intention of stepping down. “Absolutely not,” he said.

My limited experience with felons is that they are cursed with grossly excessive self-esteem. That certainly seems to be the case here.

 

20141201-1Robert D. Flach brings the Holiday Buzz! Good tax stuff from around the tax blogs just in time for Christmas.

Kay Bell, Christmas tree ‘tax’ delayed again. Effort to end it continues

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: Tax Court: Vacant House Can Still Qualify as Rental

Robert Goulder, The Vatican Bank, Christmas Cheer, and FATCA (Tax Analysts Blog). “The pontiff is cool with tax transparency.”

Tony Nitti, IRS To Sell The Right To Collect Darryl Strawberry’s Remaining New York Mets Salary.

Russ Fox, Nominations Due for 2014 Tax Offender of the Year

 

Amy Frantz, How the Grinch Taxed Your Christmas Candy in Iowa (Caffeinated Thoughts)

Howard Gleckman, The Tax Vox Lump of Coal Awards: The 10 Worst Tax Ideas of 2014 (TaxVox). My list would differ, but there are so many worthy ideas from which to choose.

Career Corner. Be Social, Don’t Skip the Party, and Other Redundant Holiday Party Advice (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/18/14: Year-end planning and relatives. And: when will the President sign the extenders?

Thursday, December 18th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

When will he sign? Now that Congress has finally sent the extender Bill, HR 5771, to the President, the “expired provisions” require only his signature. When will that happen? I have no idea. There is nothing at Whitehouse.gov about it. But everyone says he’ll sign. It would be the practical joke of the year if he didn’t.

 


IMG_1944Beware t
he relative! The tax law generally assumes that when related parties do business together, they’re up to no good somehow. That’s why the law has so many provisions that deny or delay tax benefits when relatives are involved.

For example, Code Section 267 only allows a deduction to a related party “as of the day as of which such amount is includible in the gross income of the person to whom the payment is made.” That’s no problem if the “related party” is on the accrual method, because they will be accruing the income at the same time you accrue the expense. But if the related party is a cash-basis taxpayer, you have to pay this year to get a deduction this year.

But who is related? It’s more complicated than you might think. For purposes of year-end deductions,  owners of more than 50% of C corporation stock, and their families (siblings, spouses, ancestors and descendants) are related.  Families are usually considered as a single owner for the 50% test.

For pass-through entities — partnerships and S corporations — any owner is a related party, along with members of owners families and anybody related to the family members.

 

Seventh Avenue, Des Moines, this morning.William Perez, Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014. “A quick summary of the tax changes included in the Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014.”

Kay Bell, Tax filing projections for the 2015 season and beyond

Peter Reilly looks back on his idiosyncratic tax coverage this year. Everything from atheist parsonages to Dr. Dino. Peter covers a lot of stuff that I wish I did, in a lot more depth than I could.

Jason Dinesen, A Brief History of Marriage in the Tax Code: Part 1, In the Beginning

Robert D. Flach, THERE ARE A LOT MORE THAN 20 REALLY STUPID THINGS IN THE US TAX CODE! “The one and only purpose of the federal income tax is to raise the money necessary to run the government. Period.”

Me, Year-end business deductions: the two-minute drill. My new post at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record’s Business Professionals’ Blog. “While you add up the score in April, December is when you run the two-minute drill.”

 

20130419-1Robert Wood, 8 Savvy Tax Tips & Extenders For Year-End

Tim Todd, 5th Cir. Affirms IRS’s Adjustment Outside Limitations Period for Improper Installment Sale of Partnership Interest.

Keith Fogg, Collection Due Process Determination and Decision Letters Redux (Procedurally Taxing)

Jack Townsend, Plea in Corporate Corruption Case with Tax Charge. Kickbacks kick back.

Gavin Ekins, The IRS’s Long Reach Doesn’t Just Apply to Corporations (Tax Policy Blog). The post describes some of the ridiculous hoops Americans abroad have to jump through to comply with the tax law, and observes:

Are Americans alone in this onerous system? Unfortunately, they are. Only one other country taxes its citizens is this manner. Eritrea, the small country on the northern border of Ethiopia, is the only other country which taxes its citizens who live and work abroad, but unlike the U.S., they have a reduced flat rate for those citizens and none of the reporting burden.  

The results range from annoyance to financial disaster for the absurd crime of committing personal finance while abroad.

Renu Zaretsky, They Saved the Must-Pass for Last. The TaxVox headline roundup provides a good summary of the passage of the extender bill; it also talks about state gas tax moves.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 588

 

20141218-1Cara Griffith, A Champion for Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog). “New York enacted a comprehensive tax reform package designed to improve the competitiveness of the state’s tax code by merging the bank tax into the corporate franchise tax, adopting single-sales-factor apportionment with market-based sourcing, broadening the corporate tax base, and lowering the rate.”

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown 12/10: The Best Laid Plans (and Reports) (Tax Justice Blog)

 

Daniel Shaviro,  Evaluating the Case for 1986-Style Corporate Tax Reform, (TaxAnalysts, available via the TaxProf)

 

Career Corner. My Firm Holiday Party is a Teaching Moment For What Not to Do at a Firm Holiday Party (Leona May, Going Concern)

 

News from the Profession. Former Stillwater mayor charged with aiding tax fraud (MPRnews.org):

A former mayor of Stillwater was charged in federal court Wednesday with helping two Minnesota brothers keep millions of dollars in taxes from the state and federal governments.

Ken Harycki, a certified public accountant, knowingly prepared false tax forms for twin brothers Thurlee and Roylee Belfrey and their health care companies, according to charges filed in U.S. District Court.

CPAs, you must only use your powers for good.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/16/14: Extenders as dessert after the Senate eats its peas.

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Flickr image courtesy seriousbri under Creative Commons license.

Flickr image courtesy seriousbri under Creative Commons license.

It appears that the extenders will be served up to the Senate only when the Senators clean their plates. The Hill reports (my emphasis):

Once they are out of the way, Senate aides expect an agreement to confirm Obama’s other pending nominees by midweek.

That would speed up final votes on a package extending a variety of lapsed tax breaks and on the stalled Terrorism Risk Insurance Act.

Senate aides say a one-year extension of expired tax breaks will be one of the last items to move because it has strong support on both sides of the aisle and gives lawmakers incentive to stay in town to complete other work. They predict it will pass quickly once put on the schedule.

So lingering uncertainty about the tax law for taxpayers and advisors is the price we have to pay for the Senate to do its job. Glad to help, guys!

 

If Iowa's income tax were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s income tax were a car, it would look like this.

Joseph Henchman, A Big Year for State Tax Reform, and Congrats to COST! (Tax Policy Blog):

All groups who work on state tax reform should feel proud of the accomplishments of 2014. North Carolina simplified and reduced its whole system, Indiana and Michigan cut investment taxes, New York reformed its entire corporate tax system, and even Rhode Island and the District of Columbia enacted tax reductions. Additionally, voters defeated tax increase proposals in Colorado and Nevada, and in the spring a big tax increase proposal in Illinois failed. Maine raised its sales tax, the only tax increase at the state level in 2014.

Iowa is painfully absent from this list, and it needs tax reform as much as any place.

 

buzz20140923Robert D. Flach offers your Tuesday Buzz, with links from all over.

William Perez explains How to Make Sure Your Charity Donation Is Tax-Deductible

Jason Dinesen, Changing the Way I Work with Business Clients. “For all entities, I now require some sort of year-round relationship.”

Keith Fogg, Bankruptcy Court Grants IRS Equitable Tolling and Denies Discharge on Late Return (Procedurally Taxing).

Peter Reilly, Tom Coburn Tax Decoder Takes On Clergy Tax Abuse. “Senator Tom Coburn has served as a deacon in a Southern Baptist church but that has not prevented him from taking a blast at a tax break that benefits the Southern Baptist Convention mightily.”

Kay Bell, Congress’ job rating improves! But just by 1 percentage point.

David Henderson, Deadweight Loss from the New California Gas Tax. Rather than using the money for roads, it goes into a big hole high-speed rail.

 

Martin Sullivan, Will Orrin Hatch Lead on Tax Reform? (Tax Analysts Blog). “. If — as Hatch writes in the preface to the report — “reform is vital and necessary to our nation’s economic well-being”– should he not also go beyond publishing reports and principles and write a real bill?”

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 586

 

When there are so many worthy nominees, it’s hard to pick only twenty. 20 Really Stupid Things In The U.S. Tax Code (Robert Wood) I still think the Section 409A deferred comp rules and everything Obamacare should head any such list.

News from the Profession. The Office of the Future Looks Kind of Like a Homeless Encampment Under a Bridge (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/15/14: Is today the day the expired provisions arise? And: Ames Day!

Monday, December 15th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Hey, calendar-year corporations and foundations, your fourth quarter estimates are due today.

lazarus risingCromnibus passes. Extenders today? The monstrous $1.1 trillion ($1,100,000,000,000) government funding bill that had been holding up passage of the one-year “extender” bill finally cleared the Senate over the weekend. We might see the Lazarus provisions rise again as early as today. The 55 provisions that expired at the end of 2013, and which HR 5771 would retroactively extend through the end of this month, include the $500,000 Section 179 limit, 50% bonus depreciation, and the research credit. The bill would also extend the five-year built-in gain tax recognition period and the rule allowing IRAs to contribute to charity.

I’ll be following developments and post if the bill clears today.

Update, 10:54: This from The Hill makes it look like nothing happens on the extenders before late tonight.

 

Ames! Today is the final session of this year’s Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School. We expect over 300 attendees here at the conference and another 80 webinar attendees.  I always learn a lot from teaching and hearing from the attendees. Thanks to everyone who attended.

 

Kay Bell, Cutting IRS budget is a bad idea for taxpayers, U.S. Treasury.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

Kay is correct. Congress continues to pile more policy into the tax law. The IRS has become a superagency with a portfolio covering everything from industrial policy to historic preservation to running the national health care finance system. Oh, and it’s supposed to collect the revenue to finance the government, too.

Unfortunately, with great power comes great responsibility. The IRS has been abusing the power and scurrying away from the responsibility. The new Commissioner has forfeited any goodwill he had by stonewalling Congressional investigators in the Tea Party scandal. He insisted to Congress that the agency had exhaustively tried to retrieve the missing Lerner e-mails, only to have them turn up on backup tapes.

Also, the IRS undercuts its claims of poverty when it spends on things like the “voluntary” preparer initiative to sneak in the preparer-regulation scheme that the courts have barred.

It’s hardly a surprise that Congress isn’t eager to fund a rogue agency with an untrustworthy leader. Until a new Commissioner can restore trust, IRS will continue to struggle to get funding.

 

20121217-1Robert D. Flach, THE RETURN OF THE GAO UNDERCOVER OPERATION:

In 2006 the Government Accountability Office (GAO) sent undercover operatives to 19 “commercial preparer” branch offices in a major metropolitan area posing as taxpayers looking to have their tax returns prepared. Errors were identified in 19 of the 19 completed federal returns, some “significant”.

As complicated as the tax law has gotten, this is no surprise, and it’s gotten a lot worse since 2006.

Tony Nitti, The Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2014: #3-Aragona Trust Changes The Way We Look At Real Estate Professionals.   This case is a big deal, and it definitely changes the landscape of trusts under the new 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax.

Robert Wood, IRS Can Audit For Three Years, Six….Or Forever. “Anyone who is hiding income or assets from the taxman should consider how long they need to be looking over their shoulder.

William Perez, What You Need to Know About the Penalty for Not Having Health Insurance

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About EAs, #3: Two Ways to the EA. One requires working for the IRS.

Leslie Book, CDP and Installment Agreements: Sometimes Court Review is Crucial; Other Times Not So Much. “This past week the Tax Court issued an opinion in a collection due process (CDP) case, Hosie v Commissioner. The case is a bad case for those who support CDP.”

Tim Todd, Tax Court Not Limited to Administrative Record in Plan Revocation Action

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 585.

Peter Reilly, Did You Hear The One About Lois Lerner Walking Into A Bar?

Elaine Maag, Will Immigrants Get A Tax Windfall From Refundable Credits? (TaxVox)

Alan Cole, The Problem with Free Stuff (Tax Policy Blog):

If you see a promotion for something like 7-Eleven’s Free Slurpee Day, you always end up having to temper your excitement when you realize that you’ll inevitably be waiting in line with the many others who want to enjoy the same treat. This is an unfortunate fact of life, the sort of thing we all reluctantly come to grips with by the time we turn twelve or so.

What puzzles me, then, is why we so often forget that fact of life when we’re sitting in traffic.

Roads are very much like free Slurpees. While roads are certainly not free to construct (much like a Slurpee isn’t free to make) using a road involves relatively little in the way of a user fee.

I’ve driven in Slurpee-like conditions. Good tires are a must.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/12/14: Extenders by tomorrow? Don’t count on it.

Friday, December 12th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

IMG_2491They filed an extension.  Congress avoided a “shutdown” of the government blast night by passing a bill to fund the government for two more days. That presumably gives the Senate time to pass the “Cromnibus” train wreck to fund most of the leviathan for the rest of the fiscal year. Now it looks like they might wrap it up by Monday.

The Hill reports that Outgoing Majority Leader Harry Reid will have the Senate take up the one-year tax extender bill as soon as the spending bill passes:

“We’ll take up the long-term spending bill tomorrow,” Reid said on the floor shortly before 10 pm Thursday. “Senators will want to debate this legislation. We’ll have that opportunity. The Senate will vote on the long-term funding bill as soon as possible.”

The omnibus will have to wait, however, until the Senate casts a final vote on the annual Defense Department authorization bill, which may take place as late as 4:30 p.m. Friday.

Reid hopes to pass the omnibus on Friday or Saturday and then move immediately to a one-year extension of various expired tax provisions.

The expired provisions would be revived by HR 5771. The bill retroactively extends the $500,000 Section 179 deduction, 50% bonus depreciation, the R&D credit, and the 5-year S corporation built-in gain recognition period through the end of this month. It also extends the IRA charitable contribution break and the non-business energy credits, among many other things.

There is a chance this could drag out until Monday, according to The Hill:

Reid will need to get unanimous consent to stick to his plan to finish work by Saturday. If any of his colleagues object to moving the omnibus quickly, a final vote on it could be delayed until Monday. 

Given the strong dislike of the bill from parts of each party, that’s a real possibility.

Related: Paul Neiffer, Tax Extender Bill May Be Punted to WeekendRenu Zaretsky (TaxVox),  Everybody’s Working for the Weekend.

 

Scott Drenkard and Richard Borean offer a map of Corporate Alternative Minimum Taxes by State, as of July 1, 2014 (Tax Policy Blog):

state corp amt map

Iowa has one. It adds a lot of complexity and very little revenue. Sort of like the Iowa corporation income tax itself.

 

William Perez offers some Year End Tax Planning Ideas for Self Employed Persons

Annette Nellen discusses Filing status challenges and developments

Robert D. Flach brings a “meaty” Friday Buzz, including a discussion of which states are the most corrupt. The “winner” may surprise you.

Keith Fogg, Bankruptcy’s Bar to Filing a Tax Court Petition

Peter Reilly, With Amazon Facing $1.5 Billion Income Tax Bill, Bezos Too Busy To Testify.

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About EAs, #3: Two Ways to the EA

Breandan Donahue, Top Six Year-End Estate Planning Tips (ISU-CALT)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 582

Richard Phillips, Cutting the IRS Budget is a Lose-Lose for American Taxpayers (Tax Justice Blog)

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Kay Bell, Tax reform bill finally introduced in Congress’ waning days. If its going to pass never, it doesn’t hurt to start it late.

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Tax Roundup, 12/10/14: Extender bill lives, permanent charitable extender bill doesn’t. And: don’t just buy it; install it!

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

lizard20140826Whither the extender bill? HR 5771, the bill to extend retroactively through the end of this month the 55 or so tax breaks that expired at the end of 2013, has been “placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar.” That means it appears to be proceeding to a vote, though I find nothing on when that will happen. Tax Analysts reports ($link) that outgoing Senate Majority Leader Reid says he will take up the extender bill ” after finishing work on a defense authorization bill and a government funding measure.”

Meanwhile, the President has threatened to veto a separate attempt to permanently extend three charitable breaks in the extender bill, including the break for IRA contributions. While that’s bad for those breaks, it implies that the White House will not oppose HR 5771’s one-year extension.

 

20130422-2Because it looks as though the “extender” bill will clear the Senate, taxpayers looking to add fixed assets have extra incentive to get it done this year. The bill extends through 2014 — and only through 2014 — the $500,000 limit on Section 179 deductions and 50% bonus depreciation. These breaks allow taxpayers to deduct over half (bonus depreciation) or all (Section 179) of the cost of fixed assets that are otherwise capitalized, with their deductions spread over 3 to 20 years.

Taxpayers should remember that it’s not enough to order or pay for a new asset by the end of 2014 to qualify for these breaks. The asset has to be “placed in service” by year end.

A Tax Court case from last December drives home the point, where a taxpayer lost an $11 million bonus depreciation deduction in 2003 because an asset bought at year-end wasn’t “placed in service” on time.  Judge Holmes takes up the story:

On December 30, 2003, an insurance salesman named Michael Brown1 took ownership of a $22 million plane in Portland, Oregon. He flew from there to Seattle to Chicago — he says for business meetings — and then back to Portland. Brown says these flights put the plane in service in 2003, and entitle him to a giant bonus-depreciation allowance. But a few days later he had the plane flown to a plant in Illinois where it underwent additional modifications that were completed about a month later.

The IRS argued that the need for modifications meant the airplane wasn’t “placed in service” before year end. The taxpayer argued that the airplane was “fully functional” as purchased, and therefore was “placed in service” when acquired and used for its first flight on December 30, 2003. The court agreed with the IRS:

While acknowledging in his briefs that those modifications made the Challenger “more valuable to him” and allowed him to “more comfortably conduct business” as a passenger, he says they have “nothing to do with the Challenger’s assigned function of transporting him for his business.” The problem is that this posttrial framing just doesn’t square with the trial testimony, in which Brown testified that those two modifications were “needed” and “required”. We therefore find that the Challenger simply was not available for its intended use on a regular basis until those modifications were installed in 2004. Brown thus didn’t place the Challenger in service in 2003 and can’t take bonus depreciation on it that year.

A new asset doesn’t actually have to be used during the year to be “placed in service,” but it has to be ready to go. A new machine should be on the floor and hooked up, not just in a crate on the dock, or in a trailer on the way in, if you want to depreciate it. If the new asset is a vehicle, you need to take delivery to get the deduction. If the asset is a farm building, it needs to be assembled and in place, not in boxes on the ground.

Cite: Brown, T.C. Memo 2013-275

 

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The TaxProf reports on a new Treasury Inspector General report, TIGTA: IRS Has 25-30% Error Rate In Refundable Child Tax Credits, Mistakenly Pays $6-7 Billion:

The IRS has continually rated the risk of improper ACTC payments as low. However, TIGTA’s assessment of the potential for ACTC improper payments indicates the ACTC improper payment rate is similar to that of the EITC. Using IRS data, TIGTA estimates the potential ACTC improper payment rate for Fiscal Year 2013 is between 25.2 percent and 30.5 percent, with potential ACTC improper payments totaling between $5.9 billion and $7.1 billion. In addition, IRS enforcement data show the root causes of improper ACTC payments are similar to those of the EITC.

So at least 1/4 of the credit is claimed fraudulently or illegally. This is one of the provisions the President insists be made permanent as a price for permanently extending business provisions. He killed the permanent extender compromise when it didn’t also make the child credit permanent.

 

Wind turbineIowa Public Radio reports Grassley Wants Wind Tax Credit to Go Further. He should read Bryan Caplan’s review, The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels: We Owe Civilization to Fossil Fuels. “And despite decades of government favoritism, alternative fuels have yet to deliver.”

 

Peter Reilly, Seventh Circuit Will Not Let Tax Protester Blame His Lawyer For Conviction:

James Stuart thought that Peter Hendrickson had “cracked the code” – the Internal Revenue Code, that is. Joe Kristan would characterize it as finding the tax fairy – that magical sprite who make your taxes go away painlessly while your sucker friends send checks to the tax man.   

It’s always fun to be named-checked by a Forbes blogger.

Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Tax Tips for Gifts to Charity (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).

Robert D. Flach, DONOR ADVISED FUNDS. For at least 99.99% of taxpayers, these are far better than setting up a private foundation.

Kay Bell, Sen. Tom Coburn’s parting gift: a tax code decoder

Paul Neiffer, Watch Your Crop Insurance Form 1099s This Year

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About EAs, #2: We Don’t Work for the IRS

Brad Ridlehoover, The Grinch That Stole Their Reasonable Cause… (Procedurally Taxing)

Tim Todd, IRS Erred in Making Notice of Tax Lien a Condition to Installment Agreement

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 580. Lois Lerner appears to have been scheming to sic the Justice Department on the Tea Partiers as early as 2010, according to newly-unearthed e-mails.

 

Howard Gleckman asks Why Does Congress Pay For Some Tax Cuts and Not Others? (TaxVox). “It can’t be the merits of the recipients. By now, TaxVox readers know that the expired tax breaks included such worthies as preferences for race horse owners, Puerto Rican rum manufacturers, and TV and film producers.”

Eric Cederwall asks What is the Simplest Tax System? (Tax Policy Blog). “Normative economics aside, a per-person tax is one of the most economically efficient taxes for raising revenue.”  Not happening, though.

 

Adrienne Gonzalez, Kids These Days Trust the IRS More Than Olds Do (Going Concern). Like Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy, they’ll figure it out eventually.

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Tax Roundup, 12/4/14: House passes extenders; Senate alternative appears dead. And: Gas tax fever!

Thursday, December 4th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today visitors: Click here for the Lincoln year-end planning link.

lazarus risingHouse passes extenders; Senate action not yet slated. The House of Representatives yesterday revived the Lazarus provisions of the tax law, passing HR 5771 on a 378-46 vote.

The bill now moves to the Senate, which has not yet scheduled a vote. The Hill reports that Senate Democrats have given up on promoting a competing bill, which probably means they will go along with the House bill. While the President has not said he would sign the House bill, he hasn’t threatened a veto; that probably means he will go along.

The expired tax provisions revived by the bill include the $500,000 Section 179 limit, 50% bonus depreciation, the research credit, and the five-year built-in gain period for S corporations. They also include crony subsidies like energy production credits and accelerated depreciation for racetracks. A compromise plan to extend some of the provisions permanently collapsed when the President threatened to veto it.

The house-passed bill only extends the tax breaks that expired at the end of last year through the end of this month. That means the new Congress will have to do this again in 2015. Let’s hope they get an earlier start than they did this year.

Related:

Wall Street Journal, House Approves Temporary Tax Breaks

Accounting Today, House Passes $42 Billion Plan to Revive U.S. Tax Breaks for 2014

 

If Iowa's income tax were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s income tax were a car, it would look like this.

Gas Tax Fever! The Greater Des Moines Partnership unveiled its legislative agenda yesterday. While it has a few good ideas, like reviewing Iowa’s pension plans for soundness, its priorities are crony-capitalist items like support for economic development tax credits and “public-private partnerships.” Its weak tax reform plank supports the Alternative Maximum Tax, which would allow individuals to choose an optional low-rate, broad base system. You’ll look in vain for anything specific to improve Iowa’s bottom-ten business tax climate — just a general call for lower rates. That may be because many large corporations have learned to use Iowa’s rats nest of special interest breaks and crony tax credits to their advantage.

The agenda also includes support for an increase in the gas tax to fund road projects.  That plank has some policy logic behind it, but it also is a tough sell. Caffeinated Thoughts reports that Iowans for Tax Relief has already come out against it. ITR opposition makes it hard for many GOP legislators to support the increase. Maybe that’s why the Sioux City Journal is reporting “Iowa legislative leaders murky on gas tax increase

 

Robert D. Flach, IT AIN’T NECESSARILY SO – H&R BLOCK CEO ALLEGEDLY CARES ABOUT EFFICIENT AND EFFECTIVE TAX ADMINISTRATION. “Here is what is a good idea for proper efficient and effective tax administration – remove the Earned Income Credit, and all other government social welfare and other benefit programs, from the Tax Code.” Amen, Brother Robert.

 

Jason Dinesen, who is a pioneer in the taxation of same-sex married couples, offers A Brief History of Marriage in the Tax Code: Introduction

Paul Neiffer, Irrigation Systems – Is that 7 or 15 Years?  Depends on whether it’s buried.

Tony Nitti, Sorry Mr. Ryan, But Corporate-Only Tax Reform Doesn’t Work. Somebody tell the President.

Kay Bell, Spend down your flexible spending account by Dec. 31

Jeff Stimpson, In the Blogs: Start Your Engines (Accounting Today)

 

Mark J. PerryTop 400 taxpayers paid almost as much in federal income taxes in 2010 as the entire bottom 50%:

top 400 bottom 50

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 574.  Yes, there are thousands of e-mails that may show the IRS improperly accessed confidential taxpayer records. Releasing them might violate taxpayer confidentiality, so they stay secret. How convenient.

The return confidentiality rules should be amended so that those abusing them can’t also hide behind them.

20140729-1Alan Cole, Bonus Depreciation is a Step Towards Fair Tax Accounting (Tax Policy Blog).

Elaine Maag, Why the More Generous Child and Earned Income Tax Credits Should Be Made Permanent (TaxVox). Because we like having 20% of it wasted or stolen?

Tax Justice Blog, Dave Camp’s Reform Plan Should Not Be the Starting Point for the Tax Debate.

 

Cara Griffith, Transparency Concerns Linger in Washington State (Tax Analysts Blog) Cockroaches and administrators tend to prefer darkness.

 

Career Corner. Protip for Future CPAs: Forging Signatures on Your Work Experience Form is Dumb (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/2/14: Dead provisions to arise for just a few weeks? And: Shocker! IRS Commissioner wants more $$$

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

lazarus risingCongress to let the Lazarus provisions make it to the end of 2014? The White House’s threat to veto the Senate’s deal to permanently extend some of the perennially expiring tax provisions has killed that proposal. Now it looks like Congress will take up a bill to extend the provisions, which expired at the end of 2013, through the end of this year. That means we get to do this all over again next year. The Hill reports:

The vote on a short-term extension, expected as soon as this week, would come after a veto threat from President Obama derailed a developing $400 billion deal between Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and House Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp (R-Mich.) that would have extended some expired tax breaks indefinitely, as well as others for two years.

Republicans on both side of the Capitol suggested the move showed that a one-year deal was the only proposal with a chance of becoming law.

The article says “practically all” of the provisions that expired at the end of 2013 will be included. The Lazarus provisions that will come back to life include, among many others:

– A $500,000 Section 179 deduction for asset purchases that would otherwise be capitalized and depreciated.

– 50% “bonus depreciation”

– The research credit

– The five-year built-in gain period.

– The allowance of tax-free distributions from IRAs to charities.

The full text of the bill is available here: (HR 5771)

So we will get a 2014 tax law just as 2014 comes to an end. Because there is no election, there is hope that we won’t have to wait until December 2015 to know what the tax law is for 2015. Not exactly a shining moment in tax policy.

The bill also includes technical corrections for tax bills going back to 2004.

Related:

How the White House torpedoed Harry Reid’s tax deal (The Hill)

The Politics and Policy of Tax Extenders (Len Burman, TaxVox). “In theory, allowing tax provisions to expire periodically could precipitate a careful reexamination of the effectiveness of each program in light of our fiscal situation and priorities. In practice, the expiration of popular temporary provisions such as the R&E credit creates a vehicle for all sorts of budget-busting mischief.”

 

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

TaxGrrrl has posted another installment of her interview with IRS Commissioner KoskinenYou may not be astounded to hear that he wants more money:

With spending cuts already taking a toll on taxpayer services, the agency is bracing itself for another tough season. In fact, Koskinen cites funding the IRS as his biggest challenge since taking office last December.

“It’s a serious problem for us,” he says. “I don’t know who got our $500 million but I’ll bet they’re not gonna give you back the $2-3 billion we would have if we had it.”

Given that the Congress has used the tax law as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy, with responsibilities including attempting to run the broken Obamacare machine, it’s not unreasonable to think IRS has increased needs for funds.

That said, the Commissioner has nobody to blame but himself. His tone-deaf and confrontational tone with Republicans investigating the political abuse of the Exempt Organizations function has earned him no friends in the party that controls the purse strings. The sudden appearance of 30,000 Lois Lerner e-mails that he insisted could not be recovered killed any credibility he had left. Only a new commissioner has any hope of turning that around.

The Commissioner also says he has cut spending to the bone:

The agency is already down 3,000 employees last year. Another 2,000-3,000 are on their way out by the end of this year. The current rate of replacement is one new employee for every five employees who leave… 
What gets cut next? The Commissioner is clear that it will be more personnel. That is, he noted, all that’s left.

Well, maybe. I’d be more convinced of that if he decided there just wasn’t enough cash lying around for his “voluntary” tax preparer initiative — a blatant attempt to get around the Loving decision shutting down mandatory preparer regulation.

Related: Robert Wood, Horrible Bosses, IRS EditionPeter Reilly, Restoring Trust In IRS Is A National Imperative

 

buzz20141017Robert D. Flach has posted his fresh Tuesday Buzz, including a link to his post at The Tax Professional on tax preparer civil disobedience in ACA enforcement. I will have more to say about this topic later this week.

William Perez explains Itemized Tax Deductions

Russ Fox, Mundane Tax Fraud Downs Friend of Cicero Town President

Keith Fogg, Appeals Fumbles CDP Case and Resulting Resolution Demonstrates Power of Installment Agreement (Procedurally Taxing)

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About Enrolled Agents

Jack Townsend, More on Willfulness. You can’t break the law if you aren’t trying.

Kay Bell, December to-do list: shopping, family visits and tax tasks

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 572

Andrew Lundeen, Kyle Pomerleau, Less Than One Percent of Businesses Employ Half of the Private Sector Workforce (Tax Policy Blog). “On the other hand, while only 0.4 percent of all firms have over 500 employees, this small group of businesses employs 50.6 percent of the nation’s private sector workforce, with most of those employees working for C corporations.”

News from the Profession. This Timesheet-Addicted Managing Partner Will Make You Grateful Not to Work For Him (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern). A charming threat of dismissal issued the day before Thanksgiving will always make you thankful for an updated resume.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/1/14: Abe Lincoln’s year-end tax wisdom. And: Oh, THOSE e-mails!

Monday, December 1st, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today visitors, here is your film tax credit link: Report from the Battle of Scottsdale.

 

Lincoln“If we could first know where we are, and whither we are tending, we could better judge what to do, and how to do it.” Abraham Lincoln’s “House Divided” speech.

I hope you all had a good Thanksgiving. Now it’s December, which means it’s time to begin serious tax planning. President Lincoln’s timeless observation applies very much to year-end tax planning.

To do any tax planning, you have to know where you stand before making any year-end tax planning moves. You need to see where your income, deductions and tax payments are likely to be if you do nothing before year-end — in other words, you need to project your 2014 tax return.  You also need to make your best guess at your 2015 taxes.

If you try to do tax planning tricks without doing a projection, you can actually make things worse. For example, if you prepay state and local taxes in 2014, and you are subject to alternative minimum tax in 2014, you accomplish nothing. If you are also not subject to AMT in 2015, you’ve actually increased your tax bill over the two-year period.

The best way to start your projection is with a copy of your 2013 return. Identify income and expense items that are likely to be different in 2014 and 2015. Then review your pay stub and for income and withholding and see where you are likely to end up for the year on those items.  If you have a business, you need to forecast your income at year end. The you know where you are and whither you are tending, and you and your tax advisor can better judge what to do and how to do it.

 

This Koskinen isn't the IRS commissioner

This Koskinen isn’t the IRS commissioner

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 571. It seems the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration found Lois Lerner’s missing e-mails on backup tapes that Commissioner Koskinen said didn’t exist. Commissioner Koskinen’s effort to find the missing e-mails rivals O.J. Simpson’s search for the real killer.

Robert W. Wood, In ‘Lost’ Trove Of IRS Emails, 2,500 May Link White House To Confidential Taxpayer Data.

 

TaxGrrrl’s Interview with Commissioner Koskinen: Miserable, Awful & Delayed: Commissioner, Tax Advocate Talk 2015 Tax Season:

Already, the Commissioner is anticipating that the IRS will only be able to answer about 53% of calls – after a wait time of about 34 minutes – for the upcoming fiscal year. That’s just about half – but, the Commissioner confirms, “It could be worse.”

 

But the Commissioner still thinks he has the spare resources for a “voluntary” preparer regulation scheme.

Russ Fox, One Ringy Dingy, Two Ringy Dingies… “Yes, I was on hold for two hours today on the IRS Practitioner Priority Service before my call was picked up.”  Good thing his call was a priority, then.

 

Tony Nitti, The Four Tax Breaks (And Two Senators) That Killed The Tax Extender Deal. The immigration action is also implicated.

Robert D. Flach, OOPS – THEY DID IT AGAIN! “Well, it is December. And the idiots in Congress have not yet dealt with the issue of the ‘tax extenders’.”

Kyle Pomerleau, Why Not Just Get Rid of Them All? (Tax Policy Blog). “While most tax extenders are wasteful, there are a few that are worth keeping and would actually be part of a flat tax.”

 

20140814-1Kristine Tidgren offers A Few Year-End Tax Planning Tips for Farmers.

Alan Perez, Tax Planning for Clergy. The post includes a nice checklist for clergy tax planning.

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: How to Properly Calculate Taxability of a Federal Refund on Your Iowa Tax Return

Peter Reilly, Motocross Racing With Tax Deductible Dollars Works This Time

Keith Fogg, IRS Makes Novel Use Of Outside Contractors—To Audit Microsoft (Procedurally Taxing):

The IRS has changed the regulation concerning who can participate in an examination to include private contractors.  It has hired a private law firm as an expert.  Microsoft appears to be the first examination using private contractors to become public.  The issue deserves attention in order to determine if this represents a new and better way to examine complex returns or a capitulation of what was previously considered a governmental function.

I’m still waiting for the people who got all upset about the IRS using private collection agencies to say something about this.

 

Jeff Stimpson of Accounting Today has posted his “In the Blogs” roundup for the week. Lots of good tax links.

Annette Nellen discusses Inflation adjustments in the tax law. “Our federal income tax is not consistent regarding the need to prevent bracket creep for all taxpayers.”

Kay Bell, IRS’ positive public perception picking up a bit. It would be hard to make it sink lower.

Jack Townsend notes the WAPO Article on Expatriate Taxation – The Mayor of London.

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Cheap liquor likely to remain a focus for alcoholics. Nonresident Income Taxes Likely to Remain a Focus for State Tax Authorities (Cara Griffith, Tax Analysts Blog). The post discusses states aggressive assessment of non-residents who sneeze near state lines, and the so-far failed push for Congress to provide uniform rules.

Alan Cole, Confusing Income with Taxable Income (Tax Policy Blog): “The rest of America is quite a bit richer, and quite a bit better at earning capital income, than Wonkblog gives it credit for.”

Joseph Thorndike, The Best Hopeless Idea in Washington (Tax Analysts Blog). That would be a carbon tax.

Norton Francis, What Falling Oil Prices Will Mean for State Budgets (TaxVox)

 

No Takers for the Brown house. The IRS can’t seem to unload property seized from Ed and Elaine Brown after their armed tax protest standoff. It seems buyers want some assurance that they won’t be killed by stray booby-traps.

Career Corner, So You Failed the CPA Exam Before the Holidays, Now What? (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/25/14: Administration complicates extender negotiations. And: Instant Tax Service has to stay dead.

Tuesday, November 25th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Programming note: The Tax Update will be on the road for Thanksgiving starting Wednesday. Have a great weekend, see you Monday. 

 

Economic supergenius

Nice Section 179 deduction you have there. Hate to see something bad happen to it.

Extenders as extortion. The administration yesterday complicated the negotiations on the extension of the perpetually-expiring tax provisions by demanding an extension of the refundable child credit and a permanent expansion of the fraud-ridden earned income tax credit, the New York Times reports.

It’s obnoxious to throw a new welfare program provision into the extender negotiations at this late date, but a lame-duck administration has nothing to lose by trying. While I still think the $500,000 Section 179 deduction will be extended retroactively to January 1, this makes me a lot more nervous.

If anything good comes of this extortion attempt, it’s that it highlights the unwisdom of passing tax provisions temporarily if you don’t really want them to be temporary. Every time you need to re-enact them, you open yourself up to just this sort of shakedown.

Other coverage from The Hill: White House skeptical of possible deal on tax breaks and Lew: Avoid ‘wrong approach’ on tax breaks

Related:

TaxGrrrl, 10 Expired Tax Provisions That Might Affect You In 2014 and Kay Bell, Congress fighting over which business and individual tax extenders to make permanent

 

"Fez" Ogbasion, Instant Tax Service CEO.

“Fez” Ogbazion, Instant Tax Service CEO.

Appeals court says Instant Tax Service has to stay deadThe Sixth Circuit has upheld the 2013 ruling that put Instant Tax Service out of business. ITS, which had 150 franchise operations in a number of states, primarily in low-income inner-city locations, had shown up frequently in stories alleging shady tax prep practices (like this).

ITS was found to have encouraged its franchisees to prepare “stub returns.” These are returns preparered off of year-end pay stubs, rather than W-2 forms. The injunction also found that the franchisor used deceptive pricing and marketing practices.

ITS and its owner, Fez Ogbazion, argued the injunction was improper and overbroad. The appeals court considered the ITS appeal on the stub return issue:

Defendant Ogbazion agreed during his testimony that “[i]f you prepare a tax return using a pay stub, it’s not always accurate and does not always have all of the information on there,” and “[w]hen using a pay stub to prepare a tax return, the income information can be off for a variety of reasons.” …  And ITS employee Boynton, who had been a tax return preparer before she became a manager, agreed during her testimony that she was “aware that tax returns prepared using pay stubs are inaccurate more often than not,” that “the last paycheck stub varies from a W-2 more often than not,” and that “the income reflected on a return prepared on a pay stub can vary from income reflected on a return prepared based on a W-2.”

The court found that the District Court correctly evaluated the stub return issue:

It is clear from this evidence that pay-stub filing often results in understatement of tax liability, and ITS knew it. It is also clear from this and other evidence that pay-stub filing was common at ITS franchises. The district court’s conclusion that understatement of tax liability “inevitably results” may have gone further than we would go, but it is a plausible account of the evidence in the record as a whole.

The Moral? Wait for your W-2 before filing. Don’t try to file off of your pay stub. And if your preparer offers to prepare a return without waiting for your W-2, find another preparer.

Cite:  United States v. ITS Financial LLC et al (CA-6, Case No. 13-4341)

 

Tax Analysts has published a story covering the film tax credit panel I was on last week: NCSL Task Force Needs More Persuading on Merits of Film Incentives

 

20141125-2We’ve done a little blogroll updating. We’ve cut some blogs that haven’t been updated in months, and added Tax Litigation Survey and Forbes tax blogger Robert W. Wood.

Tony Nitti, The Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) of 2014: #5-Is The Sale Of A Right To Buy Land Ordinary Income Or Capital Gain?

William Perez, Excluding Foreign Wages from US Taxes

Robert Wood, Jersey Shore’s Mike ‘The Situation’ Sorrentino Tax Evasion Trial Delayed

Stephen Olsen, Summary Opinions for 11/07/14 & 11/14/14 (Procedurally Taxing). A roundup of tax procedure issues, including a report on IRS hiring of a private law firm to help it audit Microsoft.

Peter Reilly, AAA Does Not Revive With New S Election – Explained By Jelly Beans. Another reason not to terminate an S corporation election carelessly.

Jack Townsend, Credit Suisse is Sentenced: Is It just a Wrist Slapping (Harder than UBS But Is It Enough)?

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: Win a Home On TV, Find a Tax Collector in the Attic

 

Andrew Lundeen, Kyle Pomerleau, Pass-through Businesses Earn More Income than Corporations (Tax Policy Blog) “Pass-throughs now earn over 60 percent of all net business income.”  It includes this great chart:

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This means higner income taxes on “the rich” are really higher taxes on business and employment.

 

Eric Toder, Reforming Corporate Taxation (TaxVox) “The U.S. corporate tax system is broken.”
Annette Nellen, EU’s New VAT “MOSS” – Relevance for MFA? “MFA” is the Marketplace Fairness Act, the effort by states to collect taxes on internet commerce.

 

Jeremy Scott, New GOP W&M Members Send a Mixed Signal (Tax Analysts Blog):

The House Ways and Means Committee is undergoing a major transition. Committee Chair Dave Camp is leaving Congress at the end of the year and will be replaced by Rep. Paul Ryan. That means the end of an era and a possible major reshuffling of committee priorities. But Ways and Means is also getting four new Republican faces. The backgrounds of the new members don’t really send a clear signal on what to expect from the House on tax policy next year.

I hope they figure things out fast.

 

The Wall Street Journal has posted an Expat Finance & Tax Guide. It collects in one place WSJ pieces on expat-related topics, including FATCA nighmares and renouncing citizenship.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 565.

 

News from the Profession. Why Public Accounting Is Really Just One Long Kegger (Leona May, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/20/14: ACA and filing season pessimism revisited.

Thursday, November 20th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Programming note: The Tax Update will take tomorrow off. I will be in Phoenix tomorrow on a panel on state film tax credits sponsored by the National Conference of State Legislators.  The panel will include, among others, Joseph Henchman of the Tax Foundation. Normal programming resumes Monday.

 

guillotineACA frenzy! Thanks to a kind Twitter mention from Megan McArdle (who you really should follow at @asymmetricinfo), my Tuesday post on ACA and filing-season dread made it to a wider audience than usual, including the readers of Real Clear Politics. A cousin who I normally only see at family weddings and funerals saw it and sent me a note (Hi, Bob!), so I know it really got around.

It has also generated questions in the comments and the Twitterverse that are worth addressing. We’ll start with this from Alan in the comments:

In a few months when people receive their W2’s they will get a real shock when all the employer paid share of the company paid share of health care plan is included in their gross pay and now they must pay taxes on all that extra income.

Obamacare is ugly, but it isn’t that ugly. While many (but not all) employers will disclose the cost of coverage on W-2 box 12 (code DD), it will not be included in W-2 Box 1, “taxable wages.” From IRS.gov, Employer-Provided Health Coverage Informational Reporting Requirements: Questions and Answers:

Q1. Does the cost of an employee’s health care benefits shown on the Form W-2 mean that the benefits are taxable to the employee?

A. No. There is nothing about the reporting requirement that causes or will cause excludable employer-provided health coverage to become taxable. The purpose of the reporting requirement is to provide employees useful and comparable consumer information on the cost of their health care coverage.

20121120-2From Ms. McArdle on Twitter:

Any chance it won’t be that bad?

I suppose that depends on what “that bad” means. Blood seeping from the walls, shape-shifting brain-eaters from Planet Zargon, cats and dogs living together– probably not that bad. But there’s still plenty of bad to go around. The things that worry me:

- Many taxpayers will not have the information handy to determine their health insurance status for all 12-months of 2014. Only those who buy insurance on the exchanges will have Form 1095, the information return on insurance status.  Others are supposed to get information from employers, but they are likely to lose track of it, especially this first year.

- Lacking any matching documents, taxpayers will be tempted to claim coverage where there is none, or maybe wasn’t for part of the year, to avoid penalties. There won’t be an easy way to verify this. Preparers will either have to take taxpayers at their word or send them back for proof (or, inadvertently, to another preparer). It’s always bad when taxpayers feel they should lie to preparers. Yet as the IRS will often have no way to detect false claims of coverage, they will feel like chumps for telling the truth.

- Taxpayers with penalties for non-coverage will be irate when they find they get no refund. As Ms. McArdle wisely put it, “I do not have hard figures on this, but my basic experience in personal finance and tax reporting suggests that approximately zero percent of those affected will be expecting the havoc it will wreak on their tax refund.” Experience shows that the taxpayer’s first instinct is that the preparer screwed up.

- It will be even worse when we have to tell people to repay advance health-care tax credits paid to insurers to lower consumer out-of-pocket costs. This can happen when actual taxable income exceeds the amounts estimated when coverage was obtained on the exchanges. As the taxpayer never “saw the money” — it was paid to the insurer, not to the taxpayer directly — she may not be easily convinced that she has an excess benefit to repay.

20140521-1- Preparers haven’t had to deal with this before. Any new tax provision has a learning curve, and this is a complicated one that will apply to almost everyone. In many cases, preparers will mess up, being human. Getting it right will take extra time that is hard to come by during tax season.

- This doesn’t even touch the problems that many small employers are going to be dealing with as they realize their Section 105 individual coverage premium reimbursement plans, and their cafeteria plans funding premium payments on individual policies obtained by employees, are considered non-compliant under the ACA “market reforms.” At $100 per employee, per day, the penalties could be ruinous. While taxpayers are encouraged to report the penalties on Form 8928 and zero them out with a “reasonable cause” claim, we don’t know yet how generous the IRS will be in granting reasonable cause relief. Figuring out what to do here will be time-consuming and nerve-wracking for taxpayers and preparers, unless the IRS issues a blanket penalty waiver for 2014 (as it should).

On top of all this, we will probably have another late “extender” bill like we had two seasons ago, which made for an awful tax season by itself. Maybe things will go well this season, but so many things seem likely to go wrong that it’s hard to be optimistic.

 

Tony Nitti, The Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2014: #6-The IRS (Finally) Figures Out The Real Estate Professional Rules. It’s an excellent lesson on the tax rules covering “real estate professionals” and passive losses — and by extension, the 3.8% net investment income tax.

TaxGrrrl, Al Sharpton Denounces Claims He Owes Millions In Taxes To IRS, New York.

Jack Townsend, Another UBS/Wegelin Related Indictment in SDNY

Peter Reilly, Kent Hovind And Creation Science Evangelism – How Not To Run A Ministry. When it gets you imprisoned, you may well be doing it wrong.

Kay Bell, Former GOP VP candidate Paul Ryan to head House tax panel

Jason Dinesen, I Don’t Have Time to Write Grant Proposals or Meet with Donors … But Give Me Money Anyway!  OK, then…

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Work proceeds in clearing the ruins of the Younkers department store, which burned in March.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 560.

Cara Griffith, Bad News for State Public Pension Plans (Tax Analysts Blog). “New research has come out revealing the level at which state public pension plans are underfunded, and it’s not good news.”

The denial of reality in administering public pensions is amazing. Public defined benefit plans are a lie. Either the public is being lied to about how much current public services cost, or current employees are being lied to about their retirement benefits. Maybe both.

 

20140910-1Alan Cole, Extenders and the Opportunity for Tax Reform (Tax Policy Blog):

The Examiner characterizes many of the extenders as “repugnant carve-outs.” This is undeniably true, but it is also the case that some – but not all – of the tax extenders are genuinely good policy. Particularly, Bonus Depreciation and Section 179 are important for moving the tax code towards proper treatment of new investment.

In any case, the current system of pretending tax provisions are “temporary” to hide their true cost is dishonest and should end.

Renu Zaretsky, “Dead Reform Walking:” On Fairness, Immigration, and Spending. The TaxVox headline roundup covers developments in the Marketplace Fairness Act, extenders and immigration, among other things.

 

News from the Profession. KPMG Gives the Department of Homeland Security a Clean Audit Opinion Because of Course They Did (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern). “I don’t know about you but I feel safer already.”

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/12/14: IRAs, IRS, and the Liar’s Paradox. And: mass benefit, class tax.

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Bluto20140910

You trusted us.

The Liar’s Paradox, IRS Version. If somebody says “I am lying,” can he be telling the truth? It’s a puzzler. So are many tax law rules, like the rules governing IRA rollovers.

The tax law does not subject an IRA withdrawal to tax if it is reinvested in an IRA within 60 days. It can only be done once each year. The IRS publication on such “rollovers” said from 1984 though 2013 that the one year restriction applied to each IRA, so a taxpayer with multiple IRAs could make multiple rollovers.

Alvin Bobrow made multiple IRA rollovers in 2008 consistent with this guidance. On examination, the IRS said the once-a-year rule applied per taxpayer, not per IRA, and assessed him tax and penalties.  The Tax Court upheld the assessment and penalties, in spite of the published IRS position. This is a classic example of the unfair, penalty-happy nature of the IRS examination process, too often abetted by the courts.

While manifestly unfair, the IRS long ago won the right to bait-and-switch via its publications. As the Tax Court said years ago, “well established precedent confirms that taxpayers rely on such publications at their peril.”

Even the IRS apparently is a little embarrassed by this. On Monday it issued Announcement 2014-32, saying it would not enforce the position it took in Bobrow for distributions before 2015. That seems fair to other taxpayers, if not to the Bobrows.

But here is where the liars paradox comes in. Announcement 2014-32 is mere “administrative guidance,” just like an IRS publication, and it has no more legal standing. Technically, nothing but a sense of self-restraint keeps the IRS from saying “fooled you!” on examination, just like they did in Bobrow. Does that make anyone else a little nervous?

 

The Tax Foundation has issued a wonderful new publication, A Visual Guide to Business, Taxes, and the Economy. It is full of wonderfully-illustrated insights on the economy and taxes. I love this illustration:

 

Source: Tax Foundation, "Business in America Illustrated"

Source: Tax Foundation, “Business in America Illustrated”

The chart shows that most business income subject to tax is reported on 1040s, not on corporate returns. That means every increase in taxes on high-income individuals is a tax on businesses and a tax on employers — not just on some guy lighting cigars with $100 bills.

 

20131209-1Paul Neiffer, Sheldon Iowa is Cold. It is indeed, at least this week.

Andrew Mitchel, New Rules for Canadian RRSPs & RRIFs

Kay Bell, A question for Congress on Veterans Day: Will the business tax break for hiring returning military members be renewed?

Jason Dinesen, Same-sex Marriage, Amended Tax Returns and Filing Status. “So if you’re in a same-sex marriage and you’re amending a 2011 or 2012 tax return, you can file that amended return as married or keep your filing status as single.”

Peter Reilly, Tax Court Goes To Webster For Definition Of Construction – And Watch That NAICS Code. The courts have been placing an undeserved significance on the business code you put on your tax return.

TaxGrrrl, 14 Ways To Show Your Thanks To Our Military On Veterans Day. “Here are 14 ways to show your thanks to our vets – and some of them come with a nice tax benefit to boot.”

 

20130121-2Good. IRS Power To Regulate Tax Practitioners Slipping Away (Christopher Rezek, Procedurally Taxing). The author appears to think this is somehow a bad thing.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 552

 

Joseph Thorndike, Democrats Getting What They Deserve on Medical Device Tax (Tax Analysts Blog):

If Democrats eventually face a funding crisis for Obamacare, they have only themselves to blame. After all, they should have known better. It was a Democrat, Franklin Roosevelt, who conclusively established that broad spending programs deserve broad taxes.

Precisely. You can’t fund a mass entitlement with a class tax, but that’s exactly what Obamacare tries to do.

 

 

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