Posts Tagged ‘Jason Dinesen’

Tax Roundup, 1/14/2014: 4th quarter payment time! And: minimally-effective legislation.

Tuesday, January 14th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Hey, corporations: federal estimated taxes are due for the fourth quarter of 2013 tomorrow, so you will need to set up your EFTPS payment today!  Individual fourth-quarter payments are also due tomorrow.  Kay Bell explains How to avoid estimated tax penalties.

Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

Misdirected priorities.  The Iowa Senate will reliably prevent any worthwhile income tax reform this year, while making a futile effort to increase Iowa’s minimum wage.  O. Kay Henderson reports:

Democrats like House Minority Leader Mark Smith of Marshalltown plan to press for an increase in the state’s minimum wage.

“Today, many Iowa parents are working two or three jobs that are low-paying, trying to put food on the table and pay the bills,” Smith said. “…We owe it to Iowa to raise the minimum wage, perhaps a dollar an hour now and more in the future. Our experience in Iowa has shown that raising the minimum wage has little effect on businesses, but gives working Iowans hope for a better future.”

David Henderson discusses a new study indicating that the Senate is pursuing an unwise idea:

- Only 11.3 percent of workers who would gain from the increase live in households officially defined as poor.
– A whopping 63.2 percent of workers who would gain were second or even third earners living in households with incomes equal to twice the poverty line or more.
– Some 42.3 percent of workers who would gain were second or even third earners who live in households that have incomes equal to three times the poverty line or more.

So a minimum wage boost, even on its own terms, isn’t really there to help the poor.  Of course the price of wages can no more be set effectively by decree than any other price.  It will result in either job loss, benefit loss, or increased workloads.  As one of the studies authors notes:

Because, to the extent they are able, employers will offset the higher minimum wage by reducing non-money components of worker compensation. Burkhauser notes that such an effect will not show up in the government data because the data do not measure these non-money parts of the compensation package. But that is small comfort to those who would find themselves with higher-paying but reduced-benefit jobs.

But because that obvious effect is hard for senators to understand, they’ll just pretend it isn’t there.

 

Scott Hodge, The U.S. Has More Individually Owned Businesses than Corporations.  And they earn more income, too:

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That’s why efforts to make “the rich” pay “their fair share” are job killers.

 

Looking to get Medicaid to pay for Grandma’s nursing home?  Be careful.  Roger McEowen reports “Iowa Supreme Court Reaffirms Extensive Reach of Medicaid Recovery in Granting Department’s Claim against Irrevocable Trust“:

This case again warns practitioners of the limitations of income-only irrevocable trusts in protecting assets from Medicaid recovery in Iowa. Even if clients are willing to (1) risk the look-back period, (2) pay potential gift taxes, (3) forfeit control of their assets, and (4) deprive their heirs of a stepped-up basis at death, they still may not achieve asset protection.

And really, “free” care isn’t necessarily all that great.

 

Courts uphold FATCA rules.  Court Rejects Banking Associations’ Challenge to Regulations Addressing Offshore Tax Avoidance.  (Department of Justice Tax Release) “The regulations require U.S. banks to report to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) information about accounts earning more than $10 of interest beginning in 2013 that are held by nonresident aliens of all countries with which the United States has a tax treaty or other information exchange agreement.”

20130419-1Of course not.  The IRS Scandal, Day 250: FBI Says No Criminal Charges in IRS Probe. (TaxProf)  They didn’t even contact the victims until recently, and they have apparently decided that, with respect to the disclosure of confidential information to ProPublica, the left-side reporting outfit, was just one of those things.  I doubt if you or I would get a pass for something like that.  That’s what happens when you have a Justice Department that is more a lookout than a watchdog.

 

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Using ‘Land Banking’ To Minimize Tax On Property Development   

Martin Sullivan, Stop Beating on the IRS.  (Tax Analysts Blog) I think the IRS gives at least as good as it gets.

So true: The IRS Has Better Things To Do than the RTRP Designation (Russ Fox)

William Perez discusses the Taxpayer Advocate’s 2013 Annual Report to Congress

Jason Dinesen, But Seriously — How Do Taxes Work If You’re Married to More than One Person?  Interesting question, but anybody in that situation has more pressing non-tax issues.

TaxGrrrl, Will Overstock Force IRS To Make Up Its Mind About Bitcoin? 

Jeremy Scott, Financial Product Reform Might Not Be Imminent (Tax Analysts Blog)

 

The Critical Question:  Should It Bother Us that Boeing Says It Needs a Tax Incentive to Make Its Planes Safe? (Tax Justice Blog).  It should bother us that they realistically think legislatures are dumb enough to believe that.

Good luck with that.  Monte Jackel Puts Tax Blog Behind Subscriber Firewall, reports the TaxProf, with a $350 annual subscription rate.  I am embarrassed to learn of this blog just now, and I wish him luck.  Meanwhile the Tax Update subscription rate continues to be $0.00 (except for those wonderful folks who pay a nominal monthly charge to get it delivered to their Kindle).  In light of Mr. Jackel’s move, though, I may double that rate.

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/10/2014: Taxpayer advocate rips IRS penalties and foreign account enforcement. Also: the Code still stinks!

Friday, January 10th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

The Taxpayer Advocate’s Annual Report directs some well-deserved fire on two of the worst IRS practices: the penalty-happy approach to examinations and the shoot-the-jaywalkers approach to offshore enforcement.

The report says this about penalties:

The IRS’s decision not to abate inapplicable penalties illustrates its resource-driven approach to them. As we have described in prior reports, the IRS too often proposes accuracy-related penalties automatically when they might potentially apply — before performing a careful analysis of the relevant facts and circumstances — and then burdens taxpayers by requiring them to prove the penalties do not apply.

The IRS should identify and abate all of the accuracy-related penalties that should not apply. It should minimize taxpayer burden when administering the IRC § 6676 penalty (e.g., by not proposing it automatically) and work with the Treasury Department to support a reasonable cause exception.

Amen.  The tax law is hard, and when a taxpayer does what a reasonable person — not a reasonable tax lawyer — should do to pay the right amount, there shouldn’t be an automatic 20% mistake penalty.  Too bad the advocate doesn’t seem to have embraced my “sauce for the gander” penalty, which would make the IRS pay taxpayers the same 20% penalty when the IRS makes an unjustified assessment.

Regarding foreign account enforcement, the report faults the IRS shoot-the-jaywalker approach (my emphasis):

In the 2009 OVD program, the median offshore penalty paid by those with the smallest accounts ($87,145 or less) was nearly six times the tax on their unreported income. Among unrepresented taxpayers with small accounts it was nearly eight times the unpaid tax. The penalty was also disproportionately greater than the amount paid by those with the largest accounts (more than $4.2 million) who paid a median of about three times their unreported tax. When the IRS audited taxpayers who opted out (or were removed), on average, it assessed smaller, but still severe, penalties of nearly 70 percent of the unpaid tax and interest. Given the harsh treatment the IRS applied to benign actors, others have made quiet disclosures by correcting old returns or by complying in future years without subjecting themselves to the lengthy and seemingly-unfair OVD process. Still others have not addressed FBAR compliance problems, and the IRS has not done enough to help them comply.

20121129-1Shooting the jaywalkers so you can slap the bad actors on the wrist.

The IRS should expand the self-correction and settlement options available to benign actors so that they are not pressured to opt out or pay more than they should; do more to educate persons with foreign accounts (e.g., recent immigrants) about the reporting requirements; consolidate and simplify guidance; and reduce duplicative reporting requirements.

The IRS should follow the lead of the states that allow non-resident taxpayers who voluntarily disclose past non-compliance to file and pay five years of prior taxes, with only interest and no penalties — reserving the penalties for those who wait until they are caught.  Tax Analysts quotes one lawyer as saying this would be unfair to the already-wounded jaywalkers:

“It’s very hard to make the program more lenient now without going back and adjusting thousands of [prior] taxpayers’ resolutions since 2009,” he said. That is something the IRS is likely unwilling to do, he added.

Too bad.  That’s exactly what they should do.

 There’s a lot more to the report, including a call for a new taxpayers bill of rights (good) and a renewed call for IRS preparer regulation (a waste of IRS and preparer time).

Related: 

Lynnley  Browning, IRS top cop says the agency is too hard on offshore tax dodgers.  I can’t imagine she wrote that headline.  Any lazy headline writers who call an inadvertent FBAR violator a “tax dodger” should have half their bank account balances seized if they ever forget to report a 1099.

TaxGrrrl, Report To Congress: IRS Is Increasingly Unable To Meet Taxpayer Needs

Jack Townsend,New Taxpayer Advocate Report to Congress Addressing, Inter Alia, OVDI/P Concerns

 

TaxProf, IRS Releases FY2013 2006 Enforcement Stats:

The IRS has released Fiscal Year 2013 Enforcement and Service Results, showing among other things:

  • Individual audit rate:  0.96% (lowest since 2005)

  • Large corporation audit rate: 15.8% (lowest since 2009)

  • Revenue from audits:  $9.8 billion (lowest since 2003)

  • Number of IRS agents:  19,531 (lowest since pre-2000)

  • Conviction rate:  93.1% (highest since pre-2000)

It’s hard to see where the IRS has the resources for making compliant preparers waste their time on preparer regulation busywork.

 

William Perez, Fourth Estimated Tax Payment for 2013 Due on January 15

Paul Neiffer, How Low is Too Low For A Rental Arrangement?  “We had a reader ask the following question: ‘Does leasing cropland to a family member for substantially less than fair market value become “gifting” subject to taxes for value above gifting limit?’”

Jason Dinesen,  Review Your Small Business Operations as Part of Year-End/Year-Beginning Planning

Leslie Book, NTA Annual Report Released (Procedurally Taxing)

 

 

Christopher Bergin, The Tax Code in 2014 – It Still Stinks (Tax Analysts Blog):

I’ve always believed in progressive income taxation. This isn’t it. The conservatives have sold us on the notion that tax is a dirty word, and the liberals have sold us on the notion that class envy is a healthy state of mind.

And that, folks, is why the tax code stinks. And it won’t get any better in the new year.   

There’s more to the stink than that, but it’s a good start.

 

Scott Hodge, Millionaire Taxpayers Tend to be Older.  Well, that’s one good thing about aging, I guess.

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Howard Gleckman, Pay to Extend Unemployment Benefits? Why Not Pay to Extend Temporary Tax Breaks Too?  (TaxVox)

Tax Justice Blog,  Reasons Why Congress Should Allow the Deduction for Tuition to Remain Expired

Kay Bell, Marijuana sales, tax collections good for Colorado coffers.

 

The Newest Cavalcade of Risk is up!  Hank Stern participates with an Overseas ObamaTax Conundrum

 

Robert D. Flach brings the Friday Buzz!

Career Corner: This Year, Resolve to Finally Decide What You Want To Be When You Grow Up in Public Accounting (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/6/2014: Start this year’s year-end planning now! And lots more.

Monday, January 6th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140106-1I’m back.  It was good to take a little time off after year-end planning season and before the 2013 return season starts.  But now that it’s 12 below with howling winds, I might as well be at the office.

It was sort of a busman’s holiday, though, as I got an early start on my 2014 year-end tax planning.   While December year-end planning is important, it’s asking a lot of one month to do the work of all 12.  You can do some important tax planning in January that will pay off all year long.  For example:

- You can fund your 2014 Individual Retirement Account right now.  If you are married, you can also fund your spousal IRA.  The maximum contribution is $5,500, or $6,500 if you will reach at least age 50 by December 31, 2014.

- You can fund your 2014 Health Savings Account today too.  The HSA limit for taxpayers with a high-deductible plan and family coverage is $6,550 this year; for a single plan, the limit is $3,300.  You need to have a qualifying high-deductible insurance policy, but if you do, you can deduct your contribution and withdraw funds for tax-deductible expenses tax-free.  If you leave the funds in, they accumulate tax-free and can be withdrawn tax-free later for qualifying health costs.  If you stay too healthy to use the funds on medical care, withdrawals are taxed much like IRA withdrawals.

Using spousal IRAs and an HSA, a 50-year old with family coverage can tuck away a combined $19,550 right now and have it earn interest or dividends tax free right away — 15 1/2 months sooner than if you wait until April 15, 2015, the last day you can make these contributions.  And by saving it now, you won’t be tempted to spend it later in the year.

A few other things that you can do right away to get some of your 2014 year-end planning out of the way:

- If you care about estate planning, nothing keeps you from making the $14,000 maximum 2014 exempt gift to your preferred family donees right now.

- Make sure you’ve maxed out your 2014 401(k) deferral with your HR people — or at the very least, be sure you are deferring as much as you can get your employer to match.

- If you are an Iowan with kids, you can make a 2014 College Savings Iowa contribution that you can deduct on your 2014 Iowa 1040.  The maximum deductible contribution is $3,098 per donor, per beneficiary, so a married couple with two kids can put away $12,392 right now.  The Iowa tax benefit works like an 8.98% bonus to you for putting money in your college savings pocket.

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 242: Lois Lerner Is 2013 Tax Person of the Year.  The TaxProf provides access to a Tax Analysts piece that says:

     While many of the Service’s problems were not necessarily its own fault, the exempt organization scandal was an almost entirely self-inflicted wound. No one personifies that scandal more than Lois Lerner.

Lerner ignited a political and media firestorm when she confessed in May that the exempt organizations unit of the IRS Tax-Exempt and Government Entities Division inappropriately handled many Tea Party groups’ exemption applications.

The now former exempt organizations director’s admission and subsequent refusal to testify before Congress contributed to her becoming the public face of the scandal. Although Lerner does not bear sole responsibility for the IRS’s missteps in processing conservative groups’ exemption applications, the publicity of her role in one of the year’s biggest news stories earns her the distinction of being Tax Notes’ 2013 Person of the Year. 

And in spite of much wishful thinking, it is a scandal.

It’s worth noting that Tax Analysts gives an honorable mention to Dan Alban, the Institute for Justice attorney behind the District Court defeat for the IRS preparer regulation power grab.

 

1040 2013William Perez, How Soon Can a Person File Their 2013 Tax Return?: “The Internal Revenue Service plans to begin processing personal tax returns on Friday, January 31, 2014, for the tax year 2013 (IR-2013-100).”  But don’t even try to get it done until you have your W-2s and 1099s all in hand.

Jana Luttenegger, Reinstating Tax-Exempt Organizations  (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). She explains new IRS procedures for organizations that have lost their exemption by failing to file annual reports with the IRS.

Kay BellSocial Security taxable earnings cap in 2014 is $117,000. Thousands have already hit that tax limit.

Jason Dinesen, Small Business Planning: Got Your Financial Statements and Budget Done Yet?

Paul Neiffer, Remember Your Simplified Home Office Deduction

TaxGrrrl, What You Need To Know About Taxes In 2014: Expired Tax Breaks, Obamacare Penalties & More.

Russ Fox, 1099 Time.  A look at who has to issue information returns, and who gets them.

 

Robert D. Flach poses AN ETHICAL, AND PERHAPS LEGAL, DILEMMA:

Beginning with the 2014 Form 1040, am I legally, or ethically, required to assess my client a penalty for not having health insurance coverage?  Or can I, as I do with the penalty for underpayment of estimated tax, ignore the issue and leave it to the IRS to determine if a penalty is appropriate?  Will I face a potential preparer penalty if I ignore the issue?

It’s a good question.  I suspect they plan to make us ask the question, under the same sort of rules that make preparers unpaid social workers for the earned income tax credit.  I don’t expect to ever have to ask the question, though, as I think this dilemma will resolve itself by an indefinite delay, and eventual repeal, of the individual mandate as Obamacare falls apart.

 

David Brunori, State Tax Reform Advice for 2014 – Think About Spending (Tax Analysts Blog). Sometimes I think that’s all they think about.  But hear David out:

But in thinking about tax reform efforts in the past year, I am more convinced than ever that our refusal to rethink the size of government makes fixing problems with the tax code impossible. Here is what we know. Cutting government programs is difficult because each program has a constituency that will fight like a gladiator to protect its access to public money. So when the topic of tax reform comes up, conservatives and liberals vow to find a fix that will neither raise nor decrease spending. But we also know that politicians – the majority anyway – generally hate raising taxes. This reflects the fact that most of their constituents hate the idea of paying more taxes. But the costs of government continue to increase. And that leads to worse tax policy as states look to gimmicks, excises, gambling, and other junk ways of collecting revenue. It also ensures that some horrible tax policies are never fixed.

If the government dialed back spending to population-and-inflation adjusted 1990 numbers, I don’t think mass famines would result.

Scott Hodge, Despite Rising Inequality, Tax Code is at Most Progressive in Decades (Tax Policy Blog). I’m not sure “despite” is the right word here.

Annette Nellen, Continued bonus depreciation or tax reform?

Cara Griffith, Cyclists: The Next Great Source of Tax Revenue? (Tax Analysts Blog):

 While I strongly believe taxes should not be used to encourage or discourage behavior, the effect of requiring cyclists to register their bikes is not the big problem with these types of proposals. The real problem is that they don’t raise any revenue. Dowell’s suggestion that a bike registration fee would raise some $10 million for the city of Chicago is a pipe dream. Almost every cent would be used simply to administer the program.

From the interests of the bureaucrats proposing the program, just funding new patronage jobs is a perfectly acceptable result.

Howard Gleckman, Time To Park The Commuter Tax Subsidy (TaxVox)

Peter Reilly, Are IRS Property Seizures The Stuff Of Reality TV?   Now there’s some grim viewing.

The ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation has a shiny new look at its website.

Tony Nitti, Yes Virginia, There Is A Tax Extender Bill In Congress.

The Critical Question: If You Won the Lottery Tomorrow, Would You Still Go to Work? (Going Concern).  Only to clean out my desk, and laugh.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/31/2013: So much for Iowa tax reform. And: last-minute charity!

Tuesday, December 31st, 2013 by Joe Kristan

ijlogoThere’s only so much you can do on one day to achieve last-minute tax deductions.  The markets are open, so you can harvest your tax losses.  The post office closes early, so if you want to mail a check for a deductible expense, get down there this morning.  You might want to review all of my 2013 year-end tax tips for some other ideas.

If you are both charitable-minded and deduction-minded, credit-card donations up to midnight tonight work.  Indulge me while I suggest a few good causes that can get you a charitable deduction:

Salvation Army, doing hard work with the homeless and lost and on hand to help at disasters, doing much with little.

Iowa Donor Network, the Iowa organization that gathers and allocates donor organs.

Institute for Justice, the non-profit that helps the little guy fight back against government’s bent on stealing their business or preventing them from making a living.  IJ is the outfit behind the battle against the IRS preparer regulation power-grab — it’s hard to imagine how the IRS would have been stopped without their good work.

The Tax Foundation, fighting the good fight for sound tax policy.

Reason Foundation, supporting liberty against all comers.

Alzheimers Association, fighting an awful disease.

Sertoma, little platoons working to prevent hearing loss through education and awareness.

Cornell College, my undergraduate alma mater.

Southern Illinois University, where I got my accounting degree.

Last but not least, The ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation, sponsor of the Farm and Urban Tax Schools.

That’s it for our 2013 year-end tax tips, but there’s good stuff all year at the Tax Update!

 

Related:

William Perez, Last Day Deduction Ideas

TaxGrrrl, 13 Dramatic Year End Tax Strategies For 2013   

 

If Iowa's income tax were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s income tax were a car, it would look like this.

So much for the Iowa alternative maximum tax.  Branstad says he’s “realistic” — abandoning idea of pushing for income tax changes in 2014, reports O. Kay Henderson:

Earlier this month Governor Terry Branstad was considering a plan to let Iowans keep filing their personal income taxes under the current system, or opt for a flatter, simpler system with fewer deductions. Branstad’s now abandoning the idea.

“I’ll be real frank to say that with the present make-up of the senate and particularly with the present chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, I doubt that we’re going to see anything significant on the tax front this year,” Branstad said during an interview with Radio Iowa.

The majority Senate Democrats, led by Joe Bolkcom, are obsessed with sticking it to “the rich,” meaning employers, and the Branstad plan fails to do so sufficiently.  As the Senate can block any tax proposal, there was never much hope for the Branstad plan.

As the Governor’s half-baked plan was going nowhere anyway, perhaps now he can start working for the sort of real income tax reform that is so long overdue in Iowa.  The current system is a rat’s nest of special interest breaks, feel-good provisions, complexity and high rates that pleases only lobbyists and string-pullers.  It discourages small businesses with unforgiving complexity while paying the well-lobbied to be our friends.

Let’s get rid of all of the special deductions for special friends of the politicians, and all of the feel-good deductions, and even the deduction for federal taxes.  Oh, and lets get of the Iowa corporation income tax entirely.  Let’s drastically reduce rates to 4% or less and make Iowa taxes easy to understand and pay.  Governor, embrace the Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform plan for all and see if the soak-the-rich crowd really wants to stand up for insiders, lobbyists, complexity, high rates, and high compliance costs.

 

It’s a dishonor just to be nominated, but Russ Fox can only choose one 2013 Tax Offender of the Year.  The recipient worked very hard to earn the title, and is quite deserving.

 

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Does The Sale Of Property Generate Ordinary Income Or Capital Gain?  It depends on what you sell, and who you sell it to.

 

Scott Hodge,  Out With the Extenders, In With the New Obamacare Taxes (Tax Policy Blog).  In case you were getting excited about a new year.  It lists all of the Lazarus provisions that expire at midnight, and all of the new taxes that start at 12:01.

Kay Bell,  Expiring commuter tax break will cost public transit users

 

Robert D. Flach brings you his last Buzz of 2013!

Jason Dinesen lists his Most-Popular Blog Posts of 2013

News from the Profession.  Count Your Blessings For Not Being on These Horrible Inventory Counts (Going Concern)

 

I will take the rest of the week off to clear my mind for tax season.  Happy New Year, and see you on Monday!

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/27/2013: Should you prepay your taxes for the deduction?

Friday, December 27th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20111040logoIs it worth paying taxes early to get a deduction early?   Many more taxpayers will have to ask that question this year for the unfortunate reason that the increase in the top regular rate to 39.6% makes their regular tax higher than the alternative minimum tax.  While it’s cold consolation, you can use your deduction for state tax payments when you aren’t subject to AMT.

First you have to make sure you can use the deduction at all.  You can’t use a deduction for taxes paid on your federal return if you don’t itemize, or if you are subject to AMT.  If you pass these tests, then you should ponder if you are going to be in a much higher bracket next year.  Assuming that you are in the same bracket for both years, and that no change in the tax law will affect your deduction, it’s a time-value-of-money question.

The charts below show the tax benefit of prepaying $1,000 of state and local taxes at the federal tax brackets. The first bracket shown is the top Iowa rate, to enable Iowans to determine the value of prepaying federal taxes.  It shows the present value at several key payment dates:

 

January 15: Federal fourth quarter 2013 payments are due

January 31: due date of Iowa fourth quarter estimated taxes.

March 1: due date of first Iowa property tax installment.

April 15: due date of most state individual tax returns.

April 30: due date of Iowa individual tax returns.

September 1: due date of second Iowa property tax installment.

pv tax prepayment3

If the benefit is in green, prepayment makes sense.  If it is red, the time value lost by paying early exceeds the benefit of accelerating the deduction by a year, assuming that the benefit will arrive on April 15.

This chart is only accurate assuming all of its underlying assumptions are met, so use it with caution.   It does illustrate that prepaying January taxes usually makes sense, but prepaying September taxes seldom does.

Come back tomorrow for another installment of our 2013 year-end tax tips series!

 

Howard Gleckman, Finance Chairman In-Waiting Ron Wyden Is A Tax Reformer (TaxVox):

The 64-year-old Wyden, who has a history of proposing creative, ambitious, and sometimes controversial ideas, initially sponsored a tax code overhaul in 2010 with former GOP senator Judd Gregg of New Hampshire. After Gregg retired, Wyden found another GOP cosponsor in Dan Coates of Indiana. Wyden-Coates follows the broad outline of the original Wyden-Gregg plan.

For individuals, it would set three rates—15-25-35. The top bracket would kick in at $140,000 for couples filing jointly. It would repeal the Alternative Minimum Tax, nearly triple the standard deduction, and create a 35 percent exclusion for long-term capital gains and dividends (equal to a rate of 22.75 percent for top-bracket taxpayers). It would eliminate the tax advantages of many employee benefits–but not employer-sponsored health insurance–and simplify tax-preferred savings.

While the plan would preserve most other individual tax preferences, the very large standard deduction would sharply limit the number of taxpayers who take them (even today, fewer than one-third itemize).

Wyden-Coates would cut the corporate rate to 24 percent from 35 percent.

I can think of a better tax reform, but Wyden-Coates would be a huge improvement over what we have.

 

taxanalystslogoCara Griffith, Enabling an Informed Debate (Tax Analysts Blog):

A transparent tax system, in which there are no “secret tax laws,” is a better tax system in that taxpayers more clearly understand the laws they are required to comply with, tax officials can more easily administer the law, and both sides can engage in a more informed debate about tax policy.

I would add that the transparency should extend to subsidies, like Economic development tax credits, that are run through state tax returns.

 

Jason Dinesen, Capital Losses and Tax Planning 

Kay Bell,  Valuing your tax-deductible donations of household goods

Jim Maule, How to Lose a Charitable Contribution Deduction.  If you leave an anonymous gold coin or jewelry piece in a Salvation Army kettle, it does no good on your 1040.

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving: Ride For Reading   “Our featured charity, Ride for Reading, delivers books to children in underserved communities… by bicycle!”

 

 

TaxProf, Court: Home Depot Cannot Use Out-of-State IP Affiliate to Shift Income From Arizona,  Don’t expect state courts to uphold tricks that reduce state revenue.

Arnold Kling describes Two Views of Obamacare, and explains how it is far from a “market approach.”

 

20120514-1The flip side of the “Facebook stock option loophole”: Mark Zuckerberg’s $2 Billion Tax Bill (TaxProf).  People who complain about the deduction for stock option compensation never mention that the same amount is income to the option holders, usually at higher rates.

 

 

Memory Lane beckons at Robert D. Flach’s place with 2013: THE YEAR IN TAXES – PART ONE:

Perhaps tied for the top tax story of the year (with the death of DOMA, which I will discuss later) is the David-versus-Goliath victory of three independent tax return preparers who felt the cost of the IRS mandatory RTRP tax preparer regulation regime, especially the annual CPE requirement, was “prohibitive” for their small practices and joined with the Institute for Justice to challenge the licensing program in federal court in Loving v IRS.

Go, David!

 

The Critical Question: Did Tenth Circuit Help KPMG Weasel Out Of Liability To Buy.com Founder?  (Peter Reilly)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/23/2013: The joys of being at-risk. And: commence self-destruction sequence!

Monday, December 23rd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

S imageS image20091210-1.JPG‘Tis the season to be at-risk.  We mentioned yesterday how you can get basis for deducting S corporation losses by making a loan to the corporation.  But not just any loan.  If you borrow from another S corporation shareholder to make your loan, your basis won’t be “at-risk.”

A Monroe, Iowa farmer learned that the hard way with his 1991 loan, as we discussed long, long ago:

Larry Van Wyk, a farmer from Monroe, Iowa, got a taste of the dangers of the at-risk related-party loan rules back when farmers were their primary target. He owned an S corporation farm 50-50 with his brother-in-law, Keith Roorda. On December 24, 1991, Larry borrowed $700,000 from Keith. The loan was fully-recourse, so the brother-in-law could proceed ruthlessly against Larry in the event of non-payment. Larry used about $250,000 to repay money he owned the S corporation and loaned the remainder to increase his basis to enable him to deduct losses.

 Unfortunately, Larry’s brother-in-law had “an interest in the activity” – he owned half of it. This made the deduction not “at-risk,” even though no loan from a brother-in-law is without risk in a very real sense. The efforts of some of the finest tax attorneys west of the Mississippi were unavailing; the Tax Court agreed with the IRS, and Larry lost his losses.

It’s not enough to avoid borrowing from another shareholder; you don’t want to borrow from somebody related to another shareholder.  And as “interest in the activity” isn’t necessarily the same as “shareholder,” you should watch out for borrowing from anybody else involved in the business.  The safe thing is to visit your friendly community banker for your loan.

This is another of our daily year-end 2013 tax tips — one a day through December 31!

 

Weekend update!  In case you missed it over the weekend:

2013 Winter Solstice Tax Tip: S corporation basis and

Winter Sunday tax tip: loans for S corporation basis.

 

William Perez, Roth Conversions as a Year-End Tax Strategy

Jason Dinesen,  Six Things I’m Talking to My Small Business Clients About at Year-End (Part 2) 

 

This Koskinen isn't the IRS commissioner

This Koskinen isn’t the IRS commissioner

We have a Commissioner.  Senate Votes 59-36 to Confirm John Koskinen as IRS Commissioner (TaxProf).  A lot of folks have noted that once again we have a Commissioner who hasn’t done taxes for a living.  That doesn’t have to be fatal.  Anybody who has hung around CPA firms can tell you that somebody who is good at taxes can be pretty terrible at running an organization.

Still, it’s not a great sign.  The new guy, John Koskinen, will be 79 years-old when his five-year term runs out.  He got his reputation as a “turnaround guy” at Freddie Mac in the wake of the financial crisis, preserving the bureaucracy as responsible as any for the financial meltdown.  I suspect he was hired to protect the agency, not the taxpayer.

By the way, there is another Koskinen.

 

The crumbling mandate.  Tax Analysts reports ($link):

Individuals whose health insurance plans were canceled by insurers because they did not meet the requirements of the Affordable Care Act will be eligible for an exemption from the individual mandate penalty that takes effect in 2014, the Department of Health and Human Services said late December 19.

20121120-2Megan McArdle says this means Obamacare Initiates Self-Destruction Sequence:

As Ezra Klein points out, this seriously undermines the political viability of the individual mandate: “But this puts the administration on some very difficult-to-defend ground. Normally, the individual mandate applies to anyone who can purchase qualifying insurance for less than 8 percent of their income. Either that threshold is right or it’s wrong. But it’s hard to argue that it’s right for the currently uninsured but wrong for people whose plans were canceled … Put more simply, Republicans will immediately begin calling for the uninsured to get this same exemption. What will the Obama administration say in response? Why are people whose plans were canceled more deserving of help than people who couldn’t afford a plan in the first place?”

Arnold Kling put it more pithily: “Obama Repeals Obamacare.”

They’re desperately improvising as they go.  Not a good situation, considering the mandate tax is supposed to take effect in less than two weeks.   I’m starting to doubt that it ever gets enforced.

Related: Paul Neiffer, Cancelled Health Insurance Policies

 

20121220-3Kay Bell, Singing the praises of tax-favored retirement savings

Brian Mahany, IRS Ordered To Pay Taxpayer’s Legal Fees 

Russ Fox, The Death of the Death Master File (Sort of)

Peter Reilly,  Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine Has A Tax Lesson.  If you don’t wan’t to stay married to a spouse, you might not want to file a joint return either.

TaxGrrrl,  12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2013: Esophageal Cancer Action Network

Robert D. Flach has a special Monday Buzz!

 

Tax Justice BlogUltra-Wealthy Dodge Billions in Taxes Using “GRAT” Loophole

Michael Schuyler, Why A Death Tax “Loophole” May Make Economic Sense (Tax Policy Blog).

Jack Townsend, Swiss Bank Hype and Over-Hype.  ” Merely having U.S. clients with undeclared accounts is not the problem for those banks; it is those banks actions to become complicit in the U.S. clients’ failure to report the accounts.”

Jim Maule finds his inner libertarian, embracing a Reason Foundation report calling for elimination of the home mortgage deduction in exchange for lower rates.

 

News from the Professon.  PwC Won’t Stop Beliebin’ In Ugly Christmas Sweaters (Going Concern)

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Tax Roundup, 12/20/2013: S corporation built-in gain window closing? And more!

Friday, December 20th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

S-SidewalkThe S corporation Built-in gain window is closing.  The main benefit of S corporations since 1986 is that their income is only taxed once — when it is earned, on the tax returns of its owners.  After-tax earnings may be distributed to owners without another tax; undistributed earnings increase the basis of the owners’ stock, reducing gains when the stock is sold.

C corporations, in contrast pay a tax on their own income.  C corporation shareholders pay a second tax when the after-tax earnings are distributed; they don’t get a basis step-up for undistributed earnings, so they pay the second tax on undistributed earnings as part of their gain when they sell their shares.

To keep C corporations from becoming S corporations and liquidating the next day, Congress enacted the Built-in Gains Tax in the 1986 tax reforms.  This tax applies to any C corporation that makes an S corporation election.  It hits all “built-in gains” recognized during the “recognition period” following the election at 35%; the after-tax built-in gains are then also taxed on shareholder returns.

“Built-in gains” are any income items accrued as a C corporation as of the day of the S election.  For example, if the corporation owns land with a cost of $10,000 and a value of $15,000 as of the date of the S election, it has a $5,000 built-in gain.  If it sells the land during the “recognition period,” it pays the tax on the lesser of the actual gain or the $5,000 built-in gain.

The recognition period was 10 years when the tax was enacted.  It has been reduced to 5 years by temporary legislation, but absent new legislation it will revert to 10 years starting January 1.  That means S corporations that made elections taking effect in 2004-2007 can sell built-in gain assets before December 31 without the tax, but the same gain will be subject to the tax starting January 1.   That has obvious year-end planning implications.   If you are going to sell soon, it may be best to sell right now, as two weeks from now may be too late.

Yes, it is possible that the five-year period will get extended again, but who wants to count on Congress?

More 2013 year-end tax tips every day through December 31 at the Tax Update!

 

Why the IRS shouldn’t get political.  People who don’t think the IRS Tea Party scandal is serious need to consider how other places use the tax law.  France24 reports: Putin to pardon jailed tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky.

Mr. Khordorkovsky was imprisoned for 10 years on tax evasion charges.  His real offense was opposing Vladimir Putin while wealthy.  The message was surely heard by other wealthy Russians with the means to oppose the regime.

As complicated as the tax law is, it would be easy work for a politicized IRS to make trouble for disfavored opponents.  That’s why the Tea Party scandal is so serious, and why the new proposals to regulate 501(c)(4) outfits are so outrageous.  And yes, it could happen here.  It did.

 

Flickr image courtesy Shock264 under Creative Commons license

Flickr image courtesy Shock264 under Creative Commons license

If it needs a subsidy to happen, it probably shouldn’t happen.  Tax break for wind power is up in the air, advocates say (Des Moines Register)

The wind provision is one of about 50 tax credits that are expected to expire at the end of 2013. U.S. Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Ia., said the tax credits, which are usually dealt with together, failed to get a vote in Congress this year because key lawmakers thought they could include them as part of a major tax-reform bill.

Grassley told reporters that passage of a more sweeping tax overhaul appears unlikely. Senate Finance Chairman Max Baucus, D-Mont., told him last week that Congress expects to deal with wind and the other tax credits in 2014. “He wasn’t specific on when it would happen, but he said we are going to have to do (extensions of the tax credits) next year,” Grassley told reporters.

These things are passed one year at a time to pretend that they are much less expensive than they are under Congressional budget rules.   A felony in the private sector, business as usual in Congress.

 

Alan Cole,  Party in the UK (Tax Policy Blog)

Critically, the UK has improved its tax system substantially. It is moving towards a more competitive, more neutral tax base that treats all sorts of economic activity equally. While they have been willing to increase sales taxes – a neutral, simple tax – they are also reducing the costly corporate tax. Corporate taxes tend to substantially reduce the welfare of everyone – both the owners of corporate stock and the workers who depend on heavy capital investments. They have also abolished crippling financial transaction taxes.

Crippling financial transaction taxes like the one supported by Iowa Senator Harkin and his would-be successor Bruce Braley.

 

Jason Dinesen, Death Master File Changes Coming — Finally!  “All I can say is — thank you Congress (how often do we say that anymore?), and it’s about time.”

William Perez,  Using a Donor-Advised Fund to Donate to Charity at Year End

Howard Gleckman,  A New Look at Who Benefits from Tax Expenditures.  ”There is a tax expenditure under the holiday tree for just about everyone.”

Speaking of trees.  O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree, Please Congress don’t tax our Christmas Trees (Kay Bell)

TaxGrrrl,  12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2013: Helping Hands Center For Special Needs   

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 225

Tax Justice Blog,  State News Quick Hits in Wisconsin, Illinois, Kentucky and Oklahoma

News from the Profession.  Short Sellers, Moms, Son of God, all Credited with Encouraging PwC’s Vigorous Audit of Herbalife (Going Concern)

Get your Friday Buzz from Robert D. Flach!

 

IrwinIrwinirwin.jpgQuotable me.  From Peter Reilly, Andrew Schiff Does Not Recommend That You Imitate His Father Irwin:

When I asked Joe Kristan for his thoughts on the matter he summed up the realist perspective pretty well:

“Oh, my.

“I don’t care to go down the rabbit hole on the tax protester arguments. However convincing they may seem to adherents, they just don’t work. Given the choice between Irwin Schiff’s theories and all the federal judges that have ruled on these arguments – and they’ve been put before the courts countless times – a wise taxpayer goes with what the judges say. Every time. You can believe there is no income tax, but if the IRS agent, the federal judge, the federal marshals, and the Bureau of Prisons say otherwise, for all practical purposes there is an income tax.”

Yep, I said that.  Thanks, Peter!

 

Mom can’t share everything.  Mothers are famous for sharing all with their kids, but sometimes it doesn’t work out.  From STLtoday.com:

A Creve Coeur venture capitalist was sentenced to five years in federal prison Thursday on a tax evasion charge for dodging millions of dollars in taxes from 2006-2009, the U.S. Attorney’s office said.

Burton Douglas Morriss, 50, should have paid $5.5 million, prosecutors said, but used $18 million in tax losses in 2007 alone to reduce the amount he claimed to owe. The companies that incurred the losses “were established as single member limited liability companies for Morriss’s mother” and she had already claimed those losses in past returns, prosecutors said.

Five years is the maximum sentence for a one-count tax evasion plea.   It’s not nice to steal Momma’s tax losses.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/19/2013: Government finally to stop promoting identity theft. And more year-end tips!

Thursday, December 19th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

DMFGovernment shuts down identity theft enabling operation: its own.  The budget compromise headed to the President’s death places new restrictions on the Social Security Death Master File.  While prized by genealogists for their work, it’s prized even more by thieves, who use the information on it to snap up fraudulent tax refunds in the names of the dead.  It’s been a multi-billion dollar problem for years.

The person who stole the identity of the late husband of Jason Dinesen’s client almost certainly did so using DMF information, stealing unknown amounts from the government and disrupting the client’s tax life for years.

Bloomberg Business explains the new restrictions:

The legislation would exempt the records from the federal Freedom of Information Act and give the Commerce Department 90 days to set up a process to certify legitimate users. The public would have access to the data three years after an individual’s death.

The language in the bill was taken from a Senate Finance Committee draft from which lawmakers had asked for comment by mid-January, said Alane Dent, vice president for taxes and retirement security at the American Council of Life Insurers.

While the restrictions seem long overdue, not everyone is happy about them, aside from identity thieves.  Newsweek reports:

“Closing the Death Master File is ludicrous,” said Melinde Lutz Byrne, one of the nation’s top genealogists and part of a small group of forensic researchers at Boston University. They have banded together and for two years have fought similar proposals in Texas and Florida to block public access to the Death Master File.

“It is my opinion that the science of it all has bypassed our elected representatives and even the courts,” she said.

It’s a trade-off, but I think preventing fraud deserves priority here.  Still, the objectors are right about this:

“The IRS is handing out money like candy – and nobody wants to acknowledge it,” said Sharon Sergeant, a forensic researcher, technologist and tax-software programmer who strongly supports the Boston University group. “Why isn’t it checking to make sure dead people aren’t getting tax returns? Somebody who reads the obituaries and makes up a social security number the right way, according to the algorithm, can file a tax return and get a payment. It’s got nothing to do with the Death Master File. It has everything to do with the IRS not doing its job.”

But The Worst Commissioner Ever felt it was more important to expand power over preparers than to stop the thieves.

 

2013 year-end tip: Donate your appreciated stock now!  The tax law allows you to claim a full-value charitable deduction for donating appreciated long-term capital gain securities that are publicly-traded.  It’s a tax-efficient way to donate, as you get the full deduction without ever paying tax on the appreciation.

But there is a hitch: you have to get the stock to your favorite charity’s brokerage account by December 31 to get the deduction.  That can take time, especially when dealing with less-sophisticated smaller charities.  If you want a 2013 deduction, start by contacting the charity and learning how they want you to get the securities to them by year-end. Remind the charity that they need to provide you a written acknowledgement of the gift.  And make sure your own broker knows the transfer has to be completed this year.

Come back tomorrow for another 2013 year-end tax tip!

 

20120906-1Just bluffing.  ”Archer Daniels Midland Co. decided Wednesday to set up its new international headquarters in Chicago even after it failed in its bid for millions of dollars in state tax breaks.”  Next time our politicians claim to have “created jobs” by giving away your money, remember that they are giving their friends money to do things they would be doing anyway.

 

 

Cara Griffith, The Tax Reform Debate…for a Limited Few in Wisconsin (Tax Analysts Blog):

What was advertised as an “outstanding opportunity for the hardworking taxpayers” to engage in discussions about tax reform are also closed to the public…

Making tax proposals available to the public and opening up a dialogue with affected taxpayers can be eye-opening for people who will eventually have to develop and administer the proposal. If tax legislation is enacted, those who wrote the legislation, those who will enforce it, and those who will be affected by it should all understand what the legislation was designed to do. 

Politicians and their friends don’t like company.

 

Christopher Bergin, Transparency Is in Our DNA (Tax Analysts Blog):

Tax Analysts is involved in litigation in the commonwealth of Kentucky to get its Department of Revenue to begin releasing redacted copies of final letter rulings. The agency is resisting that, which is why we are in court.

Bureaucrats and their friends don’t like company either.

 

Chris Stephens, Pressure Mounts Against “Jock Tax” in Tennessee (Tax Policy Blog):

For example, a player at the NBA league minimum of $500,000 who is paid per game would make about $6,097 per game. If the player plays only one game in Tennessee he would pay a tax of $2,500 for that game, which is a tax rate of 41 percent. It is also worth noting that the player would also pay approximately 40 percent in federal income taxes, potentially leaving almost nothing in take home pay.

The states that want to pick the stars’ pockets forget that not everybody is paid like LeBron.  Unfortunately, the federal proposal to prevent state income taxation of employees only in-state for a few days doesn’t cover athletes or entertainers, treating the couch-surfing musician the same as Peyton Manning.

 

20111040logoTaxGrrrl, IRS Finally Announces Start Date To 2014 Tax Filing Season  Filing season starts January 31.

Paul Neiffer,  Tax Filing Begins January 31, 2014

Jason Dinesen, Six Things I’m Talking to My Small Business Clients About at Year-End (Part 1)   

Tony Nitti, With Tax Break Set To Expire, Partnerships Should Consider Converting To C Corporations Before Year End.  This is a 100% exemption on gains for C corporation stock received on original issue held for at least five years.

Kay Bell,  Homeownership tax breaks to take in December

Robert D. Flach, WHAT’S NEW FOR NEW YORK INCOME TAXES FOR 2013

Margaret Van Houten, How to Maintain Records for your Digital Assets  (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

 

Janet Novack, Minus Taxes And Hype, $636 Million Jackpot Shrinks To $206 Million — Or Less 

Jim Maule, Let’s Not Extend The Practice of Tax Extenders.  Agreed.

Stephen Olsen, The “IRS Investigations” Scam.  A client he helped through the OVDI “amnesty” program gets targeting by a scammer.  Troubling.

Jack Townsend, Judge Rakoff Speaks on the Dearth of Prosecutions from the Financial Crisis   He quotes the judge: “But if, by contrast, the Great Recession was in material part the product of intentional fraud, the failure to prosecute those responsible must be judged one of the more egregious failures of the criminal justice system in many years.”

It’s at least as much political fraud as financial fraud, but political fraud is never prosecuted.

 

Tax Justice Blog, Murray-Ryan Budget Deal Avoids Government Shut down but Does Not Close a Single Tax Loophole, Leaves Many Problems in Place

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 224

 

News from the Profession: Future CPA Seeking the Best CPA Review Course Someone Else’s Money Can Buy (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/17/2013: Map day! A B+ for Iowa tax administration.

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

I did my last session of the year yesterday for the ISU-CALT tax school in Ames, and I have much catching up to do today in the office.  It’s a two-day school, and today Paul Neiffer is on the Day 2 team at the Ames Tax School.

 

Ben Harris, The US Income Tax Burden, County by County (TaxVox):

While the median federal income tax burden across counties is about $3,400, approximately 10 percent of counties  have average tax burdens less than $2,100 and around 10 percent of counties have  average tax burdens over $6,700.

20131217-1

I think the right side of the little color key is supposed to read $7,000, not $70,000.  Unless Central Iowa has higher income than I thought, anyway.

 

Meanwhile, Joseph Henchman reports that the Council on State Taxation graded the states on “taxpayer administration,” with this map (Tax Poliy Blog):

20131217-2

Iowa gets a B+:

20131217-3

 

I think they are grading on a curve.  And Iowa gets credits for making rulings and decisions available; that hasn’t been done since August, at least not on the Iowa Department of Revenue website.

 

Jeremy Scott, IRS Moves Closer to Having a Commissioner (Tax Analysts Blog).  How novel.

O. Kay Henderson,  Energy execs say end of federal credit to curb wind energy expansion.  When something can’t happen without subsidies, that’s nature’s way of saying it shouldn’t happen.

Jason Dinesen, Will Same-Sex Married Couples Pay More or Less in Taxes Now?  “I answer by saying that the answer is: ‘yes, no, maybe.’”

 

Leslie Book, Omitted Income, Accuracy-Related Penalties and Reasonable Cause (Procedurally Taxing).  He talks about the case I discussed here, saying:

Sometimes when I read penalty cases involving individuals I am struck by how the penalties are inappropriate. Here, I understand why IRS counsel stuck to its guns and tried the case, but I also agree with the court’s conclusion on these facts. I suspect that very few taxpayers leaving off this amount of income would get relief from the penalties, though wonder if the IRM should extend the first time abatement relief to penalties other than failure to file or failure to pay, so that perhaps Counsel or Appeals will feel more comfortable in exercising discretion if there are facts suggestive of an isolated and understandable mistake.

IRS is much too quick to assess foot-fault penalties on taxpayers with a good compliance history.

 

William Perez, IRA Distributions at Year End:

Taxpayers who are age 70.5 or older are required to distribute at least a minimum amount from their traditional IRAs, 401(k) plans and similar pre-tax savings plans. These required minimum distributions must begin no later than April 1st after the reaching age seventy and a half. Individuals continue taking required minimum distributions each year. So the first year-end tactic is to figure out how much needs to be distributed from the retirement plan to satisfy the required minimum distribution rules.

Basic, but missed surprisingly often.

 

Tony Nitti,  IRS Issues Guidance On Employee Benefit Plans For Same-Sex Couples

Russ Fox,  Health Care Fraud Leads to Tax Charge

Kay Bell, Medical tax breaks’ 10% and FSA year-end considerations

TaxGrrrl has kicked off her “12 Days of Charitable Giving 2013.”  Today she highlights Children Of Fallen Patriots 

TaxProf,  The IRS Scandal, Day 222

 

Grab a Tuesday Buzz from Robert D. Flach!

News From the Profession.  Accounting Firm Busted Stealing From the Cloud in “Plain, Vanilla Dispute About a Customer List” (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/16/2013: Ames! And: if you’re explaining, you’re losing.

Monday, December 16th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

It’s a cold day In Ames, Iowa, but it’s toasty warm with 315 or so eager participants in the last session of this year’s ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax Schools!  

20131216-1

The Ames Crowd!

It’s a fun school, with lots of good attendees with great, challenging questions.  I’ve enjoyed working on the Day 1 panel with emcee Roger McEowen and IRS Taxpayer Liason Kristy Maitre

 

20120906-1“In economic development, if you’re explaining, you’re losing.”  An article at WCFcourier.com makes an often-overlooked point about how economic development spiffs that complicate the tax law end up backfiring:

A simpler tax system may top all other requests from the business groups, said Steve Firman, director of government relations for the Greater Cedar Valley Alliance and Chamber.

Firman pointed out that Iowa ranked 40th among states in the Tax Foundation’s 2014 tax climate comparisons because it is tough to explain the complexity of federal deductibility that blurs Iowa’s true tax picture.

Firman, explaining his position, pulled out a line he said he likes to use:

“In economic development, if you’re explaining, you’re losing,” he said.

Iowa’s byzantine tax system, with its dozens of special breaks, requires a lot of explaining.  The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Tax Reform Plan, with low individual rates and no corporate tax, would be a much better sell.

 

William Gale,  The Year in Taxes: From the Fiscal Cliff to Tax Reform Talks (TaxVox):

Although Camp and Baucus do not appear to have reached agreement on how much revenue should be raised or on how to raise it, the two leaders have nonetheless raised some interesting ideas. But the sorry state of tax reform can probably best be summed up by a small business owner who attended the New Jersey stop of a listening tour that the two chairmen held last summer. She urged the two leaders to “get rid of the deductions that don’t affect me.” As long as that attitude prevails, meaningful tax reform will not happen.

The same dynamic is at work in Iowa.

 

TaxGrrrl, Budget Faces Challenge From Senators Wary Of Spending, User Fees To Taxpayers   

William Perez, Use Fundsin a Health Care Flexible Spending Account (Year-End Tax Tips)

Kay Bell, Tax deductible mileage rate drops a half-cent in 2014

Annette Nellen, What’s My Rate? Challenges of Understanding 2013 Federal Taxes

Paul Neiffer, How Many 2013 Tax Brackets

 

IrwinIrwinIrwinirwin.jpgPeter Reilly, Euro Pacific Capital’s Peter Schiff Defends His Tax Protesting Father Irwin Schiff   Peter has a lot of interesting background on tax protester Irwin and his controversial, but much more prudent, son. And: “I can’t blame Peter Schiff for sticking up for his dad.  I would too, if I still had one.”

 

 

Irwin

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 221

Jack Townsend, Article on New Sentencing Guidelines on Unclaimed Deductions and Credits

 

Robert Rizzo

Robert Rizzo

Russ Fox, Former Bell Administrator Pleads Guilty to Tax Fraud; That’s the Least of His Problems:

 In what is (and was) a huge scandal, Mr. Rizzo and his cronies basically used the City of Bell as their own personal piggy bank. He’s going to be going to state prison for 10 to 12 years (his sentencing will be in March). The scandal allegedly included salaries of up to $800,000; gas tax money being used for these salaries; and falsifying city documents to hide the salaries. The city council members from that time period are awaiting trial.ta

Just a humble public servant.

 

News from the Professon:  Grant Thornton Employees Break Out Dynamic Christmas Sweaters for Holiday Party

Jason Dinesen,  North Dakota Taxes, Same-Sex Marriage, And a Really Bizarre Twist 

The party’s over.  Unemployed German couple accused of tax fraud after caught hosting sex parties.   They had a $250, er, cover charge.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/11/13: Iowa DOT restricts revenue cameras. And: whither extenders?

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013 by Joe Kristan


gatso
Department of Transportation enacts tax reduction.  
From the Des Moines Register:

Cities and counties would have to prove the need for traffic enforcement cameras on major highways under rules approved Tuesday by the Iowa Transportation Commission.

The new rules — which could take effect as early as February — would force a re-evaluation of all speeding and red-light cameras now placed on interstate highways, U.S. highways and state highways and require any new cameras to first win the Department of Transportation’s approval.

It’s not clear what effect this will have on the revenue cameras, like the one on Eastbound I-235 by Waveland Golf Course, but given the howls from the affected municipal pickpockets who profit from the cameras in the runup to the rules, I suspect it means fewer cameras.   The municipalities like their tax on passing motorists, at least those who aren’t “special.”

Of course they always invoke safety, in spite of inconclusive or contradictory evidence.  But if it really were about safety, you would see them experimenting with other solutions, like all-red phases at red lights and longer yellows.   When they have to say it’s not about the money, it’s about the money.

 

Howard Gleckman,  Whither the Tax Extenders? (TaxVox):

If published reports are correct–and if the deal does not fall apart–Congress would partially replace the hated automatic across-the-board spending cuts (the sequester) with more traditional targets for each federal agency. In effect, it would freeze discretionary spending at about $1 trillion-a-year for the next two years. Without a new agreement the 2014 level would be $967 billion.

The deal would replace the sequester cuts with a grab-bag of other reductions in planned spending and a bunch of increased fees for airline travelers and others.

But the “t” word will go unspoken in this agreement. There will reportedly be no tax hikes in the bargain. But neither will there be a continuation of expiring provisions. And there is no chance they will be extended in any other bill in calendar 2013.

That likely means no action on the “expiring provisions” until after the 2014 elections.  That means we might not know whether a bunch of tax breaks we have gotten used to will be extended into 2014 until next December, or maybe even later.  A few of the biggies:

  • The Section 179 limit on expensing otherwise depreciable property falls to $25,000 next year, from the current $500,000, absent an extender bill.
  • 50% bonus depreciation goes away.
  • The research credit disappears, as do a bunch of biofuel and wind credits.
  • The current five-year “recognition period” for built-in gains in S corporations goes back to ten years, from the current five-year period.

My money is still on an extension of these provisions, effective January 1, 2014, even if enacted later, but my confidence is wavering.

 

20121220-3William Perez, Selling Profitable Investments as Part of a Year-End Tax Strategy. “Taxpayers in the two lowest tax brackets of 10% and 15% may especially want to consider selling profitable long-term investments.”  Why?  Zero taxes on capital gains, as William explains.

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Tax Treatment of Commuting Costs   

Kay Bell, Standard tax deduction amounts bumped up for 2014

Jana Luttenegger, 2014 Mileage Rates (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Jason Dinesen, Philosophical Question About Section 108, Principal Residences and Cancelled Debt  “My question is. what if the homeowner moves out before the foreclosure process is complete?”

TaxGrrrl, You’re A Mean One, Mr. Grinch: Christmas Tree Tax Proposal Returns 

Russ Fox,  Bank Notice on IRS Tax Refund Fraud.  ”While I salute the IRS (and the banks) for doing something, this effort is equivalent to patching one hole in a roof that has over a hundred leaks.”

Robert D. Flach offers SOME GOOD CONVERSATIONS ON TAX PROFESSIONAL ISSUES

 

 

Leslie Book,  TEFRA and Affected Items Notices of Deficiency (Procedurally Taxing).  ”In this post, I will attempt to give readers a map as to how IRS can move from shamming a partnership-based tax shelter to assessing tax against the partner or partners that were attempting to game the system.”

 

Kyle Pomerleau, High Income Households Paid an Effective Tax Rate 16 times Higher than Low Income Households in 2010 (Tax Policy Blog).  He provides more commentary on a recent Congressional Budget Office report (my emphasis):

In 2010, the average effective tax rate for all households was 18.1 percent. This is the average combined effective rate of individual income taxes, social security taxes, corporate income taxes, and excise taxes. The top income quintile paid an average effective tax rate of 24 percent.  The lowest quintile had an average effective rate of 1.5 percent. The top quintile’s effective tax rate of 24 percent is 16 times higher than 1.5 percent for those in the lowest quintile.

cbo rates by income group

This is why any federal tax cut “disproportionately benefits the wealthy.”  You can only cut taxes for people who pay taxes.

 

The Critical Question: When Does the Conspiracy End? (Jack Townsend)

News from the Profession: Deloitte Associate Exercises Powers of Persuasion; Scores Firm-Subsidized Xbox One (Going Concern)

 

20131211-1Atlanta county gives money to prosperous media company.  Cobb County, Future Home of the Atlanta Braves, Strikes Out (Elia Peterson, Tax Policy Blog, my emphasis):

The county is projected to have to finance around $300 million for the development.  This includes a one-time $14 million transportation improvement subsidy, a $10 million commitment from the Cumberland Community Improvement District (CID), and payments worth $276 million of a bond issue. The bonds are financed by redirecting funds from two existing taxes (hotel & property taxes) and creating three new revenue sources (a rental car tax, a property tax in the Cumberland CID, and a hotel fee) combined to the tune of $17.9 million annually for the next 30 years.

Liberty Media, the owner of the Braves, despite being a very successful company (owning stakes in SiriusXM, Barnes & Noble, and Time Warner) had their investment subsidized by Cobb County taxpayers. Liberty Media retains most of the rights to the stadium and profits while Cobb County gets next to nothing except the promise of “surefire” economic development (the city won’t even be allowed access to the stadium they built except for special occasions).

Build it and you can’t come!

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/9/2013: Denison! And 56 cents a mile for 2014.

Monday, December 9th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

The Tax Update is in sunny, but very cold, Denison, Iowa today.

20131209-1

I’m participating in the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School here.  The only remaining session is in Ames next Monday, so register now!

 

The IRS has issued updated standard mileage rates for 2014:

- 56 cents for business travel (down from 56.5 cents for 2013);

- 23.5 cents for medical travel;

- 14 cents for charitable travel.

Gas is down.  (Notice 2013-80)

Related: Paul Neiffer, IRS Almosts Eliminates the 1/2 cent

 

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

The EITC as a poverty trap: phaseouts of the benefit impose stiff marginal tax rates on the working poor.

Mickey Kaus, Big Obamacare payoff for tax cheats?:

Doesn’t Obamacare create a big new incentive to fudge your income on your tax returns? The subsidies available on the health care exchanges seem to be based on adjusted gross income (line 37 on Form 1040)– and there’s a huge, conspicuous difference between the subsidy available at, say, a $25,000 income and a $46,000 income. (The subsidy cutoff of is $45,960 for a single person). In California, for the “bronze” policy I’m interested in, at $46,000 I’d pay $507 a month. At $25,000 I’d pay … $63. A difference of $444 a month.

I have mentioned quite often the high hidden marginal rates caused by the phase-out of the earned income tax credit.  The Obamacare subsidy phase-outs worsen this.  The government pays you to stay poor, or to cheat on your taxes if you aren’t poor anymore.  You get what you pay for. (via Instapundit)

William Perez,  Year End Review of Choice of Business Entity. “There is definitely no one-size-fits-all answer when it comes to deciding on an appropriate tax structure for a business.”

Margaret Van Houten, What our Estate Planning Clients Need To Know – What are Digital Assets? (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).  On the importance of including “digital assets” in your estate planning.

Kay Bell,  Freezing? Home improvements provide warmth, tax savings

Jason Dinesen, Colorado Tax Guidance for Same-Sex Marriage 

Tony Nitti, IRS Addresses Deductibilty Of Organizational And Start-Up Costs Upon Partnership Technical Termination 

 

 

Lyman Stone, Missouri Gives In With $2 Billion Incentive to Boeing.  Missouri taxes its residents and existing businesses to give cash to an insider with good lobbyists.

How do you know that the new proposed 501(c)(4) regulations are designed to silence right-side speech?  The left-side advocacy groups have dropped their lawsuit demanding the IRS enact regulations to silence right-side speech (Huffington Post).

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 214 and Smith: The Latest IRS Power Grab

Robert D. Flach, HERE’S A THOUGHT – A FEW MORE CENTS ON A VOLUNTARY CREDENTIAL FOR TAX PROS.  ”If the IRS does not decide to go ahead with a voluntary RTRP program after it loses the appeal of Loving v IRS, I have proposed an independent industry-based organization to administer a voluntary RTRP-like tax preparer credential in my ACCOUNTING TODAY editorial ‘It’s Time for Independent Certification for Tax Preparers. ”  It would be an improvement over the IRS system.

Peter Reilly, Cigarette Importer Sees $300M Deduction Go Up In Smoke   

 

 

Greg Mankiw, The Progressivity of the Current Tax Code :

20131209-2

 

Jack Townsend,  Swiss Banks Scrambling to Commit to Participation in U.S.Swiss Bank Initiative

TaxGrrrl, IRS To Rapper: It’s Hammertime!  Remember M.C. Hammer?  The IRS does, even if you don’t.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/5/2013: Branstad floats optional income tax without federal tax deduction. And: is IRS hiding something?

Thursday, December 5th, 2013 by Joe Kristan
If Iowa's income tax were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s income tax were a car, it would look like this.

Iowa Alternative Maximum Tax proposal revived?  Governor Branstad may push an optional income tax with lower rates and no deduction for federal taxes.  This plan looks like an attempt to improve Iowa’s byzantine income tax without provoking the wrath of Iowans for Tax Relief, the Muscatine-based advocacy group that strongly opposes efforts to do away with the deduction.  KJAN.com reports:

Iowa’s income tax rates higher when compared to most other states because Iowa offers a deduction that’s offered in only five other states. That deduction allows Iowans to subtract their federal income tax liability from their income before calculating their state income taxes.  “We don’t want to erode federal deductability,” Branstad says, “and that’s why we’re saying: ‘Give ‘em the option.’” By giving taxpayers the option to file their income taxes under the current system with that major deduction or under a new system with lower and flatter rates, Branstad might avoid the firestorm he faced from his fellow Republicans in the late 1980s when he proposed doing away with that deduction.

The Governor appears to plan to add a new twist to the plan, reports Kathie Obradovich:

Branstad indicated that he wouldn’t allow Iowans to “game the system” by changing their form every year. That means taxpayers who give up the federal deduction would have to stick with the choice even if the other option would result in lower taxes in a given year.

That means the new system would be a one-way street.  It no longer would be an “alternative maximum tax,” where taxpayers would always compute their tax both with and without the federal deduction and choose the lower amount.  That makes it even worse than the version passed by the Iowa House of Representatives last year, which would have allowed taxpayers to make the choice annually.  Unless the new system provides significantly better results in the great majority of circumstances, most taxpayers would want to retain the option to use the federal deduction.  That would stall the (presumably) desired transition to a simpler system.  Both the Branstad plan and the House plan significantly add to the complexity of the tax law.

While Iowa’s high stated tax rates — individual and corporate — don’t help, the ridiculous complexity of Iowa tax law is the real problem.  Iowa has a bunch of penny-ante credits and deductions that don’t apply for federal purposes.  These are too small to make a significant difference to taxpayers but also too small for the Department of Revenue to police.  There are also dozens of special-interest tax credits and deductions that take dollars from the rest of us on behalf of people with connections at the Statehouse.

It’s not in his nature, but the Governor ought to go bold and embrace the Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.  It strips the Iowa tax law to a very few deductions and repeals Iowa’s highest-in-the-nation corporation income tax while drastically lowering personal rates.  The Iowa Senate is unlikely to pass the Governor’s half-baked half-measure anyway; why not change the terms of the debate with a plan that actually makes sense?

Related:  The Iowa flat tax proposal: a good deal for middle class and up, but not for lower incomes.

 

taxanalystslogoChristopher BerginTax Analysts v. IRS: What Are They Hiding? (Tax Analysts Blog):

Back in August, I wrote about the lawsuit Tax Analysts had filed against the IRS seeking documents under the Freedom of Information Act. The documents being sought were training materials used to instruct and guide IRS personnel in the IRS exempt organization determinations office in Cincinnati. The big story then, and now, was generated by former EO director in the IRS Tax-Exempt and Government Entities Division Lois Lerner’s admission that the agency had used inappropriate means to determine which organizations qualified for tax-exempt status as social welfare organizations. The organizations singled out for extra scrutiny were mostly, if not entirely, conservative. Tax Analysts felt compelled to seek relief from the courts because we were getting nowhere with the IRS – other than the big stall – even though it had promised expedited treatment on our original request.

Several months later, the big stall continues — to the point that I have to ask myself whether the IRS just made a stupid mistake in targeting those organizations or whether something much worse is going on. 

They are using the “taxpayer confidentiality” excuse for their standard big stall.  Christopher isn’t buying it:

But I’ll say it again: Training materials, really? Why on earth would the IRS try to keep those secret? You’d think the training manuals would all be in a file cabinet somewhere, which hardly would require a search party of 100 lawyers and a scouring for tax return information.

Could it be that this time something is different? Could there be a smoking gun here? I’m not saying there is. I’m just saying it may be time to start asking that question. Because even for the IRS, this is darned peculiar behavior.

Congress should amend the taxpayer confidentiality rules to keep the IRS from using them as an excuse to hide its own dirty laundry.  It shouldn’t require a federal lawsuit to get the IRS to publicize internal non-taxpayer documents.

 

 

20130121-2Whither the Registered Tax Return Preparer Program?  Robert D. Flach argues that the RTRP designation that was part of the nearly-dead IRS preparer regulation power grab should be administered by the IRS on a voluntary basis.  I disagree.

Robert would like a way to distinguish the better class of “unenrolled” preparers from less-professional seasonal preparers.  I can understand that, but I don’t think that the IRS is the agency that should do this.  It would divert already strained IRS resources to do something the preparer industry could do on its own.  I agree with Jason Dinesen that if preparers want a government designation, they should take the Enrolled Agents exam, which is much more difficult than the RTRP literacy test.  The EA designation is sadly underappreciated in the market, and adding a new IRS-run designation would only make that worse.

 

The IRS reminds us that the “savers credit” can help lower-income taxpayers who contribute to a retirement plan.  This is a non-refundable credit of up to 50% of the amount contributed to IRAs or deferred to a 401(k) plan.  For parents, funding a young adult offspring’s retirement plan contribution is a tax-efficient way to help build a nest egg.

 

Don’t try this with your tax deadlines.   TIGTA: IRS Is Seven Years Past Statutory Deadline for Providing Online Account Access to Taxpayers (TaxProf).  From the TIGTA report:

The RRA 98 required the IRS to develop procedures to allow taxpayers filing returns electronically to review their account online by December 31, 2006. The IRS did not meet this requirement, and we determined that the IRS has not made adequate progress in allowing taxpayers to access tax accounts. Currently, taxpayers cannot review account information electronically.

In fact, the IRS is getting worse, having cut back electronic access for tax professionals.  That makes resolving even a simple IRS notice a tedious multi-week snail-mail slog.

 

Tony Nitti, The Definitive Questions And Answers On The New Net Investment Income Tax [Updated For Final Regulations] 

amazonCara Griffith It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane…It’s Amazon Prime Air? (Tax Analysts Blog).  Sales tax by drone.

Alan Cole, Report: Obamacare Premium Subsidies Will Need Fraud Protection (Tax Policy Blog).  No kidding.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 210

 

Kay Bell, Tax e-filing continues to grow, hitting 122 million in 2013

TaxGrrrl, Will Congress Drive Up Gas Taxes In 2014?   

 

Um, because most commuters drive?  Why Does the Tax Code Favor Commuters that Drive? (Tax Justice Blog)

Going Concern, IRS’ Improved e-File System Is a Total Success Except For Two Jerks Who Foiled It

 

Don’t trust tax collectors, if you’re a tax collector:

The former tax collector of Plainville, who is also former treasurer of the Connecticut Tax Collectors Association, was arrested Monday morning and charged with first degree larceny, after being under investigation for possible embezzlement since June.

Debra Guerrette, of Bristol, was placed on administrative leave from Plainville’s Revenue office in June after Bristol police informed the town Guerrette was involved in a criminal investigation.

After an analysis of the financial records for the Connecticut Tax Collectors Association, and also Guerrette’s financial records, police said she had “misappropriated funds in excess of $50,000” between 2008 and 2013, into her personal account.

Will there be a special assessment of the collectors to make up the difference?

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/2/2013: Remember the January 15 property tax credit deadline! And: final 3.8% tax regs.

Monday, December 2nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1There’s a new deadline this year for Iowa business owners with real property.   Iowa business owners have a January 15, 2014 deadline to apply for the business property tax credit enacted in this year’s legislative session.  Many have yet to apply, reports gazette.com:

Commercial property owners have been slow to apply for a new property tax credit designed to give a little boost to small businesses.

Most business owners who own the property in which the business operates are eligible for the Iowa Business Property Tax Credit.

A $50 million pool of money is available for the first year of the new tax credit. The state legislature included the credit in an historic property tax relief bill signed into law on June 12.

“It is important they get them in now so we can process them,” said Cedar Rapids City Assessor Scott Labus.

Businesses can find the form online here.  It should be filed with the local county assessor’s office. The gazette.com article says the maximum credit for the coming assessment year is $523.

 

Paul Neiffer,  Final Net Investment Income Regs Have Good News For Farmers:

In Final Regulations issued earlier this week, the IRS changed their interpretation of this rule and have now indicated that any self-rented real estate or rental real estate that has been properly grouped with a material participation entity will not be subject to the tax.  In even better news, any gain from selling this type of property will also be exempt from the tax.

Good news not just for farmers, but for any business where the owners rent property to a corporation they control.

 

Tony Nitti, IRS Issues Final Net Investment Income Tax Regulations: A First Look And More   It was a dirty trick to issue them over Thanksgiving, when I wasn’t watching.   I will be posting on some key issues.

 

20130419-1Illinois storm victims get filing relief (IRS news release):

The President has declared the counties of Champaign, Douglas, Fayette, Grundy, Jasper, La Salle, Massac, Pope, Tazewell, Vermilion, Wabash, Washington, Wayne, Will and Woodford a federal disaster area. Individuals who reside or have a business in these counties may qualify for tax relief.

The declaration permits the IRS to postpone certain deadlines for taxpayers who reside or have a business in the disaster area. For instance, certain deadlines falling on or after Nov. 17, and on or before Feb. 28, 2014, have been postponed to Feb. 28, 2014.

The IRS is also waiving the failure-to-deposit penalties for employment and excise tax deposits due on or after Nov. 17, and on or before Dec. 2, as long as the deposits are made by Dec. 2, 2013.

You don’t have to be damaged to qualify, you just have to be located in the affected area.

 

No, that’s not the real threat.  The Muscatine Journal mistakes the painkiller for the ailment:

Tax breaks for wind-power producers are set to expire in a little more than a month, threatening hundreds of manufacturing and energy jobs in the state if nothing is done.

In Iowa, much of the attention has focused on the federal Renewable Fuel Standard in which the federal government guarantees a market for biofuels. But for Iowa’s turbine manufacturers and power companies, it’s the federal production tax credit that takes precedence.

It’s not the loss of the tax credits that threatens these industries.  It’s their inability to survive without subsidies or, in the case of ethanol makers, their inability to sell their product unless people are forced by law to buy it.  The subsidies only dull the recipients awareness of their real ailment.

 

David Brunori, Confusing Tax Cuts with Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog):

But increasing or decreasing tax burdens should not be confused with tax reform. Tax reform should mean something. I define tax reform as meaningful changes to the tax system that comport with the general notions of sound tax policy. The goal should be to make the system fairer, neutral, more efficient, and more stable. The changes should also increase economic development and job growth. And they should ensure that the government raises enough revenue to meet the public service demands of the citizenry. Changing the rates or tinkering at the margins is not reform.

Nor is giving tax spiffs to influential or sympathetic constituencies, but that’s been the Iowa way for some time now.

 

20120529-2Lyman Stone, Missouri Considering “Massive” Incentives for Boeing (Tax Policy Blog):

This is bad tax policy in spades. Governor Nixon rejected a flawed, but still broad, tax cut on the grounds that taxes don’t matter much for businesses, but government services do. Now Missouri policymakers may try to attract one specific company with a “massive” and narrowly-targeted tax break, despite lack of evidence that incentives lead to economic growth, and ample evidence that they create problems.

It’s all about directing funds to insiders with good lobbyists.

 

Cara Griffith, A Change of Culture (Tax Analysts Blog).  She talks about the natural tendency of tax authorities to conceal information and make tax practice an insiders’ game.  She notes that North Carolina doesn’t release private rulings and hasn’t updated public corporate directives since April 2012.  Iowa is better, but they haven’t updated their “What’s new” website since August.

 

William Perez, Updated Form W-9.  With the additional rules of FATCA piled on top of existing foreign withholding rules, you should make sure to get a W-9 from your vendors, depositors and ownership groups.

 

Jason Dinesen reminds us of the Iowa Insurance Premium Deduction

Trish McIntire reminds us that Refund Advances are really expensive loans.

Robert D. Flach, TO PER DIEM OR NOT TO PER DIEM – THAT IS THE QUESTION.

 

Kay Bell offers some Tax-saving moves to make by Dec. 31, 2013

Howard Gleckman,  Obama Will Try to Clarify the Role of Tax-Exempt Groups in Politics.  Your new role in furthering public debate?  Shut up!

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 207

Tax Justice Blog: This Holiday, The Tax Justice Team Is Thankful For…  In other words, watch your wallets, folks.

The Critical Question: Do We Need A Clergy Tax Simplification Act Of 2014?    (Peter Reilly)

Going Concern, 10 Things Accounting Professionals Should Be Thankful For This Year

TaxGrrrl, This Man’s Nuts: Plan To Sell Testicle For New Car Is Taxable   As if there weren’t enough non-tax arguments against this plan.

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/13/13: Is more IRS money what we need? And why I’m hoping against hope!

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013 by Joe Kristan
Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

Is more money the answer to “pitiful” IRS service?   That’s what Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson believes, based on a story by Tax Analysts ($link):

National Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson in a November 9 speech decried as pitiful the level of IRS customer service given to taxpayers, which she attributed to inadequate funding that has forced the Service to automate many of the most important tax administration functions and skimp on training employees on taxpayer rights.

Everything else being equal, you can do more with more money.  Yet we all face limits to our resources, so we prioritize.  The IRS — at the urging of Nina Olson — has directed resources unwisely to its misguided attempt to boss the tax prep industry.  It has been a debacle so far, and it appears headed to oblivion in the courts.

The IRS has another administrative problem that the Taxpayer Advocate has pointed out.  The tax law is too complicated to effectively administer even with a much larger budget.  The tax law is seen as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy, and like a knife with too many gadgets, it becomes hard to work as a knife.  This chart from Chris Edwards at the Cato Institute illustrates the problem:

irs budget cato 20131113

 

Chris Edwards explains:

The chart shows that the IRS has become a huge social welfare agency in recent decades. Handouts have soared from $4.4 billion in 1990 to an estimated $91.1 billion in 2013 (red line). Handouts are down a bit in recent years because some of the refundable credits from “stimulus” legislation have expired. IRS administration costs have grown from $7.7 billion in 1990 to an estimated $15.3 billion in 2013 (blue line). 

How should we reform the IRS budget? First, we should terminate the handout programs. That would save taxpayers more than $90 billion annually and cut the IRS budget by 86 percent. 

The largest IRS handout is the refundable part of the EITC, which is expected to cost $55 billion in 2013.

So true.  Considering that over $10 billion of the $55 billion is stolen or otherwise issued improperly, the EITC is a nightmare.  There would be plenty of funding available for tax administration if EITC could go away.

But the chart also shows something else: if the tax law was no more complicated than it was in 1990 — and believe me, it was plenty complicated — the IRS administrative budget would be adequate.  But with the IRS transformed into a monster multi-portfolio agency charged with healthcare administration, welfare, industrial policy, environmental enforcement, etc., etc., its budget is hopeless.

 

This will work out well:

This article examines the tax collection process to see how the IRS might enforce the individual mandate under the healthcare reform law. It concludes that resistant taxpayers can generally be forced to pay the tax penalty only if they are entitled to receive refundable tax credits that exceed their net federal tax liability. 

From Jordan BerryThe Not-So-Mandatory Individual Mandate, via the TaxProf.

 

Don’t trust the Tax Foundation?  Maybe you’ll trust the Congressional Budget Office.  A commenter yesterday took issue with a chart I reproduced showing not only the tax burden at different income levels, but the amount of government spending benefiting different income levels:

It’s not “the first chart for any tax policy debate,” it’s the last chart you should want to find on your side of the debate if you want to have any credibility.

If that doesn’t work for you, maybe this one from the CBO will be less objectionable:

cbo table

This chart is more focused on direct transfers, but it says pretty much the same thing.  It also covers 2006, and the tax law has hit the high end harder since then. (Via Greg Mankiw).

 

Scott Hodge, Andrew Lundeen,  54 Million Federal Tax Returns Had No Income Tax Liability in 2011 (Tax Policy Blog)

 

Paul Neiffer,  Sale of CRP Land – Is it Subject to the 3.8% Tax?  It depends a lot on whether an appeals court upholds the Tax Court Morehouse decision imposing self-employment tax on CRP income.  ”And if the Morehouse case is overturned on appeal and the CRP is treated as rents, the land sale will also be subject to the 3.8% tax.”

 

Kay Bell, Tax tips for newlyweds saying “I do” on 11-12-13 or any day

Jack Townsend,  U.S. Banks File Long-Shot Litigation to Block FATCA Reciprocal Requirements

Leslie Book,  Disclosure and the 6-Year Statute of Limitation: S Corp Issues (Procedurally Taxing)

Jason Dinesen,  EAs are Partly to Blame for Our Obscurity  “Yes, we are treated as the red-headed stepchild of the tax world. But a big reason for this is that we ALLOW people to treat us this way.”

Russ Fox, Dan Walters with Another Example of California Dreamin’

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 188

 

Hope lives! 

It’s Time to Give Up on Tax Reform” – Joseph Thorndike, October 29, 2013

When Tax Reform Rises From the Dead, What Will It Look Like?Joseph Thorndike, November 12, 2013.

I should note that his vision of resurrected tax reform is hideous.  If that’s what hope for tax reform comes to, I’ll hope against his hope.

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/25/13: No production deduction for direct-mailer. And: the brain-damage excuse.

Friday, October 25th, 2013 by Joe Kristan


199
Direct mail operator fails to qualify for “Domestic Production Activity Deduction.”  
One of the sillier parts of the tax law is the 9% deduction for nothing given to “producers” of manufactured, constructed, raised or mined property.  If all you do is manufacture, you get 9% off the top of your taxable income under Section 199.

In a modern interconnected economy, distinguishing between “manufacturing” and other activities is silly.  The law is made more silly because it has special interest provisions allowing some architects and engineers to take the deduction.  Sure you need them for a construction project, but just try getting a building up without lawyers and accountants, too.

The law’s unwise distinction between “production” activities and other activities encourages taxpayers to try to qualify, and forces the courts to try to draw distinctions.  That happened yesterday when the Tax Court looked at a direct mail operator’s Section 199 deduction.  From the Tax Court opinion:

 During 2005, 2006, and 2007, ADVO distributed direct mail advertising in the United States. Direct mail advertisers such as ADVO distribute advertising material through the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) to residential recipients, who are the targeted potential customers for the products and services sold by ADVO’s clients, the advertisers. The advertising material can be either “solo direct mail” or “cooperative direct mail”. For solo direct mail, the printed advertising material of a single advertiser is delivered in a stand-alone envelope or as a postcard to a residential recipient. For cooperative direct mail, also known as a shared mail package, the printed advertising material for several different advertisers is consolidated into a single delivery mechanism (such as an envelope or sleeve) and delivered as a single unit to residential recipients.

The court had to go through an elaborate analysis of whether ADVO was a “manufacturer.”  Judge Wherry concluded:

After careful review of all of the aforementioned factors in the light of the specific facts and circumstances of this case, we find that ADVO did not have the benefits and burdens of ownership while the advertising material was printed.

This implies ADVO was a “contract manufacturer,” and that its customers might have qualified.  It also implies that if ADVO had structured its paperwork differently, it might have won.  If this deduction is repealed in return for lower rates for everyone, we’ll all win.

Cite: ADVO, Inc. and Subsidiaries, 141 T.C. No. 9

Related: TREASURY ISSUES ‘PRODUCTION DEDUCTION’ PROPOSED REGULATIONS and LINK TO SECTION 199 POWERPOINT SLIDES

 

Iowa announces business property credit applications open.  From a Department of Revenue Press Release:

Applications for credit against 2013 property tax assessments must be received by the county or city assessor by January 15, 2014.  The actual amount of credit each property unit will receive depends in part upon the total value of all property units and the average consolidated rates in each unit.  The credit calculation is designed to spend ninety-eight percent of the amount appropriated by the Legislature to the Business Property Tax Credit Fund.  For the first year of the credit $50 million was appropriated to the Fund.  The Legislative Services Agency has estimated that the maximum first year credit amount will be approximately $523.

It applies to “certain commercial, industrial, and railroad properties.  More information here.

 

Careful fiscal stewardship.  A judge awarded $7 million in attorney fees for the legal team that forced Des Moines to refund $40 million in illegally-collected taxes.  The city fought the refund to the supreme court, so they incurred hefty legal fees on top of those they are paying for the plaintiffs.   Well done, Des Moines!  It could have been worse, as the attorneys requested twice the amount — and some attorneys in the story linked above think they may get it on appeal.

It will be interesting to see whether this is an issue in next month’s city elections.

 

Andrew Lundeen,  Income Taxes Account for the Largest Share of Federal Revenue (Tax Policy Blog):

20131025-1

 

Paul Neiffer, 180 Months Means 180 Months!:

In Estate of Helen Trombetta vs. Commissioner, the Tax Court essentially ruled creating a grantor trust with retained interests having a term of 180 months, you better make sure you live for at least 181 months if you want to save on estate taxes.

Hang in there, in other words.

 

Jason Dinesen, Insolvency and Canceled Debt: Make Sure You Can Prove It!  You really have to be tapped out to exclude debt-cancellation income from taxes.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 169

Christopher Bergin, Loving You Is Easy (Is It?) (Tax Analysts Blog).  He unwisely thinks IRS regulation of tax preparers will do more good than harm.

Oh, boy.  New Comprehensive Tax Reform Plan from Citizens for Tax Justice (Tax Justice Blog)

Jana Luttenegger, Estate Planning Awareness Week, Oct 20-26 (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Kay Bell, Obamacare to blame for the 2014 tax filing season delay?

Jack Townsend, Switzerland as Club Fed for Swiss Enablers of U.S. Tax Crimes  Given the alternatives, confinement to Switzerland isn’t the worst thing that could happen.

 

Quotable.  David Henderson:

By preventing insurance companies from pricing for pre-existing conditions, Obama has almost destroyed the market for individual insurance. He has taken one of the few parts of the health care that worked pretty well–the market for individual insurance–and badly wounded it. Unless this part of ObamaCare is repealed, we will still have a mess on our hands.    

Sadly, that magical thinking provision will be the hardest to undo.

 

Catch your Friday Buzz from Robert D. Flach!

 

TaxGrrrl,  Vatican Suspends ‘Bishop Of Bling’ Over $40 Million Home Renovation.  How?  ”In Germany, churches are largely funded by taxes – there is no direct prohibition between mixing Church and State as there is in the United States.”

 

News from the Profession: McGladrey Tax Associate Opts for Pedantry in His Farewell Email (Going Concern)

 

20131025-2My brain made me do it.  Former football star says brain injury spurred tax evasion.  WFTV.com reports:

That former football star, Freddie Mitchell, hoped an Orlando federal judge would show him mercy Tuesday.

Mitchell, a retired Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver, was convicted in an elaborate tax fraud scheme in which he cheated the government out of millions of dollars.

AccountingWeb.com reports that Mr. Mitchell pleaded guilty to help recruit an NBA player for whom a co-conspirator claimed false refunds, which Mr. Mitchell claimed a share.  He allegedly claimed over $2 million in other false refunds through an LLC.

So the brain was damaged enough to commit crime, but not so much that it kept him from a drawn-out plan to defraud people and to use an LLC to do it.  It’s funny how nobody ever blames brain injuries for, say, giving their life savings to charity.

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/22/13: Birthday edition! And an unappealing appeal.

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

The Internal Revenue Code of 1986 celebrates its 27th birthday today.

President Reagan signs PL 99-514, the Tax Reform Act of 1986.

The authors of the Tax Reform Act of 1986 felt so good about their work amending the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 that they gave it a new name.  And it had some wonderful features compared to what we have now:

- Top marginal rate of 28%, with no stupid phase-outs of itemized deductions or exemptions.

- No capital gain-ordinary income rate differential – tolerable with low marginal rates, and a great simplifier of tax planning.

- It eliminated a whole bunch of complexity, including investment tax credits, and it simplified the life of preparers everywhere by making miscellaneous itemized deductions subject to a 2% of AGI floor, saving us the pain of telling clients they can’t deduct the Swimsuit Issue as an investment expense.

Sure, it had more complexity than I’d care for.  The complicated passive loss rules came in then, on top of existing complicated at-risk rules.  Phase-outs of the passive loss rules imposed hidden marginal tax brackets that helped inspire many awful imitations, like the phase-outs reenacted this year of itemized deductions and personal exemptions.   The 1986 Act brought us inventory capitalization rules, and it left in place the alternative minimum tax.  But at the time, it looked like a good start at much better tax policy.  Now it looks like a high-water mark.

 

Martin SullivanTax Policy In a Knowledge Based Economy (Tax Analysts Blog):

The skeptical accounting profession rarely allows worker training, brand-building, software, and business restructuring to be capitalized, but in so doing it is unwittingly keeping the most important sources of value out of view of managers and stockholders.

Actually, smart managers and investors know about these things, but financial statements aren’t very good at measuring them.

 

20120801-2Tax Court leaps back to work, releasing seven new cases on its first day back after the shutdown.  They include a Judge Holmes case illustrating how good news on the estate tax return can mean bad news on a later income tax return; that case will get its own post this week.

 

TaxGrrrl, Losing Your Identity In Five Easy Steps. Step One: Go To The Doctor.  ”And it can all start out with something as simple as handing out your Social Security number at the doctor’s office”

Jason Dinesen, Incorporate Your Life? Not So Fast  ”…simply having a business entity DOES NOT make everything in your life tax deductible.”

William Perez, Payment Plan Options. “The IRS will automatically grant a payment plan if your balance owed is under $50,000 and the monthly payments will fully pay the outstanding balance in 72 months or less.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 166

Jack Townsend,  Ex Top UBS Banker Arrested; Likely to be Extradited

Kay Bell, Amazon tax now out in Illinois, coming Nov. 1 to Wisconsin

 

Not only is it the birthday of The Code, it’s Buzz Day at Robert D. Flach’s place!

The Critical Question (Really): Is Obamacare in a Death Spiral? (Megan McArdle): “Another week has passed, which apparently means that it’s time for another terrifying article from Sharon LaFraniere, Ian Austen and Robert Pear on the federal health-care exchanges.”

 

SuccessDetermined Iowa City man may be first in state to buy insurance via glitch-plagued public exchange (Des Moines Register):

Voss said Monday that he tried more than 100 times before finally being able to sign onto healthcare.gov, type in his personal information, compare insurance plans, and purchase a policy. 

I wonder if Amazon.com ever tried that?

 

20121226-1Speaking of train wrecks,  McCoy gives up on train funds (Des Moines Register).  An Iowa legislator gives up on spending $310 million to build a money-losing, slower and more expensive competitor to the Megabus.  Now he can concentrate on getting that downtown zeppelin port that is so critical to the economic future of Des Moines.

 

The Cougars of Madison County. No, Francesca Johnson isn’t back on the prowl.

 

Hey, I said I’m sorry!  That you want to put me in jail.  A New Mexico man convicted of tax crimes and of collecting fraudulent farm payments maybe should have left well enough alone, if you can think a five-year prison sentence is well-enough.  But Billy Melot appealed, with potentially dire consequences.  DailyJournal.net reports:

A southern New Mexico farmer and businessman could face more time in prison because a federal appeals court on Monday tossed out his five-year sentence for failing to pay more than $25 million in federal taxes and fraudulently collecting farm subsidies.

However, the court said a federal district court judge erred in calculating Melot’s sentence by concluding that he had accepted responsibility for his crimes. Judges have the discretion of imposing a less severe sentence when they make that determination.

Under federal sentencing guidelines, the court said, Melot had potentially faced more than 20 years in prison.

The appeals court opinion noted that if Mr. Melot accepted responsibility, he had a funny way of showing it:

Since his conviction, Melot has tenaciously opposed the Government’s efforts to collect the restitution he was ordered to pay by the district court, attempting to thwart the collection of more than $18 million in outstanding income tax assessments and more than $6.5 million in outstanding excise tax assessments. In 2012, a federal magistrate judge issued a certification of criminal contempt against him in the ancillary collection proceedings, finding he “actively and intentionally participated in a scheme to fraudulently create a third party interest in his properties with the intention of defrauding the Court, sabotaging the orderly administration of justice and delaying the United States’ lawful efforts to recover the judgment as ordered by the Court.”

Mr. Melot is 61 years old.  If his sentence is stretched to 20 years, he won’t have much time to enjoy any money he keeps away from the feds.

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/16/2013: Extension season is over, now what? And the joy of infinite marginal tax rates.

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20111040logoI hope you don’t have to.  Filing Tax Returns after the October 15th Deadline (William Perez):

You’ll need to mail in your return to the IRS, whether you prepare the return yourself or hire an accountant. That’s because the IRS’s electronic filing servers start going offline after October 15th to prepare for the next filing season.

If you are filing after October 15 this year, my first advice is to file quickly, as you are likely to never file if you don’t get it done now.  My next advice is to make sure it doesn’t happen next year.

Most people who file late make it harder than it needs to be.  90% of the stuff that could possibly go on their returns comes from third parties — things like W-2s, 1099s, mortgage interest and property tax statements, and thank-you notes from charities.  People who can’t seem to file on time should get a big envelope.  They should put these items in the envelope as they come in starting in early January.  They should seal the envelope on February 28 and give it to their preparer.  For most taxpayers, that is all you need to get a reasonably accurate return.

The procrastinators want to go through their checkbooks and find every last $10 charitable gift, and then they never get around to it.  When they finally do, it’s almost certainly a poor use of their time, and when it causes them to file late, it costs them a lot more than that last $10 deduction will save.

Related:  2012 Tax Season Officially Bites the Dust (Paul Neiffer)

 

 

Implicit marginal ratesAlan Cole, Obamacare Puts Infinite Marginal Tax Rates in Action (Tax Policy Blog):

The moment your modified AGI reaches 400% of the poverty line, you instantly lose a subsidy that could easily be worth $15,000. This is a discontinuity in public policy with respect to income. It is a place where an infinitesimal change can result in disastrous consequence for a taxpayer. At 400% of the poverty line, the marginal tax rate is infinite.

It’s an extreme example of the way means-tested welfare benefits can impose high hidden tax rates on poor and middle class taxpayers — punishment ignored by advocates of higher benefits in the name of “compassion.”  More from Arnold Kling.

 

Tony Nitti,  A Quick Look At Expiring 2013 Tax Provisions: What To Do Before Year-End

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 160

 

Kyle Pomerleau, What is the Debt Ceiling and Why Does it Matter? (Tax Policy Blog) ’

Howard Gleckman, The U.S.May Not Default on Friday But Washington Is Still Playing A Dangerous Game

Joseph Thorndike, Debt Limit Fights Are All the Same – Except for This One (Tax Analysts Blog)

But in fact, the nation’s fiscal shortfall can’t be permanently finessed with any sort of measures, be they ordinary, extraordinary, or even superhuman. Default will happen — the only question is when.

Have a nice day.

 

 Jason Dinesen,  If EAs are Liechtenstein and CPAs are the U.S., What are the Unenrolled?   That’s not fair to CPAs; I don’t know any who’ve been shut down for the last two weeks.

 

Leslie Book, Potential Storm Over Removal Power of Tax Court Judges (Procedurally Taxing):

Kuretski is like one of the many thousands of CDP cases where the parties disagree on some aspect of a collection determination, but also has one very big wrinkle: the taxpayers are using the case as a vehicle challenging the constitutionality of the President’s powers to remove Tax Court judges under Section 7443(f).

I didn’t know the President could do that.

 

2014 State Business Tax Climate IndexTax Justice Blog, State News Quick Hits: Criticism of “Business Climate” Rankings Grows, and More.  Most of the criticism comes from politicians in states with poor business tax climates, and their allies, for some reason.

 

Brian Mahany, High Intrigue in Florida FBAR Trial!

Lush Caribbean islands, secret unreported Swiss accounts, tens of millions of dollars and a husband who disappears into the night. Is this the plot of a new best seller suspense novel? No! It’s some of the events unfolding in a Ft. Myers federal court room where prosecutors say that Patricia Hough conspired to defraud the IRS and filed false tax returns.

I prefer a boring life, at least compared to something like this.

 

Kay Bell, Supreme Court says ‘no’ to NY strip club’s tax relief plea.

The Critical Question: Do Women in Accounting Really Have More Opportunities Than They Did Ten Years Ago? (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/10/13: Climate change edition. And great moments in web design!

Thursday, October 10th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Iowa has moved out of the bottom 10 in the Tax Foundation’s State Business Tax Climate Index for 2014.  That’s the good news.  The bad news is that it’s not the result of Iowa’s tax climate improving, but because Connecticut’s got worse.

 

2014 State Business Tax Climate Index

Iowa’s 49th-place rating for Corporation taxes accounts for much of Iowa’s poor showing.  Iowa has the highest stated corporate tax rate, at 12%.  It has a state corporation alternative minimum tax and is full of complexity — yet is so full of loopholes and carve-outs that it generated only around $425 million of Iowa’s $7.8 billion in 2012 tax revenues.  By comparison, Iowa’s (also complex and loophole-ridden) individual income tax generated over $3 billion of that revenue.

If Iowa's income tax were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s income tax were a car, it would look like this.

Iowa’s Association of Business and Industry has made improving Iowa’s business tax climate its legislative priority for the upcoming session.  Here’s what I think we need:

- Repeal of the futile Iowa corporation income tax.

- Repeal of every last economic development credit, including the refundable research credit and especially including enterprise zone and similar credits.  No company is so important that it should be receiving cash subsidies in excess of taxes paid to Iowa.

-  Drastic simplification of the Iowa individual tax, including repeal the deduction for federal taxes and of as many special breaks and credits as possible, in exchange for rates of 4% or lower.

In other words, the Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.  We can do a lot worse — in fact, we do now.

Related:

Russ FoxThe 2014 State Business Tax Climate Index: Bring Me the Usual Suspects.  ”And for those who think that taxes don’t matter, I’m in Nevada as a result of taxes and California’s miserable business climate.”

TaxGrrrl, Go West, Young Man: Best States For Businesses Are In The West

Joseph Hechman and Scott Drenkard, A Response to Matt Yglesias on the 2014 State Business Tax Climate Index (Tax Policy Blog):

There is however a brief blog post by Slate’s Matt Yglesias that went up this morning, which is along the lines of (1) there’s businesses in California and New York, (2) Tax Foundation criticizes California and New York for their tax policy, so therefore (3) taxes don’t affect business and individual location decisions. Center for Budget and Policy Priorities’ affiliates have already started spreading around Yglesias’s post on Twitter, and we imagine it will show up in other places.

The answer to this is easy. Those high-tax states also have other non-tax qualities—and often legacy investments and industries—that overcome the obstacle of a broken mess of a tax system for many businesses and individuals.

Taxes aren’t everything, but they’re definitely something.

 

 

The Tax Foundation has helped draft a new tax reform proposal for Nebraska. Some thoughts from David Brunori in A Solid, Albeit Mild, Tax Reform Proposal:

The primary plan is relatively straightforward. It is revenue neutral, reduces personal and corporate income tax rates, reduces incentives, expands the sales tax to more services, and simplifies administration. Moreover, belying the assertion that conservatives hate poor people, it doubles the earned income tax credit, greatly increases the personal exemption, and indexes the tax rates. In other words, the plan is consistent with virtually every notion of sound tax policy. It would make the Nebraska tax system fairer, simpler, and more conducive to retaining people and firms.

I think increases in the earned income credit are unwise because their high hidden marginal rates as taxpayers improve their incomes serve to punish emergence from poverty.  Still, the plan would be a big improvement for Nebraska — and for Iowa, for that matter.

 


Tony Nitti, Custom Homebuilders Are Subject To Section 263A And A Primer On The UNICAP Rules.  “Today is the day we discuss Section 263A, among the more dry topics in the driest area of law known to man”  I covered the case Tony writes about here.

Jason Dinesen, Basics of the Iowa Pension Exclusion

Kay Bell, Avoid common mistakes on your extended Oct. 15 tax filing

Paul Neiffer, Watch our for FBAR.  As Paul points out, you don’t have to be even trying to hide anything from the IRS to get clobbered.

 

 

Wikipedia image courtesy Tallent Show under Creative Commons license

Wikipedia image courtesy Tallent Show under Creative Commons license

Jack Townsend, IRS Information on Operations During Government Shutdown 

William Perez, IRS Shut Down, Week 2


Peter Reilly,  Blame It On the Lawyers – Creating Basis Out Of Thin Air Not The Taxpayer’s Fault   

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 154

Howard Gleckman,  It is Never Good When the U.S. Treasury Gets Compared to Brazil (TaxVox)

Tax Justice Blog, Stop the Presses: Apple Has Not Been Cleared on Tax Avoidance Charges.  So they should seek out new taxes to pay?

Keith Fogg, Vince Fumo: Local Political Corruption Meets Tax Procedure (Procedurally Taxing)

 

Going Concern, The Definitive Guide to Accounting as a Second Career.  Maybe I should consider that.

 

Janet Novack, Dumbest Identity Thief Ever? ”He contacts police looking for wallet he lost stuffed with debit cards issued in 13 stolen names.”  Yes, he may be dumb, but what does it say about the IRS that he and other dummies are stealing $5 billion of our money through identity theft fraud annually?

Great moments in web design.  From Instapundit: “HEALTHCARE.GOV NOT ONLY THE WORLD’S WORST WEBSITE, it’s also the world’s most expensive, with a price tag of $634,320,919.”  The Tax Update website cost approximately 1/400,000 of that, and we may have enrolled as many folks in Obamacare as Healthcare.gov has so far.

 

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Tax Update, 10/8/13: One week left! What to do if the K-1 never comes. And: money for Harold Hill!

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130311-1Extended 1040s are due one week from today.  There is no second extension available.

I know, the timing might not be good.  But if it hasn’t been good enough to get your tax information together since January, it will probably never be good.   If you don’t scrape up every loss at the slots or every item you dropped off at Goodwill, it doesn’t matter.

You probably aren’t waiting on K-1s anymore.  Tax returns for partnerships, S corporations and Trusts with income reportable on 1040s  were due September 16.  You should have all of your information in hand, and it’s just a matter of spending an hour or two getting it together and to your waiting preparer.  If you are still “working on it,” you’re either overdoing it or not really working on it.

If you don’t have all of your information — if, for example, you are still missing a K-1 — get ready to file as best you can without it.  If it’s a small K-1, you probably can just ignore it.  If it’s a big one, then talk to your preparer.  If it will only generate a passive loss that you can’t use, just go ahead and file without it by October 15, as it won’t affect the amount of your 2012 tax.  If you believe the K-1 will show taxable income when it is finally released, you should talk it over with your preparer.  Use any information you have to take a shot at what the tax will be.

Big or small, income or loss, be sure to file Form 8082 with your return to tell the IRS that you are filing using numbers that aren’t on a K-1.  It helps protect you from penalties.

In any case, don’t ignore the K-1, or pretend it will be zero when you know better.  That doesn’t work.  File by the extended due date.  You’ll get much better results by filing on time and amending if necessary than by filing late.  The penalties for late payment if you owe on an amended return — if any — won’t exceed 1/2% of the underpayment per month.  The penalties on a late-filed return run to 5% per month.

 

hh44.jpg

Harold Hill gets a check.  The Iowa Film Tax Credit is repealed, but it is still stimulating the economy for Iowa attorneys and small-time filmmakers.  The Des Moines Register reports that the state has agreed to pay $225,000 to a Rhode Island man miffed that Iowa stopped the film credit gravy train:

The settlement is with financers of the movie “2001 Maniacs: Field of Screams,” which is available on Netflix.

The settlement will partially resolve a lawsuit brought by Anthony Gudas of Providence, R.I., who said his company, Tax Credit Finance, invested money in four film projects based on contracts with the state where tax credits were never paid.

The lawsuit for the three other film projects continues.

The film credit program caused a brief frenzy of production activity before it collapsed following revelations of taxpayer funds buying luxury cars for filmmakers.  A state audit showed that about 80% of the $36 million in credits issued by the program were improper and that oversight was almost non-existent.  Seven film figures ultimately copped pleas or were convicted at trial for cheating on the program, with two filmmakers earning 10-year prison terms.

And the three remaining lawsuits?  From the Register story:

Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Thompson in December said for three of the films, producers had not submitted documentation the state needed for the projects to qualify for the credits.  And, in the fourth, state officials said the producer, Harel Goldstein of California, had created false invoices. Goldstein later pled guilty to felony fraud and forgery charges in connection to the invoices.

So the program was looted; “But some benefits can’t just be measured on a dollar-for-dollar basis.” Don’t you wish we were giving more money to Hollywood?

 

Grover’s coming to town.   Tax opponent Grover Norquist to speak in Iowa Wednesday.  (Des Moines Register). I won’t be able to attend, but it should be interesting.

 

Wikipedia image courtesy Tallent Show under Creative Commons license

Wikipedia image courtesy Tallent Show under Creative Commons license

TaxGrrrl, The View From The Trenches: What The Shutdown Has Meant So Far For Taxpayers:

My advice to taxpayers: pretend things are normal. Yes, that feels nearly impossible. But to the extent possible, file as usual and make payments as usual. But don’t get too complacent: all of those meetings, calls and audits will be rescheduled eventually: it’s a delay, not a complete reprieve.

Sound advice.

William Perez, IRS Shut Down, Week 2

 

Jason Dinesen, Glossary of Tax Terms: Medical Dependent 

 

Kay Bell, Tax Carnival #121: TaxtoberFest 2013.  Looks delicious!

 

20131003-1Andrew Lundeen,  Obamacare Raises Marginal Tax Rates above 50 Percent.  Not just for “the rich,” either.

Megan McArdle,  Republicans Didn’t Sabotage Health Exchanges, Obama Did.  ”In short, the administration passed a law with an unrealistically aggressive implementation schedule. And because of the way it passed it, it had no way to finesse that deadline.”  But it would be horrible blackmail for Congress to delay it for a year.

 

 

 

Clint Stretch, Tax Reform Is on Furlough (Tax Analysts Blog).   ”As long as Congress is fighting over a continuing resolution and the debt limit, there is no oxygen in the room for other initiatives. Members will be stuck on their talking points, and constituents won’t be thinking about tax reform.”

Robert W. Wood, Bitcoin Is Biggest Loser In Silk Road Meltdown—IRS Wins Big

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 152

Jeremy Scott, It Isn’t Time to Bury the Income Tax Just Yet (Tax Analysts Blog)

Tax Justice Blog,  State News Quick Hits: Brownback Under Fire, and More

 

The Critical Question: Should Small Business Have Veto Power Over Corporate Tax Reform? (Martin Sullivan, Tax Analysts Blog)

Robert D. Flach has his Tuesday Buzz on!

 

Note: There will be no Tax Roundup tomorrow.  See you Thursday!

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