Posts Tagged ‘Jeremy Scott’

Tax Roundup, 4/9/14: Common K-1 problems. And: if the preparer doesn’t have a brain, give him a diploma!

Wednesday, April 9th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

S-SidewalkSo you read yesterday’s post and you’re still preparing your own return?  You’ve answered the questions you need to ask yourself before starting to put numbers from your S corporation/Partnership/Trust (collectively, “thing”) K-1 onto your 1040 schedules?  OK, if you are intrepid enough to be doing your own return here, you are mostly on your own.  Don’t shortcut it.  This is one chore where you really should read the instructions (S corporation, Partnership, Trust), rather than just opening the box and putting pieces together.

There’s no point in me trying to walk through the whole K-1 with you; that’s what the instructions are for.  I will point out a few items on the K-1 (or left out) that frequently cause errors and trigger questions.

On the partnership K-1 the ending capital account is probably not your “basis.” The capital account is frequently useless in measuring basis.  It might be the same as your basis if the “Tax basis” box is checked, but the only sure way to track your basis is to keep your own running basis schedule year-by-year.  S corporation shareholders can find their basis computation schedule here.

Don’t double-count your gains.  The “Unrecaptured Section 1250 gain” in Box 8c of your S corporation K-1  (9c of the partnership return) is a part of the “Net Section 1231 gain” (S corporation box 9, partnership box 10).  The total income is the Section 1231 gain, not the sum of the unrecaptured 1250 and 1231 amounts.  You use the “Unrecaptured 1250 gain” on your Schedule D worksheet to figure out how much of your Section 1231 gain is taxed at a 25% rate, rather than the normal 20% top capital gain rate.

Don’t double count “investment income.”  If you have interest, dividends or capital gains on your K-1, the partnerships is required to tell you how much of that is “investment income” with a code “A” in the “other information” box on the K-1.  You only need that number if you are computing an investment interest expense deduction on Form 4952.  You don’t add it as additional income on your return.

Beware the “net investment income” disclosure, code “Y” in the “other information” section.  The partnership and S corporation instructions for computing this came out late, and this number is likely to be wrong.  If you have to fill out Form 8960 to compute your Obamacare net investment income tax, you shouldn’t count on this number, especially for a K-1 with trade or business income.  Use instead the separate items from the K-1 that are investment income for Form 8960 purposes.

Be careful out there, and come back tomorrow for a new 2014 filing season tip!

 

20140307-1Russ Fox, Bozo Tax Tip #5: Procrastinate.  You mean waiting won’t solve my tax problems?

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Are Those S Corporation Distributions Taxable?

 

William Perez, Tax Freedom Day 2014.  April 21.

Kay Bell, Being DIFferent could prompt a tax audit.  Kay points out things that can attract IRS attention on your 1040.

Jeremy Scott, Audit Electability (Tax Analysts Blog).  ”However, a taxpayer’s choice of entity can have broad tax ramifications, including some consequences unintended even by the complicated U.S. tax regime.”

Stephen Olsen, Summary Opinions for 4/4/2014.  (Procedurally Taxing), A good roundup of some recent tax cases, including coverage of the Ohio accounting firm’s unpleasant breakup that we covered last week.

 

20140409-1The IRS Commissionerwho apparently can’t regulate his own employees sufficiently to provide subpoenaed documents to Congress, still wants to regulate tax preparers.

The idea is no more than what the Wizard of Oz told the scarecrow: regulated preparers wouldn’t be any smarter, but they would have a diploma.  An IRS-issued Doctorate in Thinkology doesn’t make an inept preparer competent, any more than granting a CPA or a JD makes somebody a good tax preparer.  I would much sooner have uncredentailed Robert D. Flach do my 1040 than any number of fully-credentialed CPAs and attorneys I know.   All regulation would accomplish would be to raise prices, lining the pockets of the big tax prep franchises while driving many taxpayers to self-prepare or stop filing.

TaxGrrrl, House Committee Gunning For Criminal Charges In IRS Scandal

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 335

 

Roberton Williams, If You Have High Income, Your Taxes Are Going Up (TaxVox)

Tax Justice Blog, “Tax Extenders” Would Mean Even Lower Revenue than the Ryan Plan

Jim Maule, How Shocking is Tax Evasion?

Radio Iowa, Senator Grassley says fouled up tax system is depressing.  He’s depressed?  As a senior taxwriter for most of the last three decades, he’s answerable for a lot of the depression.

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/1/14: Two weeks to go edition. And: neglected spouses!

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014 by Joe Kristan


4868
April 15 is two weeks from today.  You should already be well along the way in getting your taxes done.  If you aren’t,  you need to get to work – and you should be pondering an extension.

Even an extension isn’t a free lunch.  As Trish McIntire explains below, extensions extend the filing deadline, not the payment deadline, so you need to have at least an idea of your current tax situation even to extend.

Start with your 2012 return.  Make sure you have all of the items you reported on that return — W-2s, K-1s, 1099s.  Then think through what might have changed since last year.  New kid?  New spouse?  Lose an old spouse?  Won the lottery?

Then pencil out a return, or hurry down to your preparer.  If your preparer tells you to extend, don’t fight it.  An extended return is not a “red flag” to the IRS.  And when figuring out how much to pay with your Form 4868, round up.  This time of year, it seems most surprises are the bad kind, so assume the worst.

 

20120511-2If you want to know what does work as a red flag for the IRS, the Tax Court yesterday had a good example:

Petitioner’s 2010 Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, was prepared by H and R Block. On Schedule C, Profit or Loss From Business, petitioner reported gross income of $1,274, office expense of $142, and car and truck expenses of $17,978, for a net loss of $16,846.

A schedule C with just a little income and a big loss caused mostly by car and truck expenses probably goes straight to the “audit me” bin, because the IRS knows that many taxpayers are like this one:

Although petitioner provided his 2009-10 mileage log, he nevertheless failed to provide any corroborating receipts or other records that substantiated the statements made in the log. Petitioner’s mileage log did not address the business purpose of each trip. Guessing as to where he may have gone in 2010, petitioner added the places of business travel to his log in 2012. The log was thus not contemporaneous, and the reconstruction was not reliable.

If you want to take car deductions, you need to keep track of them as you go, in a log, a calendar, or a smart-phone app.  Otherwise you, like the taxpayer in this case, won’t stand much of a chance against the IRS.

Cite: Houchin, T.C. Summ. Op. 2014-29.

 

20140401-1William Perez, Retroactive Charitable Donations for Typhoon Haiyan Relief:

Taxpayers can take a deduction on their 2013 tax return for cash donations made between March 26, 2014, and April 14, 2014, to charities providing disaster relief to areas impacted by Typhoon Haiyan.

Normally, charitable donations can be deducted only if the donation is made by the end of the year. But the recently enacted Philippines Charitable Giving Assistance Act (HR 3771) gives taxpayers the option of deducting donations for Typhoon Haiyan relief on their 2013 tax returns.

William explains what you need to do to claim the retroactive deduction.

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): Q Is For QDRO

Trish McIntireThe Annual Extension Post:

So what if you can’t get your return done in time to file by then? You can file an extension. It can be done electronically or by filing a paper Form 4868 by April 15th. And it does have to be postmarked or electronically filed by April 15th. After that time, the extension won’t help you.

Remember, an extended return does not attract IRS attention; a late or erroneous return does.

 

Kay Bell, America’s pastimes: Baseball, ballpark proposals and taxes

 

Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp Won’t Seek Reelection (Accounting Today).  That can’t be a good sign for his misconceived tax reform plan.

Jeremy Scott, Fair Shot for Everyone’ Contains Details for No One (Tax Analysts Blog):

Setting a new low for lack of detail and specificity, Senate Democrats unveiled their “Fair Shot for Everyone” agenda last week. Only loosely a set of real proposals, the agenda is merely a series of talking points designed to distract voters from President Obama’s lagging approval numbers and the continuing unpopularity of the Affordable Care Act.

Not a glowing review.

Howard Gleckman, Should Tax Reform Be Sold on Values Instead of Economics?

 

20120906-1Paul Brennan, In Iowa, your taxes help corporations not pay theirs (Iowa Watchdog.org):

Of course, $950,000 isn’t much more than chicken feed to a company like Tyson, which posted $583 million in profits in 2013. It also doesn’t compare with the tens of millions of tax dollars the state paid out to big companies through the Research Activities Credit last year.

But it is probably enough to leave tax payers feel well and truly plucked.

Nobody notices a few missing feathers.

Des Moines Register, Branstad will sign Iowa Speedway tax break in Newton ceremony Wednesday.  Because NASCAR has better lobbyists than you do.

Tax Justice Blog, State News Quick Hits: State Lawmakers Not Getting the Message

 

BitcoinAlan Cole, Bitcoin’s IRS Troubles (Tax Policy Blog:

The price of the virtual currency Bitcoin has fallen to about $461 from a closing price of $586 last Monday. This decline of about 21% came in the wake of an IRS ruling that net gains from Bitcoin transactions will be taxed as capital gains.

Nobody wants a Schedule D item for every purchase.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 328.  April Fools edition, unfortunately.

News from the Profession: The Forgotten Spouses of Public Accounting (Going Concern).  I’m sure mine is around here somewhere.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/25/14: Shaky foundations can be costly. And: monitors!

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140325-1Not a firm foundation.  A U.S. District Court case out of Texas last week shows why using a tax-exempt entity can be hazardous to your health.  A Mr. Ziegenhals was “manager, director, trustee, and registered agent” of The Le Tulle Foundation, which was “formed in 1991 as a testamentary trust with the stated purpose of operating ‘exclusively for charitable purposes for the benefit of the citizens of Matagorda County, Texas [and] for no other purposes.’”

The court said an IRS audit found that Mr. Ziegnhals “used funds from the Foundation to obtain personal benefits and pay his expenses unrelated to the purported charitable purposes.”  That triggered a revocation of charitable status and taxes on “self-dealing,”  The total amount of “self-dealing” is alleged as $46,266.21.

What did that cost the alleged self-dealer?  From the decision (my emphasis):

The amount allegedly owed by Ziegenhals – $461,125.44 as of November 29, 2013 — is based on the IRS’s calculations of penalties, statutory additions, and interest that have accrued from his unpaid private foundation excise taxes in 2003 and his unpaid federal income taxes in 2007. See Docket Entry Nos. 42-13, 42-14, 42-15. The current amount owed is much larger than the original unpaid taxes of $46,266.21 from 2003 and $6,829.98 from 2007 because the IRS assessed several statutory taxes and penalties on Ziegenhals as both a self-dealer and foundation manager for each year until he was issued the notice of deficiency in 2009 -- an example of what can happen when someone fails to pay his taxes in the first place and then also does not cooperate in repaying the delinquencies in a timely manner.

For example, the IRS imposed a first tier tax of 5 percent for each act of self-dealing, see 26 U.S.C. § 4941(a)(1), a second tier tax of 200 percent of the amount involved for each act of self-dealing that was not corrected within the taxable period, see § 4941(b)(1), a first tier tax of 2.5 percent against Ziegenhals as the foundation manager, see § 4945(a)(2), and a second tier tax of 50 percent of the amount involved for refusing to agree to corrections, see § 4945(b)(2). In addition, the IRS determined that Ziegenhals’ actions constituted willful and flagrant conduct, and thus imposed a penalty equal to the amount of the private foundation excise taxes pursuant to § 6684. 

I don’t recommend private foundations for taxpayers who lack a huge amount of money.  While it can seem attractive to have something named for you that will outlive you, you need a lot of money to make it worth the hassle.  You have to file very detailed and complicated annual reports with the IRS, with $100 daily penalties for late filing.  Those filings are open to the public.  And if you or your heirs get careless in managing the foundation, the taxes and penalties can explode, as the gentleman from Texas now knows.

It’s much easier to use a donor-advised fund run by a competent charity, like The Community Foundation of Greater Des Moines.  They take care of the filings and hassles, and you get at least as good of a tax benefit as you get from having your own foundation.

Cite: Zeigenhals (USDC SD-TX, 3:11-cv-00464)

 

20120906-1Special interest break approaches the checkered flag.  The bill to extend the special sales tax spiff for the Newton racetrack passed the Iowa Senate yesterday.   The bill lets the track keep sales tax it collects from customers, up to a 5% rate.

The break was first passed when the track opened, with requirement that 25% of the ownership be from Iowa and with a 2016 expiration.  When NASCAR bought the track, that ended the deal.  SF 2341 extends the deal through 2025 and lets NASCAR, owned by a wealthy out-of-state family, keep this special deal that is unavailable for any other tourist and entertainment facilities competing for Iowa dollars (though an athletic facility under construction in Dyersville will have a similar break).  I’m sure they have a good story why they needed to pass this, but I don’t buy it; the track isn’t going anywhere, and NASCAR bought it knowing they didn’t qualify.

Like much bad legislation, it had bipartisan support, passing 36-9.  There is a glimmer of good news.  The total of nine “no” votes is the most I’ve seen for an “economic development” giveaway.  Hats off to Senators Behn (R, Boone), Bowman (D, Jackson), Chapman (R, Dallas), Chelgren (R, Wappelo), Guth (R, Hancock) , Quirmbach (D, Story), Schneider (R, Dallas), Smith (R, Scott) and Whitver (R, Polk).

 

Time for Project Oblivion!  The Des Moines Register reports West Des Moines data center project gets $18 million in incentives:

Iowa’s next major data center prospect seeking state-incentive money is headed to the Iowa Economic Development Authority with a stamp of approval from the West Des Moines City Council.

The council on Monday endorsed “Project Alluvion” as a consent agenda item without any discussion, offering up to $18 million in local incentives to land the major project.

Council documents show Project Alluvion would create at least 84 jobs and a minimum of $255 million in taxable valuation.

“People might say, ‘Geez, giving $18 million for only 84 jobs.’ The jobs are important, but it’s more than the jobs,” Councilman Russ Trimble said after Monday’s meeting. “It’s going to help us build the tax base and keep property taxes down.”

That’s 214,285.71 per “job.”   So, if we were to move our firm to West Des Moines, that would qualify us for about $7.5 million.  Hey, we use computers — we’re high-tech!  We’d even call it a cool name, like Project Oblivion!  Or Des Moines can pay us to stay, whatever.

Related:  LOCAL CPA FIRM VOWS TO SWALLOW PRIDE, ACCEPT $28 MILLION

 

Joseph Henchman, Wisconsin Approves Income Tax Reduction, Business Tax Reforms (Tax Policy Blog).

 

Kris20140321-3ty Maitre, Changes Coming for IRA Rollovers in 2015. (ISU-CALT)  ” So going forward, advise your client to make only one IRA rollover per tax year, or to be on the safe side one rollover every 366 days.”

Peter Reilly, No Margin For Error When Using IRA Rollover As Bridge Loan   

Kay Bell, IRS offers an easier way to deduct your home office 

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): M Is For Medicare Payments   

Paul Neiffer, One More Reason Why Tax Reform is Going After Cash Method:

 I ran across a posting on the net farm income and loss reported by Schedule F farmers for 2011 and 2012.  During each of these years, the USDA estimated that farmers had net farm income in excess of $120 billion.

However, on schedule Fs reported by individual farmers, they showed a net loss in 2011 of about $7.11 billion and for 2012 a net loss of $5.06 billion. 

Yeah, “simplification” is really why farmers need accrual accounting.  Not paying tax is a lot simpler.

 

Jeremy Scott, Portman’s Disappointing Tax Reform Plan (Tax Analysts Blog).

Len Burman, Profiles in Courage at the IRS (Really) (TaxVox).  It’s a good post, once you get past the manifestly false statement that the current scandals are “fake.”  And you’ll notice that Doug Shulman, unlike the hero of the Burman post, left on his own terms.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 320

 

 

Going ConcernThe Debate Heats Up Over How Many Computer Monitors You Should Have.  The good folks at GC quote some loser who says nobody needs more than one monitor.  Here’s how I feel about the issue:

monitors

Now if the one monitor was, oh, 3′ x 5′, I’d reconsider.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/18/14: Now it gets serious. And: a foolproof plan goes awry.

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

 

Flicker image courtesy Michael Coghlan under Creative Commons license.

Flicker image courtesy Michael Coghlan under Creative Commons license.

OK, we’ve got all of the corporations done or extended.  Now it gets serious.

For the last several years, our 1040 practice has become more and more a three or four-week death sprint.  Most of our individual returns are business owners or executives, or their families.  That means most of them are waiting on K-1s.  Ever since the enactment of the reduced dividend rate, it has taken longer every year for brokerages to issue their 1099s.  It’s common for “corrected” 1099s to come out several weeks after the originals.  So it just takes longer for our clients to assemble their 1040 data.

While the start of the returns is delayed, April 15 is still April 15.  That means all of the most complicated returns hit in the four weeks after the corporate return deadline.  This isn’t good for many reasons — not least of which is that you don’t want a bleary-eyed tax pro helping you deal with big-dollar decisions, like the grouping options under the passive activity rules that kick in this year.

What I’m getting at: if your tax pro recommends an extension, don’t object.  This stuff is hard — if it wasn’t, you wouldn’t be paying someone else to do it.  You don’t want to risk an expensive mistake by rushing things.  There is nothing to the myth that extensions increase your risk of getting examined.  I have extended my own 1040 every year for 20+ years without an exam.   Errors, on the other hand, absolutely do increase your audit risk.

Your tax return is worth the wait.

 

Russ Fox, The Flavor of the Season

 

20140303-1Paul Neiffer, Real Estate Includes Land but Not For Depreciation Purposes.

William Perez, Alternative Minimum Tax

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): I Is For Internal Revenue Code

Leslie Book, Insider Trading and Forfeiture of Millions in Stock Gains Runs into Section 1341 and Issue Preclusion (Procedurally Taxing)

Janet Novack, Former Qwest CEO Could Score $18 Million Tax Refund For Forfeited Insider Trading Profits

Kay Bell, College bowl tax audits and Colorado pot taxes.

 

Marc Ward, Annual Financial Statements Must Now be Delivered to Shareholders:

One of the changes to the Iowa Business Corporation Act that went into effect this year is a new requirement that corporations deliver financial statements to their shareholders. These financial statements must include a balance sheet, an income statement and a statement of changes in shareholders’ equity.  The financial statements must be sent within 120 days of the end of the fiscal year.

I did not know that.

 

taxanalystslogoJeremy Scott asks, Would a Republican Senate Improve the Chances for Tax Reform? (Tax Analysts Blog):

Republican chances for retaking the Senate have improved… 

And that would be good for tax reform proponents, even those who don’t support GOP policies or want to see Republicans in office. Senate Democrats aren’t interested. And they aren’t going to work with a Republican House at all. Tax reform takes a lot of legislative groundwork, and right now at least, the GOP is the only party with any real interest in doing it.

There is, of course, another factor.  I don’t think President Obama will sign anything big coming out of a GOP Congress.

William McBride, Some Questions Regarding the Diamond and Zodrow Modeling of Camp’s Tax Plan. (Tax Policy Blog).

Eric Todor, Who Should Get the Tax Revenue from Apple’s Intellectual Property? (TaxVox)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 313

 

Great moments in tax evasion.  A Texan who was worried about being sentenced to prison came up with an ingenious plan: hire someone to murder the sentencing judge.  Because then the court system would just forget about him, or something.

Somehow that plan went awry, and Phillip Ballard was sentenced to 20 years in federal prison yesterday for his trouble. Mr. Ballard is 72.  This will impact his retirement options.  (via Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/11/14: The Taxpayer Hotel Edition. And: private-sector Kristy!

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Des Moines public officials think a fancy new convention center hotel is just what we need to hang with the cool kids, reports KCCI.com:

A plan to build a four-star hotel next to Hy-Vee Hall and Wells Fargo Arena won’t happen unless Des Moines city leaders can convince the state’s economic development authority to fork over millions in tax incentives for the project.

Des Moines Assistant City Manager Matthew Anderson said this week is a prime example that proves why a hotel is needed next to the Iowa Events Center.

Fans from across the state are coming to downtown Des Moines in droves to cheer on their favorite teams at the boy’s state basketball tournament.

Cindy Curran said there’s something missing. “Accommodations to stay overnight,” said Curran. “A nice hotel with restaurants in there, amenities to go with that.”

wells fargo arena

A casual reader could be forgiven for thinking that there are no hotels within a few blocks of Wells Fargo Arena.  They might think that the Des Moines Marriot Downtown, with its own nice restaurant and bar, had suddenly vanished.  They might think the historic Renaissance Savery Hotel, home of Bos Restaurant, had closed down.  They might think the new Hyatt Place in the Liberty Building had already failed.  And has the historic Hotel Fort Des Moines and its Django Restaurant disappeared after all these years?

Nope, they’re all going strong, and all still connected to Wells Fargo Arena by an enclosed all-weather skywalk system.  In fact, Downtown Des Moines has more restaurants and places to stay than ever.  They need a new competitor, apparently, but one that can’t happen  without $34 million in subsidies tax incentives.

If a business can’t happen without taxpayer subsidies, that’s a sure sign that it shouldn’t happen in the first place.  Convention centers have been a money pit for governments around the country, as the think tank Heartland Institute reports:

As convention planners seek to have large new hotels and related facilities built for their events, taxpayers are often stuck footing the bill for what could be a building that sits empty much of the year.

It’s always easier to support a new business when you invest somebody else’s money.

Related: The Convention Center Shell Game.

 

KristyMaitreIowa’s IRS stakeholder liaison privatizes herself.   From the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation:

CALT is pleased to announce that Kristy Maitre, the former IRS Senior Stakeholder Liaison for the State of Iowa, has joined our staff. Kristy brings 27 years of IRS experience to her role as CALT’s new tax specialist.

Practitioners who have attended our seminars are already familiar with Kristy and her vast breadth of practical knowledge of tax and estate planning. Kristy has taught hundreds of continuing education classes to tax practitioners around the country. At CALT, she will continue to offer training through live seminars, but will expand her reach with frequent webinars and other educational offerings through the CALT website. Stay tuned as CALT will soon unveil more exciting changes enabling us to better serve the tax practitioner community.

Great news for Kristy and ISU-CALT, bad news for IRS service.

 

William Perez, Free Tax Software Available Through IRS Free File

Russ Fox, Regulating Tax Preparers Always Prevents Tax Preparer Fraud (Not True, of Course)

potleafTaxGrrrl, It’s No Toke: Colorado Pulls In Millions In Marijuana Tax Revenue.  I think popular support for pot prohibition, with its attendant violence, prison crowding, and other social costs, will continue to decline.  At some point the lure of revenue will overcome the reflexive instinct of politicians to preserve control over things.

Jason DinesenWhat’s So Bad About More People Preparing Their Own Taxes?  “My goal is to have clients who actually need a professional preparer, or at the very least, people who could prepare their own taxes but who like the comfort provided by having a professional take care of it for them.”

One of these is not like the others  Filing season 2014: Death, taxes, root canals and refunds.  (Kay Bell)

 

Carlton Smith, Tax Court dodges CDP record rule ruling (Procedurally Taxing)

Jim Maule, Cracking the Tax Protest Movement.  ”The unfortunate thing about the tax protest movement is that most of the people in it are vulnerable folks who fall for the siren song of the ringleaders, just as those who support special tax breaks, even without benefitting from them, have fallen for the siren songs of those who procure special tax breaks for themselves and their clients.”

 

Joseph Henchman,  Idaho Considering Complicated and Gimmicky Job Creation Tax Credit.  (Tax Policy Blog) The best tax incentive is a simple, low-rate tax system without gimmicky incentives.

taxanalystslogoMartin Sullivan, If the Camp Tax Reform Bill Won’t Pass, Why Is It So Important? (Tax Analysts Blog):

The Camp discussion draft has changed the tax policy landscape like no other single document in the last three decades, for two reasons. First, it has burst the bubble of all the feel-good tax reformers who have been wasting our time promoting unrealistic tax plans. The Camp plan is the ultimate reality check on tax reform. It is far more complicated and painful than marketers of tax reform have told the public to expect. It is unlikely that any realistic tax reform would be any shorter or sweeter than the Camp draft.

The second reason the Camp reform is monumentally important is the extensive and detailed workmanship that went into it.   

I’m not convinced — I think the initial draft of a tax reform plan should be a lot more idealistic.  The cynical, politically-necessary modifications will arrive soon enough on their own, and conceding so many of them up front only invites more.

 

Jeremy Scott, Camp Hits Popular Deductions Hard (Tax Analysts Blog).  ”The elimination of the state and local tax deduction is one of the larger revenue raisers in Camp’s plan.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 306

 

Quotable:

When the law interferes with people’s pursuit of their own values, they will try to find a way around. They will evade the law, they will break the law, or they will leave the country. Few of us believe in a moral code that justifies forcing people to give up much of what they produce to finance payments to persons they do not know for purposes they may not approve of. When the law contradicts what most people regard as moral and proper, they will break the law–whether the law is enacted in the name of a noble ideal such as equality or in the naked interest of one group at the expense of another. Only fear of punishment, not a sense of justice and morality, will lead people to obey the law.

Milton Friedman, via David Henderson.

 

News from the Profession: The Profession is Really Reaching For the “I Still Let My Mom Pick Out My Outfits” Demographic (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/4/14: Des Moines votes on refunding illegal tax. And: life after football!

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20121002-2Des Moines voters decide today whether to approve a legal tax to refund a similar tax imposed illegally.  The Des Moines Register reports:

A special election Tuesday will determine how the city pays back a portion of a franchise fee it illegally collected from 2004 to 2009.

The Iowa Legislature gave Des Moines the authority to temporarily increase its franchise fee — a tax assessed on anyone who connects to electric and natural gas utilities — to pay off the judgment.

However, if voters reject the proposal, city officials will be forced to raise property taxes for at least 20 years in order to issue and pay municipal bonds to cover the court judgment.

When the tax was ruled illegal, the city appealed all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court before finally conceding that it would have to issue refunds — incurring enormous legal bills in the process, including a $7 million bill to the winning lawyers on the other side.  From the District Court opinion awarding the fee:

This case has been in our courts since 2004.  To say it was highly contested would be a gross understatement.  The history of this case shows that the City, while it was entitled to do so, erected one barrier after another in an attempt to prevent the class from being successful in obtaining a refund.  Almost without exception, class counsel was successful in dismantling each of those barriers.

It just goes to show that the city will do the right thing, once it has exhausted all appeals.  Maybe next time they won’t be so quick to enact an illegal tax.

The state legislature voted to allow Des Moines to impose the tax legally to repay the illegal tax.  Somehow I doubt the legislature would do a similar favor for taxpayers by letting them, say, legally not pay income tax for a few years to help them repay the taxes they had illegally avoided in prior years.  

 

William Perez, Deducting Work-Related Expenses

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): A is for Affordable Care Act

Leslie Book, EITC Snapshot: Overclaims and Commercial Preparer Usage (Procedurally Taxing).  ”In fact, there is a steady decline in the use of paid preparers among EITC claimants, while the rate of paid preparer usage overall has remained fairly steady.”

Another reason why preparer regulation to cut fraud is like pushing on a string.

Jack Townsend, The Scariest Tax Form? Scary Is in the Eye of the Beholder.  I think the article he cites, which chooses Form 5471, makes a good case, considering the almost-automatic $10,000 fine for filing it late.

Kay Bell,  Tax moves to make in March 2014

 

TaxProf, Tax Court Issues 63-Page Opinion Debunking Cracking the Code Book

 

taxanalystslogoTax Analysts Blog is having a tax reform party:

Clint Stretch, 10 Reasons Republicans Should Embrace the Camp Tax Bill.  This is pretty faint praise:  ”2. If they want a credible claim that Obama and Democrats are responsible for the failure of tax reform, they must pass a bill in the House.”

Jeremy Scott, Comparing the Camp and Obama Bank Taxes:

Including the bank tax in his plan is one of Camp’s most intriguing decisions, if only because the gain for him isn’t obvious, even after a closer look. The tax doesn’t raise much money. It is very similar to an Obama proposal that congressional Democrats didn’t really like, meaning it doesn’t buy the chair any bipartisan support. And it comes about four years too late to take advantage of widespread public anger at financial institutions. All Camp seems to have accomplished is legitimizing a revenue raiser for future use by the progressive caucus and undermining his own party’s opposition to this kind of tax increase.

Just… brilliant.  I prefer ending the “too big to fail” subsidy directly, if necessary by denying deposit insurance to such institutions.

Martin Sullivan, 25 Interesting Features of Camp’s New Tax Reform Plan.  ”Biggest disappointment. Camp and fellow House Republicans all but promised to reduce the top rate to 25 percent. They failed.”

Christopher Bergin, Tax Reform Only a Mother Could Love:

Many political observers think the GOP has a good chance of not only increasing its majority in the House, but also taking the majority in the Senate. I’m among those who believe that the Republicans will shoot themselves in the foot before that happens. I’ll bet there are more than a few Republicans this week who fear that Camp just put a bullet in the chamber.

I think the Camp plan will be quietly forgotten long before November, but there is still plenty of time for the GOP to demonstrate its skills with a Glock 40.

Norton Francis, Camp Tax Reform Would Create New Challenges for States (TaxVox).  The repeal of the deduction for state and local taxes and limits on muni bonds won’t win friends in the state capitals.

 

National Review, via InstapunditThe IRS Is the Problem:

Representative Camp’s thou-shalt-not list is fine so far as it goes, and, unlike the IRS bureaucracy, Congress does have the authority to rewrite the law. But his proposal falls short in that it assumes that the IRS is a proper and desirable regulator of political speech. It is not. It is not even particularly admirable in its execution of its legitimate mission, the collection of revenue: Its employees have committed felonies in releasing the confidential tax information of such political enemies as the National Organization for Marriage and Mitt Romney, and the agency itself has perversely interpreted federal privacy rules as protecting the criminal leakers at the IRS rather than the victims of their crimes. 

Instapundit comments: “Abolish governmental immunity and make them personally liable for damages for misconduct.”  Hard to argue with that; it would be a good addition to my “Sauce For the Gander” reforms.  I still don’t understand why a nonprofit should lose its exempt status for being primarily political.  Isn’t freewheeling debate a good thing?  The IRS certainly hasn’t shown itself a neutral observer here.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 299

 

Scott Drenkard, Johannes Schmidt, Guess Which State Has the Highest Liquor Taxes in the Nation? (Tax Policy Blog).  Think coffee.

 

Preparing for life after football.  Two former members of a Sioux Falls indoor football league team may have to change their post-athletic career plans.  From the Sioux Falls Argus:

A federal grand jury has indicted six people for conspiracy to defraud the United States and aggravated identity theft.

Two of those indicted – Undra Stewart Franks, 27, and Donta Moore, 28 – are former Sioux Falls Storm players.

The new federal indictment says Moore, Franks and the others conspired to defraud victims by using names, Social Security numbers and dates of birth stolen from others to file fraudulent income tax returns that claimed false income tax refunds.

Identity theft isn’t just a Florida thing.  If you deal with Social Security numbers at work, treat them as valuable confidential data — because that’s what they are.  Guard your own identity by never giving out your social security numbers, protecting your bank account info, and being sure never to transmit those things in unencrypted e-mails.  If you need to send documents with that info electronically, use a secure file transfer site, like our rothcpa.filetransfers.net.

 

News from the Profession.  10 People Not Cut Out to Be Partner (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/25/14: Temporary Permanence Edition. And: Reform week?

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20120511-2Some of us just have jobs.  Others have callings.  If you feel you have a calling, it can be very difficult to sway you from your vocation.  Sometimes not even a permanent federal court injunction will do the trick.  

A permanent injunction apparently didn’t stop an Iowan whose calling appears to be to spread the gospel of ESOP.  John L. Henss was already promoting his vision of Employee Stock Ownership Plans when I moved to Iowa as a young CPA in 1985.  By a remarkable coincidence, Iowa had more than its share of tax litigation involving flawed ESOPs over the years (see, for example, here, here and here).

One of the most remarkable cases was the 1992 case of Martin v. Feilen (CA-8, 965 F.2d 660), involving alleged self-dealing and fiduciary breaches among the trustees and administrators of Feilen Meats, an Iowa packer.  Among the defendants was John L. Henss.

Judge Loken authored the decision of the Eighth Circuit on the case, a decision that went badly for Mr. Henss (my emphasis):

Henss was the dominant decision-maker for FMC and the ESOP with respect to all or nearly all the transactions discussed in this opinion. He also holds himself out as an ERISA expert who has structured and provided other services and advice to hundreds of ESOPs. In addition to engaging in the actionable self-dealing we have described, Henss’s trial testimony displayed an appalling insensitivity to the proper role of ESOPs and ESOP fiduciaries. For example, Henss stated repeatedly his view that ESOP fiduciaries are exempt from ERISA’s “prudent man” rule when investing plan assets in an employer’s stock or property.

To summarize, we affirm the district court’s judgment that Henss and Stephen Thielking, and their personal corporations, breached their ERISA fiduciary duties in causing the ESOP to engage in the above-described Transactions Subject to ERISA, and we affirm the district court’s permanent injunction against Stephen Thielking and Stephen K. Thielking, C.P.A., P.C. We modify the permanent injunction against John Henss and John L. Henss C.P.A., P.C., to further enjoin them from acting as a service provider to any ERISA plan. 

So that ended Mr. Henss’ career in the ESOP field, right?  Never underestimate the tenacity of a man with a calling.  His name reappeared in another ESOP case yesterday in Tax Court.  It was a remarkable case, actually, in that a partnership had an Employee Stock Ownership Plan.  But when you have a calling, a lack of a corporation with actual stock won’t stand between you and an ESOP.  But mere tenacity isn’t enough, according to Judge Kerrigan (my emphasis):

Respondent contends that because K.H. Co. was a partnership for tax purposes, it did not have qualifying employer securities. The parties do not dispute that K.H. Co. was a partnership at all relevant times. Indeed, K.H. Co. admits that it filed Forms 1065, U.S. Return of Partnership Income, for tax years ended September 30, 1995 through 2004. Because K.H. Co. was a partnership for tax purposes and did not have any stock, it did not have any qualifying employer securities for purposes of sections 409(l) and 4975(e)(7) and (8) in which the plan could invest. Therefore, petitioner failed to operate as an ESOP pursuant to its terms when K.H. Co. became its employer, sponsor, and administrator. 

But aside from the obvious one, what problems might this ESOP have?  Perhaps the required ESOP stock appraisal, performed for 2000, 2001 and 2002 by none other than John L. Henss.  Apparently “permanent” had already worn off by then.  From the Tax Court:

John L. Henss was chosen to appraise K.H. Co. The administrative record includes appraisals and appraisal summaries for only 2000, 2001, and 2002. Written on “JLH” letterhead, the cover letter of each appraisal states: “At your request, we have prepared an appraisal valuation of KH Company, L.L.C.” The cover letters refer to the “appraised value of common stock of KH Company, L.L.C.” The cover letters are all dated, but none of them are signed.

Mr. Henss’ qualifications are not described in the appraisals. The appraisal summaries state merely: “The undersigned holds himself out to be an appraiser. The undersigned is an accountant who is familiar with the assets being appraised.” Mr. Henss did not sign or date the appraisals or the appraisal summaries. 

     Petitioner claims that Mr. Henss has degrees in English, accounting, and law. Petitioner further claims that Mr. Henss “has been preparing appraisals of stock for employee stock ownership plans for many clients for several years” and that he is the author of a book on ESOPs. Petitioner also contends that Mr. Henss was in all other respects a person who was “independent” as set forth in the statute, the regulations, and the Commissioner’s announcements on the subject.

Section 1.170A-13(c)(5)(i)(A), Income Tax Regs., provides that a qualified appraiser is an individual who includes on the appraisal summary a declaration that he or she holds himself or herself out to the public as an appraiser or performs appraisals regularly. Because there is no signature below the statement on the appraisal summaries that the “undersigned holds himself out to be an appraiser”, the plan failed to meet this requirement. 

Not to mention that he had been enjoined from providing services to ERISA plans — a term that would seem to cover appraisal services.

Whatever the nature of his calling, things haven’t universally gone well in court for clients who have used Mr. Henss.   Perhaps when selecting an ESOP service provider, one might well take federal court injunctions into consideration.

Cite: K.H. Co. LLC Employee Stock Ownership Plan, T.C. Memo 2014-31.

 

taxanalystslogoIt appears the House GOP will release its tax reform plan today.  Tax Analysts Blog is on it:

Martin Sullivan, Can Dynamic Scoring Save Tax Reform? Don’t Count on It

Jeremy Scott, How to Pay for Camp’s Tax Reform Plan

Clint Stretch, The Tax Reform Blame Game

Renu Zaretsky, House GOP Tax Plan Hits This Week; IRS Getting Worked Over But It’s Still Working.  This is a new daily news roundup at TaxVox.

Tax Justice Blog, State Tax Breaks Pile Up.  Government by special favor always has its fans.

 

William Perez, Reporting Unemployment Compensation Benefits

S-SidewalkTony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: 2013 Tax Planning Is Not Finished For S Corporations – How To Purge Problematic Earnings and Profits   

Kay Bell, Most taxpayers support tax preparer competency standards.  I find this a meaningless result, a question posed to people who have given approximately no thought to the issue and who have more developed views of Miley Cyrus than John Koskinen.

Peter Reilly,  New Jersey Gets To Second Guess IRS On Estate Tax Marital Deduction 

TaxGrrrl, Pharrell Williams & The Ultimate Charitable Hat Trick   

 

Liz Malm, Mississippi Lawmakers Consider Firearm Sales Tax Holiday (Tax Policy Blog).  Even for a good cause, sales tax holidays are a bad idea.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 292

Is there nothing the tax law can’t do?  Meanwhile in Canada, You Get a Tax Credit For Not Stinking the Joint Up (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/11/14: Employer mandate “shared responsibility” delayed for some. And: fresh scam!

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20121120-2It’s such a disaster, we’re only going to force some employers to do it right now. The IRS has issued final regulations on the employer health insurance mandate that delay their impact on companies with 50-100 employees until 2016.  The “shared responsibility provisions” — such a creepy name — will still apply to employers with 100 “full-time equivalent” employees in 2015.  The Wall Street Journal reports:

 Under the original 2010 health law, employers with the equivalent of at least 50 full-time workers had to offer coverage or pay a penalty starting at $2,000 a worker beginning in 2014. Last year, the administration delayed the requirement for the first time by moving it to 2015.

The new rules for companies with 50 to 99 workers would cover about 2% of all U.S. businesses, which include 7% of workers, or 7.9 million people, according to 2011 Census figures compiled by the Small Business Administration. The rules for companies with 100 or more workers affect another 2% of businesses, which employ more than 74 million people.

You’ll look in vain in either Sec. 4980H, the “shared responsibility” tax code section, or Sec. 1513 of the Affordable Care Act, which enacted 4980H, for anything that says the provision can take effect later than 2014.  Once again the administration is making it up as it goes in a tacit admission that Obamacare is a half-baked mess.  I hope somebody with 100 employees sues the IRS on equal-protection grounds to enjoin this politically-motivated selective enforcement.   To me it’s another clue that the individual mandate will also be delayed, and ultimately abandoned.

Paul Neiffer, Some ACA Relief for Employers with 50 to 99 Employees

Jason Dinesen, The Affordable Care Act and Small Businesses   

Martin Sullivan, Forget Obamacare for a Minute. Here’s Some Good News About Health Policy (Tax Analysts Blog).  

 

Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

New filing season, same old scams.  Our area IRS Taxpayer Liason says this email is circulating:

Dear Applicant,

An Income Tax repayment is a refund of tax that you’ve overpaid.
Internal Revenue Service  ( IRS ) has received new information about your taxable
income you’ve overpaid too much tax through your job or pension in previous years.

There was a mistake with your tax, which an error occurred on your tax return,
and therefore your income reduced. Your employer also used the wrong tax code.

You are eligible to receive a refund of $2670.48 USD as your recent tax refund.
IRS will send you a repayment. You’ll get the repayment either by cheque in the post or by bank transfer.

Please click here to get your tax refund on your Visa or Mastercard now.

Note : Your refund can be delayed for a variety of reasons. For example submitting
invalid records or applying after the deadline.

Best Wishes,

IRS Tax Refund Service Team
Internal Revenue Service.

Of course it is a scam.  Some obvious clues: a real IRS notice doesn’t have to tell you that it’s dealing in “USD.”  We say “checks” in the US; you get “cheques” in Canada, the UK, or other old Commonwealth countries.  IRS doesn’t do refunds on credit cards.  And, of course, the most important clue:  the IRS will never initiate contact you with an e-mail or phone call.  If an email says it’s from the IRS, it’s not.

 

TaxGrrrl, Understanding Your Tax Forms: The W-2   

 

haroldHooray for Hollywood!  Movie Producer Peter Hoffman Charged With Film Tax Credit Fraud.  It involves Louisiana, which continues its co-dependent relationship with Hollywood with film tax subsidies.  Iowa, sadder but wiser, now prefers producer room and board subsidies to Film Tax Credits.

 

Howard Gleckman, Incoming Senate Finance Chair Wyden Outlines His Tax Agenda (TaxVox):

Speaking in Los Angeles to a conference sponsored jointly by the USC Gould School of Law and the Tax Policy Center, Wyden framed his tax agenda around several key issues:

Narrow the gap between taxation of investment income and ordinary income.

Significantly increase the standard deduction.

Simplify and enhance the refundable Child Tax Credit and Earned Income Tax Credit.

Revise savings incentives by creating a new investment account for all Americans at birth, shift savings subsidies from high-income taxpayers to low- and moderate-income households, and consolidate and simplify the current tangle of existing tax-preferred savings incentives.

Enhance job training.

Restore Build America Bonds—a short-lived idea that partially replaced tax-exempt state and local bonds with direct federal subsidies. He’d also seek ways to encourage business to funnel overseas earnings into domestic infrastructure investment.

It’s a disappointing agenda from somebody considered a thoughtful center-left voice on tax policy.   Any tax on investment income is best understood as a double-tax, and I don’t think by “narrowing the gap” he means lowering ordinary inocme rates.  His second, third and fourth points are fine, but the “Enhance job training” and “Build America Bond” proposals are just political pinatas to be broken open by insiders.  If you want to see what jobs training dollars really accomplish, I refer you to Iowa’s own CIETC.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 278

checkboxJeremy Scott, Check the Box for Tax Avoidance (Tax Analysts Blog).  

The check-the-box rules allowed multinationals to create entities that were treated one way in a foreign jurisdiction and another by the United States. These entities, so-called hybrids, are at the core of companies like Apple’s tax strategies, and they have been used to bring about obscenely low effective tax rates (2.3 percent on $700 billion in foreign earnings, according to the Obama administration).

I think any corporate above zero is obscenely high.

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Proposal to Exempt Olympians’ Prize Money from Taxation: Good Politics, Wrong Solution (Tax Policy Blog)

Kay Bell, IRS takes a bite out of U.S. Olympic medalists’ winnings

 

Keith Fogg, Holding People Hostage for the Payment of Tax – Writ Ne Exeat Republica (Procedurally Taxing). No, he’s not talking about tax season.

 

News from the Profession: PwC Will Probably Be the First Accounting Firm to Replace Interns With Robots.  (Going Concern).  Makes sense, as they were the first to do so with partners.

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Tax Roundup, 2/4/14: Sometimes the tax crime isn’t the worst crime. And the Carnival moves on.

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

WashingtonRule 23 of George Washington’s Rules of Civility has a lot going for it:

When you see a Crime punished, you may be inwardly Pleased; but always show Pity to the Suffering Offender.

Yet even the Father of His Country might have had a hard time suppressing a smile over a federal tax sentencing in California yesterday.  From the Contra Costa Times:

A former San Ramon family law attorney was sentenced to two years in prison Monday for evading taxes and illegally eavesdropping on a client’s estranged spouse with the help of a now-incarcerated private investigator who set up divorcing men for drunken-driving arrests.

Mary Nolan, 62, of Oakland, already relinquished her law license and paid $469,000 in back taxes Sept. 27 after she pleaded guilty to four counts of tax evasion and one count of illegal eavesdropping.

Nolan represented the ex-wives of two men who were arrested after [the private investigator's] attractive female employees lured them into drinking and driving. Those convictions were expunged after the scheme became known in 2011, when Butler and jailed former Contra Costa Narcotics Enforcement Team Commander Norman Wielsch were caught selling drug evidence and admitted to pimping and robbery, among other crimes.

Oddly, the sentencing judge not only failed to impose the 33-month sentence requested by the prosecution, but he also seemed to think the tax charge was more serious than the honey-trap thing, reports Concord Patch:

Breyer told Nolan during the sentencing today, “To eavesdrop on conversations that clearly weren’t intended for an adversary to hear is a
very unfair thing to do.”

But he said he was especially concerned about the failure of Nolan, as a lawyer, to pay the taxes due.

“What I find most troubling is the fact that you were a lawyer. Lawyers have that special responsibility not just to know the law but to follow it,” he told Nolan.

Yes, evading $400,000 of taxes is a bad thing, whether or not you are a lawyer.  Still, ruining lives setting up and framing people to win divorce cases strikes me as worse than making the IRS work hard for its money.   Maybe when you’re a federal judge, things start to look a bit funny.

 

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Well, technically “a bunch” isn’t “a smidgeon.”   ‘Not Even a Smidgeon of Corruption’ at IRS, Obama Says.  (Tax Analysts, $link).   If so, it sure is funny how Lois Lerner was so quick to invoke her 5th amendment right against self-incrimination.  

Clint Stretch, Dumb Mistakes Aren’t Crimes.  (Tax Analysts Blog)  He says “IRS employees will not knowingly do someone’s political bidding.”  History shows otherwise.

 

 

TaxProf, OMB: EITC Is 4th Most Error-Prone Federal Program, With 22.7% Error Rate.  If it makes you feel better, the three worse ones are all Medicaid or Medicare.  Makes you want the government and IRS to pay in a bigger role in health care, for sure.

 

Minnesota:  Come for lovely winter weather, and stay for the annual tax hit!  The Minnesota Center for Fiscal Excellence has computed the annual cost for a high-earning individual of life in the tundra.  It’s not cheap:

MNvIA

Of course, beautiful Iowa doesn’t have a lot to crow about, as it looks good only by comparison with Minnesota.  While the hypothetical taxpayer could only buy a nice new sedan annually for the savings of moving from Minnesota to Des Moines, she could buy some really nice wheels every year with a move to Sioux Falls.

 

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Reasonable Compensation In The S Corporation Arena:

The IRS Fact Sheet provides “The amount of the compensation will never exceed the amount received by the shareholder either directly or indirectly. However, if cash or property…did go to the shareholder…the level of salary must be reasonable and appropriate.”  This language would seem to indicate that there is no requirement that compensation be paid to a shareholder-employee provided the shareholder also foregoes distributions. Even with that bit of guidance from the IRS, it is prudent advice to encourage a profitable S corporation to start making reasonable salary payments to its shareholder-employees as soon as it has the means to do so.

Unfortunately, the IRS has shown that it will attempt to force a salary even when the means are lacking.

Paul Neiffer, You Can File Income Tax Returns Now (Maybe)

 

Jeremy Scott, Making Tax Reform a Partisan Issue (Tax Analysts Blog):

And it isn’t hard to see why. Linking tax reform to the debt ceiling risks making it a partisan issue. Forcing Congress to take up reform is a GOP victory, because it causes Democrats to give up on a clean bill. So Democrats, many of whom are sympathetic to the tax reform process, will have to oppose tax changes because Republicans have politicized the debate, defining tax reform as a win for their side.

Ah, the majesty of government.

 

Lyman Stone, New Study: High Excise Taxes Drive Cigarette Smuggling in Boston, New York, Providence (Tax Policy Blog).  That has to be the most predictable news of the day.

Sad news from Kay Bell ”The time has come, however, to put the Tax Carnival on hiatus.”  It’s a lot of work to put one together.  Thanks, Kay, for all of the help you’ve given tax bloggers over the years with the Carnival of Taxes.  So until she feels like reopening the Carnival, let’s have one last ride on the Midway.

20120829-1

 

Going Concern, Here Is a Short List of People Less Deserving of Bonuses Than IRS Employees.  Hard to argue with the list, especially the first two, but I would throw in the other branches as well.

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/14/2014: 4th quarter payment time! And: minimally-effective legislation.

Tuesday, January 14th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Hey, corporations: federal estimated taxes are due for the fourth quarter of 2013 tomorrow, so you will need to set up your EFTPS payment today!  Individual fourth-quarter payments are also due tomorrow.  Kay Bell explains How to avoid estimated tax penalties.

Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

Misdirected priorities.  The Iowa Senate will reliably prevent any worthwhile income tax reform this year, while making a futile effort to increase Iowa’s minimum wage.  O. Kay Henderson reports:

Democrats like House Minority Leader Mark Smith of Marshalltown plan to press for an increase in the state’s minimum wage.

“Today, many Iowa parents are working two or three jobs that are low-paying, trying to put food on the table and pay the bills,” Smith said. “…We owe it to Iowa to raise the minimum wage, perhaps a dollar an hour now and more in the future. Our experience in Iowa has shown that raising the minimum wage has little effect on businesses, but gives working Iowans hope for a better future.”

David Henderson discusses a new study indicating that the Senate is pursuing an unwise idea:

- Only 11.3 percent of workers who would gain from the increase live in households officially defined as poor.
– A whopping 63.2 percent of workers who would gain were second or even third earners living in households with incomes equal to twice the poverty line or more.
– Some 42.3 percent of workers who would gain were second or even third earners who live in households that have incomes equal to three times the poverty line or more.

So a minimum wage boost, even on its own terms, isn’t really there to help the poor.  Of course the price of wages can no more be set effectively by decree than any other price.  It will result in either job loss, benefit loss, or increased workloads.  As one of the studies authors notes:

Because, to the extent they are able, employers will offset the higher minimum wage by reducing non-money components of worker compensation. Burkhauser notes that such an effect will not show up in the government data because the data do not measure these non-money parts of the compensation package. But that is small comfort to those who would find themselves with higher-paying but reduced-benefit jobs.

But because that obvious effect is hard for senators to understand, they’ll just pretend it isn’t there.

 

Scott Hodge, The U.S. Has More Individually Owned Businesses than Corporations.  And they earn more income, too:

20130412-1

 

That’s why efforts to make “the rich” pay “their fair share” are job killers.

 

Looking to get Medicaid to pay for Grandma’s nursing home?  Be careful.  Roger McEowen reports “Iowa Supreme Court Reaffirms Extensive Reach of Medicaid Recovery in Granting Department’s Claim against Irrevocable Trust“:

This case again warns practitioners of the limitations of income-only irrevocable trusts in protecting assets from Medicaid recovery in Iowa. Even if clients are willing to (1) risk the look-back period, (2) pay potential gift taxes, (3) forfeit control of their assets, and (4) deprive their heirs of a stepped-up basis at death, they still may not achieve asset protection.

And really, “free” care isn’t necessarily all that great.

 

Courts uphold FATCA rules.  Court Rejects Banking Associations’ Challenge to Regulations Addressing Offshore Tax Avoidance.  (Department of Justice Tax Release) “The regulations require U.S. banks to report to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) information about accounts earning more than $10 of interest beginning in 2013 that are held by nonresident aliens of all countries with which the United States has a tax treaty or other information exchange agreement.”

20130419-1Of course not.  The IRS Scandal, Day 250: FBI Says No Criminal Charges in IRS Probe. (TaxProf)  They didn’t even contact the victims until recently, and they have apparently decided that, with respect to the disclosure of confidential information to ProPublica, the left-side reporting outfit, was just one of those things.  I doubt if you or I would get a pass for something like that.  That’s what happens when you have a Justice Department that is more a lookout than a watchdog.

 

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Using ‘Land Banking’ To Minimize Tax On Property Development   

Martin Sullivan, Stop Beating on the IRS.  (Tax Analysts Blog) I think the IRS gives at least as good as it gets.

So true: The IRS Has Better Things To Do than the RTRP Designation (Russ Fox)

William Perez discusses the Taxpayer Advocate’s 2013 Annual Report to Congress

Jason Dinesen, But Seriously — How Do Taxes Work If You’re Married to More than One Person?  Interesting question, but anybody in that situation has more pressing non-tax issues.

TaxGrrrl, Will Overstock Force IRS To Make Up Its Mind About Bitcoin? 

Jeremy Scott, Financial Product Reform Might Not Be Imminent (Tax Analysts Blog)

 

The Critical Question:  Should It Bother Us that Boeing Says It Needs a Tax Incentive to Make Its Planes Safe? (Tax Justice Blog).  It should bother us that they realistically think legislatures are dumb enough to believe that.

Good luck with that.  Monte Jackel Puts Tax Blog Behind Subscriber Firewall, reports the TaxProf, with a $350 annual subscription rate.  I am embarrassed to learn of this blog just now, and I wish him luck.  Meanwhile the Tax Update subscription rate continues to be $0.00 (except for those wonderful folks who pay a nominal monthly charge to get it delivered to their Kindle).  In light of Mr. Jackel’s move, though, I may double that rate.

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/7/2014: Koskinen proposes voluntary IRS preparer certification. And: Obamacare, small business incubator?

Tuesday, January 7th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
This Koskinen isn't the IRS commissioner

This Koskinen isn’t the IRS commissioner

The new IRS Commissioner, John Koskinen, would like for IRS to oversee a voluntary preparer certification program if their preparer regulation power grab fails in the courts, reports Accounting Today. But he would still prefer the power grab:

“If you could require certification of preparers and some educational requirements, it would help taxpayers feel some level of confidence that preparers actually know what they’re doing, and the vast majority of them do,” Koskinen said during a conference call with reporters after he was sworn in ceremonially Monday by Treasury Secretary Jack Lew with an audience of many IRS employees in attendance. “My sense is that we should be able to provide that same educational training and that background to preparers. If you can’t require it, offer it, and if you complete the information, you get a certificate that says, ‘I have completed the IRS preparer course.’ I think that could be over time very valuable to preparers, and consumers could ask preparers, ‘Have you gone through the IRS training?’ Whatever happens with the court case, we ought to be able to move forward on that and provide taxpayers with as much assurance as we can that the preparers they are dealing with have met some kind of minimum standards.”

Somebody should point out to him that there already is such a program: the Enrolled Agent Program.  If the IRS runs the now-mothballed Registered Tax Return Preparer literacy test as a voluntary program, it will be a crippling blow to the more rigorous and underappreciated EA designation. Before he worries more about the competence of preparers, Commissioner Koskinen should fix his agency first (my emphasis):

“When I look at the impact of the budget and the implications of further cuts or what happens the next time there’s a sequester, the first thing that happens is the waiting time on a phone call goes up and our service goes down,” he said. “We try to get to 70 or 80 percent, but sometimes it gets as low as 50 or 60, which means at 50 percent that half the people who are calling are getting no answer at all and no satisfaction. It just seems to me that’s intolerable. Taxpayers deserve better, so we need to do whatever we can to provide the services that taxpayers need and expect. They ought to be able to dial the IRS number and get an answer promptly, and they ought to be able to get accurate information.”

Even the shabbiest storefront preparer at least processes more than half of its customers.

 

Why Iowa income tax reform will go nowhere this yearvia the Sioux City Journal:

Senate Democratic Leader Mike Gronstal, D-Council Bluffs, said Senate Democrats would formulate a tax-relief approach geared toward income tax cuts for middle-class Iowans, not the two-tiered plan being pushed by Republicans.

“Nobody in my caucus is going to go along with a scheme that leaves middle-class Iowans carrying more than their share of the tax burden in Iowa so rich people can choose whichever one works the best for them,” Gronstal said.

The idea that the state income tax system is somehow a way to fight The Rich Guy is willfully dumb, with zero-income-tax South Dakota right next door.  Oh, and you know what another word for “the rich” is?  Employers. 

Source: The Tax Foundation

Source: The Tax Foundation

 

Megan McCardle poses the question “Will Obamacare Inspire Small-Business Ownership?“:

One theorized benefit of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is that it will unleash a new era of entrepreneurship. Undoubtedly, there are people in the U.S. who wanted to start a business but feared losing their health insurance. Now that they know they can buy it, presumably they’ll be freed to take risks without fearing that they could end up uninsured and uninsurable.

Unfortunately, we just don’t have that much empirical evidence. European nations with more generous social safety nets have lower rates of entrepreneurship than the U.S. does, even though a thought experiment might suggest that generous welfare programs would encourage people to take more risks. Nor did we see a radical unfurling of entrepreneurial energy in Massachusetts after RomneyCare.

She also points out that Obamacare is a kick in the head for businesses that actually succeed:

Meanwhile, of course, the law imposes significant new penalties for growing a company; anyone with more than 50 employees not only has to provide health insurance for their employees, but they also have to meet a substantial regulatory burden to demonstrate that they’re providing affordable coverage. That might discourage people from growing their firms. 

You know, it just might.

 

Russ Fox, Your Mileage Log — Start It Now (2014 Version).  You would not believe how much it helps in an IRS exam.  And doing it retrospectively when the IRS exam notice arrives tends to go badly.

Peter Reilly, Post Divorce Tax Intimacy Can Be Riskier Than Post Divorce Sex   Ewww…

Paul Neiffer, Roger’s Top Ten. “Roger McEowen from Iowa State University and their Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation (CALT) just listed his Top 10 Ag Law and Taxation Developments for 2014.”

William Perez, Resources for Preparing and Filing Form W-2 for Small Businesses

Robert D. Flach tells us WHAT’S NEW FOR NJ STATE TAXES FOR 2013

Kay Bell, Tax Carnival #124: Happy New Tax Year 2014

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Martin Sullivan, Goodbye Baucus, Hello Wyden (Tax Analysts Blog): ”On tax reform the current chair of the Senate Finance Committee has been a laggard. Wyden will be a leader.”

Jeremy Scott, A To-Do List for Wyden (Tax Analysts Blog).  Tax Reform, Extenders, and the Tea Party investigation.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 243

 

Joseph Henchman, Parking and Transit Benefits Tax Exclusion Parity Expires Again; Congress Should Consider Permanent Fix.  (Tax Policy Blog).  ”The tax code is probably the wrong place to be subsidizing commuters, and the entire provision ought to be eliminated. If Congress wishes to retain it, it ought to consider a non-expiring unified exclusion of all transportation commuting expenses.”

Tax Justice Blog, Corporate Income Tax Repeal Is Not a Serious Proposal.  Stawmen go up in flames.

Ben Harris, Rethinking Homeownership Subsidies (TaxVox).  He wants to revamp them.  I’d prefer to get rid of them.

 

TaxGrrrl, Cracker Barrel Waitress Serves Up Happiness, Gets Tip & More .  $6,000 more.

The Critical Question: Is College That Guy on eBay Who Never Paid For the Crap You Sent Him? (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/17/2013: Map day! A B+ for Iowa tax administration.

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

I did my last session of the year yesterday for the ISU-CALT tax school in Ames, and I have much catching up to do today in the office.  It’s a two-day school, and today Paul Neiffer is on the Day 2 team at the Ames Tax School.

 

Ben Harris, The US Income Tax Burden, County by County (TaxVox):

While the median federal income tax burden across counties is about $3,400, approximately 10 percent of counties  have average tax burdens less than $2,100 and around 10 percent of counties have  average tax burdens over $6,700.

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I think the right side of the little color key is supposed to read $7,000, not $70,000.  Unless Central Iowa has higher income than I thought, anyway.

 

Meanwhile, Joseph Henchman reports that the Council on State Taxation graded the states on “taxpayer administration,” with this map (Tax Poliy Blog):

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Iowa gets a B+:

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I think they are grading on a curve.  And Iowa gets credits for making rulings and decisions available; that hasn’t been done since August, at least not on the Iowa Department of Revenue website.

 

Jeremy Scott, IRS Moves Closer to Having a Commissioner (Tax Analysts Blog).  How novel.

O. Kay Henderson,  Energy execs say end of federal credit to curb wind energy expansion.  When something can’t happen without subsidies, that’s nature’s way of saying it shouldn’t happen.

Jason Dinesen, Will Same-Sex Married Couples Pay More or Less in Taxes Now?  “I answer by saying that the answer is: ‘yes, no, maybe.’”

 

Leslie Book, Omitted Income, Accuracy-Related Penalties and Reasonable Cause (Procedurally Taxing).  He talks about the case I discussed here, saying:

Sometimes when I read penalty cases involving individuals I am struck by how the penalties are inappropriate. Here, I understand why IRS counsel stuck to its guns and tried the case, but I also agree with the court’s conclusion on these facts. I suspect that very few taxpayers leaving off this amount of income would get relief from the penalties, though wonder if the IRM should extend the first time abatement relief to penalties other than failure to file or failure to pay, so that perhaps Counsel or Appeals will feel more comfortable in exercising discretion if there are facts suggestive of an isolated and understandable mistake.

IRS is much too quick to assess foot-fault penalties on taxpayers with a good compliance history.

 

William Perez, IRA Distributions at Year End:

Taxpayers who are age 70.5 or older are required to distribute at least a minimum amount from their traditional IRAs, 401(k) plans and similar pre-tax savings plans. These required minimum distributions must begin no later than April 1st after the reaching age seventy and a half. Individuals continue taking required minimum distributions each year. So the first year-end tactic is to figure out how much needs to be distributed from the retirement plan to satisfy the required minimum distribution rules.

Basic, but missed surprisingly often.

 

Tony Nitti,  IRS Issues Guidance On Employee Benefit Plans For Same-Sex Couples

Russ Fox,  Health Care Fraud Leads to Tax Charge

Kay Bell, Medical tax breaks’ 10% and FSA year-end considerations

TaxGrrrl has kicked off her “12 Days of Charitable Giving 2013.”  Today she highlights Children Of Fallen Patriots 

TaxProf,  The IRS Scandal, Day 222

 

Grab a Tuesday Buzz from Robert D. Flach!

News From the Profession.  Accounting Firm Busted Stealing From the Cloud in “Plain, Vanilla Dispute About a Customer List” (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/10/2013: Penalize everyone edition! And one for me, one from you.

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

 

20120511-2IRS: shoot first, let the Tax Court sort it out later.  One of the most annoying features of exams in recent years is the IRS habit of imposing penalties on almost every underpayment, regardless of the cause or the taxpayers’ history of good compliance.  It’s nice to see a case like one in the Tax Court yesterday that held the IRS went too far.

The taxpayer were a married couple with a 50-year unblemished compliance history.  The wife’s employer switched from issuing paper W-2s to downloadable versions for 2010.  She didn’t get the memo, if there was one, and left her wage income off the couple’s 1040.  The IRS computers noticed and issued a notice and penalty; the taxpayers double-checked with their preparer and immediately paid the extra taxes, but they balked at the 20% underpayment penalty.

The Tax Court pointed out (all emphasis mine):

     Petitioners regard their tax situation as fairly complex, as they receive income from multiple sources, including two subchapter S corporations that lease farmland out of State. Petitioners worry about their ability to prepare accurate tax returns; accordingly, for many years, including 2010, petitioners have hired a certified public accountant (C.P.A.) to assist them in the preparation of their returns.

Petitioners are aware of the importance of recordkeeping, and for many years they have maintained a system for keeping track of documents that will be needed to prepare their returns. Thus, when petitioners received in the mail a tax document such as a Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, Form 1098, Mortgage Interest Statement, Form 1099-R, Distributions From Pensions, Annuities, Retirement or Profit-Sharing Plans, IRAs, Insurance Contracts, etc., or Schedule K-1, Beneficiary’s Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc., they would briefly review it and then place it in a dedicated tax file, along with other tax-relevant documents that they collected throughout the year. In February or March petitioners would meet with their C.P.A. and furnish him with their tax file. Once the return had been prepared, petitioners would again meet with the C.P.A. to review the return.

So the taxpayers had a pretty good system in place to ensure compliance.  Yet the missing W-2 fell through the cracks — partly because their preparer thought the wife had retired.

     Petitioners’ failure to notice the absence of a Form W-2 for Mrs. Andersen was an oversight on their part. However, the oversight was at least partially understandable given both the number of petitioners’ tax documents and the fact that Mrs. Andersen never received from either her employer or her employer’s payroll agent a paper copy of a Form W-2, something that she had previously received throughout her career. Nor had Mrs. Andersen received notification from either of those parties that the payroll agent had discontinued issuing Forms W-2 in paper form in favor of making electronic copies available on the Internet.

Petitioners also failed to notice, when they reviewed their return with Mr. Trader, that Mrs. Andersen’s wages were not included on line 7. But when, as part of the review process, petitioners and Mr. Trader compared the 2010 return with the 2009 return, the parties noted the similarity of the amounts of income and the absence of any anomaly, thereby suggesting that no error had occurred. Indeed, the difference between the amounts of income reported on petitioners’ 2010 and 2009 returns was less than $1,000, or two-thirds of one percent of their 2009 income, a difference that would not ordinarily give rise to any suspicion that income had not been fully reported.

So the mistake was one a reasonable human would make.  But the IRS thinks no mistake is reasonable, apparently.  Fortunately the Tax Court held otherwise:

Clearly, petitioners made a mistake. But we think it was an honest mistake and not of a type that should justify the imposition of the accuracy-related penalty. In short, we think that petitioners’ diligent efforts to keep track of their tax information, hiring a C.P.A. to prepare their tax return, reviewing their return with the C.P.A. when it was completed, and prompt payment of the deficiency upon receipt of the notice of deficiency, together with the other facts and circumstances discussed above, represent a good-faith attempt to assess their proper tax liability. Accordingly, we hold that petitioners have carried their burden with respect to the reasonable cause and good faith exception under section 6664(c)(1) and that petitioners are therefore not liable for the accuracy-related penalty under section 6662(a).

So: good records, full cooperation with a reliable preparer, and prompt payment of any underpaid taxes on discovery of the underpayment were key.  It’s ridiculous that it took a trip to Tax Court to get what seems like the only appropriate and fair result.  The IRS should stop being so trigger-happy with penalties.  Maybe a sauce for the gander rule, where the IRS and IRS personnel are as liable for penalties on incorrect assessments as taxpayers are for those on underpayments, would get them to see reason.

Cite: Andersen, T.C. Summ. Op. 2013-100

 

Kyle Pomerleau, CBO Report Confirms that the Federal Government Redistributes a Substantial Amount of Income  (Tax Policy Blog, my emphasis):

They also break down taxes paid and spending received by income quintile. When looked at this way, the redistribution becomes very clear. According to their analysis, those in the lowest quintile received $22,000 in spending minus taxes. In contrast, taxes exceeded spending by $56,000 in the highest quintile.

Source: Congressional Budget Office

Source: Congressional Budget Office

 

When private think tanks like the Tax Foundation issue this sort of report, people favoring higher taxes on “the rich” dismiss it.  CBO numbers are harder to credibly attack as partisan.

But we can always find a dark side.   CBO Finds Growing U.S. Income Inequality (Roberton Williams, TaxVox)

 

William Perez, Selling Losing Investments as Part of a Year-End Tax Strategy.

Tony Nitti, IRS Addresses Deductibility Of Organizational And Startup Costs Upon Partnership Technical Termination.  By saying no.

TaxGrrrl, Tax Scammers Continue To Dial Up Trouble For America’s Seniors.  This is a big problem.  Unless they have contacted you by mail first, the tax folks aren’t going to phone you.  Just hang up.

Paul Neiffer, How $12,000 Becomes $6,000 or less.  By putting it in farmland, if crop prices stay where they are.

 

Stephen Olsen,  IRS says Hom Gonna Getcha on FBAR too.  “The Swiss government and banks are folding like a bunch of cheap patio chairs.”

Phil Hodgen, Voluntary Disclosure and Frozen Swiss Bank Accounts

Brian Mahany,  How To Respond When Your Foreign Bank Asks About Your IRS Compliance

Jeremy Scott, Will FATCA Ever Go Into Effect? (Tax Analysts Blog) “FATCA should be put into effect as soon as possible, and the administration should stop bending separation of powers rules by using delays to functionally repeal unpleasant parts of statutes.”

Nah, just repeal the whole mess.

 

 

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Winter Carnival!  Tax Carnival #123: It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Tax Time (Kay Bell)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 215

Um, no, was there one?  Remember the Tax Reform Act of 1995? (Clint Stretch, Tax Analysts Blog“What is certain is that the 1995 hope of creating a tax system that genuinely favors savings and investment is dead.”

It’s always a good Tuesday for a Robert D. Flach Buzz!

 

We hardly knew ye.  Farewell to Feel-Good Tax Reform (Martin Sullivan, Tax Analysts Blog)

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Tax Roundup, 12/3/2013: Tax Court says no vesting, no K-1. And: gas tax fever!

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20120511-2Who pays, partner?  A Tax Court decision yesterday held that an executive of a partnership holding a non-vested capital interest should not be considered a “partner” for allocation of taxable income and loss before the interest vests.

The taxpayer was an executive of Crescent Holdings, LLC, a Georgia real estate partnership.  According to the Tax Court, he received a 2% capital interest in the partnership that was subject to forfeiture if he failed to stay in the job for three years.  He resigned before the interest vested, so he got nothing.  The partnership had allocated income to him on a K-1 for the period up to his resignation — and gave him some cash to pay taxes on the income —  but he argued that because he was non-vested, he shouldn’t receive any K-1 allocation.

Tax Court Judge Ruwe agreed:

Since petitioner forfeited his right to the 2% interest before it substantially vested, he never owned the interest. Petitioner never received any of the economic benefits from the undistributed partnership income allocations to the 2% interest. Requiring petitioner to recognize the partnership allocations in his income is inconsistent with the fact that he received no economic benefit from the allocations.

“His” 2% was allocable instead to other partners.

Non-vested stock or partnership interests subject to “a substantial risk of forfeiture” are not includible in income until the forfeiture risk lapses, unless the taxpayer makes a timely Section 83(b) election to include the value in income on receipt in spite of the risk.

This decision tells partnerships preparing 2012 returns that they shouldn’t allocate taxable income to partners with unvested interests.  I suspect some partners and partnerships may file amended returns for open years as a result.  It’s not entirely clear, but I read the opinion as saying that a timely Section 83(b) election would change this result.

Cite: Crescent Holdings LLC et al. v. Commissioner; 141 T.C. No. 15

 

Because he really, really wants the money.  Branstad declines to issue gas-tax veto threat (Iowa Farmer Today):

“The goal would be over the next couple of months: Does a consensus develop around something or not? And, I guess time will tell whether that happens,” Branstad said. If an agreement emerges, he said he would include a recommendation on how to address a projected annual shortfall of $215 million for critical road and bridge repair needs during his Condition of the State address Jan. 14.

The “shortfall for critical road and bridge repair” has become a mantra at the statehouse, which means they really want to get into your wallets some more.  The $215 million number comes from an Iowa Department of Transportation report.  No politicians seem willing to challenge a self-serving number from the agency that would benefit from more transportation money.  Compared to other states, Iowa isn’t doing so bad.  For example from the most reason Reason Foundation survey of state highway conditions:

Iowa Highways 2009

Many states are getting less gas revenue from gas taxes as cars become more efficient.  There is a case that some adjustment of the tax makes sense.  Still, Iowa is 17th nationally in per-mile spending, and it doesn’t seem like we are doing badly compared to the rest of the country.  And no matter how much they jack up the gas tax, I suspect they’ll continue to tell us we have crumbling infrastructure anyway.

 

Seventh Circuit: Inherited IRA not exempt from creditor claims. That’s a different result that would apply to bankrupt’s own IRA.  Cite: Clarke, CA-7, Nos. 1241 and 12-1255.

 

Tony Nitti, Final Net Investment Income Regulations: Self-Charged Interest, Net Operating Losses, And More

Paul Neiffer,  Bonus Payments Are Ordinary Income – Not Capital Gains. A Tax Court case involving an upfront oil and gas lease bonus payment.

 

nfl logoJeremy Scott, NFL Encourages Localities in Race to the Bottom (Tax Analysts Blog)  So does NASCAR.

William McBride, Baucus Offers Ways to Pay for a Lower Corporate Tax Rate (Tax Policy Blog)

The shopping season that never ends.  Shopping for Tax Extenders (Clint Stretch, Tax Analysts Blog) “Of the 55 tax provisions that will expire at the end of the year, all but a few have expired before. Taxpayers will have to be satisfied with retroactive reinstatement again.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 208

 

 

Robert D. Flach has your Tuesday Buzz!

Kay Bell, States still getting stiffed on sales taxes on Cyber Monday

Celebrate!  Cyber Monday: It’s The Most Wonderful Tax Evasion Day Of The Year!  (TaxGrrrl)

Going Concern: According To This Paper, It Takes Cojones To Commit Fraud

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/26/13: If they can spend your money better than you, by all means write them a check. And more!

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1I really wasn’t baiting anybody when I asked Would you trust a state legislator to spend your $54?   but Des Moines Register columnist Rekha Basu bit anyway with $54 refund would do us more good if state kept it.  This is classic (my emphasis):

Your 54 bucks might get you a dinner out, a pair of jeans, a couple of sideline tickets to a Hawkeyes football game, or some fancy bottles of wine. But consider what it could have done for the state.  The budget for fixing roads and bridges falls $215 million short of need every year. That especially riles state Sen. Joe Bolkcom, who chairs the Senate’s Ways and Means Committee. Not only could our little refunds take care of critical infrastructure repairs, but they’d create jobs in the process, points out the Iowa City senator.

You don’t matter; the state does. You’d just squander your money, but the all-wise state would unerringly direct your money to where it is most needed for the greatest good.  Just like Joe Bolkcom did when he voted for the Iowa Film Tax Credit Program, which gave tens of millions of taxpayer dollars to grifters and Hollywood sharpies before it collapsed in scandal and disgrace — but not before Rekha Basu could sing its praises:

But some benefits can’t just be measured on a dollar-for-dollar basis. The movies provide employment to local actors, construction crews, artists, caterers, drivers and a host of others. They expose non-Iowans to what the state has to offer. More intangible is the benefit of interactions in a state that can be cut off from the trends and centers of power. Not to mention the excitement factor. We’ve relied on caucuses every four years to bring action and celebrities to town. Now, sightings are anytime, any place.

 Saturday, “The Experiment” had a wrap party downtown. Brody and Whitaker were there, mingling and posing for pictures. Frank Meeink was there. The Iowan who may have inspired the 1998 “American History X” has an acting role. Deb Cosgrove, the nurse, was there. She’s been tending to the medical needs of the film’s luminaries. Casey Gradischnig, local multi-media designer, was there. He’s been working for Whitaker.

Yes, this is the sort of critical infrastructure that we should be trusting our wise leaders to fund on our behalf, so we don’t blow it on football games or bottles of wine, or groceries or medicine — all of which “creates jobs” just as much as money given by politicians to well-connected contractors or filmmakers.

Ms. Basu says she is “tempted” to return her $54.  Talk is cheap.  If she really thinks the state can spend her money better than she can, she can write a check to “Treasurer, State of Iowa,”  mark it as a donation to the state, and send it to the Department of Revenue, Attn: Courtney Kay-Decker, 1305 E. Walnut, Des Moines IA 50319.   Otherwise, she reveals that she doesn’t really trust the state to spend “her” money;  only other peoples’ money.

 

William Perez,  Strategies for Reducing the Net Investment Income Tax.  ”Planning strategies for the NIIT focuses on managing adjusted gross income, managing investment income or managing both.”

I would add that many strategies that might otherwise be unwise because of Alternative Minimum Tax, like prepaying state income taxes on big capital gains, become helpful in dealing with the net investment income tax.

 

I’ve seen niftier.  Nifty Scheme Lands Five at ClubFed (Russ Fox)

 

nfl logoJeremy Scott, The NFL Is Tax-Exempt? Yes, But . . . . (Tax Analysts Blog):

Removing the league’s tax exemption would be a largely symbolic move that would raise little revenue and wouldn’t change much about how the league does business. Far more significant would be increased debate and transparency over publicly financed stadium construction and the tax favors that are doled out to keep teams from moving…

The teams themselves are taxed, and that’s where the real money is.

 

Brian Strahle, MARKET-BASED SOURCING GOES INCOGNITO:

The trend toward market-based sourcing of revenue from services has been increasing over the past several years. Some states have adopted market-based sourcing by enacting legislation, and others have imposed it by interpreting their statutes and regulations to allow it.

Legislators looove taxing non-voters.

 

Stephen Olson, Summary Opinions for 11/22/2013 (Procedurally Taxing).

TaxGrrrl, Chrysler Slows But Doesn’t Put Brakes On IPO Amid Questions Over Taxes 

Peter Reilly, Decision On Clergy Housing Tax Break Evokes Memory Of JFK .  Not a connection I would have made.

Kay Bell, Religious housing tax break deemed unconstitutional

 

Elizabeth Malm, Richard Borean, Monday Map: Adjustment of State Income Tax Brackets for Inflation (Tax Policy Blog)

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Clint Stretch, Max Baucus and the Stamp Tax (Tax Analysts Blog).  I don’t think Sen. Baucus was around for the Stamp Act of 1765, but I’m not so sure about Sen. Grassley.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 201

 

Tuesday is Buzz-day at Robert D. Flach’s place!

One of these things is not like the others?  Tax Simplification, Male Prostitution, and Mormon Thrift Stores (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/29/13: The case against the research credit. And no tax break for bike-shares.

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013 by Joe Kristan
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Flickr image courtesy Windy_ under Creative Commons license

Martin Sullivan, ‘Extortion’ and the Research Credit (Tax Analysts Blog) is the first prominent tax commentator I’ve seen who sees the research credit the much the way I do (my emphasis):

The problem is not with the theory of the credit but with its execution. I have been around a while and have researched the research credit since its inception in 1981. My take is that the essential problem of the credit has only grown worse: It is impossible to find a practical definition of subsidy-worthy research in the 21st century. It is less clear than ever where corporate research ends and other innovation-inducing functions like design and software development, begin. There is little empirical work regarding why, in this modern economy in which investment spending defies categorization, some business-building activity should be subsidized and others not. This inability to target incentives to where they should go means scarce resources are inappropriately and arbitrarily assigned to certain activities, certain businesses, and certain industries while others are left in the cold. What was intended as an incentive for productive activity by clever scientists and engineers turns out to be an incentive for totally unproductive activity by clever lawyers, accountants and lobbyists.

So true — though the accountants do use clever engineers to help turn stuff businesses do anyway into “research.”  I’m convinced that the credit is almost entirely harvested by businesses doing what they would do anyway.

Repeal of the research credit could fund a reduction of approximately 1 percentage point in the corporate tax rate. The benefits of the credit as it works in practice are questionable. In contrast, a reduction in the corporate rate would undoubtedly be a big plus for America’s competitiveness.

That’s right.  The IRS is institutionally incapable of distinguishing between worthwhile “research” and other spending.  If the IRS can’t competently police a tax spiff, get rid of the spiff and lower the rates for everyone.

 

Andrew Lundeen, Scott Hodge,  About Half of Tax Returns Report Less than $30,000 (Tax Policy Blog)

The median taxpayer earns roughly $33,000. This means that half of the 145 million tax filers (about 72 million or so) earn less than $33,000 and half earn more. While only about 14 percent of taxpayers earn more than $100,000, they pay the vast majority of all income taxes in America today.

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Compare that with who pays:

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In other words, The bottom half of the distribution’s income tax burden is actually negative.

 

TaxGrrrl,  10 Things You Need To Know About Getting Married & Taxes

Kay Bell, A clearer look at maximizing medical tax deductions

Paul Neiffer,  Setup Your Deferred Payment Contracts Now:

The election is on a contract by contract basis so it is important to have at least a couple contracts in the $20-30,000 range to allow for the correct amount of adjustments to income.  If you have only one contract for $150,000, that may not give you the best flexibility.   

It’s one of those sweet tax planning tools that would be bizarre and subject to penalties for most of us, but is just Tuesday for farmers.

 

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Flickr image courtesy Galpalval under Creative Commons license

Robert W. Wood, Bike Share Programs Are Not Tax-Free, Says The IRS  (Via the TaxProf).  The IRS says bikes borrowed from rent-a-bike stands, like those in downtown Des Moines, can’t be a reimbursed as a “qualified transportation fringe benefit.”  In contrast, expenses of personally-owned bikes qualify.

 

Phil Hodgen is running a series on the tax effects of expatriating.  He’s gotten ahead of me, so I’ll start at the beginning and add a link every day, starting with  Chapter 1 – A Quick Overview of the Exit Tax.

Jack Townsend, Does Our Criminal Justice System Find Truth Well And What is the Tolerance for Error?  “The question is whether our traditional criminal justice system for finding truth by triers of fact — usually juries but sometimes judges — really do it well and how much confidence can we have that they do it well.”

 

Jeremy Scott, Revenue Divide Will Likely Derail Conference Committee (Tax Analysts Blog)

TaxProf,  The IRS Scandal, Day 173

Tax Justice Blog, PricewaterhouseCoopers Report Quietly Confirms Low Effective Tax Rates for Corporations But Directs Attention to Irrelevant Figures

Linda Beale,  Carried Interest — a tax privilege for the rich whose end time has come.  Except it’s not just for “the rich,” and it would do more harm than good.

 

Keith Fogg, Vince Fumo: IRS Finding of Jeopardy (Procedurally Taxing)  ”As mentioned in a previous post, the Service recently invoked the rarely used jeopardy assessment procedure against former state Senator Vince Fumo in connection with the activities leading to his criminal conviction.”

Robert D. Flach says it’s TIME FOR YEAR-END PLANNING.

 

News from the Profession:  “Is the CFO’s quitting time after 3 pm?” Coming to an Auditor’s Questionnaire Near You (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Update, 10/8/13: One week left! What to do if the K-1 never comes. And: money for Harold Hill!

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130311-1Extended 1040s are due one week from today.  There is no second extension available.

I know, the timing might not be good.  But if it hasn’t been good enough to get your tax information together since January, it will probably never be good.   If you don’t scrape up every loss at the slots or every item you dropped off at Goodwill, it doesn’t matter.

You probably aren’t waiting on K-1s anymore.  Tax returns for partnerships, S corporations and Trusts with income reportable on 1040s  were due September 16.  You should have all of your information in hand, and it’s just a matter of spending an hour or two getting it together and to your waiting preparer.  If you are still “working on it,” you’re either overdoing it or not really working on it.

If you don’t have all of your information — if, for example, you are still missing a K-1 — get ready to file as best you can without it.  If it’s a small K-1, you probably can just ignore it.  If it’s a big one, then talk to your preparer.  If it will only generate a passive loss that you can’t use, just go ahead and file without it by October 15, as it won’t affect the amount of your 2012 tax.  If you believe the K-1 will show taxable income when it is finally released, you should talk it over with your preparer.  Use any information you have to take a shot at what the tax will be.

Big or small, income or loss, be sure to file Form 8082 with your return to tell the IRS that you are filing using numbers that aren’t on a K-1.  It helps protect you from penalties.

In any case, don’t ignore the K-1, or pretend it will be zero when you know better.  That doesn’t work.  File by the extended due date.  You’ll get much better results by filing on time and amending if necessary than by filing late.  The penalties for late payment if you owe on an amended return — if any — won’t exceed 1/2% of the underpayment per month.  The penalties on a late-filed return run to 5% per month.

 

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Harold Hill gets a check.  The Iowa Film Tax Credit is repealed, but it is still stimulating the economy for Iowa attorneys and small-time filmmakers.  The Des Moines Register reports that the state has agreed to pay $225,000 to a Rhode Island man miffed that Iowa stopped the film credit gravy train:

The settlement is with financers of the movie “2001 Maniacs: Field of Screams,” which is available on Netflix.

The settlement will partially resolve a lawsuit brought by Anthony Gudas of Providence, R.I., who said his company, Tax Credit Finance, invested money in four film projects based on contracts with the state where tax credits were never paid.

The lawsuit for the three other film projects continues.

The film credit program caused a brief frenzy of production activity before it collapsed following revelations of taxpayer funds buying luxury cars for filmmakers.  A state audit showed that about 80% of the $36 million in credits issued by the program were improper and that oversight was almost non-existent.  Seven film figures ultimately copped pleas or were convicted at trial for cheating on the program, with two filmmakers earning 10-year prison terms.

And the three remaining lawsuits?  From the Register story:

Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Thompson in December said for three of the films, producers had not submitted documentation the state needed for the projects to qualify for the credits.  And, in the fourth, state officials said the producer, Harel Goldstein of California, had created false invoices. Goldstein later pled guilty to felony fraud and forgery charges in connection to the invoices.

So the program was looted; “But some benefits can’t just be measured on a dollar-for-dollar basis.” Don’t you wish we were giving more money to Hollywood?

 

Grover’s coming to town.   Tax opponent Grover Norquist to speak in Iowa Wednesday.  (Des Moines Register). I won’t be able to attend, but it should be interesting.

 

Wikipedia image courtesy Tallent Show under Creative Commons license

Wikipedia image courtesy Tallent Show under Creative Commons license

TaxGrrrl, The View From The Trenches: What The Shutdown Has Meant So Far For Taxpayers:

My advice to taxpayers: pretend things are normal. Yes, that feels nearly impossible. But to the extent possible, file as usual and make payments as usual. But don’t get too complacent: all of those meetings, calls and audits will be rescheduled eventually: it’s a delay, not a complete reprieve.

Sound advice.

William Perez, IRS Shut Down, Week 2

 

Jason Dinesen, Glossary of Tax Terms: Medical Dependent 

 

Kay Bell, Tax Carnival #121: TaxtoberFest 2013.  Looks delicious!

 

20131003-1Andrew Lundeen,  Obamacare Raises Marginal Tax Rates above 50 Percent.  Not just for “the rich,” either.

Megan McArdle,  Republicans Didn’t Sabotage Health Exchanges, Obama Did.  ”In short, the administration passed a law with an unrealistically aggressive implementation schedule. And because of the way it passed it, it had no way to finesse that deadline.”  But it would be horrible blackmail for Congress to delay it for a year.

 

 

 

Clint Stretch, Tax Reform Is on Furlough (Tax Analysts Blog).   ”As long as Congress is fighting over a continuing resolution and the debt limit, there is no oxygen in the room for other initiatives. Members will be stuck on their talking points, and constituents won’t be thinking about tax reform.”

Robert W. Wood, Bitcoin Is Biggest Loser In Silk Road Meltdown—IRS Wins Big

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 152

Jeremy Scott, It Isn’t Time to Bury the Income Tax Just Yet (Tax Analysts Blog)

Tax Justice Blog,  State News Quick Hits: Brownback Under Fire, and More

 

The Critical Question: Should Small Business Have Veto Power Over Corporate Tax Reform? (Martin Sullivan, Tax Analysts Blog)

Robert D. Flach has his Tuesday Buzz on!

 

Note: There will be no Tax Roundup tomorrow.  See you Thursday!

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Tax Roundup, 10/1/2013: Shutdown edition. And two weeks left for 2012 1040s!

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Extended 1040s are due two weeks from today! Sorry for not posting yesterday, but I’m sure many of you understand.  I was laying in canned goods and ammo for the government shutdown.

Wikipedia image courtesy Tallent Show under Creative Commons license

Wikipedia image courtesy Tallent Show under Creative Commons license

The TaxProf has the IRS Shutdown Plan.  You can still file, but the examiners get a day off.

I like Don Boudreaux’s take:

 If I walk into a supermarket to buy a few artichokes and discover that the supermarket has no artichokes for sale that day, I don’t pay the supermarket for the artichokes that I don’t get.  So shouldn’t we taxpayers be relieved of the obligation to pay for the national-government services that we are not now receiving?

It implies the big difference between things we get from businesses and things we get from the government:  if we don’t like what they have at one store, we can go to another, but if we don’t like the service from Uncle Sam’s Essentials, we can’t exactly take our business elsewhere.

 

Andrew Lundeen and Kyle Pomerleau explain What Happens When There Is a Government Shutdown (Tax Policy Blog):

From 1976 to present there have been 17 shutdowns and like this shutdown, many were caused by political disagreement. For instance, the government shutdown for 12 days in 1977 over a political fight between the House and the Senate over Medicaid policy.

The average length of past government shutdowns is 6.4 days, but this is no indication of how long this shutdown will last. During the Reagan administration there were several shutdowns that only lasted one day.

So either it’s not the end of the world, or the world ends a lot.

Glass half-full: Shutdown Will Stop IRS Audits, but Not ACA Implementation (Jeremy Scott, Tax Analysts Blog)

TaxGrrrl, With Shutdown, Taxes Still Due But You Can’t Ask IRS For Help   

Janet Novack,  Federal Government Begins First Shutdown In 17 Years 

Kay Bell, IRS lays out plan to deal with federal government shutdown

 

William Perez,  IRA Recharacterizations Due by October 15th:

“Recharacterizing” means, quite simply, we can change the character of the IRA: if the contribution was made to a traditional IRA, we can re-characterize it to a Roth IRA; and if the contribution was made to a Roth IRA, it can be recharacterized to a traditional IRA.

 

tax fairyTrish McIntire, It’s Here…

The Health Insurance Marketplace (HIM) opened today! The Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates that almost everyone must have health insurance by January 1, 2014. The HIM is a way for anyone not covered by an employer’s affordable plan to shop for health insurance. Let’s face it the ACA is complicated and the HIM part is no exception. This post will cover the highlights of the Marketplaces to give you an overview of what will happen.

The Health Care Fairy is  the Tax Fairy’s sister.  Believers in either one end up disappointed.

 

Missouri Tax Guy, How To Write Off Travel Expenses As Business Expenses.  ”You can’t go on a one-day business trip and stretch it into a week of sightseeing, and then deduct anything as business-related.”

Point, counterpoint:

4 Reasons the Medical Device Tax is Bad Policy (Kyle Pomerleau, Tax Policy Blog)

The Medical Device Tax Should Not Be Repealed (Tax Justice Blog):

One argument made by the industry against the medical device excise tax is that it singles them out for higher taxes. The reality, however, is that the excise tax was passed as one of many levies on various healthcare sectors to help pay for health insurance expansion. 

That apparently would include the 10% excise tax on tanning booths that is part of Obamacare financing.  They say the tax is paid by something called “various healthcare sectors.”  That’s a fancy way to say “patients.”

 

Jack Townsend, Zwerner Rises to Defense Against Multiple FBAR Penalties:

Readers will recall that, in an unexpected development, Treasury assessed and DOJ Tax sued to collect the 50% FBAR penalty against Carl Zwerner for four years.  Up to that point, based on the information publicly available (principally from offshore account plea convictions), Treasury had only assessed a single FBAR of 50% for the highest year.  Thus, it was of considerable interest — and angst — to taxpayers and practitioners that Treasury would assert 4 years of FBAR penalties.

That could get expensive.

Brian Mahany,  FBAR, FATCA Are Not Dirty Words!  They can certainly trigger some, though.

 

Consolation prizes: Attorney Found Guilty of 28 Tax Charges, but Does Get Nomination for Tax Offender of the Year (Russ Fox)

Peter Reilly,  Has Kent Hovind Given Up Fight Against IRS ?   Mr. Hovind is famous for opening a theme park based on the idea that humans and dinosaurs co-existed.  I suppose if you hang around politicians, you could conclude that.

Robert D. Flach is Buzzing the government shutdown.

 

Nothing is stopping you from writing a check right now, says a cynical tax blogger.   “Tax Us More!” Say Some Wealthy Pennsylvanians (Jim Maule) Because they can pay more taxes any time they want, they really mean “tax other people more.”

 

Career Corner: Ex-PwC Employee Discovers Just How Limiting a Career-Limiting Move Supporting Terrorism Can Be.  (Going Concern)  I worked there when I was a very green new accountant, and I was frequently terrified.

 

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Tax Roundup, 9/24/2013: Departures edition – with and without benefits. And: Career Corner!

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

The IRS official at the center of the Tea Party scandal is retiring.  Iowa Public Radio reports that Lois Lerner is retiring:

The IRS announced Monday that Lerner would step down after being placed on paid leave in May. She refused that month to answer questions at a congressional hearing, citing the Fifth Amendment right not to incriminate herself.

The scandal involved groups applying for 501(c)(4) status in the period 2010-2012. Organizations with the words “Tea Party” or “patriot” in their names faced more questions and bureaucratic delays, although some progressive groups also encountered bureaucratic hassles, according to an inspector general’s report.

In a statement emailed to NPR, the IRS said the problems identified with screening tax-exempt status requests were the result of “mismanagement and poor judgment.” 

In a change of procedure, the IRS announced the retirement via a press release, rather than by planting a question at a continuing education event.

Tax Analysts ($link) reminds us of the compliance hassles that Ms. Lerner piled on all sorts of exempt organizations:

One of the more notable developments during Lerner’s tenure as exempt organizations director was the comprehensive redesign of Form 990, “Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax.” The new version requires EOs to provide much more information about their activities than previously. 

Anyone who works with exempt organizations, or who serves on an EO board, knows how much additional useless busywork costs the new 990 imposes.

Lerner also oversaw a massive IRS outreach to get EOs that had not filed information returns for three straight years to come into compliance to avoid automatic revocation of exemption.

By “outreach” they mean “revoked their tax-exempt status.”  Thanks for leaving, Ms. Lerner, you’ve done quite enough.

Related: TaxGrrrl, Lesson Lerner-ed? Disgraced IRS Official Tenders Resignation  

 

 

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Rashia Wilson in happier days.

While we say good-bye to Ms. Lerner, let’s spare a moment to note a different sort of departure, one involving somebody who may have had more influence on tax administration than Ms. Lerner.  TBO.com reports (my emphasis):

Three years after Tampa police stumbled on the first active tax-refund fraud operation they had seen, one of the suspects was sentenced Monday to eight years and five months in federal prison.

Maurice “Thirst” Larry faces even more prison time when he is sentenced today in another case in which his girlfriend, Rashia Wilson, is serving 21 years of federal time. Larry is expected to face a longer term in the second case because it involves the theft of millions of dollars, while the other case involved hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Larry and Wilson, along with Marterrance “Qat” Holloway, are viewed as pioneers in the wave of stolen identity tax-refund fraud that has flooded the streets of Tampa, dubbed the epicenter of a national epidemic that has cost U.S. taxpayers billions and left countless identity theft victims to pick up the pieces.

This sort of fraud costs the Treasury around $5 billion annually, while creating financial nightmares for taxpayers whose identities are stolen.  The flat-footed IRS response is one of the greatest failures of tax administration since the tax law was enacted.

What sort of devious criminal geniuses could crack open the Treasury like a pinata?

Authorities said Larry, a high school dropout with five young children fathered out of wedlock, has been a jet-setter, flying between Miami, New York and Las Vegas. He and Holloway also drove expensive cars and wore pricey clothes.

Just like James Bond, then.

 

Jana Luttenegger,  Deducting Clothing as a Business Expense:

Practically speaking, not many individuals can use the un-reimbursed clothing expense deduction. If your clothing expenses do qualify, in addition to providing receipts, be prepared to prove the apparel is not suitable for everyday wear.

Me,  Dress for success, but don’t look to the IRS for any fashion help.  My latest post at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record blog for business professionals.

 

Brian Mahany,  Have A Government Security Clearance? Watch Out for IRS Tax Liens!

Paul Neiffer,  How Zero Equals $380.  How gambling losers can lose again at tax time under the new Obamacare Net Investment Income Tax.

Jim Maule, Deductions Require Evidence and a Bit of Care:

The first aspect of the case that caught my eye was the attempt of a tax return preparer to deduct a vacation as a business expense. She explained that she operated her tax return business from her home, and explained that “living in her neighborhood was stressful and that she felt harassed by her clients who would call her home at any hour.” Accordingly, she concluded that she needed to travel “just to get rest so that . . . [she] could function.” The Court, not surprisingly, denied the deduction, characterizing the cost of the vacation as a personal expense.

Peter Reilly, Musician Wins Hobby Loss Case   Peter covers the Gullion case that I covered last month, but he went further by contacting the victorious taxpayer, getting a perspective that you can’t get from reading the Tax Court opinion.

 

Linda Beale,  Beanie Baby creator to pay more than $50 million for offshore accounts

TaxProf,  The IRS Scandal, Day 138

Kay Bell, Dolce & Gabbana use their tax troubles as fashion inspiration

Jack Townsend,  Schedule UTP and Criminal Penalties. “Moreover, in almost all cases in which such behavior would be material, a knowingly incomplete or missing Schedule UTP could be used in support of the various penalties that might apply to the related underreported taxes — the 75 % civil fraud penalty and the accuracy related penalties.”

Jeremy Scott, Sun Capital Might Be Bigger Than You Think (Tax Analysts Blog)

Tax Justice Blog, When Congress Turns to Tax Reform, It Should Set These Goals.  Not necessarily my goals.

Andrew Lundeen, Elimination of State and Local Tax Deduction Possible (Tax Policy Blog)

Clint Stretch, Shopping for Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog)

 

It’s Tuesday, so it’s a Buzz-day for Robert D. Flach!

 

Quotable:

Perhaps if people with low incomes made really good decisions about how to spend their money, then poverty would be near zero. However, over the course of their lifetimes, many people make many bad decisions, and as a result they will spend a lot of time dealing with financial adversity. The moral and practical implications of this view of poverty are not as clearcut as either a progressive or a conservative would like.

Arnold Kling.

 

Career Corner: If You Can’t Admit You’ve Committed CPE Fraud, Then You Need to Take Another Ethics Course (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 9/17/2013: Public pensions, floods and flamingos.

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

 Monday Map: Funded Ratio of State Public Pension Plans (Joseph Henchman, Richard Borean, Tax Policy Blog).  It looks at the funding of state pension plans using the 3.2% 15-year Treasury Bond rate to discount pension obligations.  This is a conservative rate, but a lot closer to reality than the 8% rate still used in some states.

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Iowa’s pension obligations are only 43/% funded under this standard — and that’s better than most states.  Public defined benefit plans are a menace and, ultimately, a lie.

Related  Defined benefit badminton

 

Glenn Reynolds,  Clean up the IRS:

 Emails recovered by the House Ways and Means Committee demonstrate that the targeting of Tea Party groups — and of voter-integrity groups — was orchestrated from the top of the agency. Rather than being conducted by a few rogue employees in the Cincinnati office of the IRS, the Tea Party targeting was regarded by Lerner as something “very dangerous” politically, and she observed that “Cincy should probably NOT have these cases.”

The emails also reveal Lerner’s concerns that the Democrats might lose their Senate majority, and her hopes that the Federal Election Commission might “save the day” by interfering with right-leaning grassroots activity. The IRS also shared information with the FEC, something not permitted by statute, raising questions about just how politicized both agencies were.

Ms. Lerner, of course, is a former FEC staffer who may have used her position there to try to run politicians she didn’t like out of the business.  So much for the “Rogue agents in Cincinnati” story.

 

Joseph Henchman,  Detroit Free Press Explains Why Detroit Went Bankrupt.  They list a lot of mistakes, but this one jumps out:

Outrageously high payments to incentivize economic development deals, with extensive bureaucracy slowing down approvals of everything.

I’m not at all convinced that Iowa can do this any better.

 

Martin Sullivan, U.S. Tax Exceptionalism (Tax Analysts Blog):

A new study from the OECD shows how the world is cutting corporate taxes and raising consumption taxes. By refusing to budge in this direction, the United States is becoming less competitive…

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For economists this is a no-brainer. The corporate tax–with its arbitrary and excessive burden on the profits of certain businesses–is our most damaging tax. A broad-based consumption tax, like a VAT — which unlike the income tax is not inherently biased against saving and investment — causes the least harm to the economy.

Economists do favor consumption taxes, but there are two potentially insurmountable obstacles to a U.S. VAT.  It would not be “progressive” enough for liberals, and conservatives and libertarians will suspect that it will just be on top of income taxes, rather than a replacement for them.

 

Tony Nitti, IRS Provides Tax Relief To Victims Of Colorado Storms

Kay Bell, Deadly flooding devastates Colorado

William Perez, Missing a Tax Document for 2012?

TaxGrrrl,  Are You Ready For Some (Charity) Football? Defense, Donations & Deductions 

Leslie Book, IRS Issues New Guidance on Requests for Equitable Relief (Procedurally Taxing)

 

TaxProf, Michael Jackson’s Estate Raises Novel Issue of Valuation of Celebrity Images

Russ Fox,   California Is #1…For Highest Marginal Tax Rates for S-Corps

 

Jeremy Scott, The Faltering Financial Transaction Tax and the Future of Wall Street (Tax Analysts Blog):

Whether a tax on transactions is better than a tax on activities or a direct levy on banks isn’t really important. What is important is that the financial sector, which bears a disproportionate share of the blame for the deep recession that is still affecting employment and growth, share in the costs of insuring against future bailouts and be forced to restructure itself to better insulate the rest of the economy from excessive risk.

How about we stop bailing them out instead?

 

Peter Reilly,  Occupy Wall Street Anniversary Focuses On Robin Hood Tax.   That’s “a financial transaction tax of 0.5% that will raise hundreds of billions of dollars a year that puts people before profit and helps stabilize the financial markets.”  Yeah, right.

I think Robin Hanson gets the real motivation for such a tax:

So somehow, conveniently, we just wouldn’t find that their unequal wealth evoked as much deeply felt important-social-issue-in-need-of-discussing moral concern in us. Because, I hypothesize, in reality those feelings only arise as a cover to excuse our grabbing, when such grabs seem worth the bother.

 

It’s Tuesday, so it’s Buzz Day at Robert D. Flach’s Place.  This edition includes a link to Jim Maule’s 20-part series on partnership tax.

 

Why I favor pink flamingos.  From KCCI.com:

Police say a rare copper sculpture from the front yard of a Des Moines home last week has been found cut into pieces at an area scrap metal yard.

The Des Moines Register reports that the abstract sculpture by the French artist Dominique Mercy had been valued at nearly $8,000.

Police say it was stolen sometime early Friday. Police found the sculpture at a scrap yard on Monday, but it had already been ruined.

The sculpture weighed between 40 and 50 pounds and was taken from the pedestal it sat on.

It must have been pretty abstract if the scrapyard couldn’t figure out that it was art, instead of scrap.
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