Posts Tagged ‘John Koskinen’

Tax Roundup, 3/3/16: IRS sets up ID theft victims for another round. And: if you don’t have kids, there’s Craigslist!

Thursday, March 3rd, 2016 by Joe Kristan
This convicted ID thief likely was a first-day filer.

The kind of criminal mastermind ID thief that continually outwits the IRS.

There is no bottom. Every time I think that the John Koskinen’s IRS couldn’t possibly be less competent, they prove me wrong. Identity Thieves Bypass IRS Protections for Previous Victims (Tom VanAntwerp, Tax Policy Blog):

The IRS provides an Identity Protection PIN (IP PIN) to victims of identity theft with the goal of preventing it going forward. This IP PIN is mailed to individuals at the start of tax season, and is required to file a return. But the IRS also allows taxpayers to retrieve their IP PIN online by answering the same kinds of knowledge-based authentication questions that let thieves take advantage of the older Get Transcript website.

Computer crime reporter Brian Krebs published this account of Becky Wittrock, a previous identity theft victim whose IP PIN was compromised:

“I tried to e-file this weekend and the return was rejected,” Wittrock said. “I received the PIN since I had IRS fraud on my 2014 return. I called the IRS this morning and they stated that the fraudulent use of IP PINs is a big problem for them this year.”

Wittrock said that to verify herself to the IRS representative, she had to regurgitate a litany of static data points about herself, such as her name, address, Social Security number, birthday, how she filed the previous year (married/single/etc), whether she claimed any dependents and if so how many.

“The guy said, ‘Yes, I do see a return was filed under your name on Feb. 2, and that there was the correct IP PIN supplied’,” Wittrock recalled. “I asked him how can that be, and he said, ‘You’re not the first, we’ve had many cases of that this year.’”

Wittrock noted that the IRS representative said that they would be moving away from using the IP PIN in the near future and replacing it with a different system. No details are known about how this new system might function or if it will avoid the insecure knowledge-based approach to authentication.

Through lax IRS controls, the IRS lets a thief file a return in your name. You go through a long, exasperating process to straighten things out. Meanwhile, the IRS sits on your refund, even though it promptly wired cash to the thief. Then they give you an IP-PIN and assurance that it won’t happen again. And it happens again.

I never thought Doug Shulman would lose his crown as Worst Commissioner Ever. I wish I were right about that. And they think they should regulate preparers because we’re incompetent and out-of-control.

More coverage:

TaxProf, The IRS Is Using A System That Was Hacked To Protect Victims Of A Hack—And It Was Just Hacked

Taxable Talk, The Most Terrifying Words in the English Language Strike Again

 

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TaxGrrrl, On Dr. Seuss’ Birthday, Oh, The Taxes You’ll Pay!:

More taxes!
Whether you like it or not,
Taxes will be something
you’ll pay quite a lot.

Oh, but the IRS will take such good care of it, you’ll not mind, not one little bit!

 

Peter Reilly, Tax Losses From Genetically Engineered Deer Allowed. “The purpose of the selective breeding is to get deer with really impressive head gear.”

Kay Bell, Doing the weird and wacky tax deduction dance. Yes, deer.

Leslie Book, Follow up On Clean Hands Post: The Imposition of Penalties and How Using a Preparer Does Not Automatically Constitute Good Faith and Reasonable Cause (Procedurally Taxing). “At the end of the day, the opinion is certainly a warning that merely hiring a preparer is not enough, and proving reliance on an advisor requires perhaps a bit more focus than a taxpayer’s testimony that the accountant prepared the return.”

 

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Scott Drenkard, Philadelphia Mayor Proposes Gigantic Soda Tax (Tax Policy Blog). It’s the tax that’s gigantic, not the pop serving.

Donald Marron, Budgeting for federal lending programs is still a mess (TaxVox). A good reason to not have federal lending programs.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1029

News from the Profession. Accounting as Performance Art? Sure, Why Not? (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

You can get anything on Craigslist! Even dependents, it seems. From a Department of Justice press release:

Tammy Dickinson, United States Attorney for the Western District of Missouri, announced today that an Ozark, Mo., man has been indicted by a federal grand jury for filing false income tax returns after he advertised on Craigslist to purchase identity information for children that he could claim as dependents.

Raheem L. McClain, 37, of Ozark, was charged in a three-count indictment returned under seal by a federal grand jury in Springfield, Mo., on Feb. 23, 2016. That indictment was unsealed and made public upon McClain’s arrest and initial court appearance on Tuesday, March 1, 2016.

The federal indictment alleges that McClain caused an advertisement to be posted on Craigslist on Jan. 16, 2015, stating:

“WANTED: KIDS TO CLAIM ON INCOME TAXES – $750 (SPRINGFIELD,MO)

IF YOU HAVE SOME KIDS YOU ARENT CLAIMING, I WILL PAY YOU A $750 EACH TO CLAIM THEM ON MY INCOME TAX. IF INTERESTED,REPLY TO THIS AD.”

In a way, it makes economic sense. It would let people whose incomes are too high monetize otherwise useless dependents. But as you might have gathered from the word “indictment,” the tax law frowns on this sort of thing.

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/26/16: Gronstal hints at approach to Section 179 coupling deal. And: Yes he can! (Release his returns)

Friday, February 26th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

couplingInteresting, if true. In opening hostage negotiations over the fate of Section 179 coupling, Iowa Senate Majority Leader Gronstal may have hinted at a “Main Street vs. Walnut Street” approach. From wcfcourier.com:

If the choice is between offering tax relief to a limited number of manufacturers “or taking care of 30,000 farmers, 25,000 small businesses,” Gronstal said he would “gravitate more toward the 50,000 or 60,000 effort to help those folks (rather) than something that is much more narrow in terms of its impact.”

I say “may have” because I think he is hinting at trying to get the Governor to reverse its regulatory change to sales tax rules on manufacturing supplies.

By “Walnut Street,” I refer to downtown Des Moines, where several of the big law/lobbying firms in town have their offices (Nothing against Walnut Street — that’s where Tax Update World Headquarters is located, too).  Whether or not Sen. Gronstal realizes it, the coupling issue is ultimately about whether to benefit a handful of insiders and big companies benefitting from special tax benefits, or whether to further the interests of the rest of the taxpayers who pay for any special deals.

The revenue cost from adopting the $500,000 Section 179 limit for Iowa is estimated around $90 million. Eight taxpayers by themselves claimed $35 million in research credits in 2015, of which around $30 million were paid to the companies in cash because they exceed the claimants income tax bills. Just last week the state promised $15 million to DuPont as a location incentive. The potential loss of Section 179 deduction is making its many beneficiaries suspicious of the multi-million dollar “economic development” tax credits that benefit relatively few insiders with lobbyists.

Walnut Street back in the day.

Walnut Street back in the day.

While Senator Gronstal will insist on concessions for passing the bill, I expect he will reach a deal without insisting on his full pound of flesh. More than anything else, he wants to remain Majority Leader, with control over whether legislation lives or dies. He has only 26-24 control of the Senate. If he is perceived as blocking coupling, it may be just enough to tip a close race or two against his party. I think his reference to the “50,000 or 60,000” shows he’s aware of this. That’s why I think an agreement to couple with the federal limit is now likely in the next two or three weeks. I have no insider information to confirm this guess.

Related: Me, Tax season impasse: why your 2015 Iowa tax return may be on hold. My new post at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record Business Professional’s Blog.

Other coverage: Des Moines Register, Gronstal opens door to Iowa tax-coupling deal

 

Yes he can! Trump says he can’t release tax returns because he’s being audited (marketwatch.com). That’s not true, of course. While it’s illegal to release someone else’s returns without their permission, you can make your own returns public any time. The IRS doesn’t make you sign some sort of confidentiality agreement when they audit you.

Like every other silly thing he says, this probably will probably increase his standing in the polls.

Related: TaxGrrrl, Trump Won’t Release Tax Returns, Citing IRS Audit: Is It A Legitimate Excuse? “Trump could absolutely release those returns now – even in the middle of an audit.”

 

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Tony Nitti, Beachbody Coach? Rodan & Fields Consultant? At Tax Time, Beware The Hobby Loss Rules. “If your Facebook feed is anything like mine, videos of clumsy toddlers and unlikely animal pals have recently given way to a relentless string of friends pushing side businesses.”

Kay Bell, Penalty for late tax filing increases in 2017. “Starting in 2017, if you send in your Form 1040 (and additional forms and schedules) more than two months after the return is due, you’ll be slapped with a penalty of $205 or 100 percent of your due tax, whichever amount is smaller.” Another example of the ugly practice of funding the government through penalties instead of taxes.

Keith Fogg, Discharging the Failure to File Penalty in Bankruptcy (Procedurally Taxing).

Somehow I missed this: WHAT’S THE BUZZ, TELL ME WHAT’S A HAPPENNIN’ – SPECIAL TAX SEASON EDITION (Robert D. Flach). “An unprecedented tax season BUZZ!  Some good stuff that needs to be spread around now – and could not wait until April.”

Andrew Mitchel, Charts of Examples in Rev. Proc. 91-55: Form 5472 & Direct and Ultimate Indirect 25% Shareholders. A big issue when you have foreign owners of a U.S. corporation.

Robert Wood, Kanye West Could Still Get $1 Billion Tax Free. Why?

Jim Maule, Section 280A and the Tree House. “The reader asked, ‘Can a tree house qualify under the Section 280A rules? Can a tree house be depreciated?’ Though there’s no direct authority, careful reading of the applicable statute provides an answer.”

Party on Walnut Street.

Party on Walnut Street.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1023

Renu Zaretsky, Times get taxing for candidates… Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers last night’s debate, candidate tax returns, and the lost credibility of the IRS under Shulman and Koskinen.

 

News from the Profession. Password Inundation: Password Policies We Love to Hate (Megan Lewczyk, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/30/15: IRS: we didn’t overcharge you, and we won’t do it again. And: Beggars’ Night!

Friday, October 30th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

The IRS yesterday issued rules reducing the fees charged for giving tax preparers for Preparer Tax Identification Numbers, or PTINs. The rules reduce the annual fee from $50 to $33, but raise the fee charged by a third-party vendor that collects the fee from $13 ($14.25 for first time applications) to $17 for all applications.

It’s an interesting move, considering that the IRS is fighting a lawsuit arguing that the IRS has been overcharging preparers for the numbers, which are required for preparers signing tax returns. The IRS claims that the reduction reflects reduced costs for the program.

Dan Alban of the Institute for Justice, the public interest law firm that led the successful fight against the IRS preparer regulations, says that it is an admission that the IRS has been overcharging, and that the IRS cost reduction argument doesn’t hold up. From his Twitter feed:

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The IRS has never been straight with us about either preparer regulation — really, a power grab and a move to assist the big tax prep franchise outfits — or the PTIN fee. I look forward to seeing how the judge hearing the PTIN lawsuit reacts to this news.

Related: PTIN User Fee Will Be Lowered (Sally Schreiber, The Tax Adviser).

 

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I’m back from the Santa Monica TIAG conference. TIAG is an international alliance of independent accounting firms that Roth & Company joined last year. There were great sessions on technical and practice management topics, but the best part is to meet and get to know lawyers and accountants around the world. It’s nice to know people in other countries to call when our clients need professional services aboad, and it’s fun to compare notes with our offshore counterparts.

 

Friday – Buzz Day! Robert D. Flach rounds up interesting tax stuff from all over.

William Perez talks about Itemized Tax Deductions..

Annette Nellen, Poor recordkeeping – complexity or too busy. “Every year there are several tax cases where taxpayers think they’ll get a better result in court despite poor records. They almost always lose.”

Kay Bell, Obama and House reach budget, debt ceiling deal

Jack Townsend, Movie Review of Film on Corporate Offshoring

Jim Maule,Where Do the Poor and Middle Class Line Up for This Tax Break Parade? Properly decrying corporate welfare, the good Professor asks and answers:

So could it be time for “if you can’t beat them, join them”? Not for those of us who lack the resources to sign up for the parade, or perhaps what should be called the corporate gravy train.

What the good Professor hasn’t realized is that this is exactly what we can expect when we give the government more and more authority to run and regulate things. Those with the means and the connections win.

 

20151030-3TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 903Day 904. This from the Day 904 link sounds about right to me regarding the idea of impeaching Commissioner Koskinen:

The evidence against Koskinen will be convincing, but Democrats and the media will claim that because it all involves his defiance of congressional directives – and in their opinion Congress shouldn’t have been investigating in the first place – he really didn’t do anything wrong. They used the same argument in defense of Bill Clinton. Sure, he lied under oath and obstructed justice, but there never should have been an investigation in the first place.

I think it’s a poor use of limited time and political capital.

Peter Reilly, IRS Commissioner Koskinen Impeachment Trial Would Be Historic. A long but worthwhile discussion of the history and process of impeachment, and its prospects.

Keith Fogg, Notification of IRS as a Junior Creditor (Procedurally Taxing). “Two recent lien decisions demonstrate the power of the federal tax lien and the specific steps that parties must take when trying to address that lien.”

Robert Wood, Last Chance To Report Offshore Accounts To IRS, Penalties Climb To 50%

TaxGrrrl. 5 Things You Need To Know About Paul Ryan’s Rise To House Speaker & Tax Reform.

Jeremy Scott, Paul Ryan Punts on Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog). “Paul Ryan is moving on to become speaker, and tax reform might be in a worse spot than it was when Dave Camp’s H.R. 1 went over like a lead balloon.”

Cara Griffith, Why Do We Still Have Unpublished Opinions? (Tax Analysts Blog). “Now unpublished opinions readily appear in online databases. As a result, unpublished opinions are not unpublished in the sense that no one has access to them, but are simply not published in an official reporter and hold less or no precedential value with courts.”

 

Greg Mankiw, Keep the Cadillac Tax. Better idea — scrap the ACA altogether, give a capped health insurance tax credit for individuals, eliminate interstate barriers to health insurance sales, and let nature take its course.

Career Corner, It’s Time for the Accounting Profession to Get Serious About Mental Illness (Leona May, Going Concern). They aren’t the same thing?

 

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Beggars’ Night! Des Moines and its suburbs don’t trick-or-treat on Halloween. Instead our little goblins go forth on October 30 – “Beggars’ Night.” An explanation: What’s up with Beggars’ Night?:

An article in The Des Moines Register on October 28, 1997, says “Blame World War II.” as well as rowdy youths in the early history of Des Moines. According to this article and other sources, Beggars’ Night was created in 1938 by the Des Moines Playground Commission (later the Parks and Recreation Department) because Halloween night had become a night of vandalism and destructive “tricks” such as setting fires and breaking windows.

Kathryn Krieg, director of recreation for the commission, in 1938 began a campaign to encourage less violent forms of Halloween fun. She declared Beggars’ Night to be October 30 in Des Moines, and further required that children would only receive their treat after earning it by performing a trick or telling a riddle. This too is the opposite of the rest of the country, which traditionally provides the treat in order to avoid being tricked!

So if you need a joke for tonight, you can always rely on the classics, like “What’s the pirate’s favorite restaurant? Arrghhhh-bys!”

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/5/15: Cool implosion, but no tax break. And more tax fairy tales!

Monday, October 5th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

This happened in Downtown Des Moines over the weekend:

YouTube Video Courtesy star105

Preservationists wanted to save the building, the old YMCA. I never understood this. Some beautiful buildings have been lost in Des Moines, but this isn’t one of them. If you aren’t willing to buy a building and fix it up yourself, it doesn’t seem right to tell the owners that they have to do it with their own money.

But did they get a tax break for the implosion? Did they get to write off the cost of the building when they brought it down? It would seem logical — obviously the building is a total loss. But no, it doesn’t work that way. Internal Revenue Code Section 280B is pretty clear:

In the case of the demolition of any structure—
(1) no deduction otherwise allowable under this chapter shall be allowed to the owner or lessee of such structure for—

(A) any amount expended for such demolition, or
(B) any loss sustained on account of such demolition; and

(2) amounts described in paragraph (1) shall be treated as properly chargeable to capital account with respect to the land on which the demolished structure was located.

So not only is there no write-off of the building, the cost of the demolition itself is capitalized, along with any remaining basis in the building — to be recovered only when the land is sold someday. So the income tax law doesn’t encourage implosions. Pretty much the opposite.

 

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Jack Townsend, IRS Makes FOIA Disclosures to Tax Analysts Regarding OVDP and Streamlined Processing. “One point that was already known to practitioners is that rejection of the transition streamlined relief inside OVDP is not a determination of wilfulness so that, upon opt out, the wilfulness penalty is pre-determined.”

Peter Reilly, Rand Paul Suffers Setback In Foreign Reporting Lawsuit

 

Kristine Tidgren, Let the Motions Begin: Drainage Districts Seek Partial Summary Judgment. Des Moines Water Works is suing upstream drainage districts for not keeping nitrates out of the river. 

Annette Nellen, Obamacare – can pieces be removed? “Obamacare has too many complicated tax provisions in addition to many complicated non-tax provisions.”

Kay Bell, Time to make your flexible spending account choices

Sonya Miller, Freezing the Refunds of Our Guests (Procedurally Taxing). “We are aware of a group of nonresident taxpayers (taxpayers that fall under the rules for aliens temporarily present in the United States as students, trainees, scholars, teachers, researchers, exchange visitors, and cultural exchange visitors) who had their 2014 refunds frozen.”

TaxGrrrl, Treasury Sends Dire Warning To Congress: We’re Running Out Of Money Faster Than Expected.

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 877878879. They’re still talking about impeaching Koskinen. If the administration really wants to build trust in the IRS, they’ll dump him. Until they do so, we can assume his stonewalling and stiff-arming of the GOP appropriators is the behavior the administration wants out of him.

Scott Greenberg, New Study Shows that Tuition Deduction Does Not Increase College Attendance (Tax Policy Blog):

 Last year, Bulman and Hoxby published a similar study of three federal education credits, which concluded that all three have a “negligible” effect on college attendance. This finding was in stark contrast to the Obama administration’s claim that the expansion of the American Opportunity Tax Credit made it possible for 12 million more students to earn a college degree.

The increase in subsidies over the years coincides with wild increases in tuition costs. I don’t believe that’s a coincidence.

 

Renu Zaretsky, Hope’s Limits, Math, and Cuts. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup talks about the apparent death of an international tax reform effort and efforts to improve IRS verification of earned income tax credit eligibility.

 

Russ Fox, There Is No Magic OID Process. Just like there is no Tax Fairy.

Me, Chasing the Tax Fairy. My latest at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record business professionals’ blog. I discuss four manifestations of the Tax Fairy cult – The ESOP Fairy, the Home-based Business Fairy, the Pennies-on-the-dollar Fairy, and the Classic 105 fairy that Hank Stern spotted.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/17/15: St. Patrick didn’t chase the taxes out of Ireland.

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150317-1aTax luck of the Irish. While America celebrates Irish heritage by today by drinking far too much bad dyed beer, we’ll ponder the sober look taken by Kyle Pomerleau at the Irish tax system (my emphasis):

It may be surprising to Americans to hear that Ireland has pretty high taxes. We usually hear about Ireland’s tax system in the context of its corporate income tax rate, which sits a low 12.5 percent, half the average rate of the OECD. We are led to believe that Ireland is a low-tax country in general.

In reality, Ireland’s tax code has some of the highest marginal tax rates, especially on income, in the OECD.

Ireland’s top marginal individual income tax rate is 40 percent on individuals with incomes over 33,800 EUR ($36,236).  On top of that, individuals need to pay payroll taxes of 4 percent on wages and other compensation. Ireland also has “Universal Social Charge,” which tops out at 8 percent (11 percent for self-employed individuals).

Altogether, the top marginal tax rate in Ireland is 52 percent. The average top marginal income tax rate (plus employee-side payroll taxes) is 46 percent in the OECD. Not only is this rate high, it applies at a relatively low level of income ($40,174).

It’s enough to make me glad great-great-great Grandpa took off for North America in the 1840s.*

The tax rate is also high on investment income. Capital gains are taxed at 33 percent, which is significantly higher than the OECD average of about 18.4 percent. Dividends are taxed at ordinary income tax rates of 40 percent plus the 8 percent Universal Social Charge (48 percent).

The US top marginal rate, excluding state taxes, is about 44.588%, considering phase-outs and the Obamacare 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax, but it doesn’t kick in until taxable income reaches $406,750 for single filers and $457,600 on joint returns. Our fully-loaded top capital gain and dividend rate is 19.25%. So if you must drink something, drink to having a less awful top marginal rate than Ireland.

*OK, technically he came from County Tyrone, which is in the U.K., not the Republic of Ireland.

 

daydrinkersMaria Koklanaris reports on a study by the left-side policy shop Good Jobs First (Tax Analysts $link):

There are 11 companies listed in both the top 50 state and local subsidy recipients and the top 50 federal subsidy recipients. They are Boeing, The Dow Chemical Co., Ford Motor Co., General Electric, General Motors, JPMorgan Chase & Co., Lockheed Martin Corp., NRG Energy Inc., Sempra Energy, SolarCity, and United Technologies.

Also, six companies on the top 50 state list are on the list of the top 50 recipients of federal loans, loan guarantees, and bailout assistance — Boeing, Ford Motor, General Electric, General Motors, Goldman Sachs, and JPMorgan Chase. Five companies — Boeing, Ford Motor, General Electric, General Motors, and JPMorgan Chase — are on all three lists.

All companies you just feel good about when you pay extra taxes, so they can pay less. Especially GE and JPMorgan Chase.

 

Christopher Bergin, The IRS Doubles Down on Secrecy (Tax Analysts Blog):

Faced with blistering criticism over how it handled exemption applications, accusations that it wrongly – and, perhaps, even criminally – withheld e-mails from lawmakers and the public, and rising concerns that it is the most secretive government agency we have, what is the Internal Revenue Service’s response?

To become even less transparent. As the saying goes: You can’t make this stuff up.

I think the evidence can lead to only two conclusions about the current IRS commissioner: either he is the most tone-deaf and socially-unskilled administrator in the Federal government, or he wants to make the IRS as unaccountable as possible.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 677. IRS, fighting transparency tooth and nail.

 

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

Peter Reilly, Don’t Sic IRS On Racist Frat Boys. “Nobody ever suggests that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or the Department of Education should pitch in and help collect taxes, but for some reason the IRS is seen as the Swiss army knife of social policy, ready to further shred its tattered reputation addressing issues that stump other institutions.”

 

 

William Perez, Need to File a Year 2011 Tax Return? Deadlines and Resources

Kay Bell, Filing tips for the 2015 tax deadline that’s just a month away

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2015): I Is For Insolvency. And Illinois, but that’s the same thing.

Robert Wood, Of Obamacare’s Many Taxes, What Hurts Most. So many choices.

Stephen Olsen, Summary Opinions for week ending 02/27/15 (Procedurally Taxing). A roundup of developments in the tax procedure world.

Russ Fox begins his last part of tax season hibernation. Take care of yourself and your clients, Russ. I’ve been tempted to hibernate myself, but since now is when people are most interested in this stuff, I keep at it.

 

Picture by Dan Kristan

Picture of Irish countryside by Dan Kristan

 

Richard Auxier, Can Rube Goldberg Save the Highway Trust Fund? (TaxVox). “In principle, the Highway Trust Fund (HTF) is simple. Drivers pay a federal gas tax when they purchase fuel, the revenue goes to the HTF, and the federal government sends the dollars to states and local governments for highway and transit programs. But in practice the system is a mess and a new proposal by a road builder trade group shows just how tangled this web has become.”

News from the Profession. Accountants Share Their Dreams. (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/3/15: ‘Tens of thousands’ of returns delayed by ACA. Also: Feds, Iowa provide partial deadline relief for farmers.

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson

Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson

Tax season is saved! Tax Analysts reports ($link) that the IRS is sitting on “tens of thousands” of returns affected by the Obamacare advance premium tax credit:

Speaking March 2 in Washington at an American Payroll Association event sponsored by Bloomberg BNA, Olson said the returns have been “held for quite a long time, since the beginning of the filing season,” because the IRS is still waiting for matching data from state health insurance exchanges. The returns are being held in suspense and the IRS has instructed its employees not to inform taxpayers why their return is being suspended when the taxpayer contacts the Service, she said.

According to Olson, the Taxpayer Advocate Service will not follow the IRS’s instructions to remain silent on the issue because taxpayers have the right to be informed under the taxpayer bill of rights.

More of Commissioner Koskinen’s famous committment to transparency and disclosure. But all is well, right?

Olson said her office has received days of training on the ACA so her employees are prepared when these cases come in. “I think this is one of the most complicated provisions that we’ve ever inserted into the Internal Revenue Code” and I’m “astonished at the complexity of it,” she said.

“I’m very concerned about the filing season,” Olson said, adding that the federal exchange has already sent erroneous reporting information to 800,000 taxpayers.

Just yesterday the IRS, on the due date for farmer and fisherman returns where no estimated tax was paid, waived estimated tax penalties for such taxpayers where they are still waiting on 1095-A forms from their healthcare exchange. This follows the universal waiver of late payment penalties for amounts owed on the advance premium credit, the waiver of ACA penalties on health insurance premium reimbursement plans, and the last-minute waiver of Form 3115 requirements for smaller businesses under the repair regs. It’s an overwhelmed IRS desperately patching up a failing tax season with duct tape and wire.

 

binFeds extend 1040 deadline to April 15 for farmers awaiting form 1095-A; Iowa extends deadline to April 15 for all farmersFarmers are eligible for a special deal that lets them not pay estimated taxes, as long as they file and pay the balance due by March 1. The deadline was yesterday because March 1 was on a Sunday this year.  As we reported yesterday, the IRS issued a last-minute waiver of the deadline for farmers still awaiting their Form 1095-A from an ACA exchange.

Yesterday Iowa followed suit. The Iowa Department of Revenue sent this to practitioners on its email list (I can’t find a link on the Department website; the emphasis is mine):

The Iowa Department of Revenue has granted an extension to all farmers and commercial fishers to file 2014 Iowa individual income tax returns without underpayment of estimated tax penalty.

If at least 2/3 of their income is from farming or commercial fishing, taxpayers may avoid penalty for underpayment of 2014 estimated tax in one of the following ways:

(1) Pay the estimated tax in one payment on or before January 15, 2015, and file the Iowa income tax return by April 30, or

(2) File the Iowa income tax return and pay the tax due in full on or before March 2, 2015.

The issuance of corrected premium tax credit forms (Form 1095-A) from the Health Insurance Marketplace may affect the ability of many farmers and fishers to file and pay their taxes by the March 2 deadline.

Therefore, any farmers or fishers who miss the March 2 deadline will not be subject to the underpayment of estimated tax penalty if they file and pay their Iowa taxes by April 15, 2015.

The Iowa relief is not limited to farmers awaiting a 1095-A. The slightly tricky thing: non-farmer Iowa 1040s are due April 30, but the new farmer deadline is April 15. Be careful out there.

Related: Paul Neiffer, IRS Has Impeccable Timing (As Usual)

 

 

W2All is well.  Tax Analysts reports ($link) Additional Medicare Tax Reporting Is Causing Problems. It quotes Paul Carlino, an IRS branch chief:

Carlino explained that reporting amounts in Form W-2 box 6 that do not equal the 1.45 percent tax on wages has caused confusion among taxpayers, some of whom seek refunds believing their employer withheld an incorrect amount of tax.

Carlino said that another problem is taxpayers who are not having the additional Medicare tax withheld. 

The Additional Medicare Tax is unique among federal payroll taxes in that it is computed at separate rates for married and single filers, requiring a reconciliation on the 1040. That can result in underwithholding.

 

Russ Fox, Don’t Call Us:

When I called today I reached the normal recording, but every time I attempted to obtain help for an individual not in collections (that’s one of the options when calling the PPS) all I got was, “Due to extremely high call volumes that option is not available now. Please try your call again later.”

Well, the IRS has other priorities than your silly tax return, peasant.

 

TaxGrrrl, Tax Checks Go Up In Flames After Mail Truck Burns. Sums up this tax season.

Robert Wood, Obama Immigration Fix: 4M Illegals Who Never Paid U.S. Tax, Get 3 Years Of Tax Refunds. Only about 25% of EITC payments are made improperly. What could possibly go wrong?

William Perez, Moving Expenses Can Be Tax-Deductible

Kay Bell, Jeb Bush reportedly won’t sign no-tax pledge

Soon, my precious, soon.

Soon, my precious, soon.

Peter Reilly, Lois Lerner Out From Under Freedom Path Lawsuit For Now

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 663, quoting James Taranto from the Wall Street Journal: “So the IRS admittedly denied tax-exempt status improperly to at least 176 groups, tried to apply extralegal restrictions to others, and is still delaying approval for those groups that have gone to court in an effort to vindicate their rights.”

 

Alan Cole, How to Dismantle an Ugly IRS Worksheet (Tax Policy Blog):

The difficulty of the worksheet is not the fault of the IRS. If anything, the IRS put a very difficult concept into a one-page worksheet. But even with the worksheet’s good design, it’s still 27 lines. That’s because the underlying tax code it deals with is not elegantly designed.

The post goes on to explain how our system of taxing corporation income twice leads to this complexity.

 

Martin Sullivan, High Hopes for Highway Funding: A Bridge to Nowhere (Tax Analysts Blog). “Congress is talking a lot about long-term solutions to our infrastructure funding problem, but will likely only do another short-term patch.”

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Renu Zaretsky asks Can Expectations Be Too Low? In today’s TaxVox headline roundup. (No, by the way.). The post addresses the low IRS audit rate for businesses, the IRS plan to issue retroactive earned income tax credit to beneficiaries of the executive amnesty for illegal immigrants, and the upcoming Supreme Court arguments in King v. Burwell on whether the IRS exceeded its authority in granting ACA credits in states that didn’t set up exchanges under the act. 

 

Career Corner, Here Are Some Coded Phrases You Will Hear During Busy Season (Andrew Argue, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/12/15: The Federal $21 billion thief subsidy; the Iowa $37 million corporation subsidy.

Thursday, February 12th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Lincoln

Accounting Today visitors: click here for the post on the updated auto depreciation limits.

Happy Lincoln’s Birthday. President Lincoln signed the first U.S. income tax into law in August, 1861, to cope with costs of the Civil War and the loss of income from customs collections in the rebellious states.  Wikipedia says the tax was initially 3% on income over an $800 exemption. Right away they started tinkering, and adding expiring provisions:

The income tax provision (Sections 49, 50 and 51) was repealed by the Revenue Act of 1862. (See Sec.89, which replaced the flat rate with a progressive scale of 3% on annual incomes beyond $600 ($12,742 in 2009 dollars) and 5% on incomes above $10,000 ($212,369 in 2009 dollars) or those living outside the U.S., and perhaps more significantly it was explicitly temporary, specifying termination of income tax in “the year eighteen hundred and sixty-six“).

The rates were increased again in 1864 to a top rate of 10%, but it actually was allowed to expire after the end of the war.

For some reason, this early version of the income tax isn’t a big topic in history books. Something else must have been going on then.

 

Rashia says "thanks, Commissioner!"

Rashia says “thanks, Commissioner!”

April 15, the thieves holiday Tax-refund fraud to hit $21 billion, and there’s little the IRS can do (CNBC):

Tax-refund fraud is expected to soar again this tax season, and hit a whopping $21 billion by 2016, from just $6.5 billion two years ago, according to the Internal Revenue Service.

And the problem—which the agency admits is growing quickly—is compounded by an outdated fraud-detection system that has trouble identifying many attempts to trick it.

$21 billion. The entire tax system of the state of Iowa raises maybe $8 billion, and the IRS issues $21 billion annually to thieves. Not counting earned income credit fraud, of course.

I’m no IT expert, but saying the IRS is helpless sounds like a cop-out. Even with obsolete technology, the IRS has been slow to stop obvious fraud, such as multiple (say, hundreds of) refunds going to a single bank account. The agency allowed this crisis to spin out of control years ago. Practitioners certainly knew about it during Doug Shulman’s execrable term as IRS commissioner, but he spent his efforts trying to regulate practitioners and harass the Tea Party, while grossly failing at the more basic duty of not wiring money to theives. Commissioner Koskinen obviously hasn’t solved the problem. I think it’s fair to conclude that they just haven’t considered it their biggest problem.

This should be the highest IRS priority, certainly more so than the “voluntary” preparer program. It should also be the highest oversight priority of the tax writing committees in Congress, who should be able to find a way to find the necessary funding in a way that keeps the Commissioner from diverting it to pet projects. Of course, the history of IRS technology upgrades isn’t very encouraging.

It’s possible that the solution will also require taxpayers to wait longer for refunds. It takes a lot longer to get a refund when your identity is stolen anyway, so it’s probably worth taking a little more time. But when technology exists to enable the credit card company to call me when my wife is buying an expensive dress in Chicago, the IRS ought to be able to notice someone like Rashia Wilson before she fills her purse with Benjamins.

Related: TurboTax Fraud May Impact Federal Returns Too, FBI Investigating (Robert Wood)

 

Iowa’s $37 million corporate subsidy programNot everybody knows that the State of Iowa mails subsidy checks to business taxpayers, including $11.7 million just to one. Iowa’s research credit is “refundable,” which means once it wipes out your Iowa tax, the state sends you a check for any remaining credit.

The total 2014 Iowa research credits claimed was $56,918,030 for 2014, according to the newly-issued Iowa Research Activities Tax Credit Annual Report for 2014. (Hat tip: Iowa Fiscal Partnership). Sixteen companies claimed $42 million of the credit, according to the report:

RAC2014

I know everybody thinks they have earned whatever cash they have coming from the state, and I’m not shy about claiming refundable credits for my clients. When the state offers you cash, you’d be foolish not to take it. Still, there’s no way this makes any sense from a tax policy perspective.  The money sent to a few taxpayers should be used to lower rates for everyone, or to help eliminate the futile Iowa corporation income tax.

 

William Perez, Last Year’s State Refund Might be Taxed on Your Federal Return

TaxGrrrl, IRS Releases Latest Version Of Its Mobile App – And Something’s Missing. Service!

Russ Fox, A Bipartisan Tax Bill? I’ll Drink to That! “It’s to end age discrimination against bourbon and whiskey.”

Peter Reilly, Lois Lerner’s Old IRS Team Looking Anti-tech. “…now I’m thinking there might be a full blown Luddite cult operating in there.”

Jason Dinesen, Tips For Financing a Small Business: Part 1 of 5 — There’s Going to Be Paperwork, Deal With It

Kay Bell, Got your tax refund yet? IRS issued 7.6 million in January

 

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Principal Park, home of the Iowa Cubs. About 2 months until opening day!

 

Andrew Lundeen, Proposed Tax Changes in President Obama’s Fiscal Year 2016 Budget (Tax Policy Blog). “In total, the plan includes $2.4 trillion in proposed tax increases offset by $713 billion in new credits, deductions, and other offsets, for a total tax increase of nearly $1.7 trillion over the next ten years.”

Cara Griffith, Series LLCs: The Next Generation of Passthrough Entities? (Tax Analysts Blog). I think they will continue to be the wave of the future, as they have been for years now.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 644

 

Career Corner. Interruptions at the Office: Good or Bad? (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern). Bad, unless cookies are implicated.

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/5/2015: Conformity bill passes Iowa Senate with Sec. 179, but without Bonus. And: buy Maserati, or pay tax?

Thursday, February 5th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Iowa Senate passes conformity bill. The Iowa Senate sent the 2015 “code conformity” bill (SF 126) to the House yesterday on a 49-0 vote. The bill, conforms Iowa’s 2014 tax law to reflect December’s “extender” legislation, including the $500,000 “Section 179” deduction, but not including bonus depreciation.

The House could vote on the bill as early as today, though it’s not on this morning’s House debate calendar. Still, with the bill out of the Senate, it seems like a sure thing, even if it has to wait until next week.

ice truck

 

There may have been a flaw in the planThe former owner of Arrow Trucking Company pleaded guilty yesterday to tax charges connected with the 2010 failure of the company.

The “information” containing the charges outlines an energetic looting of the company that brought in a host of helpers — and potential informants. For example:

In about September 2009, a conspirator asked an Arrow Trucking Company employee to have a telephonic communication with a representative of Transportation Alliance Bank with respect to an audit and to falsely verify the authenticity of fraudulent invoices.

Well, that’s one witness right there. And here’s another.

In about December 2009, a conspirator asked an Arrow Trucking Company employee to have a telephonic communication with a representative of Transportation Alliance Bank with respect to an audit and to falsely verify the authenticity of fraudulent invoices.

Well, no harm no foul — they had pretty much made sure the IRS would catch up with them, if the information is to be believed. They failed to file the federal Form 941 payroll tax returns for 2009, or to remit the payroll taxes for those quarters. That’s a sure way to attract IRS attention. And once the IRS started sniffing around, they left a lot of clues for the IRS in the alternative uses they made of the withheld taxes. These other things included payment of $20,000 in company funds to an ex-wife. But that didn’t mean the next ex was slighted:

During the year 2009, Arrow Trucking Company funds were used to make payments to The Events Company for a conspirators wedding.

They should have been able to leave the wedding in style:

During 2009, Arrow Trucking Company Funds were used to make payments related to a Bentley automobile for the benefit of a conspirator.

Or maybe, honey, we want something a little sportier:

During 2009, Arrow Trucking Company Funds were used to make payments related to a Maserati automobile for the benefit of a conspirator.

It all seems like fun and games, but that fun led to this:

In December 2009, the carrier left hundreds of its drivers stranded on highways across the United States after a Utah bank voided company fuel cards.

Between halting payroll tax returns, using company funds for lavish toys, and getting employees to lie for them, they pretty much made sure the feds would visit, belt and suspenders. The IRS audit program for businesses is designed to find such things, but it sounds like they left a pretty easy trail to follow.

 

This Koskinen isn't the IRS commissioner

This Koskinen isn’t the IRS commissioner

Peter Reilly, Mr. Koskinen’s Last Chance To End The Form 3115 Madness:

Here is the crisis.  Some very smart people with a lot of influence in the tax industry are telling all the rest of us the following story.  You know those new regulations are telling you to change your accounting methods.  Even if you look at what you’ve done over the years and decide that there is no income or expense to be picked up it is still an accounting method change.  Given all the new concepts you could not possibly have been using those methods.  So if your client has any sort of a trade or business, there are one or more Forms 3115 that have to be filed. 

If he was as keen on preserving limited IRS resources as he keeps telling Congress, he would announce that taxpayers could adopt the new accounting methods without a 3115 by attaching an election to their return, if they prefer it that way. That would save forests, and enormous amounts of IRS storage space.  But if he were serious about maximizing agency resources, he also wouldn’t allow 200 IRS employees to collect government checks for union work, and he wouldn’t divert IRS resources into a “voluntary” preparer regulation scheme.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 637. This edition links to a Bloomberg piece about the Commissioner’s recent Senate testimony: IRS Chief: I Don’t Want to Be Seen As Influencing 2016. I take that as meaning he wouldn’t mind influencing  the elections; he just doesn’t want to be seen doing so.

 

Robert Wood, Coming Soon: No Travel Or Passport If You Owe IRS. What could go wrong?

 

Kay Bell, Seven tax extenders approved by Ways & Means Committee. Similar to the permanent extenders that passed the house and died last year, they can be seen as a counter to the President’s tax proposals in his budget.

Robert Goulder, Smart Tax Reform: Parity for Passthroughs (Tax Analysts Blog):

An obvious difficulty in business-only tax reform is devising a means to level the playing field between corporate and noncorporate entities. The overwhelming majority of commercial enterprises in the United States (roughly 90 percent) are not organized as corporations. They take alternate forms such as S corporations, partnerships, LLCs, or sole proprietorships. The primary difference, of course, is the lack of entity-level taxation for noncorporate businesses.

Unless you hate pass-throughs, as the administration seems to.

 

Kyle Pomerleau, The President Proposes Changing the International Tax System for Corporations (Tax Policy Blog)

 

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Cara Griffith, Texas Comptroller to Look to Legislature for Guidance on Taxing Aircraft (Tax Analysts Blog)

Tracy Gordon, A Fuller Accounting of How State and Local Governments Fared in the Great Recession (TaxVox).

 

News from the Profession. Let’s Catch This PwC Partner Up on the Fun Stuff She Missed Over the Last 20 Years (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/14/15: Education credits to delay refunds? And: it’s not volunteering when you’re paid.

Wednesday, January 14th, 2015 by Joe Kristan
Kristy Maitre

Kristy Maitre

If your tax refund this year seems to take forever to arrive, education credits might be involved. The invaluable Kristy Maitre, former IRS Stakeholder Liaison and now with the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation, has leaned that the IRS may delay refunds on returns claiming the “American Opportunity Credit.” From an e-mail she has distributed:

If your client is getting the American Opportunity Credit this year you need to be aware of a possible “refund hold” on the credit to verify attendance at the college. At this time we “assume” only that part of the refund will be held and the other part of refund not related to the American Opportunity Credit will be released.

At this time we are not sure who this will impact, IRS appears to want to keep it a BIG secret. Our concern is that the tax preparer will be blamed for the delay of the refund and overall it would make the preparer look bad as well as having to deal with an upset client due to the issue. I was able to find some criteria in a new IRM, but we need more information from IRS.

Your client should be  informed by IRS of the reason the refund is being held and that once the 1098-T from the accredited institution is verified the refund will be released,  or they will receive a Letter 4800C to inform them if further documentation is required to allow the education credit…

The AOTC is a “refundable” credit; if the credit exceeds the tax computed, the IRS will pay you the excess. Given the high incidence of refund fraud involving refundable credits like the AOTC, it’s understandable that the IRS would want to verify eligibility before issuing a refund.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

Unfortunately, this verification will come from matching 1098-Ts issued by colleges and universities. These forms, which purport to show tuition paid, are notoriously unreliable. The inevitable matching errors will leave some taxpayers trying to get their refunds fixed well into the summer.

This highlights the unwisdom of using the tax law as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy. It’s hard enough to get taxable income right. Congress also assigns IRS education policy, health care, social welfare, industrial policy, campaign finance regulation, you name it. Like with the Swiss Army Knife, you can only add so many functions before you make it bad at being a knife.

 

This Koskinen isn't the IRS commissioner

This Koskinen isn’t the IRS commissioner

Commissioner Koskinen wants us to blame cuts in his budget for tax refund delays. In a memo to IRS employees, he outlines the dire effects of the cuts in his agency budget, including:

Delays in refunds for some taxpayers. People who file paper tax returns could wait an extra week — or possibly longer — to see their refund. Taxpayers with errors or questions on their returns that require additional manual review will also face delays.

It’s foolish of Congress to pile work onto the IRS and then cut its budget. That said, Mr. Koskinen has brought a lot of this on himself with his combative and tone-deaf response to the Tea Party scandal.

Also, there’s a bit of the Washington Monument Strategy in his memo, by making cuts in areas that inflict pain on taxpayers. I would be more convinced that the IRS is really committed to making taxpayer service a priority if his list of budget adjustments included sending to the field, or laying off, the hundreds of full-time IRS employees who do only union work. He would be more convincing if he said the “voluntary” preparer regulation initiative was on ice until funding improves. Instead, the Commissioner puts the National Treasury Employees Union and his own power grab ahead of processing refunds.

 

No Walnut STVolunteering. I don’t think that word means what you think it means. From Governor Branstad’s 2015 Condition of the State address:

 In addition, I am offering legislation creating the Student Debt Reorganization Tax Credit. This tax credit allows individuals to volunteer for worthy causes within Iowa’s communities and in exchange have contributions made toward their student debt.

There is so much wrong with this, beyond the idea that it’s “volunteering” when you get paid for it. It’s one more random addition to an already ridiculous mishmash of distortive and unwise education subsidies. It’s one more incentive for students to take on debt they can’t otherwise afford. And it misplaces human capital from productive for-profit enterprise to the black hole of the government and non-profit sector.

Iowa Form 148 already lists 32 different tax credits. The Governor thinks adding some more is the solution to Iowa’s problems. I think the credits are a big part of the problem, as they help make the Iowa tax law the complex high-rate mess that it is.

 

William Perez, How Soon Can We Begin Filing Tax Returns?

Kay Bell, Reducing your 2014 tax bill using exemptions, deductions

Jason Dinesen, H&R Block Doesn’t Really Have ACA “Specialists” On Staff. A bold charge, but a convincing one.

Peter Reilly, Can Walgreen Stance On Property Tax Hurt Income Tax Position Of 1031 Investors? Thoughts on getting too cute in analyzing the value of a real estate interest.

Leslie Book, Can IRS Change Taxpayers from Procrastinators to Payors By Drafting Letters that Make Taxpayers Feel Bad? (Procedurally Taxing). Usually people feel bad when they get a letter that says “notice of levy,” but that’s not what he’s talking about.

Robert Wood, Citizenship Renunciation Fee Hiked 422%, And You Can’t Come Back

Jack Townsend, Another UBS Depositor Sentence; Consideration of the Role of Potential Deportation

 

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David Brunori, Using the Poor for Fixing the Roads (Tax Analysts Blog):

The Michigan Legislature passed a bill that would significantly increase the state’s earned income tax credit. Some 800,000 Michigan families will see tax relief. I think that is a good thing. But the change won’t go into effect unless voters approve a sales tax increase from 6 percent to 7 percent.

I don’t share David’s enthusiasm for the EITC, but I do appreciate the absurdity of the sales tax link.

Kyle Pomerleau, Representative Van Hollen Releases New $1.2 Trillion Tax Plan.  “Unfortunately, most of Representative Van Hollen’s tax plan would move the U.S. further away from having a competitive, modern tax code.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 615. This installment covers a Tea Party group that has been waiting five years for Lois Lerner’s old office to approve their exemption application.

 

Career Corner. Age and accounting as a second career (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/2/14: Dead provisions to arise for just a few weeks? And: Shocker! IRS Commissioner wants more $$$

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

lazarus risingCongress to let the Lazarus provisions make it to the end of 2014? The White House’s threat to veto the Senate’s deal to permanently extend some of the perennially expiring tax provisions has killed that proposal. Now it looks like Congress will take up a bill to extend the provisions, which expired at the end of 2013, through the end of this year. That means we get to do this all over again next year. The Hill reports:

The vote on a short-term extension, expected as soon as this week, would come after a veto threat from President Obama derailed a developing $400 billion deal between Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and House Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp (R-Mich.) that would have extended some expired tax breaks indefinitely, as well as others for two years.

Republicans on both side of the Capitol suggested the move showed that a one-year deal was the only proposal with a chance of becoming law.

The article says “practically all” of the provisions that expired at the end of 2013 will be included. The Lazarus provisions that will come back to life include, among many others:

– A $500,000 Section 179 deduction for asset purchases that would otherwise be capitalized and depreciated.

– 50% “bonus depreciation”

– The research credit

– The five-year built-in gain period.

– The allowance of tax-free distributions from IRAs to charities.

The full text of the bill is available here: (HR 5771)

So we will get a 2014 tax law just as 2014 comes to an end. Because there is no election, there is hope that we won’t have to wait until December 2015 to know what the tax law is for 2015. Not exactly a shining moment in tax policy.

The bill also includes technical corrections for tax bills going back to 2004.

Related:

How the White House torpedoed Harry Reid’s tax deal (The Hill)

The Politics and Policy of Tax Extenders (Len Burman, TaxVox). “In theory, allowing tax provisions to expire periodically could precipitate a careful reexamination of the effectiveness of each program in light of our fiscal situation and priorities. In practice, the expiration of popular temporary provisions such as the R&E credit creates a vehicle for all sorts of budget-busting mischief.”

 

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

TaxGrrrl has posted another installment of her interview with IRS Commissioner KoskinenYou may not be astounded to hear that he wants more money:

With spending cuts already taking a toll on taxpayer services, the agency is bracing itself for another tough season. In fact, Koskinen cites funding the IRS as his biggest challenge since taking office last December.

“It’s a serious problem for us,” he says. “I don’t know who got our $500 million but I’ll bet they’re not gonna give you back the $2-3 billion we would have if we had it.”

Given that the Congress has used the tax law as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy, with responsibilities including attempting to run the broken Obamacare machine, it’s not unreasonable to think IRS has increased needs for funds.

That said, the Commissioner has nobody to blame but himself. His tone-deaf and confrontational tone with Republicans investigating the political abuse of the Exempt Organizations function has earned him no friends in the party that controls the purse strings. The sudden appearance of 30,000 Lois Lerner e-mails that he insisted could not be recovered killed any credibility he had left. Only a new commissioner has any hope of turning that around.

The Commissioner also says he has cut spending to the bone:

The agency is already down 3,000 employees last year. Another 2,000-3,000 are on their way out by the end of this year. The current rate of replacement is one new employee for every five employees who leave… 
What gets cut next? The Commissioner is clear that it will be more personnel. That is, he noted, all that’s left.

Well, maybe. I’d be more convinced of that if he decided there just wasn’t enough cash lying around for his “voluntary” tax preparer initiative — a blatant attempt to get around the Loving decision shutting down mandatory preparer regulation.

Related: Robert Wood, Horrible Bosses, IRS EditionPeter Reilly, Restoring Trust In IRS Is A National Imperative

 

buzz20141017Robert D. Flach has posted his fresh Tuesday Buzz, including a link to his post at The Tax Professional on tax preparer civil disobedience in ACA enforcement. I will have more to say about this topic later this week.

William Perez explains Itemized Tax Deductions

Russ Fox, Mundane Tax Fraud Downs Friend of Cicero Town President

Keith Fogg, Appeals Fumbles CDP Case and Resulting Resolution Demonstrates Power of Installment Agreement (Procedurally Taxing)

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About Enrolled Agents

Jack Townsend, More on Willfulness. You can’t break the law if you aren’t trying.

Kay Bell, December to-do list: shopping, family visits and tax tasks

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 572

Andrew Lundeen, Kyle Pomerleau, Less Than One Percent of Businesses Employ Half of the Private Sector Workforce (Tax Policy Blog). “On the other hand, while only 0.4 percent of all firms have over 500 employees, this small group of businesses employs 50.6 percent of the nation’s private sector workforce, with most of those employees working for C corporations.”

News from the Profession. This Timesheet-Addicted Managing Partner Will Make You Grateful Not to Work For Him (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern). A charming threat of dismissal issued the day before Thanksgiving will always make you thankful for an updated resume.

 

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