Posts Tagged ‘Kay Bell’

Tax Roundup, 1/14/16: Branstad budget omits $500,000 Section 179 deduction for Iowa; no 2015 conformity.

Thursday, January 14th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

IMG_1291Priorities. Governor Branstad yesterday told a business group that he is leaving Section 179 conformity out of the new Iowa state budget. That means Iowans will be unable to claim the $500,000 maximum Section 179 deduction for 2015 returns, assuming the legislature doesn’t override this.

The Governor dropped this little bomb after touting a new $15 million incentive tax credit for “bio-renewable chemical production” to members of the Iowa Association of Business and Industry. He said the new credit will be “revenue neutral,” taking its funding from existing incentive credit programs. (Note: I was there, so this is all firsthand). He said that there just isn’t room for it in the budget.

The Governor has inadvertently highlighted the priorities of a tax policy dedicated to directing economic activity using tax credits. My my count, the Governor budgets $277.3 million in fiscal year 2017 to steer economic activity towards favored activities via tax credits:

Iowa credits fy 2017

Presumably the new bio-renewables credit is buried in here somewhere.

By definition, these credits go to a few lucky taxpayers. The largest one, the refundable research credit, goes overwhelmingly to a few big companies — and mostly as cash grants. The Department of Revenue’s calendar 2014 research credit report showed that $42.1 million of the $56.9 million in credits claimed went to 16 taxpayers. About 2/3 of the 2014 credits were “refunds,” meaning that the credit exceeded the taxpayer’s liability for the year, so the state issued a check for the difference.

20120906-1The Section 179 deduction, by contrast, is available to any non-rental business that buys fixed assets and has taxable income. It requires no negotiation with the Department of Economic Development. It’s available regardless of whether your business is bio-chemical, renewable fuels, or whatever else is the economic development flavor of the month. It’s simple to administer – you just use the number you claim on your federal return. But it has one dreadful flaw: it provides no opportunities for politicians to issue press releases or attend ribbon cuttings.

While I don’t have exact numbers for the tax revenue cost to the state for FY 2017, the Legislative Service Bureau estimated an $88.5 million revenue loss in fiscal year 2015 from the last Section 179 conformity bill.

Of course, all Section 179 revenue losses are a matter of timing. By denying Section 179 deductions, the state has a revenue gain in the first year of the asset’s life, but gives it all back through depreciation over the rest of the asset life. By contrast, tax credits are forever. They never turn around.

There is so much disheartening about this development. Failure to conform on the $500,000 Section 179 limit — after doing so for a number of years — suddenly increases the Iowa tax for thousands of Iowans who purchased equipment in 2015. Because Congress made the Section 179 deduction permanent, it signals that Iowa will permanently de-couple and use its own computation — an inherently bad policy. It requires Iowans to maintain a separate Iowa fixed asset schedule for assets that would otherwise have been written off. And, if the legislature tries to reverse the Governor’s decision, it leaves Iowans uncertain of their 2015 tax law until well into the filing season.

But perhaps most disheartening is the stark way that it shows how Iowa’s tax system, with its high rates and special favors for the well-connected, mistreats the regular taxpayers who are just going about their business, hiring people, and paying their taxes. Lots of taxes.

Related: Hide the spoons, hold your wallets. The General Assembly is back.

 

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Robert D. Flach reports that a certain national tax prep outfit has A NEW GIMMICK.

Robert Wood, Powerball Losers Make Lemonade By Selling Losing Lottery Tickets

Paul Neiffer, Planted Vines and Trees Qualify for Bonus Depreciation

Kay Bell, Final 2015 estimated tax payment is due Friday, Jan. 15

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 980

Cara Griffith, Waiting on the Court to Figure Out How to Tax Remote Sales (Tax Analysts Blog)

Jared Walczak, What Percentage of Lottery Winnings Would Be Withheld in Your State?

Howard Gleckman, Clinton and Sanders Face Off Over Who Should Pay for New Social Programs (TaxVox).

 

Career Corner. An Introvert’s Guide to Surviving Team Lunches (Leona May, Going Concern)

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Tax Roundup, 1/12/16: IRS wants to shoot more jaywalkers. And: the benefits of IRS ethics training.

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20120912-1They think it’s expensive because it is. Tax Analysts reports ($link) on a speech given by an IRS international tax deputy commissioner that shows how little the IRS cares about wreaking havoc on the lives of taxpayers who inadvertently fail to comply with the weird and obscure foreign account reporting rules. The talk by David Horton shows that the IRS continues to assume anybody who has failed to file FBAR forms is a bad actor. For example:

The IRS’s 2014 OVDP (Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program) guidance provides transitional rules for non-willful taxpayers who entered the OVDP earlier, but could have been eligible for the streamlined program. [Robert] Panoff wondered why they were incurring lower penalties than similarly situated taxpayers who completed the OVDP. 

Horton explained that these taxpayers are still in the OVDP, so they will get criminal clearance and a closing agreement, while streamlined participants get neither. Criminal clearance and a closing agreement are worth paying for, the thinking goes. A streamlined participant could later get a notice of deficiency for penalties that are assessed as taxes.

So a non-willful failure to file still benefits from “criminal clearance?” That’s a funny thing to need for a non-willful violation, and it shows an “it’s all criminal” mindset. Shoot all the jaywalkers!

The article has this:

Every practitioner hopes to shoehorn his offshore-account-holder clients into the streamlined program. Indeed, the only taxpayers who don’t welcome the streamlined program are recent immigrants who think that 5 percent of a home-country bank balance is a stiff price to pay for a green card.

That’s because it is ridiculously expensive.

Nowhere in the piece is any evidence that they (or the author) are aware that accidental Americans and compliant taxpayers can be financially ruined for failing to meet a requirement unknown to 95% of the populace. There’s certainly no awareness of the fundamental injustice of hitting taxpayers with 5-figure fines for committing personal finance abroad without an FBAR.

There is a crying need for foreign financial reporting reform. Two good first steps:

  1. Increase the FBAR foreign account thresholds to the amounts that apply for reporting foreign financial assets on Form 8938. These don’t begin to apply until the assets exceed $50,000, or $200,000 for taxpayers abroad. Using this threshold for foreign financial account filing would eliminate the vast majority of filings, leaving them only for taxpayers who actually have enough income to justify the hassle.
  2. Provide an automatic and penalty-free option to enable taxpayers to come in out of the cold, as long as they file before they are contacted by the IRS and any unreported tax required is relatively small. This would work much like the programs states have for businesses who want to come into compliance. The states benefit from getting the taxpayers in the system, and the taxpayers get in from the cold without financial ruin.

Unfortunately, the IRS apparently wants to go the other way: “Horton reported that while the IRS is still getting a steady flow of offshore voluntary disclosure program filings every month, that program has to end eventually.” Then it will be a choice to either stay out of compliance and risk financial disaster, or come into compliance and guarantee it.

 

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But preparer regulation will help prevent preparer fraud! From a U.S. Attorney press release:

Yolanda Castro, 48, an employee of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service in Fresno, pleaded guilty today to aiding and assisting in the preparation of a false tax return, United States Attorney Benjamin B. Wagner announced.

According to court documents, Castro was employed by the IRS for approximately 20 years, including as a tax examiner and contact representative. Between 2007 and 2013, she prepared and filed false federal income tax returns for herself, her family members and others in which she fraudulently claimed tax deductions and credits. For instance, on her own 2008 tax return, Castro claimed a credit for education expenses that she did not incur, and provided the IRS phony textbook receipts to support the claim. Likewise, in tax returns she prepared for herself and others, Castro claimed child care expenses that had not been incurred.

Surely some ethics continuing education would have saved her.

 

Robert D. Flach has a little Buzz for your Tuesday. “Not much BUZZ today – but, as I always say, some BUZZ is better than no BUZZ.”

Russ Fox reminds us that it’s 1099 Time for 2016. “The best way to check whether or not you need to send a 1099 to a vendor is to know this before you pay a vendor’s invoice.”

William Perez, What You Need to Know about Reporting Payments Using Form 1099-MISC

TaxGrrrl, No, You Can’t Actually File Your Tax Return Early (And More Info About Tax Refunds). “Some tax preparers are suggesting in ads and on social media that they can somehow help you skip the line and get you a refund before anyone else. Don’t be fooled.”

Robert Wood, 12 Surprising Items IRS Says You Must Report On Your Taxes. You won’t believe number 2!

Jason Dinesen, Glossary: Social Security Wage Base. “The term Social Security Wage Base refers to the maximum amount of wages or self-employment income on which the 6.2% Social Security tax is based.”

Paul Neiffer, Relief for Older Farmers with IRAs. And not just farmers.

 

Keith Fogg, Improving Payroll Tax Compliance (Procedurally Taxing). “From my perspective working on these cases within the IRS, the failure of employers to pay over the collected taxes usually resulted from poor cash management.”

Renu Zaretsky, New Taxes, Excess Profits, and a Windfall. Lots of cynical posturing by desperate politicians in today’s TaxVox headline roundup.

 


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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 978. The process of running out the clock continues.

Scott Greenberg, Which Tax Extenders are Left? (Tax Policy Blog):

Looking over the list below of remaining tax extenders, none of them seem like “must-pass” policies. As a result, the pressure is off of Congress to renew all of the tax extenders as a package. Instead, Congress should take the time to evaluate the remaining tax extenders one by one, making the good provisions permanent and letting the bad ones expire. Temporary tax policy is bad tax policy, and it’s about time that Congress laid the ritual of tax extenders to rest once and for all.

Let’s hope so.

 

The Critical Question. Would a cuddly mascot make the IRS lovable? (Kay Bell). That would look like a stuffed Cthulhu

The Critical Question II: Accounting Firms Allowing Side Gigs: Good Idea or Independence Mine Field? (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/11/2016: Hide the spoons, hold your wallets. The General Assembly is back.

Monday, January 11th, 2016 by Joe Kristan
If Iowa's income tax were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s income tax were a car, it would look like this.

Same recipe, same dish. The 2016 session of the 86th General Assembly of Iowa convenes today. As the membership is about the same as last year’s session, we can expect pretty much the same tax policy results. There will be no fundamental reappraisal of Iowa’s dysfunctional income tax this year. If anything, it might get a little worse.

Iowa’s tax system is a rat’s nest of high rates and complexity, full of special-interest loopholes, feel-good spiffs for sympathetic groups, and subsidies for the well-connected. It’s a great deal for the insiders who can work the system, paid for by high rates on those of us without lobbyists and tax credit consultants.

What Iowa needs is an overhaul that lowers the rates significantly, paying for them by simplifying the rules and swearing off subsidies like the notorious Orascom deal and the now-defunct film tax program. In other words, something like The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.

What Iowa is likely to get is more special interest tax subsidies. In a story about 10 issues likely to spark debate in Iowa Legislature, The Des Moines Register reports:

A host of Iowa business and farm groups are lobbying for state tax credits to attract investment in renewable chemical manufacturing and advanced bio-refining. The goal is to build upon Iowa’s renewable fuels industry. Iowa needs to move swiftly because of competition for businesses looking to invest in the industry, business lobbyists say.

“If we are looking at a game changer for this session, this is it. It is absolutely huge,” said Jay Byers, chief executive officer of the Greater Des Moines Partnership. Legislation to provide renewable chemical manufacturing tax credits was approved by the House last session, but failed to pass the Senate.

20120906-1A “game changer?” New tax credits? The dozens of tax credits we already have haven’t done the trick, so we need more?

Think about it. The idea that the state can constructively direct investment capital assumes that the insiders that make up the Greater Des Moines Partnership and the small town politicians who run the state legislature have some unique insight on what the industries of the future are. If so, they should be investing their own money in these “game changers,” because there’s obviously a great profit opportunity to be had. Instead they want to spend your money, and mine, on it. That tells you something important.

Remember, these are the same people who told us it would be a great idea to subsidize Iowa’s film industry with tax credits (page 6 at the link), and that worked out just great.

The only constructive thing likely to come out of the legislature is a “code conformity” bill that updates Iowa’s 2015 income tax rules for the retroactive passage of the federal “extenders” bill in December. The Department of Revenue cautions taxpayers to not file returns using the extended provisions until the conformity bill is passed. The Section 179 deduction, the educator expense deduction, and tax-free IRA gifts are key provisions that are affected. Last year the code conformity bill was one of the first bills passed, in mid-February.

 

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TaxGrrrl, Taxpayers Get A Breather On Passport Requirement For Domestic Travel As REAL ID Requirement Delayed:

The key date to know is January 22, 2018. That’s the date on which air travelers with a driver’s license or identification card issued by a state that does not meet the requirements of the REAL ID Act (unless that state has been granted an extension to comply with the Act) must present an alternative form of identification acceptable to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) in order to fly domestic. Acceptable identification would include a passport or passport card, Global Entry card, U.S. military ID, airline or airport-issued ID, federally recognized tribal-issued photo ID.

Congress last year passed a provision allowing IRS to revoke passports for non-payment of taxes. And of course the IRS never makes mistakes.

 

William Perez, How Soon Can We Begin Filing Tax Returns?

Annette Nellen, PATH and Many Tax Changes – PL 114-113

Kay Bell, 24 top taxpayer problems of 2015. “IRS electronic approach to customer service tops National Taxpayer Advocate’s annual list”

Jack Townsend, Hawaii Businessman Sentenced to 46 Months

Peter Reilly, Poor Return Preparation Kills Facade Easement Tax Deduction. “Often the buildings already have so much restriction on them already that promising not to alter them is a little like me renouncing my super powers

Robert D. Flach has thoughts on FINDING A TAX PROFESSIONAL.

Russ Fox, Fraudster Tries Alchemy; Will Have 20 Years to Think That Over:

Joseph Furando of Montvale, New Jersey thought he had the perfect way of performing alchemy. He took biodiesel fuel that wasn’t eligible for two tax credits and magically turned it into biodiesel fuel that was eligible for the tax credits:

Tax Credits, fraudulent? Unthinkable!

 

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Scott Drenkard, Businesses Love Texas, Except this One Tax that Holds the State Back (Tax Policy Blog)

Renu ZaretskyLooking ahead to 2016 and beyond? It’s blurry. (Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers the upcoming State of the Union Address, the Taxpayer Advocate report from last week, and more.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 977

 

Something to look forward to. Winner Of $1.3 Billion Powerball May Face Suits By Friends, Co-Workers, Family (Robert Wood).

Career Corner. Unhappy Accountants: Go Get a 10% Raise (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/8/16: A look at Iowans and their federal income taxes.

Friday, January 8th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20160108-1aSoak the rich? Iowa’s soaking in it! The Iowa Legislative Service Bureau this week published a report on the federal taxes paid by Iowans in 2013. It’s a useful reminder that the politicians running around Iowa talking about how “the rich” pay no taxes are talking nonsense.

This table covers a lot of ground:

 

 

 

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Source: Iowa Legislative Service bureau. Click to enlarge.

Note that for the >$1 million filers, the biggest category is “other income.” Given that they also pay the highest effective rates, it’s clear that this isn’t tax-preferred capital gains or dividends. It’s K-1 income from partnerships and S corporations, or business income from farms or schedule C businesses. In other words, its taxes paid by employers. When you soak the rich, you are soaking employers.

It’s also clear that “the rich” in Iowa are paying a bigger share of their earnings than everyone else. If we count “the rich” as taxpayers with gross income over $200,000, their average federal tax rate as a percentage of gross income — before any deductions — is 22.4%, compared to 7.3% for all other taxpayers.

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Tax Update Chart using Iowa Legislative Service Bureau data. Dollars in millions.

The taxes paid at the top end are a much larger share of the tax paid than of their share of the income: they have 20.8% of the gross income, but pay 44.7% of the taxes. While some politicians may say that’s not enough, remember that much of that is income earned by employers from their businesses. If they have to pay more to the IRS, that’s money they don’t have to hire people, give raises, or grow their business.

Another lesson is that even with the disparity towards the high end, 59.2% of the taxes paid are paid by those in the $25,000-$200,000 gross income range. When the politicians promise to give you stuff paid for by someone else, they lie. They intend to take your money, give you some back, and expect you to thank them.

 

Last night I gave a presentation to IMA chapters across the state over the Iowa Cable Network, mostly on the newly passed extenders bill. You can download the Powerpoint slides I used here.

 

It’s Friday! It’s Buzz Day! At Robert D. Flach’s place. Links all around, including commentary on Turbo Tax ads.

Russ Fox, Substance Over Form. “So today’s petitioner, who represented himself in Tax Court, won that he was an independent contractor, not an employee”

TaxGrrrl, When It Comes To Taxes, Where Not To Win Powerball.

Robert Wood, To IRS, ‘Willful’ Means Penalties Or Jail

Jason Dinesen, How Often Should a Budget Be Updated?

Kay BellRecently issued tax identity theft PINs are valid for 2015 filings despite wrong date in IRS letters to taxpayers

 

 

Alex Durante, New NBER Paper Underscores Need for Corporate Integration (Tax Policy Blog). By “corporate integration, they mean “stop taxing corporation income twice.”

For the convenience of the politicians all concerned how corporate taxes have declined as a share of all federal taxes, they illustrate the obvious:

c corp share of entities

The high C corporation rate and the second tax imposed when corporate earnings are withdrawn as dividends or cashed out on a share sale explain why people set up their businesses in other ways.

 

Howard Gleckman, If Banning Negligent Low-Income Households From Taking Tax Credits Is Such a Great Idea, Why Stop With Them? (TaxVox). Good point.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 974. Today’s link discusses the proposal abandoned by the IRS yesterday to make charities collect social security numbers of their donors.

 

If you are a regular reader, you know better than to click on the link if you get an email like this:

HRscamemail

Be careful out there, people, and be smart.

And have a great weekend.

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Tax Roundup, 1/7/16: Taxpayer Advocate report describes IRS “pay to play” plans. And: IRS nixes plan to make charities collect tax ID numbers.

Thursday, January 7th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20150107-2Have you heard about the IRS “Future State Plan?” Or “CONOPS?” Me neither.

The latest annual Taxpayer Advocate Report to Congress is the first I’ve heard about this mostly-secret IRS initiative. The report explains (my emphasis):

During the past year-and-a-half, the IRS has devoted significant resources to creating a “future state” plan that details how the agency will operate in five years. The plan is explained and developed in a document known as a Concept of Operations (CONOPS). There are many positive components of the plan, including the goal of creating online taxpayer accounts through which taxpayers will be able to obtain information and interact with the IRS.

However, the CONOPS also raise significant questions and concerns. Implicit in the plan — and explicit in internal discussion — is an intention on the part of the IRS to substantially reduce telephone and face-to-face interaction with taxpayers. The IRS is hoping that taxpayer interactions with the IRS through online accounts will address a high percentage of taxpayer needs. It is also developing plans to enable third parties like tax return preparers and tax software companies to do more to assist taxpayers for whom online accounts are insufficient — an approach that will increase compliance costs for millions of taxpayers.

Nina Olson, Taxpayer Advocate

Nina Olson, Taxpayer Advocate

The IRS, as usual, is cooking this all up in secret, with only well-connected insiders in on the plan. Tax Analysts describes the report ($link):

A major concern is the aura of secrecy around the CONOPS documents. Despite the fact that the IRS is conducting internal discussions about its “future state” plans, Olson’s report says the Service has repeatedly declared CONOPS data elements and documents “official use only” and not for public dissemination. “Never before has the IRS made this assertion in so many instances,” the TAS report says. One area where the IRS has shared its CONOPS plans — the Large Business and International Division — caters to a group of taxpayers that can afford to “pay to play,” the TAS said, while future service plans remain under wraps for the roughly 150 million individual taxpayers and 54 million small business taxpayers.

If you look at it from the viewpoint of most taxpayers, this plan seems incomprehensible. But if you believe that the IRS is really trying to serve the interests of the national tax prep franchise outfits, national accounting firms, and the biggest law firms, it completely makes sense.  It actually fits in well with the IRS preparer regulation efforts to eliminate competition for the national tax prep firms — a regulation effort that the Taxpayer Advocate still regrettably and unwisely supports. Those who are drafting the new taxpayer service labyrinth can be expected get nice raises by going out into the tax industry to help their new employers navigate through it.

Related: Leslie Book, The National Taxpayer Releases Annual Report to Congress (Procedurally Taxing); Accounting Today, Taxpayer Advocate Concerned about IRS Plans for ‘Pay to Play’ Taxpayer Service,

 

Another IRS screw-up averted. I just received a Tax Analysts breaking news email saying:

The IRS has withdrawn proposed regulations that would implement the statutory exception to the contemporaneous written acknowledgement requirement for substantiating charitable contribution deductions of $250 or more.

These rules would have required donors to provide charities with their social security numbers — a horrible idea in the identity theft era. Expect the IRS to try to sneak them back in when they think people aren’t looking.

 

Nicole Kaeding, American Migration in 2015 (Tax Policy Blog).
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Four of the ten states with the most inbound migration have no personal income tax. Most of the states where the population is fleeing have very hign income taxes, including Illlinois, Connecticut, New York and New Jersey. To be fair, high-tax Vermont seems to be attracting people, probably from dysfunctional New York.

This won’t help inbound migration. Illinois Announces Plans To Delay Tax Refunds Through March (TaxGrrrl)

Kay Bell, Delayed state tax refunds in Illinois, Louisiana & Utah because of tougher tax identity theft procedures. And because Illinois is broke.

Robert Wood, Obama Executive Action? Tax Hikes Could Be Next. “President Obama has stretched executive authority with immigration and gun law changes. And he is “very interested” in executive action on taxes too.”

Jack Townsend, Government Asserts Wylys’ Fraud in Bankruptcy Court. It’s a multibillion dollar tax case involving offshore trusts and a “blame the tax pro” defense. Mr. Townsend goes deep on the cases being made by both sides.

Paul Neiffer, “BIG” Might Not Be a Problem. Paul discusses the now-permanent five year “recognition period” for S corporation built-in gains.

William Perez lists Tax Deadlines for 2016

Robert D. Flach posts MY ANNUAL POST FOR JOURNALISTS AND BLOGGERS, reminding us all that he doesn’t care for conflating “tax professional” with “CPA.”

Peter Reilly, No Foreign Income Tax Exclusion For Army Civilian In Afghanistan

Tony Nitti, Love In The 21st Century: Bad Breakup Leads To Form 1099, Lawsuit. I’m not a trained relationship professional, but I think its safe to observe that issuing a 1099 to your ex-girlfriend burns all the bridges.

 

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Megan McArdle, Closing Tax ‘Loopholes’ Would Choke the Middle Class. “If you want to pay for any major new program by “closing the loopholes,” it is these loopholes that you will need to close, because the amount of revenue raised by, say, doing away with carried interest treatment of sweat equity partnership stakes works out to a rounding error on the federal budget.”

David Brunori, Taxing Guns Is Just Wrong (Tax Analysts Blog). “The fact is that a gun tax will have no effect on gun violence.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 973. A dispatch from the denialist front.

 

News from the Profession. #BusySeason Has Arrived (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/6/16: Oh, I meant that other year. And: IRS won’t rule on truck rehab “glider kits.”

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20160106-1Better increase their budget. The IRS provides a special “Identity Protection Personal Identification Number,” or “IP-PIN,” to identity theft victims to help them with future tax filings. The IP-PIN lets them tell the IRS that the return being filed is being filed by the real taxpayers, rather than by some grifter in Tampa (Florida) or St. Petersburg (Russia).

Now, after the IRS has already screwed up things for innocent taxpayers by sending their refunds to thieves, they have added insult to the injury. TaxGrrrl reports IRS Sends IP PIN Letters With Wrong Tax Year, Stresses It Will Not Affect Returns Filed In 2016.

Letters sending out IP PINs for the 2016 filing season (for the 2015 tax year) were mailed out at the end of December 2015 (but dated January 4, 2016) marked with the incorrect year. The letter, also referred to as a CP01A Notice, incorrectly indicates the IP PIN issued is to be used for filing your 2014 tax return when the number is actually to be used for your 2015 tax return. 

The IRS isn’t sending correction letters.

The funny thing: the IRS gets really mad if impatient taxpayers use forms for the wrong year and cross off the year at the top of the form, writing in the right year. Do as we say, not as we do…

Related:

IRS Notice on Your Identity Protection PIN.

Russ Fox, IRS Errs on Identity Theft PIN Letters. “One would think that the IRS proofed important letters and notices before they’re finalized.”

 

ice truck“Glider kit” guidance grounded. The IRS will decline to issue rulings on whether the excise tax on over-the-road tractors applies when a new cab, chassis, frame and axle — a “glider kit” is applied to an old engine and power train. Tax Analysts reports ($link):

Section 4052(f)(1) provides that if a modification to the chassis or body doesn’t exceed 75 percent of the retail price of a comparable new chassis or body, then it won’t incur the section 4051 tax. The IRS decided that it will not rule on whether a modification using a glider kit qualifies for the 75 percent exception under section 4052(f)(1).

A more recent legal memorandum (ILM 201403014) makes clear that the IRS has evolved its thinking on the issue, determining that when an outfitter combines an old engine and transmission with a new cab, chassis frame, and axles, the excise tax applies and the exception isn’t applicable. It also explains that taxpayers must include a 4 percent markup in the price of the refurbished truck for purposes of computing the tax, minus the value of used components if they’re customer provided.

The article adds:

The Iowa Motor Truck Association, in an alert (http://goo.gl/IXnYaS) issued to its members following the release of ILM 201403014, also warned that “the memo probably indicates that IRS auditors will now be more aggressive about glider-kit transactions, and that at least some transactions that have been regarded as exempt may turn out not to be.”

This is obviously a big deal to dealers and their customers. It’s terrible that the IRS is making this sort of policy by internal memos rather than through published guidance, leaving taxpayers hanging.

 

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

Megan McArdle has some wise thoughts on the tax law in Why We Fear the IRS (my emphasis):

Legal complexity does not accumulate linearly; it accumulates exponentially. When you have one law on the books, and you add a second, the new law may (or may not) have some unexpected interaction with the old law. This would be one complexity point for regulators to manage. But with each new law, the number of potential interactions grows quickly, until it passes the ability of any layman to grasp it (and eventually, surpasses the professionals as well, which is why they’re increasingly specialized in narrow areas). We are long past that point with the tax code.

That’s a point universally ignored by politicians who use the tax law as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy. A Swiss Army Knife the size of a railcar is interesting, but it’s not much good as a knife.

Her post also covers important ground on why the tax law has gotten so bad. Recommended.

 

Paul Neiffer, Is Section 179 a Ticking Tax Time Bomb?. The ability to deduct up to $500,000 in new equipment may have unintended consequences:

On the face, this sounds like a great tax deduction for farmers, however, with continued low commodity prices, might this be a ticking tax time bomb for many farmers.  This is due to a farmer having to liquidate some farm equipment due to the bank requiring additional liquidity be put into the farm operation or perhaps the farmer has lost some ground and no longer needs the equipment.   This sale of equipment causes the Section 179 to be “recaptured” as ordinary income and since the farmer probably does not have sufficient liquidity to prepay additional farm expenses, causes the farmer to be in a high tax bracket.  This leads to a large tax bill which then requires the farmer to sell additional equipment or grain to cover the tax bill.  This is especially harsh when the equipment was financed 100%.

In theory, the tax savings from the original deduction should be available to cover that tax bill, but if you are having to liquidate to pay the bank, the savings have already been spent on other things.

 

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Robert D. Flach, THE PATH ACT OF 2015 AND TAX PLANNING FOR 2016

William Perez, What Is the Alternative Minimum Tax? “Essentially, this is a tax based on a person’s adjusted gross income if they aren’t itemizers.”

Kay Bell, Seattle gun & ammo taxes drive gun seller out of town.  The criminals, they get to stay.

Jason Dinesen, What is Form 1023-EZ? “Form 1023-EZ is a new IRS form used by some not-for-profits to apply for tax-exempt status as a 501(c)(3) organization.”

Jim Maule, Is This Proposed Tax Necessary or Even Sensible?:

Several days ago, in a New York Times editorial, Max Frankel proposed “a relatively simple new tax – officially called a user fee – “ based on “the grandeur of each lofty view” from the apartments being built in very tall luxury skyscrapers along the southern edge of Central Park. He suggested it could informally be called a “window tax” and he suggested various dollar amounts for windows and doors based on height, the existence or absence of obstructions, and the nature of what can be seen.

Gee, what could go wrong? A little history shows some problems with Mr. Frankel’s proposal:

The window tax was a property tax based on the number of windows in a house. It was a significant social, cultural, and architectural force in England, France and Scotland during the 18th and 19th centuries. To avoid the tax some houses from the period can be seen to have bricked-up window-spaces (ready to be glazed or reglazed at a later date).

Prof. Maule rightly criticizes the proposal.

 

Robert Wood, As Offshore Banks Agree To U.S. Tax Evasion Deal, Account Holders Must Deal With IRS. Betting on foreign bank secrecy is a bet against the odds.

Keith Fogg, Fulfilling the Requirements of Section 6751 When the IRS Imposes a Penalty (Procedurally Taxing). “In Legg v. Commissioner, the Tax Court issued a division opinion concerning this little known provision that serves as a gatekeeper to the assertion of many penalties.”

Peter Reilly, Tax Court Sorts Out Basis On Russian Fast Food Merger. “The IRS can argue that what you said you did – the form – is not what actually happened – the substance.  You can’t generally do that yourself, because you got to choose the form, so you are stuck with it.”

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Renu Zaretsky, The Case of Tax Scams, Private Debt Collectors, and Wishful Thinking (TaxVox). “There is one way Congress could make tax compliance and collection easier and tax avoidance harder, while improving the public’s perception of the IRS. It could simplify the tax code. Unfortunately, that’s a call Congress has not chosen to make.”

Stephen J. Entin, Michael Schuyler, Are Dividend Taxes Harmless? Don’t Bet On It!

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 972

 

Career Corner. New Year’s Resolutions That Will Make Busy Season Less Awful (Leona May, Going Concern). It’s hard to argue with “Stop stealing co-workers’ lunches”

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/5/16: Start your year-end planning today! And: private tax audits for fun and profit!

Tuesday, January 5th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

IMG_1182Welcome to 2016. We’ve just finished another round of 2015 year-end planning. It’s too soon for most of us to be working on our 2015 filings, given the need for 1099s, W-2s, K-1s, etc. But it is a good time to start getting things in order for 2016.

Too many people want to know the last day they can do something for their tax planning. It’s better to worry about the first day to do something. Many tax moves are best done at the beginning of the year. If you fund a tax-deferred account at the beginning of the year, you start sheltering the investment income from taxes 15 1/2 months sooner than somebody who waits until the end of the year.

Here are a few 2016 tax planning moves you can make right now:

Fund an IRA. You can fund a 2016 IRA to the extent of the lesser of your 2016 earned income or $5,500 – or $6,500 if you are going to be 50 years old by year-end. You don’t have to wait until you have earned that $5,500 or $6,500; if you are still working, you’ll get there. And don’t forget a spousal IRA, same limits.

Health Savings Accounts for 2016 can be funded up to $6,750, or $7,750 if you will reach age 55 by year-end.

A 55 year-old working couple with a high-deductible health plan can stash $20,750 in tax-deferred IRAs and HSAs today and shift the earnings on those funds to the non-taxable category now, instead of waiting until April 2017. Not only do they start their tax savings right away, but they aren’t tempted to spend that money between now and then.

While Section 529 plans can’t generate deductions like HSAs and traditional IRAs, they do shelter investment earnings like HSAs and IRAs, and they have more flexible contribution limits. The IRS explains:

Contributions can not exceed the amount necessary to provide for the qualified education expenses of the beneficiary. If you contribute to a 529 plan, however, be aware that there may be gift tax consequences if your contributions, plus any other gifts, to a particular beneficiary exceed $14,000 during the year.

Taxpayers filing in Iowa can deduct their contributions to the College Savings Iowa Section 529 plan up to $3,188 per beneficiary, per donor on their Iowa income tax return. A married couple funding plans for their two children can therefore deduct up to $12,752 in 2016 CSI contributions.

So start that 2016 year-end planning right away!

 

Tax Analysts reports ($link) that a Chicago Whistleblower Has Filed 938 FCA Tax Cases, Attorney Says. It quotes the director of the Illinois Department of Revenue, Connie Beard, talking about False Claims Act lawsuit trolling:

Beard told the lawmakers that the suits “are not true whistleblower lawsuits,” wherein an insider who has knowledge of a company’s fraudulent behavior seeks to report it to the state. “These are lawsuits that simply accuse business taxpayers, big and small, of incorrectly collecting and reporting tax,” she said.

As if Illinois wasn’t hopeless enough.

 

nytchart20151229-7Scott Hodge, IRS “Fortunate 400” Report Shows Evidence of Significant Income Shifting to Avoid Fiscal Cliff Tax Rate Hikes (Tax Policy blog). They show how taxpayers shifted income to beat the 2013 tax hikes:

Finally, we get to the bottom line and can see that taxable income declined 23 percent in 2013 to $85 billion from $111 billion in 2012.

So what explains this? Well, the more interesting narrative to come out of the IRS report is the evidence of income shifting in 2012 as the 400 wealthiest taxpayers anticipated the eventual tax increases on personal and investment income that would result from the fiscal cliff tax legislation.

Nearly all the major sources of income for these 400 taxpayers were up significantly in 2012 compared to 2011, as they pulled income from the future into a lower-tax year…

The lesson here is that high-income taxpayers have considerable flexibility as to how and when they report income. Headlines reporting that the rich are paying higher average tax rates as a result of the fiscal cliff deal don’t really tell the whole story.

People aren’t stupid. If they have a choice between recognizing income in a low-tax or a high-tax year, a sensible person picks the low-tax one. As the biggest source of income of the “400” is capital gains, there was a lot of pressure to beat the 2013 rate hikes from 15% to 23.8%.

Related coverage here.

 

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Robert D. Flach gets 2016 started with a bang Buzz! A tremendous link fest to start they year.

William Perez, How Soon Can We Begin Filing Tax Returns?

Andrew Mitchel, Flowchart – Section 267(a)(2) & (3) Related Party Matching Rules (International Tax Blog). Andrew’s charts are a wonderful resource.

Annette NellenTop Ten Items of Tax Policy Interest for 2015 – #10. The “gig economy.”

Kay Bell, 2016’s first tax tip: Filing season starts on Jan. 19

Jason Dinesen, Choosing a Business Entity: LLC. “LLCs provide legal protection much like a corporation, but LLCs are easier to form and are generally easier to administer.”

Jack Townsend, Judge Criticizes Prosecutor’s Use of Language Directing Secrecy for Receipt of Grand Jury Subpoena. “I hope that all readers of this blog know that grand jury proceedings are generally secret and the grand jurors and government actors in the process must keep them secret.  FRCrP 6(e)(2), here.  But the obligation of secrecy is not imposed on witnesses before the grand jury.”

Jim Maule, Taking (Tax Breaks) Without Giving (What Was Promised). “Too many tax breaks are handed out in exchange for promises by the recipients to do something beneficial for the community at large.” Once the politicians issue the press release and cut the ribbon, they have what they want, and they don’t much care what happens next.

Peter Reilly, Family Partnership Valuation Discounts Approved By Tax Court. A big year-end Tax Court case is discussed.

Leslie Book, NY Times Article Today Highlights Why People Pay Taxes as Well as Some of My Favorite PT Posts of 2015 (Procedurally Taxing)

Robert Wood, 2016 Brings IRS Power Over Passports, Use Of Private Debt Collectors

TaxGrrrl, 100 Things You Absolutely Need To Know About Money Before You’re 35

Tony Nitti, Ben Carson Releases Tax Plan, Promises End To Mortgage Interest, Charitable Contribution Deductions.

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 967Day 968Day 969Day 970Day 971.

Howard Gleckman, What Can Congress and President Obama Accomplish in 2016? Pray they don’t define “accomplish” the same way.

2015 top news from the profession. Going Concern Editor’s Picks for 2015: Relationships at Work, Bad Auditing, Women in Accounting and More (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

Russ Fox, My Day on Jury Duty. Congratulations to Russ on getting it out of the way January 4.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/30/15: What needs to be paid by tomorrow. And: NY Times has fun with a chart.

Wednesday, December 30th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20141226-1Things that have to be paid for by the end of the day tomorrow. The unforgiving calendar is nearly ready to turn, and that leaves only today and tomorrow to do some things to help lower 2015 taxes. Some expenses are only deductible if they are paid by the deadline.

For cash basis business taxpayers, payment needs to be made for most business expenses by the end of the day tomorrow. “Payment” means the check is written and postmarked, or a wire transfer is completed, or a legitimate liability has been incurred. If it’s on the credit card by the end of the day tomorrow, it’s considered paid for.

The only business expenses that normally can be paid and deducted after year-end for cash-basis taxpayers are pension and profit-sharing contributions. these are deductible this year if paid by the due date of the 2015 tax return, including any extensions.

For accrual-basis taxpayers, any expenses owed related parties are deductible only if paid by the end of the day tomorrow (Section 267). For C corporations, this generally includes expenses owed to 50% owners and their family members, and to corporations and partnerships owned by 50% owners. For S corporations and partnerships, any ownership at all makes you “related,” and the definition of “family” goes beyond ancestors, descendants and siblings to include aunts, uncles, nephews and nieces.. These rules can get complicated, so be sure to pay by tomorrow or consult your tax advisor if you aren’t sure.

Gifts are a different story. It’s not enough to mail a check by tomorrow to count as a 2015 gift; the check actually must be cashed. If you are trying to get an annual exclusion gift under the wire by tomorrow, consider a wire transfer or a cashiers check.

Charitable contributions can deducted this year if mailed this year, but be sure to get a certified mail postmark if it’s a big one — or better yet, use a credit card. If you are making a gift of appreciated stock, it has to be in the charity’s brokerage account by the end of the day tomorrow to count.

Finally, if you are spending money on depreciable property, even if you plan to use the Section 179 deduction, it’s not enough to buy and pay for the property by tomorrow. It must be “placed in service.” That means on-site, ready to go, not at the dealership or in crates on the dock.

This is the penultimate entry of our 2015 year-end planning tips series. Come back tomorrow for the finale!

 

The New York Times yesterday ran an article headlined For the Wealthiest, a Private Tax System That Saves Them Billions: The Very Richest Are Able to Quietly Shape Tax Policy That Will Allow Them to Shield Billions in Income. It offers a lot less than it promises. It pretty much establishes that really rich people can afford expensive tax advice, and they buy it.

The article includes this misleading chart:

 

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This shows that those 400 people are really putting one over on the IRS with their clever planning, doesn’t it?  Well, not really. I’ll superimpose the top capital gains rates that applied for the years on the chart (sourced here):

 

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Funny how that income tax rates of those sneaky 400 people correspond with the top capital gain rates. Why would that be — because those dastardly 400 rich people conspire to incur capital gains?

No. As we’ve pointed out here, capital gains are what get people on that top 400 list. They normally hit the top 400 only once, by having a once-in-a-lifetime capital gain, like the sale of a business.

You also may notice that the New York Times cuts off the chart conveniently right before two big increases in the capital gain rate — the 2013 expiration of the Bush 15% capital gain rates and the 2013 effective date of the 3.8% net investment income tax. You can bet that the line goes right back up starting in 2013.

Update, 12/30/15, 4:25 pm, from The Washington Post:

On Wednesday, the Internal Revenue Service published an update to its annual assessment of how much the 400 highest-earning Americans pay in taxes. It showed that the effective tax rate paid by those Americans jumped in 2013 to nearly 23 percent.

Gee, amazing how that works! I’ve updated the chart to show the new number.

Correction: this post originally stated in error that the Net Investment Income Tax took effect in 2014, instead of 2013.

Related: Scott Hodge, New Treasury Data Shows How Progressive America’s Tax Code Really Is (Tax Policy Blog):

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More coverage: TaxProf, NY Times:  How The Ultra Wealthy Buy Tax Policy

Robert D. Flach, THE YEAR IN TAXES 2015

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2015: The Innocence Project

Robert Wood, Tax Double Whammy: IRS Can Revoke Passports And Uses Collection Agencies

Peter Reilly, World Class Rider Does Not Insure Allowable Tax Losses In Horse Case

Kay Bell, IRS seeks tax pros’ input on fighting tax ID theft fraud

William Perez, Forgiven or canceled mortgage debts could be nontaxable

Paul Neiffer, 50% Bonus Depreciation Applies to More Property. “Any interior improvement made to non-residential real estate will qualify for bonus depreciation with certain exceptions for (1) elevators and escalators, (2) internal structural framework, and (3) enlarging a building.”

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 965:

Donors listing the IRS as their employer have donated roughly $453,800 to Democratic candidates and causes and $221,400 to Republican candidates and causes since 1990. About one in four of the dollars for Democrats, or roughly $117,500, went to President Barack Obama.

But IRS employees since 1990 have also donated $203,000 to the National Treasury Employees Union, which in turn has given about 95 percent of its $6 million in political contributions to Democrats over the last 25 years, OpenSecrets.org data shows.

Yet we are asked to believe the IRS operates in a fair and neutral manner towards all political persuasions.

 

Harvey Galper, Five Questions to Ask When You Look at a Presidential Candidate’s Tax Plan (TaxVox). How about, “Should I seek counseling?”

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/29/15: No year-end basis, no S corporation loss. And: ACA 1095 deadlines extended.

Tuesday, December 29th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

S-SidewalkBasis or bust. With the re-enactment of bonus depreciation for 2015, some S corporations find themselves with taxable losses for 2015. That won’t do much for the 2015 tax returns of S corporation shareholders who have no basis in their stock at year-end. While they also have to get by the “at-risk” and “passive loss” limits, they don’t even get to those problems without basis.

A taxpayer’s initial basis in an S corporation is the amount paid for the stock. It is increased by capital contributions and by undistributed income of the S corporation. It is reduced by distributions of S corporation earnings and by S corporation losses. If there have been 2015 distributions, they count before the losses do.

A shareholder with no stock basis can still get deductions by loaning money to the S corporation by year-end. The loan has to meet the at-risk rules (it can’t be funded by another shareholder or by the corporation, for example), but if it meets those requirements, it can create basis for S corporation losses. But don’t do anything hokey like making a loan on December 31 and having the corporation repay it on January 3.

It’s a trap! Well, it doesn’t have to be, but remember that any losses you take against a loan reduce the basis of the loan. That means that if the loan is repaid before the losses are restored by S corporation income, the repayment will be taxable gain to the extent of the unrestored losses.

This is another installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series running through December 31. Collect them all!

 

1095-C cornerIRS delays due dates for 1095-B and 1095-C reporting2015 is the first year many employers are required to file a new form documenting insurance coverage, or offers of coverage, for their employees. Apparently many employers are still scrambling to figure out how to comply with the complex rules, because yesterday the IRS announced (Notice 2016-4) a delay in the deadlines for providing these forms to employees and to the IRS. A summary:

2016-4 deadlines

Employers are encouraged to file under the old deadlines if they can, but they now have a blanket extension, with no need to file any extension request.

While the IRS will be processing forms starting January 16, this announcement tells us that millions of taxpayers will lack the forms they need to properly report their ACA tax credits or penalties for inadequate coverage. The IRS says that employees can rely upon “other information received” from employers or insurers, and do not have to amend returns if the 1095s they receive later show that their original amounts are incorrect. What could possibly go wrong with this? Aside from rampant errors and outright fraud, I mean.

We are now approaching six years since the enactment of the ACA, and it’s still a mess.

Related: Russ Fox, IRS: We’ll Trust You on Health Insurance for 2015 Because… “We won’t have delays regarding filing returns because taxpayers haven’t received Forms 1095-B or 1095-C as long as they’re aware of their health insurance coverage. That’s a very good thing for all.”

 

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If you are trying to lose weight added by holiday treats, go to Robert D. Flach’s place for a “slender” Tuesday Buzz!

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2015: Red Paw Emergency Relief Team

Robert Wood, House Oversight Probes Hillary Speech Fees To Clinton Foundation. The assignment of income rules only apply to little people.

Leslie Book, PATH, CDP Venue and Berglund v Commissioner, A Recent Tax Court Case Where Venue Matters (Procedurally Taxing)

Jason DinesenFrom the Archives: Taxation of Emotional Distress Payments

Kay Bell, 10 tax-saving things to do by December 31

Jana Luttenegger WeilerLast Minute Tax Extenders – 2015 Edition (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

William Perez, Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015

Annette Nellen, Top Ten Items of Tax Policy Interest for 2015 – #6 and #7. Includes coverage of the return due date changes enacted this year.

Me, Forget April 15. Well, don’t, actually, but Dec. 31 matters more. My latest at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record Business Professionals’ Blog.

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 964.

Renu Zaretsky, Bans, Subsidies, Searches, and Bubbles. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers new EITC restrictions and Nevada’s corporate welfare cornucopia for Tesla, among other morsels.

Stephen Entin, Disentangling CAP Arguments against Tax Cuts for Capital Formation: Part 4 (Tax Policy Blog). “Most major tax bills of the last thirty years have provided serious tax reductions or refundable credits (resulting in negative taxes) for lower income families. These are extraordinarily expensive, but do next to nothing to promote capital formation to raise productivity, wages, and employment.”

 

Caleb Newquist, Opening Day of Tax Season Less Than a Month Away (Going Concern). “Anyone with a PTIN is due to report on January 4.” Haven’t renewed your PTIN yet? Get on it!

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/28/15: Harvesting without a combine. And: Tax Credits as a fiscal trap.

Monday, December 28th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

harvestThe corn’s in, but the harvest isn’t over. The tax law taxes capital gains for almost all individual taxpayers when you sell an appreciated asset, even though it shouldn’t. Still, if you’re like most of us, not everything you buy goes up.

The tax law allows individuals to deduct capital losses when they cash out a money-losing investment, up to the amount of capital gains plus $3,000. That means paying capital gain taxes is optional to the extent you have unrealized capital losses in your taxable portfolio. That’s a silly option to exercise. Here are some thoughts on loss harvesting:

You have to take the loss in a taxable account. A loss in an IRA or 401(k) plan doesn’t help you.

Normally the “trade date” is the effective date for tax purposes, so you can sell a stock as late as December 31 this year and still deduct the loss on your 2015 1040.

If you have a loss on a short sale, the tax law treats it as closing on the settlement date, not the trade date, so you can’t wait until the last minute to close a short sale to get a deduction. (See also Russ Fox, Harvesting Capital Losses: Act Quickly on Shorts!)

You don’t need to overdo it.  You can deduct your capital losses only to the extent of your capital gains, plus $3000.  But if you do overdo it, individual capital losses carry forward indefinitely.

Long-term losses can offset short-term gains, and vice-versa.

Harvesting losses helps taxpayers subject to the Obamacare/ACA Net Investment Income Tax to the extent it helps for regular taxes.

– Watch out for the wash sale rules. If you buy the same stock within the 30 days preceding or following the sale of a loss stock, your loss is disallowed. This is true even if you sell from a taxable account and buy in an IRA, according to the IRS.

See also

This is another installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series running through December 31. 

Related — weekend tax tips:

Altaring your tax planning

Keep on giving! A high-end tax planning tip.

 

1916 Spaulding by The editors of Horseless Age. Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

1916 Spaulding by The editors of Horseless Age. Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Tax Credits as a trapThe Sunday Des Moines Register this week told the story of a tax credit deal gone awry, leaving the small college town of Grinnell, Iowa in a financial pickle.

Grinnell once housed Spaulding Manufacturing Company, one of many small early Midwest automakers. The Spaulding story is told in my college buddy Curt McConnell’s fine book, Great Cars of the Great Plains.

There is only one known surviving Spaulding vehicle. It was to be a crown jewel of a transportation museum to be built around the dilapidated remains of the old Spaulding plant. But it hasn’t gone well, according to the Register:

Three years after it opened, the Iowa Transportation Museum has hit a dead end, losing its building to foreclosure and leaving the city of Grinnell on the hook to repay more than $4 million in federal aid for the project.

The museum, which had operated in a renovated portion of the old Spaulding manufacturing plant in downtown Grinnell, closed in October, unable to pay its mortgage to Iowa City’s MidWestOne Bank. The bank even took possession of the museum’s crown jewel, a rare 1913 Spaulding automobile built at the Grinnell plant.

It sounds as though the business plan of attracting auto tourists to Grinnell was hopelessly optimistic, but it was tax credit failure that finished things off:

The museum built its budget around receiving $900,000 in federal historic tax credits that never arrived. A 2012 federal appeals court ruling about a real estate project in New Jersey shook up the market for historic tax credits. A subsequent IRS memo explaining the ruling said, essentially, that investors should not stand to profit from historic tax credits without shouldering some of the risk. As a result, investors backed away from historic tax credit projects.

“That is where things really started to come apart on us, and it was just kind of a chain reaction from there,” Brooke said.

This is where I find myself puzzled. By their terms, federal historic rehab credits have never been transferable. A transferable tax credit can be sold by the original recipient to cash in on a tax break too big to use by itself. Tax credit middlemen tried to make them transferable by setting up “partnership” structures where investors were nominal partners, but really were in it only for the tax credits, with economic gains and losses from the rehab project allocated elsewhere.

To my surprise, the Tax Court had gone along with that structure, but the Third Circuit Court of Appeals reversed them in Historic Boardwalk Hall LLC (CA-3, No. 11-1832). The court held that because the tax credit investor didn’t share meaningfully in either potential income or loss from the project, it wasn’t a partner eligible for tax credits.

That was the risk I had always seen in these deals, and it came home to Grinnell.

The Moral? When it takes tax credits to make a deal work, it doesn’t really work. It’s just crony capitalism.

Enjoying a short Des Moines winter commute.

Enjoying a short Des Moines winter commute.

Robert D. Flach has started a new organization, TAX PROFESSIONALS FOR TAX REFORM. “We believe that the one and only purpose of the Tax Code is to raise the money necessary to fund the government.” A worthy cause.

William Perez, Understanding Canceled Debt Income and Taxes

Kay Bell, Uncommon charitable gifts still provide donors the typical tax deduction. A discussion of property donations. “As with all tax deductible donations, you also need to make these more uncommon ones by Dec. 31 in order to claim them on this year’s taxes.”

Paul Neiffer, Farm and Ranch Provided Housing. A partnership, sole proprietor or S corporation cannot provide and deduct employee related housing for any of its owners (unless they own less than 2% AND are not related to any other owners).”

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2015: Fender Music Foundation

 

Seventh Avenue, Des Moines, this morning.

TaxProf, Hemel:  Taxes To Cause Vanguard Fund Fees To ‘Quadruple’? Not So Fast. We know the nosy busybodies would punish Vanguard’s small saver base with higher fees to feed the federal black hole. The only dispute is how much.

Tax Policy Blog, Apple CEO Tim Cook: We Need a Tax Code for the Digital Age. “The solution to ‘profit shifting’ is not a new patch to an already complicated tax code. The solution that the U.S. needs is a comprehensive tax reform that reduces both the corporate tax rate and the complexity of the entire tax code.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 961Day 962Day 963. The Day 961 post notes the obvious problems of giving one of the most aggressively secretive agencies power over passports. Day 962 inadvertently confirms one of the driving forces of the IRS scandal — ongoing bitterness over the Citizens United decision preventing bureaucrats from selectively restricting free speech rights.

Robert Wood, More Calls To Impeach IRS Chief Over Targeting, Bonuses, Obstruction

 

Stuart Gibson, Unlikely New Year’s Resolutions (Tax Analysts Blog). Like these:

-Citizens of Greece: Pay all the taxes they owe.

-Greek tax collectors: Pay all taxes they collect into the Greek treasury.

Unlikely indeed.

 

Peter Reilly, Did You Hear The One About Bernie Sanders And Kent Hovind Walking Into A Tax Blog? Well, Bernie is evidence of the co-existence of dinosaurs and hominids.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/23/15: The wisdom, or not, of paying taxes by year-end. And: Deep thoughts at Think Progress.

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2015 by Joe Kristan

dimeIs it wise to prepay deductible taxes? Paying 4th quarter estimated taxes before December 31 is a standard piece of the year-end tax planning toolkit. Sometimes taxpayers go further and pay in December all of their taxes that would be due in the following April. Is it wise to pay all of your taxes 3 1/2 months early to move a deduction up a year?

The first question you have to answer, with regard to payments of state and local taxes deductible on your federal return, is whether you will be paying alternative minimum tax this year or next year. For example, a taxpayer with an unusual lump of income this year who waits until next year to pay state taxes may trigger AMT next year, wasting those state tax deductions. On the other side of the coin, taxpayers who are in AMT this year get no value from prepaying deductible taxes, so they might as well put the money to work until the taxes are due.

If the taxes are just as deductible in either year, it’s a time value of money question. What is the present value of spending a dollar now to get a fraction of that back as a tax benefit a year earlier? I’ve run some numbers, using the top Iowa marginal tax rate and the rates at the different federal brackets:

2015 year-end payments pv2

This shows a benefit at all brackets from prepaying estimates due in January, but prepaying taxes due in April only makes sense at higher brackets, and it never works to prepay September property taxes in the prior year if AMT is not a factor.

This is another installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series

 

Think Progress is an openly partisan agitation outfit, so we shouldn’t expect it to know much about taxes. Still, it is a regular source of talking points for a certain breed of politicians who promise to spend everything on everyone, all to be paid for by someone else. That makes it worthwhile to occasionally correct it for saying something half-baked like this (my emphasis):

There may be some truth to the, as no one has accused Apple of doing anything illegal. But while Cook has advocated for lowering the corporate tax rate and closing loopholes, corporate taxes are already a shrinking portion of the government’s revenue, getting replaced instead by payroll taxes paid by working people.

Yes, corporate taxes are a shrinking portion of government revenue. But it’s not because the corporate tax law has suddenly become lax. It’s because most businesses are no longer taxable as corporations in the first place.

entity forms chart

Source: Tax Foundation

The 1986 tax reforms made it sensible for most closely-held businesses to be partnerships or S corporations. Unlike C corporations, which pay corporation taxes, these “pass-through entities” don’t pay taxes; instead, the income is reported on their owners’ 1040s.

Think Progress says the C corporation taxes are being replaced by “payroll taxes on working people.” That’s demonstrably wrong. C corporation taxes are being supplanted by business taxes paid on 1040s, which are generally paid at high tax brackets. Perhaps Think Progress has developed a strange new respect for hard-working high-bracket individuals.

Tax foundation Distribution of Federal Taxes in 2014

Chart Courtesy Tax Foundation

Cracking down on C corporations, as Think Progress advocates, will do nothing but confirm the trend away from C corporation taxation. I suppose then they’ll just continue the beatings until morale improves.

Related: Individual Tax Rates Also Impact Business Activity Due to High Number of Pass-Throughs (Scott Hodge, Alex Raut)

 

WOWT.com, Former Omaha IRS Agent Arrested for Tax Fraud Scheme. And yet we are told that these people need to regulate preparers to stop tax fraud.

 

Jared Walczak, States Lag Behind Federal Government on Small Business Expensing (Tax Policy Blog). “Forty-five states and the District of Columbia allow first-year expensing of small business capital investment under Section 179. Of those, thirty-four states are in conformity with the now-permanent $500,000 federal expensing level.”

William Perez, How Do You Claim a Sales Tax Deduction on Your Federal Taxes?

Annette Nellen, Top Ten Items of Tax Policy Interest for 2015 – #3. Thoughts on the Quill decision.

Kay Bell, Home energy tax breaks are extended, just in time for the arrival of, for many, an unusually warm winter

Jack Townsend, U.S. Taxpayer Seeks Declaratory Judgment that Goevernment Must Prove Willfulness for the FBAR Willful Penalty by Clear and Convincing Evidence. Given the stakes, it seems only fair, but the IRS prefers to be able to cause financial ruin with cloudy and unconvincing evidence.

 

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Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: Taxpayer Identity Theft, Part 2

Jim Maule asks Is the Soda Tax a Revenue Grab or a Worthwhile Health Benefit? I say its a revenue grab combined with moral preening.

Stephen Olsen, Summary Opinions for November (Procedurally Taxing). A roundup of tax procedure headlines.

Robert Wood, 5 Things To Know About Year-End’s Massive Tax Bill

TaxGrrrl, Real Housewife Teresa Giudice Released From Federal Prison

Tony Nitti, Moving? Don’t Forget The Tax Deduction. “At 23 years old I packed up my life, and in a move made popular by members of the witness protection program, fled New Jersey for the quiet of the Colorado mountains.”

Robert D. Flach talks about priorities in A YEAR-END TAX QUESTION FROM A CLIENT

 

Cheer up! Social Security is Still Going Broke (Arnold Kling)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 958

Howard Gleckman, Trump Would Slash Taxes for the Top 0.1 Percent By An Average of $1.3 Million, Add Nearly $10 Trillion to the Debt (TaxVox)

 

Thanks a bunch, Prof. Avi-Yonah. CBS News:  Vanguard Investors, Your Fund Fees Could Quadruple If Michigan Tax Prof Reuven Avi-Yonah Is Right (TaxProf). A great example of how with a little corporation-bashing, busybody do-gooders would screw millions of small investors.

 

Holiday Giving News from the Profession. This Flask-Calculator Is the Perfect Gift for the Accountant Who Drinks Everything (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/22/15: If you want a 2015 qualified plan, time to fly! And lots more.

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
The view from Tax Update world headquaters yesterday.

The view from Tax Update world headquaters yesterday.

10 days to get a qualified plan in place. Some of the best deductions for sole proprietors and one-owner corporations are found in the tax law’s “qualified plan” rules. A payment to a qualified pension or profit-sharing plan is deductible now, grows tax free, and is only taxable on retirement. For one-employee companies, it’s a deduction for taking money from one pocket and putting it in another.

One of the best of these opportunities is the “Solo 401(k),” which allows a deduction of up to $53,000 for contributions to a solo owner-employee’s retirement plan. But there’s one little catch: the plan has to be in place by December 31 of this year to allow a 2015 deduction.

If that sort of deduction sounds attractive, you should consult a qualified plan professional. Some brokerage houses can steer you the right way, as can the Vanguard mutual fund company.

Remember, though, that once money is in a qualified plan, expect it to stay there. Early withdrawals face a 10% penalty, as well as income tax liability. 401(k) plans generally can’t be investors in or lenders to the plan owner’s business. There are annual compliance costs that inevitably reduce the tax benefits. Still, for an annual deduction that size, some inconvenience can be tolerated.

This is the second installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series. Collect them all!

 

Kay Bell, Upcoming filing season will start on time: Jan. 19, 2016. Almost none of my clients are ready by then. While I’m glad that the season isn’t delayed by a failure to pass an extender bill, I think identity theft requires a later start to issuing tax refunds. They shouldn’t be processed until W-2 and 1099 information is in the IRS system – preferably with special W-2 codes like those the IRS is experimenting with this season to catch fraudulent claims. 

Of course, that means the government will sit on overpayments longer. That should be addressed by changing the “I got a big refund!” culture. That could be done by lowering to 75% the amount of taxes that have to be paid in by April 15 to avoid a penalty and by changing the withholding tables to make refunds less likely.

 

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Robert D. Flach comes through with a “meaty” Christmas Week Buzz, with lots of Extender bill discussion and a hint of perhaps the most unusual Christmas Eve tradition ever.

Tony Nitti, Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2015: #4 – Who Can Qualify As A Real Estate Pro?

Russ Fox, Are Tips (Gratuities) at the Poker Table Deductible? “As long as the tip is reasonable, it’s clear that a professional poker player can deduct the tip as a business expense.” You’ll have to read the post to see whether it works for amateurs.

William Perez, All About the Earned Income Tax Credit. “The easiest way to find out if you qualify for the earned income credit is to use an application found on the IRS Web site called the EITC Assistant.”

Andrew Mitchel offers a True / False Quiz on FAST Act Passport Revocation Provisions

Hank Stern, Major O’Care Disappointment (Insureblog). “Now that the (disastrous) first phase of the 2016 Open Enrollment season is behind us, lets’ take a look at what a huge disappointment it was.”

Carlton Smith, Tilden v. Comm’r: Postal Service Tracking Data Determines Timeliness of Tax Court Petition (Procedurally Taxing)

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2015: PACT For Animals

 

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Scott Greenberg, Fact-checking Hillary Clinton on Millionaires’ Taxes (Tax Policy Blog). “There are very few millionaires in the U.S. that pay “10 percent to nothing” in taxes.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 957. Today’s link goes to a Washington Post story that says “There is no love lost between Republicans in Congress and the Internal Revenue Service, whether it’s their dislike for the tax code, the current tax commissioner or their fury at the agency’s treatment a few years ago of conservative groups.” If you want to see increases in the IRS budget, you want Commissioner Koskinen to resign.

Howard Gleckman presents The TaxVox Lump of Coal Awards for the Ten Worst Tax Ideas of 2015. While I might quibble with one or two of the choices, it’s a strong list. For example:

8. Tax credits for what ails you. Hillary Clinton has taken a page out of Bill Clinton’s fiscal playbook: Identify a kitchen table problem and propose a modest tax subsidy to relieve the pain. She has tax credits for families burdened by the high costs of education, caring for aging parents, and high medical costs. And she’s proposed another credit to encourage employers to give workers a stake in their companies. My TPC colleague Gene Steuerle has a name for this: tax deform.

It’s more than a federal problem, for sure.

 

Matt Gardner, What Apple’s Tim Cook Gets Wrong About Its Tax Avoidance (Tax Justice Blog). Mr. Cook has the temerity to think that he has a duty to shareholders, instead of to grasping politicians.

 

Career Corner (or, News from the Profession). Former EY Employee Who Liked Secretly Filming People in the Bathroom Given Four Years to Think About His Choices (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/21/15: Winter’s here, along with a new tax law. Fixed-asset planning time!

Monday, December 21st, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20151211-1It’s the darkest day of the year, but with the signing of the Extender Bill, H.R. 2029, we are no longer in the dark for year-end fixed asset tax planning. The “PATH” act has some important fixed-asset provisions:

A permanent (and inflation-indexed) $500,000 annual limit for Section 179 deductions. This provision lets qualifying taxpayers deduct currently fixed asset costs that would otherwise have to be capitalized and depreciated over multiple years.

“Bonus Depreciation” is extended through 2019. This provision allows taxpayers to deduct 50% of the cost of depreciable property in the first depreciable year, with the remaining cost depreciated over the property’s normal tax life. Unlike Section 179, it cannot be taken for used property, but unlike Section 179, it can be used to generate net operating losses.

-15-year depreciation is made permanent for “Qualified Leasehold Improvement Property , Qualified Restaurant Buildings and Improvements, and Qualified Retail Improvements. These rules enable taxpayers to depreciate these items over 15 years, rather than the usual 39 year life for commercial buildings.

In theory, this provides a great opportunity to knock down your 2015 tax bill with last-minute purchases of fixed assets. But there’s a catch. It’s not enough to buy and pay for new fixed assets to deduct them this year. They also have to be “placed in service” by year end. From the IRS publication on depreciation:

You place property in service when it is ready and available for a specific use, whether in a business activity, an income-producing activity, a tax-exempt activity, or a personal activity. Even if you are not using the property, it is in service when it is ready and available for its specific use.

Example 1.

Donald Steep bought a machine for his business. The machine was delivered last year. However, it was not installed and operational until this year. It is considered placed in service this year. If the machine had been ready and available for use when it was delivered, it would be considered placed in service last year even if it was not actually used until this year.

It’s not enough to have a new machine in crates on the loading dock. It has to be set up and ready to go. If you are buying a farm building, having it in pieces waiting for assembly doesn’t get you there.

That’s why year-end purchase of vehicles and farm equipment are popular. Once they arrive, they are pretty much ready to go. But you have to actually take delivery. “On order” isn’t enough. And remember that there are limits on the amount of Section 179 deduction and depreciation for passenger vehicles.

This is the first installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series

 

6th avenue 1910

 

Russ Fox, Once Again, the IRS Doesn’t Start by Calling You:

My mother received a phone call on Saturday morning at 6 am from “Agent Smith” of the IRS demanding immediate payment of her taxes or she would find herself “thrown in jail.” Yes, the scamsters are still out there.

Now imagine you’re a senior citizen, and you get a phone call waking you up telling you to pay the IRS or you’ll find yourself in prison. It doesn’t take a genius to know that these scamsters can intimidate their victims.

Remember, if the caller demanding payment and saying the police are coming says he’s from IRS, he’s not from IRS.

Tony Nitti, Tax Court: Luring Pigs To Untimely Demise With Kool-Aid Counts As Material Participation. Sooey!

Robert D. Flach, THERE IS STILL TIME TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF A “QCD” FOR 2015!

 

Paul Neiffer, Wind Energy Credits Extended and Phased-Out

Annette Nellen is counting down the “Top Ten Items of Tax Policy Interest for 2015.” #1 is non-tax bills used to change the tax law; #2 is IRS Funding Challenges. Anybody who is serious about improving IRS funding should be demanding the resignation of Commissioner Koskinen. Nobody’s going to trust him with extra funding.

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: Insolvency and Canceled Debt: Make Sure You Can Prove It!

Jim Maule, Winning Back Your Tax Payments. “A reader made me aware of a recent suggestion that every taxpayer who files a timely and honest tax return, along with timely payment, be entered into a lottery.” It a way, that’s already true.

Leslie Book, Extenders Bill Gives IRS Additional Powers to Impose Penalties on Preparers and Disallow Refundable Credits (Procedurally Taxing). “Under the new law,  the accuracy-related penalty can be applied to any part of a reduced refundable credit subject to deficiency procedures.”

Peter Reilly, Bernie Sanders And The 90% Income Tax Rate That He Does Not Call For. ” Bernie Sanders wants us to have an economy like it was in the sixties and early seventies, when a summer of hard work could pay a year’s tuition and there were plenty of factory jobs that would support a family.” Maybe Bernie should reconsider his nostalgia.

Robert Wood, New Law Says Money For Wrongful Convictions Is Tax Free

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2015: Wounded Warrior Project

Kay Bell gets into the holiday spirit with Christmas gifts for tax and financial geeks

 

old walnut

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 954Day 955Day 956. Coverage of the limits on IRS power included in the extender and omnibus legislation.

Alex Tabarrok, Subsidies Increase Tuition, Part XIV (Marginal Revolution):

Remarkably, so much of the subsidy is translated into higher tuition that enrollment doesn’t increase! What does happen is that students take on more debt, which many of them can’t pay.

So naturally the Extenders bill made the American Opportunity Tax Credit permanent.

Jared Walczak, The Opening Salvo of 2016’s Soda Tax Battle (Tax Policy Blog). “Soda taxes are poised to be on the agenda in many cities in 2016, an effort spearheaded by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.” I propose a tax on people who can’t mind their own business.

Renu Zaretsky, Promises, Hopes, and Complaints. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers Hillary promises, Nevada trolling for ribbon-cuttings with taxpayer money, and Apple’s CEO tax code thoughts: “He wants changes to the US tax code, which ‘was made for the Industrial Age, not the Digital Age… It’s backwards. It’s awful for America.'”

 

News from the Profession. Let’s Help Deloitte Global CEO Punit Renjen With His First Tweet (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/18/15: 2016 standard mileage rates are out. And: Extender bill clears House.

Friday, December 18th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today newsletter visitors: The post about fines and penalties is here.

54 cents

54 cents. The IRS yesterday released the new standard mileage rates for 2016:

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2016, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

  • 54 cents per mile for business miles driven, down from 57.5 cents for 2015
  • 19 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes, down from 23 cents for 2015
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations

The business mileage rate decreased 3.5 cents per mile and the medical, and moving expense rates decrease 4 cents per mile from the 2015 rates. The charitable rate is based on statute.

Gas has come down. Blame the speculators!

Related: William Perez, How to Deduct Car and Truck Expenses on Your TaxesKay Bell, Business mileage deduction rate to drop in 2016Russ Fox, 2016 Standard Mileage Rates Released

 

Extender bill moves to Senate. The House of Representatives yesterday approved the permanent extender bill, H.R. 2029, on a 318-109 vote. The bill moves to the Senate. The Hill reports:

In the Senate, support for the tax measure is more bipartisan than it is in the House. Senate Finance Committee ranking member Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) joined with the Republican chairmen of the House and Senate tax-writing committees in announcing the deal.

The Senate’s third-ranking Democrat, Charles Schumer (N.Y.), released a statement Wednesday praising the fact that the bill would cement a tax benefit for mass transit commuters in a win for his state.

The Extender bill will be considered as part of a package in the Seanate, reports Tax Analysts ($link):

House GOP leaders worked throughout the day to build support for passage of an omnibus appropriations bill for fiscal 2016. The $1.1 trillion spending measure, which is also an amendment to H.R. 2029, is scheduled for a vote on December 18. Lawmakers expect that both the tax and spending measures will be combined into one bill and move to the Senate later that day, where it is expected to pass with bipartisan support. 

The Hill reports the Senate vote may happen as soon as today.

Related: Scott Greenberg, The Twelve Most Important Provisions in the Latest Tax Bill (Tax Policy Blog). #1 on the list is the permanent $500,000 Section 179 ceiling.

 

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Fresh Friday Buzz! From Robert D. Flach.

Gretchen Tegeler, Change is difficult, as failed suburban services merger showed (IowaBiz.com).  “First, never assume anything when it comes to change, even if it seems like reasonable change. Always expect active opposition.”

Jim Maule, You Mean That Tax Refund Isn’t for Me? Really?. Judge Judy deals with a tax refund spent by an ex-girlfriend.

Peter Reilly, Venus Flytraps And Elusive Gator On Golf Course Not Worth Millions In Tax Deductions. A conservation easement goes very bad.

Robert Wood, Supermodel Bar Refaeli’s Alleged Tax Evasion On Gifts: Must You Report Yours? Gifts aren’t taxable income in the U.S., but the IRS doesn’t have to believe that money you receive is actually a gift, rather than compensation. It even has a form to report large gifts from overseas (Form 3520) so they can second guess whether amounts really are “gifts.” Large fines apply if you don’t file the form for years you receive such gifts.

TaxGrrrl, Tax Preparer For Mike ‘The Situation’ Sorrentino Pleads Guilty To Tax Fraud Conspiracy.

 

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Renu Zaretsky, Will they or won’t they? Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers prospects for the extender bill, among other things.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 953

Richard Phillips, Tax Wars: 3 Lessons about Tax Policy from the Star Wars Universe (Tax Policy Blog). “The Star Wars universe has problems with corporate tax enforcement and shell companies.”

News from the Profession. Big 4 Firms Still Getting Used to This Whole Regulation Thing (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/17/15: President supports extenders; bill stops IRS from taxing political donations as gifts. And: More ACA stuff!

Thursday, December 17th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

whitehouse logoWhite House announces support for extender bill. Things seem to be falling into place for passage of the extender bill with an announcement of support from the White House.

The bill has to pass Congress first, but Tax Analysts reports ($link) that passage is eased by splitting the extender bill from the “omnibus” spending bill:

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., said he expects the House to vote on the extenders package on December 17 and an omnibus spending bill, also introduced as an amendment to H.R. 2029, on December 18.  GOP leaders apparently decided to split the bills into two separate amendments to generate enough support for passage in the House. The spending bill may lose votes from conservative Republicans while the tax bill may lose votes from House Democrats. Those concerns are not shared in the Senate, where Democrats like both bills.

Losing votes from House Democrats doesn’t threaten the extender bill, as there are so few of them. So House vote tomorrow.

 

20150925-2Extender bill ends attempts to tax political donations as gifts. Before it was chastened by the Tea Party scandal, the IRS made moves to treat contributions to Sec. 501(c)(4) political organizations as taxable gifts. The legal justification for treating contributions to independent organizations was weak to begin with, but a provision in the extender bill (Sec. 408) settles the issue going forward by explicitly excluding such contributions from gift tax effective for gifts made after enactment.

What about old gifts?

Nothing in the amendment made by subsection (a) shall be construed to create any inference with respect to whether any transfer of property (whether made before, on, or after the date of the enactment of this Act) to an organization described in paragraph (4), (5), or (6) of section 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is a transfer of property by gift for purposes of chapter 12 of such Code.

So the IRS could continue to assert its weak position that pre-enactment gifts are taxable. I don’t think they will.

Related: TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 952. Today’s link goes to an op-ed complaining that the extender bill will make it too difficult for the IRS to restrict First Amendment rights by starting gift tax audits of political donors.

 

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IRS addresses more HRA and ACA questions. Yesterday the IRS issued Notice 2015-87, a 31 page bag of buzzwords addressing ACA issues. Disappointingly, the Notice doesn’t back off the extreme position that reimbursement of individual medical insurance premiums paid by employees will normally trigger a $100 per-day, per-employee penalty.

The bill does clarify that “opt-out” payments are normally not subject to the penalty, though they are taken into account to determine the employee cost in calculating whether an employer’s coverage is “affordable” (Q&A 9 of the Notice).

 

Paul Neiffer, Looks Like $500,000 Section 179 is Now Permanent. “One of the key provisions for farmers is to make Section 179 permanent at the $500,000 level.”

Kay Bell, Tax extenders 2015 winners and losers. “It’s a Christmas miracle! Weeks are left in 2015 and Congress has reached a deal on the 50+ tax breaks known as extenders.”

Howard Gleckman, The Hidden Agenda Behind This Year’s Tax Extender Bill (TaxVox):

What is going on here? Why would House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell put so much effort into making permanent a package of tax breaks that could be back on the chopping block a year from now?

Like much of what happens in Congress, it’s all about budget accounting. And in this case, it turns out you can buy bigger tax rate cuts by repealing permanent tax breaks than by swapping out temporary versions of the same subsidies.

I’d like to think this is all a 3-D chess play by geniuses to move the country closer to a better tax system, but I have nagging doubts, somehow.

Jason Dinesen, Glossary: Casualty and Theft Loss. “A casualty and theft loss is a deduction allowed on tax returns for people who suffer property damage or theft.”

Andy Grewal, The Management Fee Waiver Regulations May Be Doomed (Procedurally Taxing). “Prop. Reg. 1.707-2(b)(i) may reflect a good policy (a debatable point), but it does not square with the law.”

Robert Wood, Michael ‘The Situation’ Sorrentino’s Accountant Admits Tax Fraud Conspiracy. All over America, millions who don’t watch television ask, “who is Michael Sorrentino?”

 

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David Brunori, Some things worth pursuing in 2016 (Tax Analysts Blog). I don’t agrere with his support for the earned income tax credit, but he is correct on the importance of independent state tax tribunals, which Iowa lacks. And I think this is absolutely right:

Oppose tax incentives. I know — incentives are seemingly invulnerable in our political system. But the difficulty of the task should not deter the righteous. Tax incentives violate every principle of sound tax policy. They are unnecessary. They are unfair. Liberals should hate them because they waste money that could be used for schools and healthcare. Conservatives should hate them because they are the antithesis of a free market.

The cronies and insiders partnership of Central Iowa disagrees, which pretty much proves David correct.

 

I’m pretty sure the opposite wouldn’t help. Could Having a ‘Pro-CPA Culture’ Backfire on Accounting Firms Desperate for Talent? (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

Today is the big Star Wars release day. Blogger Syd Gernstein explains that WE HAVE TAXES TO THANK FOR STAR WARS:

To summarize briefly: This first episode of Star Wars started with a tax dispute. The “trade federation” did not like the fact that the republic had imposed a tax on its trade routes, and protested the tax by staging a blockade, and ultimately an invasion, of the peaceful planet of Naboo. Dissatisfied with the Republic’s inability to defend the planet, Naboo’s queen—at the urging of the planet’s then-Senator Palpatine—moved for a vote of no confidence in the Galactic Senate’s Chancellor. Palpatine then exploited the sense of sympathy for Naboo to get himself elected as Chancellor. Over the course of the next movies, Palpatine would then, essentially, transform the republic into a dictatorship, declare himself Emperor, convince Anakin Skywalker to become Darth Vader, build a couple Death Stars, and, evidently, abolish the galactic yellowpages, because it otherwise surely would have occurred to Darth Vader to streamline his epic quest to find his son, the “young Skywalker,” by looking under “S.” 

It’s a plot line convoluted enough to be worthy of The Code.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/16/15: Extender deal! Permanent R&D, $500,000 Sec. 179 limit; Bonus depreciation extended through 2019.

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150915-1It looks like we get a year off the extender watch. While normal people were asleep, someone posted the text of an extender bill agreement on the House Ways and Means Committee website. The bill would permanently several key provisions that have been only enacted for a year or two at a time up until now. It extends a few other of the Lazarus provisions through 2020, and the rest through 2016.

House Speaker Ryan requires that a bill be available for three days prior to a vote, which means the House won’t send anything to the Senate until at least Friday. The Hill reports that it’s not clear how the votes will fall, but the bill is expected to pass.

The provisions to be enacted permanently, retroactive to the beginning of 2015, include, among others:

-The $500,000 Section 179 deduction limit

-The five-year “recognition period” for built-in gains taxes for C corporations electing to be S corporations.

-The ability of IRAs of taxpayers reaching age 70 1/2 to make $100,000 annual charitable contributions that will not be included in the IRA holders income.

-The 100% exclusion for gains on certain original issue C corporation stock held for five years.

-The research credit.

-The alternative deduction for state and local sales taxes.

Other provisions to be made permanent include special breaks for conservation easements, the deduction for state and local taxes, and the above-the-line deduction for out-of-pocket educator expenses.

To get the Democratic leadership to sign off on the deal, Republican negotiators agreed to make permanent the child tax credit, the enhanced earned income tax credit, and the “American Opportunity Tax Credit” for college costs.

50% bonus depreciation is to be extended from the beginning of 2015 through 2019, along with the Work Opportunity Tax Credit. Also enacted through 2019 is the “New Markets Tax Credit,” a great geyser of corporate welfare.

Wind turbineI count 29 other provisions extended through 2016. The credits for biodiesel, renewable diesel, wind energy and residential solar are among these, along with the exclusion for qualified mortgage forgiveness and the above-the-line deduction for qualified college costs. These shorter-lived extenders also include special interest confections such as the 7-year depreciable life for speedways and special film expensing rules. I don’t know whether any extenders missed the cut.

There’s more than extenders here. This thing has 233 pages of stuff, much of which has nothing to do with extenders. A few of the major items I note at first glance are:

-A moratorium on the Obamacare medical device tax.

-Acceleration of the deadline for filing W-2s with the government to January 31, from the current February 28 deadline for paper copies and March 31 for electronic filers. This is to make it easier to match refund claims to W-2s before refunds are issued.

-Exclusion from income for payments made to wrongfully-incarcerated individuals.

-Allowing the purchase of computers for students as a qualified Section 529 plan expenditure, effective for 2015.

-A new charitable deduction for contributions to “agricultural research organizations.”

-Restrictions on tax-free REIT spin-offs.

-New restrictions on the ability to qualify as a tax-exempt small insurance company.

-Technical amendments to the new partnership audit rules.

Flickr image courtesy dave_7 under Creative Commons license.

Flickr image courtesy dave_7 under Creative Commons license.

While the tax bill doesn’t include a delay on the ACA “Cadillac tax” on high cost health insurance, The Hill reports that such a delay is included in the “Omnibus” spending bill that was also agreed to yesterday.

One item I hoped to find, but didn’t, is a provision providing relief to the ridiculous Obamacare $100 per day, per employee penalty for non-integrated health reimbursement plans. Also absent is any of the long-overdue penalty relief for non-willful compliance failures for owners of foreign bank accounts and foreign assets.

Failure remains an option. Something could happen in Congress to, or the President could stop the bill with a veto threat. Still, I expect the thing to pass as-is.

Other coverage:

Tony Nitti, Permanent R&D Credit, Increased Section 179 Expensing Highlight Tentative Deal On Tax Extenders.

Wall Street Journal, Congressional Leaders Reach Sweeping Deal on Tax and Spending Legislation

New York Times, House Reaches Accord on Spending and Tax Cuts

 

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Russ Fox, That’s A Lot of Roast Beef Sandwiches. “Nick’s Famous Roast Beef is in Beverly, Massachusetts. You can get a roast beef sandwich for $4.50 to $6.95, definitely a reasonable price. The Department of Justice is alleging that one reason the prices are low is that the owners skimmed $6 million from the business to lower their taxes.”

Robert D. Flach, YEAR-END AND HOLIDAY CHARITABLE CONTRIBUTIONS – PART II

Paul Neiffer, Iowa Land Values Drop 3.9% from 2014

Kay Bell, GOP presidential candidates’ final 2015 debate tonight. Written yesterday, of course.

William Perez, How Dividends Are Taxed and Reported on Tax Returns

Robert Wood, Why You Should Never Ask, ‘Where’s My IRS Form 1099?’

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 951. The Wall Street Journal notes the risk of political targeting in the proposed IRS rules requiring donors to supply social security numbers.

Harvey Galper, Why You Should Pay Attention to the Presidential Candidates’ Tax Proposals (TaxVox)

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Tax Roundup, 12/14/15: Ames! And, fine happy! Government is just how we take money from one another.

Monday, December 14th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20140513-1Ames! Today is the last and biggest Day 1 of the ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax Schools. 275 or so people drove through the rain to Ames for the two-day session, and another 150 are participating via Webinar. I learn a lot from the participants and their questions, and it’s a lot of fun. Thanks to everyone who has attended.

Run a red light. The use of penalties to fund government operations is an ugly development in public finance. At the local level, the use of the police department as a revenue generator via petty fines and traffic cameras contributes to distrust and hostility towards law enforcement. At the national level, it leads to unfair and sometimes ruinous penalties for paperwork failures by law-abiding taxpayers. In either case, it leads to perverse incentives. The government has the incentive to make compliance difficult so that it can impose more penalties, while the citizenry learns to avoid getting government help for fear of stumbling into an obscure fine.

So naturally Congress is doing more of it. The “Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act of 2015” (HR 644) bill is largely “paid for” by an increase in fines for file timely returns.

The failure-to-file penalty is normally 5% per month, up to 25%, for late filing, based on the amount of unpaid tax required to be shown on the return. But there is a floor. The tax cannot be less than the lesser of

-$135, or

-100% of the amount required to be shown on the return.

if the return is filed more than 60 days late.

So if a taxpayer files a return showing a $250 balance due 2 1/2 months late, the penalty for failure to file is $135, instead of the $37.50 you would get under the normal computation.

But there’s more! Penalty, there is. The short-term spending bill increases the $135 penalty to $205 for returns due after 2015 (Amended Sec. 6651(a)).

This penalty is practically targeted at small filers. Big taxpayers will  usually exceed the floor if they file late. So to “pay for” a speculative cost of a trade bill, small taxpayers will get hit a little harder if they are out of compliance and try to get back in the system. It operates as a fine for coming into compliance — which will make it just a little harder for taxpayers who are trying to clean up their finances to do so.

While Congress just gets done in a few days, the fines will remain on the books forever. This is why I am not a fan of tax “pay fors” for legislation. The damage to the tax law will continue long after this Congress is forgotten.

Related: Kay Bell, Tax-free Internet access, tougher non-filing penalties closer to enactment as trade bill clears House

 

Extenders. As of this morning, it seems to be up in the air. The Hill reports that the leader of House Democrats says she isn’t happy with the permanent extender bill being negotiated. At least one Ways and Means Democrat wants to go with a one-year extension of the Lazarus provisions, including the Research Credit, Bonus Depreciation, and the $500,000 Section 179 limit. The Republican Ways and Means Chairman has proposed a two-year bill if Congress can’t pass a permanent extender bill. A one-year extension would mean another extender fight in 2016.

In any case, it will all be passed at the last minute, and we can count on bad tax policy as a result.

Prior Tax Update coverage:

Extender battle extended to next week; efforts to make some breaks permanent continue.

 

Related: Paul Neiffer, Inflation-Indexed Child Tax Credit Stymies Extender Bill

 

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Peter Reilly, Sumner Redstone Liable For Tax On Long Ago Gift. The bill on the 1972 assessment is a testimony to the power of compound interest.

Russ Fox, Six Month Vacation Leads to Four and Eight Years at ClubFed. You aren’t allowed to take a vacation from your prison sentence.

Robert Wood, Why ‘Pay Me Next Year’ May Not Convince IRS On Your Taxes. “On a cash basis, you probably assume you can’t be taxed until you receive money. Yet if you have a legal right to payment but decide not to receive it, the IRS can tax you nonetheless.”

Scott Greenberg, A Federal Tax Credit for Refineries Would Probably Be a Bad Idea (Tax Policy Blog).

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 947Day 948Day 949.

 

News from the Profession. Not Even ISIS Immune to Shortage of Accounting and Finance Talent (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

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Tax Roundup, 12/10/15: No basis for you! 9th Circuit rules against taxpayer in demutualization case.

Thursday, December 10th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

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Demutualization debacle. A favorable decision for taxpayers who have received insurance company shares in demutualizations was overturned yesterday. A divided three-judge panel in the Ninth Circuit ruled that a taxpayer had no basis to shares of five mutual insurance companies that converted to stock companies. That means all proceeds from a sale of the shares is treated as capital gain.

Principal Mutual in Des Moines demutualized in 2001.

The court held that the taxpayers, a Mr. and Mrs. Dorrance, paid nothing for their shares:

Treating the premiums as payment for membership rights would be inconsistent with the Code’s provisions related to insurance premiums. For example, gross premiums paid to purchase a policy are allocated as income to the insurance company; no portion is carved out as a capital contribution. See I.R.C. §§ 803(a)(1), 118. On the flip side, the policyholder is allowed to deduct the “aggregate amount of premiums” paid upon receipt of a dividend or cash-surrender value. I.R.C. § 72(e). No amount is carved out as an investment in membership rights. The taxpayer can’t have it both ways — a tax-free exchange with zero basis and then an increased basis upon sale of the stock.

The district court skipped a critical step by examining the value of the mutual rights without evidence of whether the Dorrances paid anything to first acquire them. The basis inquiry is concerned with the latter question. The district court also erred when it estimated basis by using the stock price at the time of demutualization rather than calculating basis at the time the policies were acquired. The stock value post-demutualization is not the same as the cost at purchase…

This analysis brings us back to the Dorrances’ burden and the economic realities of this case. Because the Dorrances offer nothing to show payment for their stake in the membership rights, as opposed to premium payments for the underlying insurance coverage, the IRS properly rejected their refund claim.

The Ninth Circuit ruling creates a conflict among different appellate courts on the proper treatment of shares of demutualized insurers.   A 2008 Federal Circuit decision upheld a Claims Court ruling that basis should be assigned to demutualized shares under an “open transaction” approach. That sets up a possible Supreme Court decision to resolve the split.

For now, expect the many pending refund claims for gains arising from demutualization transactions to remain unpaid indefinitely.

Cite: Dorrance, CA-9, No. 13-16548.

Background: Roger McEowen, Tax Impact of Demutualization – The Saga Continues

 

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Robert Wood, #1 Tax Lady Found Guilty Of 27 Tax Felonies, Could Face 131 Years. “#1 Tax Lady” isn’t the same tax lady as former TV IRS debt settlement figure Roni Deutch.

Kay Bell, Back-up plans on tax extenders, federal spending bill

 

Jeremy Scott, How Congress Keeps Saving the Tax System From Treasury and the IRS (Tax Analysts Blog). “In fact, too often in the last few years, it’s been Congress saving the fisc from bizarre administrative decisions from Treasury or the Service that have wounded the tax system.”

Frank Yan, The “Google tax”: What it is, and Why We Should Be Cautious (Tax Policy Blog). “Broadly speaking, the Google tax imposes a penalty on large companies that shift income abroad through certain transactions and corporate structures.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 945

Peter Reilly, National Organization For Marriage Denied Attorney Fees In IRS Lawsuit. “It looks like the National Organization for Marriage has come to the end of the line in its hope for a big payday from the IRS for the unauthorized disclosure of the Schedule B (donor list) attached to its 2008 Form 990.” Too bad. If a CPA firm made such an egregious “accidental” disclosure of tax information, it would be sued to a crisp. It’s good to be king.

 

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Robert D. Flach, THE 2015 PNC CHRISTMAS PRICE INDEX. “The increase in the Partridge is due to the growing popularity as a gourmet food and in backyard farming.”

Programming note: The site was down as a result of technical difficulties this morning, accounting for the brevity of today’s update. Order has been restored; apologies for the inconvenience.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/9/15: Ways and Means Chair introduces a Plan B as permanent extender talks continue.

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20151209-1Slow train to Extenderville. The House Ways and Means Chairman has introduced a two-year extender bill (H.R. 34) as Plan B as negotiations for permanent enactment of some temporary tax provisions continue. A summary of the bill is here. The bill would retroactively revive dozens of the Lazarus provisions that expired at the end of 2014. These include:

-The $500,000 limit for Section 179 deductions for otherwise capitalized capital expenditures. The limit will otherwise be $25,000.

-The research credit.

-Bonus depreciation

-The ability to roll up to $100,000 from an IRA directly to charity without it going through the 1040 first.

-The five-year “recognition period” for S corporation built-in gains.

The bill also includes substantial permanent restrictions on the spin-offs of corporate real estate into Real Estate Investment Trusts, along with some minor reform of the special “FIRPTA” withholding tax rules on foreign real estate.

The push for a longer-term extensions isn’t dead yet, though. The Hill reports that Hopes rise for major tax package:

Sen. Ron Wyden (Ore.), the senior Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee, painted an optimistic picture during a private meeting Tuesday of Senate Democrats.

“I think it went through a trough this weekend, and then, maybe, early yesterday afternoon a bit of a breakthrough,” said Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.). 

The core of a bigger deal would indefinitely extend the research and development tax credit and the Section 179 deduction for small-business expensing, two Republican priorities that have support from pro-business Democrats.

It would also make open-ended expansions of the child tax credit, the earned income tax credit and the American opportunity tax credit, central pieces of President Obama’s 2009 stimulus package.

The President has not committed to signing a either a permanent bill or a  temporary expiring provisions bill, so there’s no guarantee anything will happen. While they have always eventually passed an extender bill during this administration, failure remains an option.

Related: What are Real Estate Provisions Doing in the Latest Tax Extenders Bill? (Scott Greenberg, Tax Policy Blog). “All in all, there’s not much of a justification for the existence of FIRPTA in the first place.”

 

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Robert D. Flach, FOR MY FELLOW TAX PROFESSIONALS – A SPECIAL REQUEST. Robert would like to see a unified advocacy organization for tax pros.

TaxGrrrl, Cloudy Security: What Your Advisor Doesn’t Know About Cloud Computing Could Hurt You. Using a cloud service provider doesn’t waive your obligations to protect client data.

Kay Bell, California has $28 million in unclaimed state tax refunds

Jason Dinesen, Glossary: Draws. “In tax terminology, the term “draw” refers to money taken out of a sole proprietorship by the proprietor, or out of a partnership by a partner.”

Keith Fogg, Requesting an Offset Bypass Refund and Tracing Offsets to Non-IRS Sources (Procedurally Taxing). “Under the right circumstances the IRS will apply administrative procedures to override the general rule required by IRS 6402 to offset the refund of a taxpayer to satisfy an outstanding liability.”

 

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Hank Stern, UHC Doubles Down on Comp (Insureblog). United Healthcare is losing money on its ACA exchange policies, so it no longer is paying brokers to sell them. I’ve never heard of such a thing, and it is compelling evidence that the economics of Obamacare are unsustainable.

Dave Nelson, The human element of information security (IowaBiz). “Social engineering is nothing more than a hacker attacking a human rather than a computer.  They use their knowledge of human behavior to con a user into giving them information over the phone, clicking links in emails or giving them physical access to systems or data.”

Jack Townsend, One More Bank Obtains NPA under DOJ Swiss Bank Program

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 944. A fellow law professor shows a thin skin.

Howard Gleckman, Bush’s Tax Plan Would Add $6.8 Trillion to the National Debt, Benefit High-Income Households (TaxVox).

 

Career Corner, Accounting Firms Should Get Rid of Managers (Going Concern). If your firm has some to spare, send them my way.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/8/15: Extenders, fourth and long. Also: No Iowa tax reform expected in 2016. And: Finland!

Tuesday, December 8th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150811-1Time to punt? Congressional taxwriters may be on the verge of giving up on passing any permanent extensions of the perpetually-expiring tax provisions this year. It is reported they may go for a two-year extension this week. Tax Analysts reports on comments from House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady ($link):

House Ways and Means Republicans are expected to introduce a two-year tax extenders bill as talks continue on a permanent extenders package without a clear solution, committee Chair Kevin Brady, R-Texas, told reporters on December 7.

“The clock is ticking. We are not going to let the extenders fail before we leave town,” Brady said. Republicans want to make sure they are ready this week with a “fallback” if an agreement isn’t reached between the parties, he said earlier.

They are scheduled to adjourn and leave town Friday, so things will need to happen quickly. The story reports that Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch expects the House to pass a two-year extension.

They had been working to permanently extend at least the research credit and the $500,000 Section 179 deduction, but the Democratic negotiators insistence on expansion of the earned income credit as part of any deal may doom the permanent effort.

Some of the Lazarus provisions that died at the end of 2014 and need to be extended to be available for 2015 filings include:

-The $500,000 limit for Section 179 deductions for otherwise capitalized capital expenditures. The limit will otherwise be $25,000.

-The research credit.

-Bonus depreciation

-The ability to roll up to $100,000 from an IRA directly to charity without it going through the 1040 first.

The full list is here.

Failure, of course, remains an option. The pre-recess crush makes getting anything done uncertain. House Majority Leader McCarthy is quoted as saying that he has a “fear” that the extenders won’t pass. In that case, we may have a retroactive package passed in January, delaying filing season, or no extender bill at all.

Related: Kay Bell, Uncle Sam faces another shutdown if Congress doesn’t reach spending agreement by Dec. 11

 

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No Iowa Tax Reform again this year. That’s the word from the Iowa Taxpayers Association annual legislative forum, reports the Waterloo-Cedar Falls Courier:

At the Iowa Taxpayers Association’s annual legislative leadership forum, held Friday at Prairie Meadows in Altoona, Democratic and Republican leaders said there is not sufficient state revenue to support new tax breaks or policy changes that would remove money from the budget pie.

“Obviously, when you’re working on tight budget margins, the opportunity for tax reform becomes increasingly difficult,” said Rep. Chris Hagenow, R-Windsor Heights, the new House Majority Leader.

“I’m just going to be very frank: I don’t see this session producing any tax policy changes,” Jochum said. “In terms of any big, new policy changes in taxes … I truly do not see any of that happening.”

That’s no surprise. The continuing split of control between the parties, the resulting ability of either side to veto any tax reform efforts, and seemingly irreconcilable views on tax policy would probably doom any tax reform effort regardless of the budget numbers. The best we can hope is that work continues behind the scenes for when the political climate for tax reform improves. The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan is ready whenever they are.

 

buzz20150804Robert D. Flach has fresh Tuesday Buzz, with links including discussion of the futility of regulating the law-abiding to stop the crooks, a lesson with broad application.

Paul Neiffer, Additional De-Minimis Election Update. “Therefore, if a sole proprietor farmer or rancher purchases a large amount of assets that individually cost less than $2,500 AND these assets are likely to appreciate in value, it may be better to not make the de-minimis election for that year.”

Tony Nitti, Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2015: #5- The Role Partnership Liabilities In Foreclosures,

Robert Wood, IRS Private Debt Collectors Are Now Legal: 10 Things You Should Know

TaxGrrrl, Wal-Mart Sues Puerto Rico Over ‘Astonishing And Unsustainable’ Tax Increase. To go with astonishing and unsustainable government spending.

Leslie Book, Summons Enforcement For Undisclosed Offshore Accounts: The I Don’t Have Em Defense Is Not an Easy One to Win

Jack Townsend, New Transportion Bill, FAST, Adds Some Tax Provisions

Of course it does. State Wants Its Share Of The Sharing Economy (Peter Reilly) “This appears to be one of the rare instances where I am providing you breaking news on a matter otherwise neglected by the tax blogosphere.” Au contraire, Pierre Peter!

 

20150731-1Finland is considering replacing its vaunted welfare regime with a guaranteed annual income;

The Finnish government is currently drawing up plans to introduce a national basic income. A final proposal won’t be presented until November 2016, but if all goes to schedule, Finland will scrap all existing benefits and instead hand out €800 ($870) per month—to everyone.

This would deal with the problem of high implicit marginal tax rates that make it too expensive for low-income Finns to go to work — a problem that also exists in the U.S., as Arnold Kling and others have noted.

It may sound counterintuitive, but the proposal is meant to tackle unemployment. Finland’s unemployment rate is at a 15-year high, at 9.53% and a basic income would allow people to take on low-paying jobs without personal cost. At the moment, a temporary job results in lower welfare benefits, which can lead to an overall drop in income.

Related: Tyler Cowen, A guaranteed annual income for Finland?Arnold Kling, Libertarian Scandinavian Welfare State?

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 943. Paul Caron telegraphs an end to this important series. Even when the Tax Prof’s daily coverage ends, the scandal remains unresolved, and Commissioner Koskinen and the administration continue to run out the clock, to the continuing damage of the IRS and to taxpayer service.

Scott Greenberg, A Lesson of Hanukkah: It’s Difficult to Determine Asset Lives: “To spell out the lesson of the story more slowly – the Maccabees came into possession of an asset (a jar of oil). They thought it would lose its value over a certain time period (a single day). However, the asset actually took much longer to depreciate (eight days).”

 

Stop the presses. Donald Trump Tweeted Something About Tax Shelters (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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