Posts Tagged ‘News from the Profession’

Tax Roundup, 4/9/15: April 15 is also a day-trader deadline. And: Grant 1, Lee 0.

Thursday, April 9th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

daydrinkersTechnology has made made sophisticated stock trading tools that exchange floor pros once could only dream of available to every home. It has democratized the ability to make, and lose, money playing the markets.

It can be tempting to chuck the desk job and run off with Maria Bartiromo and TD Ameritrade. Sadly, more than one trader has emerged from the relationship with nothing to show for it but a lifetime of capital loss carryforwards.

That’s where today’s filing season tip comes in. If you qualify as a “trader,” April 15 is your deadline for choosing whether to make the “mark-to-market election” on your trading positions for 2015. If you don’t qualify as a trader, you can’t make the election.

If you make the mark-to-market election, you are required to recognize all of your open positions at year-end on your tax return as if you had cashed them out. More importantly, all of your gains and losses are ordinary, rather than capital.

That may seem like an inherently bad idea. Aren’t capital gains taxed at a lower rate? Yes, they are, but only if they are long-term, on assets held for over one year. That’s not the kind of gain day-traders are going for. Short-term gains are taxed at the same rates as ordinary income.

Ordinary losses, on the other hand, are a good thing. Well, on your tax return, anyway, if not in any other way. While individual capital losses are deductible only against capital gains, plus $3,000 per year, ordinary losses are fully deductible, and can even generate loss carrybacks.

That makes the mark-to-market election useful for day traders. They give up capital gain treatment that they can’t use anyway, and if they have a bad year — and many beginners do — they at least get to deduct all of their losses. For example, a famous trial lawyer who left the bar for day trading used the mark-to-market election to deduct $25 million in losses.

It’s already too late to make the election, also known as the “Section 475(f) election, for 2014. But you have until April 15 to make the election for 2015. You make the election either with either an unextended 2014 1040 or with the Form 4868 extension for the 2014 return. You may not make the election on an extended 1040.

The election is made on a statement with the following information:

  1. That you are making an election under section 475(f);
  2. The first tax year for which the election is effective; and
  3. The trade or business for which you are making the election.

So if you are spending your days with CNBC and your trading program, you might want to hedge your tax risks by making a 2015 475(f) election by April 15.

Related: The lure of a Sec. 475 election (Journal of Accountancy)

This is another of our series of 2015 Filing Season Tips — one daily through April 15!

 

Russ Fox, Bozo Tax Tip #3: Just Don’t File

 

Flickr image courtesy Easa Shamih under Creative Commons license

Flickr image courtesy Easa Shamih under Creative Commons license

Tax Court judges can do math too.We talked last week about the need to properly document charitable deductions.  The Tax Court talked about it yesterday, disallowing claimed deductions of $37,315 for lack of substantiation — most of it for purported contributions of household goods. From the decision:

Petitioners did not provide to the IRS or the Court a “contemporaneous written acknowledgment” from any of the four charitable organizations. Petitioners produced no acknowledgment of any kind from the Church or Goodwill. And the doorknob hangers left by the truck drivers from Vietnam Veterans and Purple Heart clearly do not satisfy the regulatory requirements. These doorknob hangers are undated; they are not specific to petitioners; they do not describe the property contributed; and they contain none of the other required information.

So if you claim property deductions for gifts of $250 or more, you need to have something from the charity that, even if it doesn’t show the value, shows what you gave. So why not claim you just gave only gifts under $250? From the Tax Court (my emphasis):

Petitioners contend that they did not need to get written acknowledgments because they made all of their contributions in batches worth less than $250. We did not find this testimony credible. Petitioners allegedly donated property worth $13,115 to the Church; this donation occurred in conjunction with a single event, the Church’s annual flea market. Petitioners’ testimony that they intentionally made all other contributions in batches worth less than $250 requires the assumption that they made these donations, with an alleged value of $24,200, on 97 distinct occasions. This assumption is implausible and has no support in the record.

Hey, I drive a Smart car, it takes a lot of trips!

Cite: Kunkel, T.C. Memo 2015-71.

 

20140401-1Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Special Tax Deduction for Contributions to Support Families of Slain NY Officers. (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). A 2014 deduction that you can still fund today.

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2015): Z Is For Zloty. On paying taxes while abroad and you need to use a foreign currency.

Robert Wood, Newest Tax Fraud Threat? Your Payroll Tax. A good reminder of the need to use EFTPS to monitor your payroll tax service, to make sure your company payroll taxes are getting deposited with the government.

Jason Dinesen, Marriage in the Tax Code, Part 6: Community Property Laws

Kay Bell, IRS headquarters hit by brief Washington, D.C., power outage. A reminder that even if you e-file, you don’t want to wait until the very last minute.

William Perez, Requesting Additional Time to File a State Tax Return

Jack Townsend, Tax Shelter Salesman Avoids Fraud Finding for Investment in Tax Shelter. You’ll have to follow the link for the more accurate, but less printable, version of the headline.

 

David Brunori, Greed, Piracy, and Cowardice (Tax Analsyts Blog):

I have written about 100 articles on tax incentives, all of them critical. I don’t blame the “greedy” corporations. State and local taxes are a relatively small part of the cost of doing business. Corporations are handed opportunities to minimize their tax burdens — legally. And rationally, they take advantage of those opportunities. The biggest factors in deciding where to invest are labor costs and broad access to markets. If we ended all tax incentives tomorrow, there would be virtually no effect on the economy. Corporations would still be investing where they are investing.

It’s politicians responding to the incentives. Those of us who want better tax policy, broad tax bases, and low rates for all don’t show up at the legislator’s golf fund raisers. Those looking for a special deal for their company or their industry have low handicaps for a reason.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 700. 700 days, no scandal here, move along.

 

Bloomberg, An Emotional Audit: IRS Workers Are Miserable and Overwhelmed. A visit to one of the few places where they still offer on-site service. (Via the TaxProf)

 

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History alert. General Lee surrended to General Grant 150 years ago today at Appomatox Court House, Virginia. Fellow tax blogger Peter Reilly is there, and I am insanely jealous.  I am contenting myself by re-reading Lee’s Last Retreatthe best book I’ve seen about the last frantic days of the Army of Northern Virginia. It makes you feel like you are there with the crumbling confederate army as it tried to escape after shattering defeats around Richmond. It also punctures a lot of romantic myths around those events.

After tax season, I will be happy to bore you with my thoughts on why Grant is grievously underrated for his Civil War achievements, and why he is also an underappreciated president. Next week.

 

News from the Profession: CPA Firm Managing Partner Charged in Embezzlement Scheme (Accounting Today):

Patrick H. Oki, managing partner at the Honolulu-based firm was charged Monday with theft in the first degree, money laundering, use of a computer in the commission of a separate crime, and forgery in the second degree, according to the office of Prosecuting Attorney Keith M. Kaneshiro.

Mr. Oki is reported to be both a CPA and a Certified Fraud Examiner. I can only imagine the awkwardness at the next partner meeting.

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/2/15: For gift deductions, it’s not just the thought that counts. It’s the paperwork. And: more!

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan

salvation armyToday’s filing season tip: assemble your contribution documents. For some things, spending the money isn’t enough to put a deduction on your return. You also have to get the paperwork right.

Charitable contributions are very much in this category. And it’s not good enough to find some paperwork when the IRS examiner starts asking questions. You need the documents in hand before you file your return.

For cash contributions of $250 or more, you need to have, in the words of IRS:

…a contemporaneous written acknowledgment from the qualified organization indicating the amount of the cash and a description of any property contributed. The acknowledgment must say whether the organization provided any goods or services in exchange for the gift and, if so, must provide a description and a good faith estimate of the value of those goods or services. 

That’s true whether you give cash or property. That means if you don’t have a nice note from your donee for your $250 gift, you need to bug them until they give you one. It also means that if you claim a deduction for dumping a bunch of household goods at Salvation Army, you need to get a note from them with a list of the items donated and the “goods or services” statement.

You need an appraisal if you donated property (other than publicly-traded securities) to charity for deductions starting at $5,000. We will talk about that tomorrow.

For more information, See Topic 506 – Charitable Contributions at www.irs.gov.

Come back every day through April 15 for another 2015 filing season tip!

 

Russ Fox, Bozo Tax Tip #8: Be Frivolous! “Tax Court judges don’t have the same sense of humor that I do about frivolous arguments.”

 

atombombAmanda Athanasiou at Tax Analysts reports ($link), FATCA: Swatting Flies With Atom Bombs:

Possible inflation of the offshore tax evasion problem and the staggering costs of the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act are causing even the most ardent advocates of information sharing and ending bank secrecy to question the U.S. approach.

“For the U.S. to ask countries around the world to spend billions in implementation costs to deliver less than $1 billion per year is, economically, complete nonsense,” said Martin Naville, CEO of the Swiss-American Chamber of Commerce. He referred to FATCA as the least considered program in history and “mind boggling” in its unilateralism. “The net value of FATCA for the U.S. is probably negative,” said Naville, who added that tax compliance is a must but that there are better ways to achieve it.

But it goes after Fat Cats! Don’t you get our clever pun? And besides, how can we go after international money launderers without making it a crime to commit personal finance abroad?

Related: Wall Street Journal, Checking the IRS Overseas (Via the TaxProf). “Even the Obama Administration says the law would capture only $870 million a year in additional tax revenue, which is probably overstated given changes in behavior by Americans and their overseas employers.”

 

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William Perez, Do Your Home Improvements Qualify for the Residential Energy Tax Credits?

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2015): T Is For TIN (Taxpayer Identification Number)

Peter ReillyZombies Can’t File Tax Court Petitions. Making Tax Court headquarters the go-to place for a Zombie Apocalypse.

Kay Bell, IRS’ Koskinen says tax agency’s troubles are over. No joke. Joke.

Kristine Tidgren, Don’t Be Fooled! “While many artless tactics remain (if you just wire this money to Nigeria by Friday…), the emerging scams come wrapped in a cloak of credibility. It’s often difficult for even the wary to separate fact from fiction in this new age.”

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 693. “The Department of Justice announced yesterday that it will not pursue contempt of Congress charges against Lois Lerner.”  Of course not. That’s not what a scandal goalie does.

Marc Bellemare, Soda taxes don’t seem to work. (via Tyler Cowen)

Renu Zaretsky, A Penny for Your Sugar: Setting a Price on Sin. (TaxVox). “Are we are all aware of our sugar sins?”  Sins? So food nannyism is really a religion.

Not that the current tax law is exactly a shining light.  Ted Cruz and His Dim-Bulb Tax Policy (Joseph Thorndike, Tax Analysts Blog). “Increasingly, Washington is alive with interesting, conservative tax proposals. But none of them are coming from the junior senator from Texas.”

Meg Wiehe, More Than 20 States Considering Detrimental Tax Proposals (Tax Justice Blog). Pretty close to 50, I’d guess.

 

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Christopher Bergin, April Is More Than Just Tax Season (Tax Analysts Blog). “Koskinen announced that so far, the filing season has gone “swimmingly,” which apparently means the IRS answers the phone less than half the time when taxpayers call for help.” 

Today in advanced tax policy debate: How Tax Brackets are Adjusted Explained in Taylor Swift Gifs (Kyle Pomerleau, Dan Carvajal, Tax Policy Blog)

 

News from the Profession. Deloitte Not Taking Any Chances That Someone Might Burn Their Disneyland to the Ground (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/30/15: A Year After the Fire Edition. And: Can fraud be accidental?

Monday, March 30th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Friends, if your 1040 information isn’t in by now, you’re getting extended. 

It’s been a year since the old Younkers Building burned down. It was kitty-corner from our office at 7th and Walnut in Des Moines. Here is what it looked like a year ago:

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And here is the site yesterday:

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The remaining portion of the site is called the Wilkins Building. The old Younkers store was actually three buildings built at different times and connected as one store. The part that didn’t burn down was built about 20 years after the part that was obliterated.

The building was being remodeled into apartments, and the work was well along when the fire broke out in the wee hours. The sprinkler system had not been turned on, and the building went up too quickly for the fire department to do more than keep it from spreading.

The developers intend to remodel the remaining portion as apartments, retail and a restaurant. Seventh Avenue is again open, providing easy access to our office, but Walnut remains closed indefinitely.

Related:

Sunday Morning Skywalks.

Goodbye, Younkers Building.

A VISIT(ATION) TO DOWNTOWN YOUNKERS

DOWNTOWN YOUNKERS PICTURES

 

20150326-2No, you’re not. Two headlines from my Google news feed: Are you accidentally committing tax fraud? And 5 ways you’re accidentally committing tax fraud.

You don’t commit tax fraud “accidentally.” You don’t have to tell yourself “hey, I’ll commit me some fraud” to be a fraudster. But for something to rise to the level of fraud, it has to be more than an accident.

For example, accidentally leaving a $50 1099 off a return isn’t fraud. “Accidentally” omitting one for $1 million just might be, as it’s harder to accidentally forget you made that much.

 

This may be the most depressing tax case I’ve ever seen. From MyFox8.com:

The Parsons are guilty of accepting benefits from the government – benefits intended for Erica – even though Erica was no longer with them.

Erica had gone missing late in 2011, but her disappearance was not reported for nearly two years.

The adoptive mother received 10 years, and the father 8, from a judge convinced they killed their adoptive daughter after years of abuse and covered up the crime to keep collecting her government benefits — on which they failed to pay taxes.

 


tileTaxGrrrl, 
9 Tournament & Tax Tips On The Road To The Final Four. “Betting on the Final Four? Here are a few tax and tournament tips to keep in mind.”

Kay Bell, Some Final Four teams could suffer under seat tax proposal. A proposal to reduce deductions for contributions that get you good seats at the game.

William Perez, What Is the Alternative Minimum Tax?

Jana Luttenegger Weiler, 529A ABLE Account Guidance (Sort Of….) (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). “The ABLE Act will amend Section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code to create a tax-free savings account for certain individuals who had significant disabilities before turning age 26.”

Jason Dinesen, Marriage in the Tax Code, Part 5: Examples of Taxes in 1920

 

Peter Reilly, Nay Nay We Won’t Pay – Evaders, Protesters and Resisters Versus IRS. “Deliberately not paying your taxes violates the law, so I don’t want to imply that there is an “official” correct way to do it.”

Bob Nadler, Who Won the Sanchez Case? (Procedurally Taxing). “In Sanchez, the taxpayer sought innocent spouse relief in the Tax Court and lost her case because the Court held no joint return was filed.  But the underlying assessment of a joint tax may have been erroneous.  If the assessment is found to be invalid the taxpayer will probably have no tax liability.”

 

Jack Townsend, Third Circuit Affirms Sentence Based on PSR Calculation of Tax Loss In Excess of Stipulated Tax Loss in Plea Agreement. Just because you admit evading one amount of tax doesn’t mean the judge can’t be convinced you evaded more.

No, it’s not. Next question. FATCA Repeal Efforts Just Failed, But Is It A Good Law? (Robert Wood):

FATCA’s massive and systemic overkill is great and vastly expensive. It is an elephant gun aimed at mosquitoes. And it has damaged the lives of over 7 million Americans abroad. Many can no longer open or maintain bank accounts where they live, get mortgages, or run their local businesses or households without difficulty. Many institutions around the world simple will not–perhaps cannot–open and maintain accounts for Americans, financial pariahs.

Its supporters say that international tax evasion justifies it, but like so many laws claiming good intentions, it has horrendous unintended (but easily foreseeable) consequences. Its complexity makes offenders out of ordinary citizens committing personal finance abroad, and its attempt to export U.S. tax enforcement invites other countries to do the same here.

 

Younkers Tea Room in its last week.

Younkers Tea Room in its last week.

Joseph Henchman, Nevada Governor Attacks Tax Foundation Report:

The proposal replaces Nevada’s current $200-flat business license fee with a tiered gross receipts tax.

Governor Sandoval quickly responded with a statement calling our report “utterly irresponsible, intellectually dishonest, and built on erroneous assumptions.” His ally Senator Michael Roberson added that our report “is nothing more than a disingenuous hatchet-job.”

The disappointing ad hominems from Governor Sandoval and Senator Roberson cloud the serious issues raised in our impartial analysis:

  • The BLF proposal has 67 revenue ranges for each of 27 industry categories, totaling 1,811 possible tax brackets.

  • BLF taxpayers will face absurdly high marginal tax rates, reaching over 13 million percent and likely distorting business decisions.

  • If the BLF tax burden were calculated in terms of a state corporate income tax, rates would range wildly from 0.2 percent to a punitive 77 percent.

  • Tax-motivated business restructuring would harm Nevada business competitiveness, and the punitive rate on the railroad industry likely violates federal law.

  • The tax rates for each industry were calculated using Texas data from a single year, which is not representative of Nevada’s economy.

  • The revenue estimates are probably overstated, which will lead to a revenue scramble when the tax underperforms.

Gross receipts and gross profits taxes have an inherent flaw: you can have large gross receipts or gross margins, but still have a net loss after expenses. Nevada doesn’t have an income tax. The politicians seem to want one in the worst way, and they are trying to get one that way.

 

Younkers elevator

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day690The IRS Scandal, Day 689The IRS Scandal, Day 688

Len Burman, Do Senators Lee and Rubio Have a Secret Plan to Help Poor Families?

 

Russ Fox begins his annual listing of bad tax ideas with Bozo Tax Tip #10: Email Your Social Security Number. Please, don’t. And don’t sent tax documents with your identifying information as an email attachment. Identity fraud is easy enough without helping the fraudsters that way.

News from the Profession. Deloitte University Is a Cruise Ship Without Swimsuits (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

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Tax Roundup, 3/24/15: Goldilocks and the medical practice. And: the spirit is willing, but the Tax Fairy is weak.

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20120511-2Reasonable Compensation and the Goldilocks Rule. The IRS has been fighting taxpayers over how much compensation is “reasonable” since Great-grandpa realized he could reduce his corporate tax by taking it out as a salary. The agency historically fought this war over whether taxpayers were taking too much compensation. The IRS has since opened a second front, arguing that S corporation owner-employees were improperly reducing their employment taxes by taking too little salary out of the corporation. Employee owners now need to find a comp level that is “just right.”

As in any two-front war, a victory on one front might cause problems on the other. A Tax Court victory yesterday for the IRS over an eye doctor who took “too much” compensation may give ammunition to S corporation professional practices that take corporate earnings out via their K-1s and distributions — free of Medicare taxes — rather than as salary and bonus.

Judge Kerrigan says Dr. Ahmad, the owner and principal employee of Midwest Eye Center, took four $500,000 bonuses in November and Decemeber of 2007. This wiped out corporate income, which would likely have otherwise been taxed at a flat 35% rate under the “professional corporation” tax rules. They even overdid the bonus a little, carrying a net operating loss into 2008.

The taxpayer failed to convince the judge that the bonus was “reasonable”:

Petitioner produced no evidence of comparable salaries. Instead, petitioner argues that there are no “like enterprises” under “like circumstances” from which to draw comparisons. Petitioner argues that Dr. Ahmad’s large bonus was reasonable for several other reasons. Petitioner points to Dr. Ahmad’s increased workload during 2007 and the various roles that Dr. Ahmad performed, such as CEO, CFO, and COO, and the corresponding managerial duties of those positions. However, petitioner did not provide any methodology to show how Dr. Ahmad’s bonus was determined in relation to these responsibilities.

This tells us that when you have a C corporation owned by a single professional, you have to do more to determine how much bonus is “reasonable” than estimate what the pre-bonus taxable income is. If you are going to suck the income out of such a corporation through bonuses, it is wise to have written bonus criteria that make sense when compared to other practices.

It might be even better to make an S corporation election. The medical practice C corporation was hit with over $320,000 in tax on $1 million “excessive” compensation (and some other items), and another $62,000 in penalties — all of which would have been avoided in an S corporation, where all income is taxed on the 1040 regardless of whether it is “excessive.”

In fact, this case helps S corporation professional practices a little, in that it is evidence that it is not “reasonable” to assume that all income of the practice has to come out as compensation subject to employment taxes.

Cite: Midwest Eye Center, S.C., T.C. Memo 2015-53.

 

tax fairyIRS says “Rabbi” had a tax practice that wasn’t entirely orthodox. A Department of Justice Tax Press Release tells a story of a man who sought the Tax Fairy in the Torah:

The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California, alleges that Lawrence Preston Siegel, aka Larry Lave, Yehuda Lave and Larry Easy, falsely represented that he is a licensed attorney and CPA in order to solicit business for his tax practice. 

According to the civil injunction suit, Siegel pleaded guilty to one count of tax evasion and two counts of subscribing false tax returns in 1994.  He subsequently resigned from the California bar in 1994, lost his CPA license in 1997, and never regained either accreditation, according to the suit.  The complaint alleges that following his release from federal prison in 2001 for additional convictions, Siegel established a tax practice and stated online that he is an “[i]interesting combination of a Tax Lawyer and CPA who is also a Rabbi trained in Spirituality.”  Siegel, the complaint alleges, claimed to others that his “goal as a spiritual Rabbi, Tax Attorney and CPA is to save people money without going to jail … Everybody wants to pay very little tax, I do it legally and morally under the Torah.” 

It never occurred to me that a Rabbi would require the qualifier “trained in Spirituality.” Isn’t that the whole idea? In any case, he isn’t well-trained in tax, if the Justice Department press release is to be believed (my emphasis):

According to the complaint, among his tax fraud schemes, Siegel falsely advised his customers, typically high earners who own profitable businesses, that they can establish companies in Nevada and treat their California home as an out-of-state corporate office.  Siegel falsely claimed that doing so would transform a vast array of non-deductible personal expenses into tax deductible business expenses, according to the suit.  According to the complaint, Siegel boasted about this tax fraud scheme in e-mails, including one where he falsely claimed that his customers are entitled to free housing as tax-free compensation from their out-of-state companies and that “[t]he housing can [b]e luxurious and cost thousands a [] month” because “[t]here is an assumption that corporations don’t waste money.”

What’s amazing to me is that (if the allegations are true) he had clients who actually believed this. Religious or secular, reform or orthodox, believer or non-believer, the desire to believe in the Tax Fairy is strong among all races, religions and belief systems. But there is no tax fairy.

 

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Kristine TidgrenExpanded Relief for Taxpayers Receiving Erroneous 1095-As:

On Friday, March 20, CMS announced that it had discovered additional 1095-A errors among those forms issued by both State-run exchanges and the federally-facilitated exchange. CMS is notifying taxpayers impacted by these errors with emails, phone calls, and messages in their Marketplace accounts. Because of these errors, Treasury is expanding the relief it offered in February.

Now, anyone who (1) enrolled in any type of marketplace coverage, (2) received an incorrect Form 1095-A, and (3) filed their return based upon that form, does not need to file an amended tax return. The IRS will not pursue the collection of any additional taxes based on updated information contained in the corrected forms. This relief applies to tax filers who enrolled through either the federally-facilitated marketplace or a state-based marketplace. As provided before, taxpayers who were harmed by the errors may file amended returns to collect the difference.

So the liability of a taxpayer for potentially thousands of dollars in taxes depends on two items:

1. Whether the exchange botched the 1095-A filing, and

2. Whether the taxpayer filed before the 1095-A was corrected.

These are whimsical criteria on which to stake thousands of dollars of tax credits.

 

Chicago Tribune, It’s Obamacare’s first tax season. Can the IRS handle it?Kristy Maitre of the ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation is quoted: “Overall, I do not believe they’re as prepared as they could have been.”

Hank Stern, The Best Laid Plans [Updated]. “In other words, a lot of folks with even rudimentary math skills have figured out that paying the fine penalty tax and “going bare” is a much more cost-effective choice than buying coverage.”

Robert Wood, Happy Anniversary Obamacare Taxes, Many Happy Returns.

 

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Norton Francis, Bobby Jindal’s Revenue Enhancements (TaxVox). “His trick: Turn refundable business credits into non-refundable credits.”

Kay Bell, Downton Abbey’s new tax connection via Rep. Aaron Schock

Tyler Cowen presents New arguments on a carbon tax, including one that suggests a way in which “…a carbon tax could make global warming worse.”

Martin Sullivan, U.S. Effective CorporateTax Rate Higher Than Foreign Competitors? Not Really (Tax Analysts Blog)

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 684

 

News from the Profession. Conducting Tax Return Update Meetings at the Gym Maybe Not the Best Idea (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern). “If a client requests a meeting at a location where heavy objects are laying around, and there’s an off-chance that the news you have may be anything other than positive, may we suggest an alternative venue.”

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/2/15: Thawing Iowa’s frosty business tax climate. And: film credit post-production!

Monday, March 2nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
Iowa's business tax climate, illustrated

Iowa’s business tax climate, illustrated

Baby steps towards fixing Iowa’s business tax climate. At IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record’s Business Professionals’ Blog, I discuss some easy steps to make Iowa’s tax climate a little less frosty, along with a few slightly harder ones.

The real easy:

– Eliminate the Iowa individual and corporation alternative minimum tax.

– Have Iowa’s tax law automatically conform to federal changes.

– Tie Iowa return due dates to federal due dates for all returns.

The slightly harder:

– Encourage or require “composite” returns or withholding for pass-through non-resident taxpayers.

– Repeal the deductibility of federal taxes by building the tax advantages into lower tax rates.

– Repeal refundable and transferable business tax credits.

None of this takes the place of a real Iowa tax reform along the lines of the Tax Update Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan, but you have to start somewhere. My next IowaBiz piece will attempt to put some more meat on the bones of the Quick and Dirty plan.

 

The Iowa Film Tax Credit Program is dead, but the lawsuits linger. A disappointed filmmaker wanted more taxpayer money, but the Iowa Supreme Court ruled that the Department of Economic Development had the final say over what expenses would qualify. Ghost Player, L.L.C. and CH Investors, L.L.C. vs Iowa (Sup. Ct. Iowa, No. 14-0339)

 

Kristine Tidgren, March 2 Deadline Extended for Farmers Waiting for 1095-A. Farmers that file by March 1 (today this year, because March 1 was on a Sunday) do not have to pay estimated taxes. “In a last-minute announcement, the IRS has declared that farmers waiting for a corrected 1095-A will have until April 15 to file their returns and pay their taxes. If they file Form 2210-F along with their return, the penalty for failure to pay quarterly estimated tax will be waived.”

Russ Fox, It Was the Sisterly Thing To Do. “Three Wisconsin sisters allegedly decided that tax fraud and identity theft should stay in the family. They’ve been accused of filing 2,000 phony returns by the Wisconsin Department of Revenue.

 

 

Jack Townsend, DOJ Tax Tough Talk About the Violating Trust Fund Tax Withholding and Payment Obligations. It seems that the IRS has become more willing to try to jail employers who fail to pay withholding; this post discusses how it can become a criminal issue. You can’t argue with this: “The solid advice is to withhold, account for and pay over to the IRS.”

William Perez explains The Key Benefits of Health Savings Accounts. “Contributions are tax-deductible when going into the HSA. And distributions can be tax-free when coming out the HSA.”

Jason Dinesen, Financing a Small Business, Part 3 of 5: Tell Your Accountant Before You Spend the Money

Kay Bell, Lions, lambs, warning Ides and luck all apply to March taxes. “Are you a tax lion, aggressively hunting down tax breaks? Or are you a tax lamb, cowering before the complicated Internal Revenue Code?”

Leslie Book, US v Clarke Remand: Allegations of Bad Faith Still Face A High Hurdle (Procedurally Taxing). “The case involved allegations of retaliatory summons issuance following a failure to extend (for a third time) the statute of limitations and allegations that the summons was a way to avoid discovery limitations in a Tax Court TEFRA proceeding that was commenced after the summons was issued.”

Bob Vineyard, Solyndra-care (InsureBlog). While Iowa’s ACA co-op, CoOpportunity, was the first one to collapse, it might not be the last.

 

Liz Malm, Richard Borean, How Does Your State Sales Tax See That Blue and Black (or White and Gold) Dress? (Tax Policy Blog):

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Robert Wood, Finally, Suing IRS Over All Those Emails. “IRS attorneys said the back-up system would be too onerous to search. Yet in recent testimony, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration said IRS tech employees told them that IRS management never asked for the tapes.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 660Day 661Day 662. It appears that Commissioner Koskinen is putting the same effort at getting to the bottom of the Tea Party harrassment that Vladimir Putin is putting into finding Boris Nemtsov’s killer.

 

Richard Phillips, Netflix is a Real-Life Frank Underwood When it Comes to Tax Breaks (Tax Justice Blog)

Eric Todor, What if We Funded Public Education Like Affordable Care Act Health Insurance? (TaxVox). “Both seek to promote a form of universal or near-universal coverage – K-12 education for all and mandated health insurance for many. But they go about it in very different ways: one makes government subsidies explicit and the other makes much of them disappear, at least in the budgetary and political sense.”

 

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Peter Reilly, Will Christian Soldiers Be On The Streets Of Pensacola As Kent Hovind Goes To Trial? Peter covers the latest developments in the strange and sad case of the guy who had the “Young Earth Creationist” theme park devoted to the idea that humans and dinosaurs co-existed.

 De gustibus non est disputandum. Form 1040: An Unappreciated Work of Art. (Christopher Bergin, practitioner of dark arts for Tax Analysts).

News from the Profession. Florida Man Drives Porsche on Sidewalk to Make a Point, Gets Arrested. (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern). When Grandma started doing that, we took away her keys.

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/24/15: Iowa gas tax boost vote may be today. And: are tax credit subsidies on the way out?

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

It looks like the gas tax increase will come to a vote today, reports the Des Moines Register:

Rep. Josh Byrnes, R-Osage, who chairs the Iowa House Transportation Committee, said Monday he expects a tight vote. He added that talks were continuing among House Republicans.

“I don’t think we’d bring it up for debate if we didn’t think we had the votes,” Byrnes said.

It sounds like a done deal. At least that’s what they want everyone to think.

 

20120906-1Iowa has just announced a big new set of tax breaks for an out-of-state company, in the name of  “economic development.” But are “targeted” tax subsidies on the way out? Ellen Harpel says they might be in Beyond tax credits: creating winning incentive packages (smartincentives.org):

 

Tax credits have become problematic for several reasons:

  • Tax credits are often presented as no-cost incentives. That is, tax credits are not taken (incentives “paid out”) until the company has met certain thresholds and has started paying the taxes against which the credit is taken. However, as this article in the Wall Street Journal points out, the fiscal costs are substantial. It is not clear to us that other taxes expected to be generated by incentivized projects either materialize or are sufficient to fill the budget gap.
  • One reason might be that tax credits are more important to existing businesses than firms new to a location, based on our review of major incentive deals, so an incentivized project may not generate as much new tax revenue as anticipated.
  • Once the tax credits have been granted, states do not know when businesses will choose to take the credit, wreaking havoc on state budgets, possibly for decades depending on the terms of the tax credit arrangement.
  • Some tax credits are refundable (paid back to the company if their tax liability is not high enough to take the credit) or transferable (sold to another taxpaying entity). Film tax breaks often fall into this category, lowering the taxes paid by other taxpayers that are not the direct target of the incentive.

Using tax credits in this manner is not sustainable. To the extent economic development organizations continue to use tax credits, caps and limits will become the norm.

As long as politicians can get media outlets to run headlines like “New $25 million plant will bring 120 jobs to Iowa,” tax credits remain “sustainable” for vote-buying politicians. If they really wanted to help everybody — not just chase smokestacks — they would enact something like The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.

Related:

IF TRUTH IN ADVERTISING APPLIED TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCIES

WSJ, Tax-Subsidy Programs Fuel Budget Deficits

 

If Iowa’s tax climate is so bad, why do businesses locate here? A hint may be found here: J.D. Tucille, Florida, the Freest State in the Country? “California, New York, and New Jersey always rank near the bottom of these lists as intrusive, red tape-bound hellholes.”

 

Via the John Locke Foundation

Via the John Locke Foundation

Iowa is #13.

The First in Freedom Index actually draws from a lot of the sources that have been cited here before, including the Fraser Institute’s Economic Freedom of North America as well as Mercatus Center’s Freedom in the 50 States, the Tax Foundation’s State Business Tax Climate Index, and measures put together by the Center for Education Reform, among others. To this, the North Carolina group adds its own weight and emphasis. 

Imagine how attractive Iowa could be without a bottom-10 tax climate.

 

Russ Fox, “Ripping Off Your Refunds” In the Miami Herald. “There is an excellent article in the Miami Herald on the identity theft tax fraud crisis. ”

TaxGrrrl, Tax Professionals Targeted In Latest Bogus IRS Email Scam. You can fool all of the people some of the time.

Robert Wood, Can IRS Seize First, Ask Questions Later? ‘Yes We Can’.

Kay Bell, NASCAR Hall of Fame and homeowner tax breaks collide. Another subsidized municipal boondoggle.

Peter Reilly, Estate Intended For Charity Depleted By Litigation And Income Tax. A sad story, and a cautionary tale for estate planning.

 

20121120-2Hank Stern, More Delays on HRAs:

For example, pre-ACA, small employers could fund “standalone” HRAs that allowed employees to pay for privately purchased health insurance (among other things). This encouraged employees to buy the plan best suited to their needs, and employers could control costs because they weren’t beholden to a group carrier’s annual rate in creases.

Sadly, those days are gone.

Everybody must be forced into the exchanges to participate in the ACA’s cross-generational subsidies.

 

William Perez, Problems with Form 1095-A

Jared Walczak, Will Mississippi Eliminate Its Antiquated Franchise Tax? (Tax Policy Blog). It’s a tax that can be a nasty surprise to a business entering that state.

 

Alan Cole ponders The President’s Revenue Problem (Tax Policy Blog):

It’s popular to claim that you’ll fund a big new government program through a tax on investors. The strong ideological priors of the political press tell us that investors are earning huge amounts of money, and that’s where the income is.

But the math tells us otherwise. Here’s what the tax bases for wage income and capital income actually look like in practice, from my recent report on sources of personal income.

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Tax Update regular readers already know that the rich can’t pick up the tab.

 

Jim PagelsNumber of American Corporations Declines for 17th Straight Year (Reason.com):

The report claims that the reduction in the number of incorporated firms is not so much due to inversions, mergers, or bankruptcy, but rather more firms classifying themselves as S Corporations, in which profits pass directly to owners and are taxed as individual income. Individual rates are typically lower than the U.S. corporate tax rate, currently the highest among members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development at 35 percent federal plus an additional 4.1 percent average rate levied by individual states.

This is why you can’t do a “corporate-only” tax reform.

 

Jeremy Scott, Does the United States Really Need a Tax Revolution? (Tax Analysts Blog): “Those who say that tax reform doesn’t go far enough and that the nation needs a revolutionary change are probably overstating the problem.”

Martin Sullivan, The Tax Reform Supermarket (Tax Analysts Blog). “Slowly but surely, members of Congress are coming to the painful realization that conventional, Reagan-style tax reform is going nowhere.”

 

Howard Gleckman, Better Ways to Link the Affordable Care Act with Tax Filing Season (TaxVox). “But since the ACA insurance is so closely linked to tax filing, it only makes sense to synch that sign-up period with tax season.”  I have a better idea: have health insurance purchases be totally unrelated to tax season, by getting rid of the whole misbegotten ACA.

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 656, quoting the Washington Times:

The White House told Congress last week it refused to dig into its computers for emails that could shed light on what kinds of private taxpayer information the IRS shares with President Obama’s top aides, assuring Congress that the IRS will address the issue — eventually. The tax agency has already said it doesn’t have the capability to dig out the emails in question, but the White House’s chief counsel, W. Neil Eggleston, insisted in a letter last week to House Committee on Ways and Means Chairman Paul Ryan that the IRS would try again once it finishes with the tea party-targeting scandal.

Just like it couldn’t possibly find the 30,000 emails that TIGTA dug up from the back-up tapes.

 

News from the Profession. The PwC Partner Who (Sorta) Looks Like Matt Damon and Other Public Accounting Doppelgangers (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/16/15: Titanic saved! Well, except for the iceberg thing. Or, the regs are dead, long live the repair regs!

Monday, February 16th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20140925-2So is the tax season saved? The IRS gave us a big “never mind” Friday afternoon with the issuance of Rev. Proc. 2015-20, letting taxpayers of the hook for countless Forms 3115 under the “repair regs.”

The main points:

“Small” trades or businesses — those with either average 3-year gross receipts under $10 million or assets under $10 million — can adopt the most common methods under the repair regulations without having to file an accounting method change. In fact, the Rev. Proc. requires no special statement or disclosure to adopt the new methods.

The “Small” tests are based on the size of the “trade or business,” not the size of the taxpayer. This means taxpayers who exceed these limits may still qualify if their component “trades or businesses” qualify.

Taxpayers may pay a price for not filing a 3115. If you skip the 3115 for the common method changes, you aren’t allowed to get the most lucrative one – the “late partial disposition election” for real estate and machinery improvements. This is the one Peter Reilly notes as having the potential to generate “biblical” deductions. That means if you want to claim this biblical deductions for any trade or business, you need to file the most common method changes for all of them, regardless of whether they qualify otherwise under Rev. Proc. 2015-20

For the details of the new rules, I have two dedicated posts:

IRS drops “Form 3115″ requirement for smaller taxpayers under tangible property rules, and

List of Rev. Proc. 2015-20 method changes.

No Walnut STPeter Reilly says John Koskinen Saves Tax Season With Form 3115 Relief For Small Business. Well sure.  Except maybe for the entirely out-of-control epidemic of identity theft refund fraud, the continuing confusion and almost certain widespread inicidence of the new individual mandate penalty, the sticker shock that millions will face when they recompute their ACA exchange plan tax credits, and the financial disaster looming for small businesses for the horrible crime of reimbursing employee health insurance. But other than that, yes, it’s all hunky-dory.

Other Coverage: 

Russ Fox, IRS Announces Small Business Relief for Form 3115 (Property Regulation Issue)

Tony Nitti, Repair Regulation Relief: What Does It Really Mean? (Not As Much As You Think):

You don’t have to file a Form 3115. But remember, the three safe harbors that we started with 4,000 words ago — the $5,000/$500 de minimus, small building, and routine maintenance exceptions — are annual elections that apply only on a go forward basis. These still must be attached to the returns.

Paul Neiffer, You Don’t Need to File Those Form 3115s After All

 

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William Perez has Your Helpful Guide to Capital Gains Tax Rates and Losses

Jason Dinesen, Handling Franchise Fees on a Tax Return. He gives an example involving a $5,000 franchise fee: “The $5,000 franchise fee is considered an asset. The $5,000 is deducted over 180 months (15 years). This is true even though the franchise agreement is only 5 years long.”

Annette Nellen, Taxable income of a marijuana business. That’s pretty much the same as gross income.

Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Facebook Allows Users to Designate “Legacy Contact”

Kay Bell, 5 things to check when hiring a tax preparer

Stephen Olsen has his newest Summary Opinions, rounding up recent developments in tax procedure (Procedurally Taxing).

"Boris Johnson -opening bell at NASDAQ-14Sept2009-3c cropped" by Boris_Johnson_-opening_bell_at_NASDAQ-14Sept2009-3c.jpg: *Boris Johnson -opening bell at NASDAQ-14Sept2009.jpg: Think Londonderivative work: Snowmanradio (talk)derivative work: Off2riorob (talk) - Boris_Johnson_-opening_bell_at_NASDAQ-14Sept2009-3c.jpg. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Boris_Johnson_-opening_bell_at_NASDAQ-14Sept2009-3c_cropped.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Boris_Johnson_-opening_bell_at_NASDAQ-14Sept2009-3c_cropped.jpg

Via Wikipedia.

Robert Wood, Savvy London Mayor Boris Johnson Paid IRS, Is Now Renouncing U.S. Citizenship. Considering what it costs him, it’s not surprising.

TaxGrrrl, Filing As Single Or Married: When ‘It’s Complicated’ Isn’t A Choice On Your Tax Return. As a filing status, that is.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 648

Renu Zaretsky, No Hitting the Brakes for Tax Breaks… Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers early movement on extending the “expiring tax provisions.”  Remember, they only got extended through the end of last year. Also links to discussions on Section 529 deductions, tax reform, and the romantic side of spreadsheets.

 

News from the Profession. Nearly Half of Accountants Surveyed Hooked Up With a Colleague (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/11/15: Iowa Code Conformity, America’s more selective appeal, and your tax dollars at work in the $1 DVD bin.

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

IMG_1284The Iowa Code Conformity bill goes to the Governor. The Iowa House yesterday approved the Senate-passed bill, SF 126, to update Iowa’s 2014 tax law for the federal “Extender” legislation approved in December. Iowa will conform to the federal legislation, including the $500,000 Section 179 limit, but will not adopt the federal bonus depreciation.

The Governor is expected to sign the bill.

 

Our appeal is just getting more selective. 2014 – More Expatriations Than Ever (Andrew Mitchel):

Today the Treasury Department published the names of individuals who renounced their U.S. citizenship or terminated their long-term U.S. residency (“expatriated”) during the fourth quarter of 2014. 

The number of published expatriates for the quarter was 1,062 (second highest quarter ever), bringing the total number of published expatriates in 2014 to 3,415.  The total for the year breaks last year’s record number of 2,999 published expatriates. The number of expatriates for 2014 is a 14% increase over 2013.  

Chart by Andrew Mitchel LLC

Chart by Andrew Mitchel LLC

Expatriation is often an inconvenient and expensive process. The willingness of so many to go through the hassle is disgraceful evidence of the burden the “shoot the jaywalker” penalties of the foreign account reporting rules and FATCA impose — on top of America’s unique worldwide taxation regime.

Related: Thousands Renounce U.S. Citizenship Hitting New Record, Not Just Over Taxes (Robert Wood)

 

haroldYour tax dollars at work in HollywoodWhen Sony’s emails were hacked, the companies executives were embarrassed by the emails complaining about “spoiled brat” starlets and other insider dish that was exposed. But Tax Analysts’ Brian Bardwell shows that the state legislators who have approved taxpayer funding around the country for filmmakers also have plenty to be embarrassed about. From the subscriber-only story:

While the broader topic of film incentives comes up daily, it appears that top executives — at Sony, at least — are not usually involved in finding credits for individual projects, but when they are, it may be because the film is unlikely to bring in enough money to justify producing it without a government subsidy.

In other words, taxpayers are financing the marginal direct-to-DVD projects for Hollywood. That comes as no surprise to those of us who followed Iowa’s disastrous Film Tax Credit story. In a story line right out of “The Producers,” inflated expense claims allowed awful films to be made without the need to ever get a paying customer — the sale of the resulting transferable tax credits covered the expenses and generated a profit — not counting the attorney fees and jail time, of course.

 

Kay Bell, Tax fraud concerns in Minnesota, Connecticut & now Florida:

“The personally identifiable information apparently hacked at Anthem is exactly what tax fraud thieves use to make false refund claims that appear to be legitimate,” said Department of Revenue Services Commissioner Kevin Sullivan. Sullivan is suggesting that residents beat tax ID thieves to the punch.

Great.

 

Peter Reilly, Breaking – Repair Regs – AICPA Says Help On The Way – Maybe. “The only thing that I find really encouraging about the AICPA announcement is that I can show it to my partners and justify my wait and see approach, which now apparently has the imprimatur of the AICPA.”

TaxGrrrl, UNRETIREMENT. “The Social Security and tax laws hold hidden traps and rewards for the growing army of well-off folks who just keep on working.”

Leslie Book, Congress Considering Procedural Legislation (Procedurally Taxing).

Jack Towensend, Judge Jed Rakoff Reviews Brandon Garrett’s Book on Too Big to Jail: How Prosecutors Compromise with Corporations

 

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David Brunori, It’s Time to End Property Tax Exemptions — for Everyone (Tax Analysts Blog).

City governments are usually looking for payments in lieu of taxes rather than ending exemptions. And the nonprofits — particularly universities and hospitals — tenaciously oppose paying. To be sure, some municipalities and exempt organizations have reached a compromise on payments in lieu of taxes, particularly in Boston. But in the vast majority of the nation, universities, nonprofit hospitals, and property owned by religious organizations are exempt from tax.

I propose we end those exemptions. First, let’s be honest — if you narrow the tax base by exempting some property, everyone else pays more. So in Brunswick, Maine, people and businesses pay more property taxes because Bowdoin College doesn’t. And sometimes they pay a lot more.

Sometimes it can be confusing. Des Moines officials will freely complain about the big hospitals not paying property taxes, but they lacked enthusiasm when the two big non-profit hospitals in town opened new hospitals in the suburbs.

 

Scott Drenkard, Richard Borean, How Many Cigarettes Are Smuggled Into Your State Each Year? (Tax Policy Blog). A lot more since they jacked up the cigarette tax a few years ago.

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The threat of lost cigarette revenue is the real reason state officials are so horrified by the vaporous health risks of e-cigarettes.

 

Renu Zaretsky, Tax Preferences, Investigations, and Settlements. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers Senator Hatch on tax reform, financial supergenius Bernie Sanders on Social Security, and more Swiss bank tax troubles.

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown 2/10: Semi-Encouraging News (Tax Justice Blog)

Joseph Thorndike, When It Comes to Tax Reform, History Tells Us What Might Happen – And Why It Probably Won’t (Tax Analysts Blog). “The 1986 reform happened not because it was wise and prudent and necessary, but because it worked politically. And even then, only barely.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 643

 

News from the Profession. The Annual Close: The Year in Adverse Accounting Jokes (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/3/15: President announces fresh new hopeless tax proposals!

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Economic supergenius

160 tax proposals. Close to 160 doomed tax proposals. The President released the details of the tax proposals for his 2015 budget yesterday. Tax Analysts Reports ($link):

The added details on international reforms the administration is seeking serve as “a significant step forward” to flesh out its business tax reform framework and see if there is an “opportunity for movement” on business reform with Congress, a senior Treasury official told reporters at a February 2 briefing on the release of the Treasury’s green book explanation of the revenue proposals in the budget.

Overall, the fiscal 2016 budget includes roughly 160 tax proposals, of which about 30 are new, 45 are modifications or combinations of old proposals, and 85 are the same or similar to the administration’s fiscal 2015 budget, the Treasury official said.

Almost all of these proposals are doomed for this Congress. As most of these couldn’t pass when Democrats controlled the Senate, they’re hardly likely to pass now that they don’t. A GOP Congress is also not about to pass some of the more publicized class warfare proposals, like the increase in the capital gain rate, the taxation of capital gains at death, increase the estate tax rate to 45% (from 40$) and lowering the estate and gift tax lifetime exclusion to $1 million (from $5+ million).

No Walnut STA few proposals might get a sympathetic hearing on their own from GOP taxwriters. These include:

– Cash basis accounting and repeal of Section 263A inventory capitalization for companies with up to $25 million in gross receipts.

– Permanent extension of the Section 1202 exclusion for qualifying small C corporation stock gains.

– Permanent extension of the refundable Child Tax Credit.

– Increasing the maximum Section 179 deduction from $500,000 to $1 million.

A few other corporate welfare gimmicks that might get a hearing include permanent research credits and permanent New Markets Tax Credits.

While there are a few items that might attract GOP support, overall this batch of proposals is more extreme than the ones that went nowhere before. The President probably won’t let Congress just pick out the tasty bits from his proposals, so I expect little to none of this to actually pass.

Flicker image courtesy Michael Coghlan under Creative Commons license.

Flicker image courtesy Michael Coghlan under Creative Commons license.

Other Coverage:

TaxProf, Tax Provisions in President Obama’s FY2016 Budget

WSJ, Obama Would Block Strategies to Pump Up Roth IRAs

Accounting Today, Obama Proposes Sweeping Tax Changes in 2016 Budget

Jeremy Scott, Obama’s Foreign Earnings Tax: 19 Percent Minimum DOA but Deemed Repatriations Key (Tax Analysts Blog)

Kyle Pomerleau, The President’s Tax on Offshore Earnings Represents the Worst of Retroactive Policy (Tax Policy Blog)

Len Burman, Are Accrued Capital Gains Income in the Year You Die? (TaxVox). “But reclassifying exceptionally thrifty middle-class families to the top of the income distribution by counting a lifetime of unrealized gains in income when they die clearly overstates their well-being.”

Tony Nitti, Tax Aspects Of The President’s FY2016 Budget

TaxGrrrl, Obama Budget Proposal Tackles Small Business, Changes To IRS

Kay Bell, Tax highlights in Obama’s FY2016 budget proposal

Annette Nellen, President Obama’s 2015 Tax Proposals

 

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Megan McArdle, Government Blinks Again on Obamacare, a discussion of the IRS announcement that it won’t impose the failure-to-pay penalty on exchange policy purchasers who have to repay some subsidy:

The IRS emphasizes that this is a one-time-only deal, just for 2014. But I’m not sure if you should believe that. This emphasizes one of the problems we’ve spoken about a lot in this space: The political will to impose the costs of the Affordable Care Act is a lot less strong than the will to distribute the benefits.

It also telegraphs that the IRS expects that a lot of taxpayers who are anticipating a refund will be instead writing a check on April 15.

 

20140925-2Peter Reilly, Repair Regs And Tax Pros Are Like Headlights And Deer:

For the most part, the people who have been really looking at these regulations have had a large firm perspective.  To be a just a little cynical, they actually kind of like all this complexity, since they can make a case for sending out big bills to entities that can afford to pay them.  My brief time at the national level, not Big 4, but with many former Big 4 people made me realize there is a radically different perspective at that level.  They are used to having a very small number of competitors for any client who more or less sing from the same hymn book.  The client people that they deal with are quite likely fellow members of the Big 4 cult rather than tight fisted entrepreneurs who resent every penny they spend on professionals.

Regulation always favors the big, and the “repair regulations” are no exception.

 

Russ Fox, Fake Interest Income, Fake Withholding, Real Fraud at the Tax Court. “What is amazing to me is that the petitioner has not, as far as I can tell, been criminally indicted.”

Robert Wood, The Truth About Lying On Your Tax Return.  “…as with your resume, making up something on your tax return is a terrible idea.”

Martin Sullivan, JCT Report Provides New Insight on Competitiveness (Tax Analysts Blog)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 635

 

News from the Profession: How Internal Controls Will Keep You Safe From Velociraptors (Leona May, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/16/15: Insurance reimbursements may trigger $100/day penalty, but at least they’re not on W-2.

Friday, January 16th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20121120-2Letter to Congressman says insurance reimbursements that trigger $100/day Obamacare penalty still excludible from W-2. 

Small employers have long used “Section 105″ plans to reimburse employee purchases of individual health insurance, in lieu of setting up an employer group health plan. Such reimbursements were excludible from employee W-2 taxable income.

Under the Administration’s interpretation of the Affordable Care Act, such plans trigger a $100 per-day, per-employee penalty starting in 2014. Many employers are just learning that they had disqualified plans last year and are scrambling to comply; fixing a plan within 30 days of compliance may enable such taxpayers to avoid the $36,500 hit for each employee on “reasonable cause” grounds.

One question that has hung over this is whether the employer has to put the reimbursements that trigger the penalties on employee W-2s as income. A letter to an Illinois Congressman reprinted today in Tax Analysts says they don’t. From the letter  (my emphasis and links):

Prior to the ACA, an employer could reimburse employees for the medical expenses of the employee and the employee’s family and exclude those amounts from the employee’s income and wages under section 105(b) of the Code. The ACA has not changed the tax treatment of the reimbursement for employee medical expenses. However, these arrangements, under the ACA, are considered to be group health plans and must satisfy the market reform rules for them.

The guidance that we provided in Notice 2013-54 did not change the tax results described in Revenue Ruling 61-146. This ruling says that under certain conditions if an employer reimburses an employee’s substantiated premiums for individual health insurance policies, the payments are excluded from the employee’s gross income under section 106 of the Code. This exclusion also applies if the employer pays the premiums directly to the insurance company.

W2Note that the exclusion “applies.” That’s present tense, meaning it’s still alive.

Some employers responded to Notice 2013-54 by treating reimbursements as taxable, but subsequent guidance issued in November last year said that didn’t work to make the $100/day penalty go away.

While they scramble to terminate their now horrifyingly expensive Sec. 105 reimbursement arrangements and figure out how to get out of the penalties, employers still have to issue W-2s this month. Now they know they can at least leave the reimbursements off employee W-2s. Given how widespread the problems seems to be, and how terrible the penalties, the IRS ought to just issue a blanket penalty waiver on this for everyone for 2014 if the non-compliance is disclosed.

Why wasn’t this printed as guidance? This letter went to Congressman Lipinski in September. A similar letter went to Kansas Congressman Goodlatte about the same time. Obviously the IRS knew from the Congressional inquiries that guidance was needed, but until Tax Analysts published this guidance, the IRS had never explained how to handle the W-2s. They still haven’t published guidance telling employers how to  “correct” the erroneous plans, as required on the penalty waiver instructions to the penalty reporting form, Form 8929.

 

IMG_0598Yeah, like he’d admit that. From Tax Analysts ($link):

The IRS is not pursuing a “Washington monument” strategy of discontinuing taxpayer services to protest recent congressional budget cuts, Commissioner John Koskinen told reporters at a press conference on January 15.

The Washington monument strategy refers to claims made by some media outlets during the October 2013 government shutdown that various federal agencies seemed to be closing highly visible public services as a protest against the shutdown.

Koskinen denied that any such calculations entered into the IRS’s decision-making regarding service and enforcement constraints that he said were induced by Congress’s $346 million cut (to $10.9 billion) to the IRS budget for fiscal 2015.

I’ll believe that he’s serious when he closes the “voluntary” preparer registration program and stops paying IRS employees to work full-time for the Treasury Employees Union.

James Taranto at the Wall Street Journal doesn’t deny that the IRS needs more money, but doesn’t have much sympathy anyway (WSJ subscription may be required to access original):

It’s all rather comical—but also galling. The IRS’s abuse of power in its harassment of conservative nonprofits aimed in substantial part at suppressing opposition to ObamaCare. That is, the IRS traduced the free-speech rights of citizens in order to preserve a law expanding IRS power and creating more work for IRS agents.

Now the commissioner complains that the IRS has too much work and not enough resources and threatens to make life even more difficult for taxpayers. It’s like the guy who killed his parents and then pleaded for mercy because he was an orphan.

And an unapologetic one.

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Robert D. Flach has your Friday Buzz, with a warning for users of off-the-shelf software.

William Perez, The Penalty for Not Having Health Insurance. Don’t think it’s just $95.

Robert Wood. 3 Reasons Filing Taxes Sucks? Obamacare, Obamacare & Obamacare. I can think of a lot of others, myself, but these are definitely three of them.

Alan Cole, The Employer Mandate Reduces Hours Worked (Tax Policy Blog). Not by tax preparers, it doesn’t.

 

Kay Bell, IRS Free File opens Friday, Jan. 16, for eligible taxpayers, four days ahead of Jan. 20 full tax season start

Russ Fox, If You Do Government Work, It Pays to Treat the Government Well

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 617

Howard Gleckman, What To Make of the Senate Finance Committee’s Tax Reform Workgroups 

 

Keith Fogg, Eskimos and the IRS: A Winter’s Tale (Procedurally Taxing) “This post is not about tax procedure issues in the native American population in Alaska but a recent Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) report concerning frozen credits at the IRS made me think about the number of ways Eskimos have to say snow.”

 

News from the Profession. Ron Baker: You Can Put Lipstick on Billing by the Hour But Don’t Call It Value Pricing (Adrienne Gonzales, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/12/15: They’re back! Gas tax boost, maybe; tax reform, not likely as 86th Iowa General Assembly convenes

Monday, January 12th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1Same Governor. Same split party control in the legislature. So why would we expect different results? I expect no big tax cuts, tax increases or tax reforms. When you mix the same ingredients and put them in the same oven, expect the same thing to come out of the oven.

They will be legislating for the next few months, so they will talk, and who knows? Something might happen. But that’s not the way to bet.

The Des Moines Register today covers 10 key issues facing Iowa Legislature in 2015. Six of them are tax items. I think only one of them is likely to result in legislation. Let’s go down the list.

ROAD FUNDING/GAS TAX. The state gas tax isn’t inflation adjusted, and the Department of Transportation says it needs more money. As gas taxes are close to a fee on road use, you can make a policy case for an increase. It’s a lot harder to make a political case, which is why the Governor and the legislature are so deferential to one another in this area. The fracking-induced fall in gas prices may give them the legislature the excuse they need to do what they clearly want to do — raise the 10 21-cent per gallon tax. The governor may push it through if he has decided this is his last term. But most likely they’ll be saying “after you” right through adjournment.

If Iowa's income tax were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s income tax were a car, it would look like this.

INCOME TAX CUTS.  The Register conflates tax cuts with tax reform here. They aren’t necessarily the same thing. Iowa’s income tax could bring in the same amount of revenue without the highest corporation rate in the developed world by eliminating the dozens of special interest tax credits and carveouts and tax credits for the well-connected. As long as Michael Gronstal remains in control of the flow of legislation in the Iowa Senate, anything that cuts rates for “the rich” goes nowhere. In any case, the Governor doesn’t seem to mind a tax credit system that gets him invited to all the cool ribbon cuttings.

That’s too bad. Iowa has a bottom-ten business tax climate that favors those with good lobbyists while making South Dakota look attractive for everyone else. Something like The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan, which would wipe out the corporate tax, cut individual rates, and get rid of Iowa’s byzantine maze of special breaks, is long overdue.

20120906-1BROADBAND EXPANSION. This is the sort of small-ball legislation that has passed in recent years, and this seems like the most likely to get through, probably as a tax credit. Of course, every new tax credit means a puppy dies Iowa’s tax law is just a little worse and a little harder to fix. Never mind that the real obstacle to broadband expansion is in Washington, not Des Moines.

LOCAL OPTION SALES TAXES. The municipalities want to be able to drive out businesses by increasing sales tax without help from surrounding communities. Same ingredients, same cake.

BANNING TRAFFIC CAMERAS. It’s about the money, and Senator Gronstal will prevent any anti revenue camera legislation from advancing.

SALES TAX INCREASE. This proposal to increase sales taxes for natural resource funding died in the Senate last year. If you can’t get a tax increase out of the Iowa Senate, you sure aren’t getting one out of the GOP House.

Other coverage: Sioux City Journal, Iowa Legislators see limited budget room for tax cuts this session

Related: Tax States of the States: Mixed, Murky and Sometimes Mercurial (Renu Zaretsky, TaxVox)

 

IMG_0923Russ Fox, FTC Sponsors Tax Identity Theft Awareness Week

Tony Nitti, Four Things Sure To Destroy Your Tax Season. Three of them stem from Obamacare.

 

William Perez, What You Need to Know about Reporting Payments Using Form 1099-MISC

Annette Nellen, HR 30 – Defining full-time worker for ACA has costs. A story of unintended consequences.

Peter Reilly, Dressage Riding Physician Convinces IRS On Hobby Loss Audit But Loses To Massachusetts

Keith Fogg, Tenth Circuit Ups the Ante on Late Filed Returns (Procedurally Taxing)

Robert Wood, Bill Gives IRS Power Over Tax Prep, But Should It? No.

Kay Bell, St. Louis says no added taxes for new NFL Rams stadium. But the one they have is 20 years old, darn it!

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Kyle Pomerleau, Government Cost $4.5 Trillion in 2014 and We All Paid Part of It (Tax Policy Blog).

Robert Goulder, China’s Fiscal Roadmap: Tax Like America (Tax Policy Blog). If you are worried about China achieving economic domination, you can rest easy now.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 613

News from the Profession. Judging By This List, Accountants Aren’t Marriage Material (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/5/15: Early year-end planning edition. And: too cold for a film credit trial?

Monday, January 5th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today “In the Blogs” visitors: the tax and AMT article is here. You may also be interested in these thoughts on when prepaying tax is unwise, even without AMT.

 

20150105-1Now that you’re done with 2014 year-end tax planning, let’s get started on 2015. Procrastination is as human as liking sugar and shiny things. It’s natural to get serious about anything right at the deadline, whether it’s homework or tax planning.

But it’s often wiser to get started early. That’s especially true when looking at contributions to tax-advantaged savings accounts. You should look to fund these as soon as you can, rather than putting them off to the last minute. The sooner you fund your 2015 IRA, your Health Savings Account, or your Section 529 education savings account, the sooner your funds are earning their return tax-free.

So if you have the funds on hand, here’s a new year’s resolution to keep today — fully fund your tax-advantaged savings accounts. Your limits for 2015:

Contributions can not exceed the amount necessary to provide for the qualified education expenses of the beneficiary. If you contribute to a 529 plan, however, be aware that there may be gift tax consequences if your contributions, plus any other gifts, to a particular beneficiary exceed $14,000 during the year.

Taxpayers filing in Iowa can deduct their contributions to the College Savings Iowa Section 529 plan up to $3,163 per beneficiary, per donor on their Iowa income tax return. A married couple funding plans for their two children can therefore deduct up to $12,652 in 2015 CSI contributions.

 

Enjoying a short Des Moines winter commute.

Too cold for a film tax credit trial? A strange development in the Iowa Film Credit scandal, reported by the Des Moines Register:

A new fraud trial for a Nebraska filmmaker accused of using a fake purchase agreement to get tax credits should be delayed because two elderly witnesses have left Iowa for the winter, according to a prosecutor handling the case.

Yes, it’s cold here. We’re supposed to get a snowstorm today, and it’s supposed to be 1 on Wednesday. For a high temperature. And I can’t say I have a great deal of sympathy for somebody who got millions in tax credit money.

But a criminal trial is serious business, and the film scandal has been going since 2009. The prosecution says the witness is worried that he might fall. I think arrangements can be made to get him safely from the car.

What’s the case about?

Dennis Brouse, 64, has been waiting for a second trial after judges on the Iowa Court of Appeals overturned a felony fraud conviction against him in April. Brouse’s company, Changing Horses Productions, received $9 million in tax credits from Iowa’s scandal-ridden film tax credit program.

Brouse faces a single fraud charge and potentially a prison sentence, stemming from the purchase of a 38-foot camper trailer he bought from Prole couple Wayne and Shirley Weese. Prosecutors say Brouse paid the couple $10,500 in cash for the trailer, but he claimed it cost twice that amount in a statement for tax credits given to the Iowa Film Office.

The state auditor’s report on the Iowa Film Office showed a lot of creative accounting for Changing Horses, including the claim of a $1 million expense for non-cash “sponsorship” considerations. I am guessing that they are going after the trailer case because there are e-mails from the Iowa Department of Revenue blessing the “in-kind” expense concept. I’m pretty sure that there is no such endorsement of doubling expenditures.

 

Roger McEowen, Top 10 Agricultural Law and Taxation Developments of 2014 (ISU-CALT). The impact of Obamacare is #1.

20121120-2Alan Cole rings in the new year with New Year, New Individual Mandate Penalty and New Year, New Employer Mandate (Tax Policy Blog). What new individual mandate penalty?

However, it’s also worth remembering that the penalty will be doubled (or more than doubled) for 2015. 2014’s penalty is $95 or 1% of your household income, whichever is higher. 2015’s penalty is $325 or 2% of your household income, whichever comes higher.

And the employer mandate? It’s the penalty on taxpayers with 100 or more “full-time equivalent” employees. A blog post can’t really do it justice:

The IRS has issued a truly epic 56-question FAQ to help explain the even-more-epic final regulations for the employer shared responsibility provision. In case you are wondering, those final regulations total to over seventy thousand words – similar in size to the novel Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.

It will get more epic if the Supreme Court rules that the individual tax credit only applies in the 14 states that have established their own ACA exchanges. The employer mandate only applies if an employee has qualified for the credit, and the individual mandate penalty will not apply to taxpayers whose insurance becomes “unaffordable” if the credits go away.

 

Robert Wood, Think Filing Taxes Was Tough Before Obamacare? Just Wait. “This year for the first time, the Affordable Care Act has created a trickier tax season. It is more expensive too, as virtually all Americans filing tax returns will have to consider the law’s impact on them and their taxes.”

Annette Nellen, ACA – Affordability of health insurance and age

William Perez, Directory of tax extensions for each state

Russ Fox, 1099 Time (2015 Version). “It’s time for businesses to send out their annual information returns.”

 

Kay Bell, Cigarettes are a bigger state tax target than booze. I think that explains the hostility of state governments to e-cigs.

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About EAs, #4: The SEE Isn’t a Tax Prep Exam

Peter Reilly, IRS Revokes Exempt Status Of Faux Veterans Groups

 

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Renu Zaretsky, Cap and Trade Plans, Tax Deadlines, and Rate Drops. The TaxVox headline roundup covers gas taxes, dynamic scoring, and an insane plan in Washington state for a state-only “cap and trade” carbon program.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 606

News from the Profession: Celebrate the New Year with Accounting Salaries Charted by Company Type, Role, Service Line and More (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/18/14: Year-end planning and relatives. And: when will the President sign the extenders?

Thursday, December 18th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

When will he sign? Now that Congress has finally sent the extender Bill, HR 5771, to the President, the “expired provisions” require only his signature. When will that happen? I have no idea. There is nothing at Whitehouse.gov about it. But everyone says he’ll sign. It would be the practical joke of the year if he didn’t.

 


IMG_1944Beware t
he relative! The tax law generally assumes that when related parties do business together, they’re up to no good somehow. That’s why the law has so many provisions that deny or delay tax benefits when relatives are involved.

For example, Code Section 267 only allows a deduction to a related party “as of the day as of which such amount is includible in the gross income of the person to whom the payment is made.” That’s no problem if the “related party” is on the accrual method, because they will be accruing the income at the same time you accrue the expense. But if the related party is a cash-basis taxpayer, you have to pay this year to get a deduction this year.

But who is related? It’s more complicated than you might think. For purposes of year-end deductions,  owners of more than 50% of C corporation stock, and their families (siblings, spouses, ancestors and descendants) are related.  Families are usually considered as a single owner for the 50% test.

For pass-through entities — partnerships and S corporations — any owner is a related party, along with members of owners families and anybody related to the family members.

 

Seventh Avenue, Des Moines, this morning.William Perez, Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014. “A quick summary of the tax changes included in the Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014.”

Kay Bell, Tax filing projections for the 2015 season and beyond

Peter Reilly looks back on his idiosyncratic tax coverage this year. Everything from atheist parsonages to Dr. Dino. Peter covers a lot of stuff that I wish I did, in a lot more depth than I could.

Jason Dinesen, A Brief History of Marriage in the Tax Code: Part 1, In the Beginning

Robert D. Flach, THERE ARE A LOT MORE THAN 20 REALLY STUPID THINGS IN THE US TAX CODE! “The one and only purpose of the federal income tax is to raise the money necessary to run the government. Period.”

Me, Year-end business deductions: the two-minute drill. My new post at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record’s Business Professionals’ Blog. “While you add up the score in April, December is when you run the two-minute drill.”

 

20130419-1Robert Wood, 8 Savvy Tax Tips & Extenders For Year-End

Tim Todd, 5th Cir. Affirms IRS’s Adjustment Outside Limitations Period for Improper Installment Sale of Partnership Interest.

Keith Fogg, Collection Due Process Determination and Decision Letters Redux (Procedurally Taxing)

Jack Townsend, Plea in Corporate Corruption Case with Tax Charge. Kickbacks kick back.

Gavin Ekins, The IRS’s Long Reach Doesn’t Just Apply to Corporations (Tax Policy Blog). The post describes some of the ridiculous hoops Americans abroad have to jump through to comply with the tax law, and observes:

Are Americans alone in this onerous system? Unfortunately, they are. Only one other country taxes its citizens is this manner. Eritrea, the small country on the northern border of Ethiopia, is the only other country which taxes its citizens who live and work abroad, but unlike the U.S., they have a reduced flat rate for those citizens and none of the reporting burden.  

The results range from annoyance to financial disaster for the absurd crime of committing personal finance while abroad.

Renu Zaretsky, They Saved the Must-Pass for Last. The TaxVox headline roundup provides a good summary of the passage of the extender bill; it also talks about state gas tax moves.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 588

 

20141218-1Cara Griffith, A Champion for Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog). “New York enacted a comprehensive tax reform package designed to improve the competitiveness of the state’s tax code by merging the bank tax into the corporate franchise tax, adopting single-sales-factor apportionment with market-based sourcing, broadening the corporate tax base, and lowering the rate.”

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown 12/10: The Best Laid Plans (and Reports) (Tax Justice Blog)

 

Daniel Shaviro,  Evaluating the Case for 1986-Style Corporate Tax Reform, (TaxAnalysts, available via the TaxProf)

 

Career Corner. My Firm Holiday Party is a Teaching Moment For What Not to Do at a Firm Holiday Party (Leona May, Going Concern)

 

News from the Profession. Former Stillwater mayor charged with aiding tax fraud (MPRnews.org):

A former mayor of Stillwater was charged in federal court Wednesday with helping two Minnesota brothers keep millions of dollars in taxes from the state and federal governments.

Ken Harycki, a certified public accountant, knowingly prepared false tax forms for twin brothers Thurlee and Roylee Belfrey and their health care companies, according to charges filed in U.S. District Court.

CPAs, you must only use your powers for good.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/17/14: Lazarus rises! For two weeks, anyway. Senate passes extender bill.

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

The Senate has passed the extender bill and sent it to the President. The Hill reports:

By a 76 to 16 vote, the Senate passed a measure that would extend more than four dozen tax breaks for both businesses and individuals just through 2014.

Republicans and Democrats latched on to the one-year deal after the White House undercut negotiations on a broader bipartisan package, underscoring divisions between Democrats in the wake of this year’s heavy losses at the polls. Senators from both parties said Tuesday that they would have preferred legislation that restored the tax breaks through 2015.

20130113-3The President is expected to sign. That means we now know what the 2014 tax law is with two weeks left in the year. Unfortunately, all of the revived provisions die again on January 1, and Congress will have to go through this whole exercise to raise Lazarus again.

What does this do for year-end planning?

Fixed asset frenzy. Taxpayers who can place fixed assets in service between now and year-end can qualify for the $500,000 Section 179 deduction or 50% bonus depreciation.

The Section 179 rule allows taxpayers to fully deduct the cost of up to $500,000 in assets placed in service during 2014 that would otherwise be capitalized and depreciated over a period of years. It can apply no new or used property. It is normally unavailable for real estate or rental property. It is limited to taxable income, and it phases out dollar-for-dollar as fixed asset acquisitions exceed $500,000.

Bonus depreciation enables taxpayers to deduct 50% of the cost of qualifying property in the year in which it is placed in service. The remaining cost is depreciated under normal depreciation rules. It is only available for new property with a life up to 20 years, but it is not limited by taxable income or amount of assets placed in service, so it can generate net operating losses.

Remember that the tax law applies special limits to both Section 179 and bonus depreciation for vehicles.

S-SidewalkS corporation Built-in gains. The tax law requires S corporations to pay a 35% corporate-level tax on “built-in gains” included in taxable income during the “recognition period” after the convert from C corporation status. “Built-in gains” are income items, including appreciation of asset values, that exist at the time a C corporation becomes an S corporation.

This rule was enacted in 1986 with a ten-year “recognition period.” The tax goes away after the recognition period is over. The bill reduced the recognition period to five years for gains recognized in 2014. That opens tax planning doors. Taxpayers that have been S corporations for more than five years can unload appreciated assets. Taxpayers in their fifth S corporation year can reduce their taxable income to push any gains recognized this year past the recognition period — assuming this provision is extended to 2015.

IRA donations. The extender bill revives the provision allowing IRAs owned by individuals subject to the minimum distribution rules to make direct donations of up to $100,000 to charity. These donations do not show up as income or as itemized deductions on the owner returns.

Other tax breaks revived through the end of 2014 include the research credit, the deduction for state and local sales taxes, the educator expense deduction, charitable donations of conservation easements, and energy production tax credits. The Tax Policy Blog has more coverage, including a complete list of the extended benefits.

Other coverage:

Paul Neiffer, Senate Passes Tax Extender Bill 76-16

Robert D. Flach, FINALLY!

 

 

20130426-1Neil GandalWhy Does Uncle Sam Hate American Expats?  (Wall Street Journal, via the TaxProf):

The U.S. is the only developed country in the world that requires citizens who live abroad to file tax returns. This is so complicated that it is virtually impossible to do without an accountant, and that can cost more than $1,000 a year, even for very simple tax returns.

But that’s only the beginning. There are additional reporting requirements for Americans who live abroad. The FBAR (Foreign Bank Account Report) requires holders of foreign financial accounts to report detailed information about all such accounts each year. It can take many days to obtain and compile the information and then prepare the form.

The Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act of 2010 made matters worse. Fatca compliance costs for foreign banks are so high that many banks have closed the accounts of Americans living abroad. Joining the ranks of the “unbanked” is becoming the straw that breaks the camel’s back.

Our thumbless Congress, eager to to score cheap political points by cracking down on international “millionaires and billionaires,” has inadvertently, but effectively, made it ridiculously difficult for ordinary Americans working overseas to commit personal finance. They have enacted horrific financial penalties for petty paperwork violations. And the IRS has enforced these penalties under the assumption that everyone with an overseas account is a crook.

 

Tony Nitti, Have You Heard The One About The Tax Credit That You Pay To The IRS? It’s the premium tax credit under ACA that many taxpayers will have to repay with their tax returns in April.

Kay Bell, Noah’s Ark park loses state tax breaks (but Christmas is safe)

 

taxanalystslogoJeremy ScottSlashed Budget Shows IRS’s Failure to Build Political Support (Tax Analysts Blog, my emphasis):

Republicans made it clear that the cuts to the IRS were in response to the agency’s recent actions. The GOP has a long laundry list of complaints: the payment of IRS bonuses, the failure to accurately and timely answer questions about the exempt organization scandal, old training videos, and the cost of Obamacare implementation. With the exception of the last item, the Service has been tone-deaf in its response to Republicans. In fact, one might even call some of its vague and misleading answers outright defiance of the House majority. That’s an odd strategy for an agency crying out for more resources to take.

Regular readers know that this is my view also. I agree with this too:

Those who criticize the GOP’s handling of the various IRS scandals have a point. But lost in their reflexive defense of the Service are valid Republican complaints about the IRS’s lack of transparency and responsiveness. For whatever reason, the Service decided that it wouldn’t cooperate with Republicans over the scandal. Maybe it thought the GOP wouldn’t be reasonable. Maybe it thought giving clear answers and admitting obvious wrongdoing would be more damaging to its prospects than being opaque and evasive. Well, it was wrong — both in hindsight, given the budget passed over the weekend, and at the time, given the agency’s duty to be nonpartisan.

Read Mr. Scott’s whole piece. The result will be bad for taxpayers, but the IRS leadership can look in the mirror for someone to blame.

Howard Gleckman, The War on the IRS. As Jeremy Scott notes, the IRS is its own worst enemy in this war.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 587. Featuring a contrarian take on the scandal from Peter Reilly.

Robert Wood, 20 Facts About IRS Targeting, Those Emails And The White House

 

News from the Profession. Going Concern Presents: The Worst of Auditing 2014 (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/16/14: Extenders as dessert after the Senate eats its peas.

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Flickr image courtesy seriousbri under Creative Commons license.

Flickr image courtesy seriousbri under Creative Commons license.

It appears that the extenders will be served up to the Senate only when the Senators clean their plates. The Hill reports (my emphasis):

Once they are out of the way, Senate aides expect an agreement to confirm Obama’s other pending nominees by midweek.

That would speed up final votes on a package extending a variety of lapsed tax breaks and on the stalled Terrorism Risk Insurance Act.

Senate aides say a one-year extension of expired tax breaks will be one of the last items to move because it has strong support on both sides of the aisle and gives lawmakers incentive to stay in town to complete other work. They predict it will pass quickly once put on the schedule.

So lingering uncertainty about the tax law for taxpayers and advisors is the price we have to pay for the Senate to do its job. Glad to help, guys!

 

If Iowa's income tax were a car, it would look like this.

If Iowa’s income tax were a car, it would look like this.

Joseph Henchman, A Big Year for State Tax Reform, and Congrats to COST! (Tax Policy Blog):

All groups who work on state tax reform should feel proud of the accomplishments of 2014. North Carolina simplified and reduced its whole system, Indiana and Michigan cut investment taxes, New York reformed its entire corporate tax system, and even Rhode Island and the District of Columbia enacted tax reductions. Additionally, voters defeated tax increase proposals in Colorado and Nevada, and in the spring a big tax increase proposal in Illinois failed. Maine raised its sales tax, the only tax increase at the state level in 2014.

Iowa is painfully absent from this list, and it needs tax reform as much as any place.

 

buzz20140923Robert D. Flach offers your Tuesday Buzz, with links from all over.

William Perez explains How to Make Sure Your Charity Donation Is Tax-Deductible

Jason Dinesen, Changing the Way I Work with Business Clients. “For all entities, I now require some sort of year-round relationship.”

Keith Fogg, Bankruptcy Court Grants IRS Equitable Tolling and Denies Discharge on Late Return (Procedurally Taxing).

Peter Reilly, Tom Coburn Tax Decoder Takes On Clergy Tax Abuse. “Senator Tom Coburn has served as a deacon in a Southern Baptist church but that has not prevented him from taking a blast at a tax break that benefits the Southern Baptist Convention mightily.”

Kay Bell, Congress’ job rating improves! But just by 1 percentage point.

David Henderson, Deadweight Loss from the New California Gas Tax. Rather than using the money for roads, it goes into a big hole high-speed rail.

 

Martin Sullivan, Will Orrin Hatch Lead on Tax Reform? (Tax Analysts Blog). “. If — as Hatch writes in the preface to the report — “reform is vital and necessary to our nation’s economic well-being”– should he not also go beyond publishing reports and principles and write a real bill?”

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 586

 

When there are so many worthy nominees, it’s hard to pick only twenty. 20 Really Stupid Things In The U.S. Tax Code (Robert Wood) I still think the Section 409A deferred comp rules and everything Obamacare should head any such list.

News from the Profession. The Office of the Future Looks Kind of Like a Homeless Encampment Under a Bridge (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/11/14: Cromnibus cuts IRS budget, delays extender vote. And: Mileage goes to 57.5 cents.

Thursday, December 11th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

The “Cromnibus” train-wreck spending bill process seems to be holding up everything else, including the extender vote. The 55 Lazarus provisions awaiting revival are on hold while Congress struggles to avert a government “shutdown” at midnight tonight.

Flicker image courtesy Michael Coghlan under Creative Commons license.

Flicker image courtesy Michael Coghlan under Creative Commons license.

Outgoing Senate Majority Leader Reid has said that the Senate will finish the Cromnibus before voting on the extender bill, HR 5771. The house-passed bill would extend dozens of tax breaks that expired at the end of 2013 retroactively through the end of this month. Business provisions in the bill include the $500,000 Section 179 deduction, 50% bonus depreciation, the R&D credit, and the 5-year built-in gain period for S corporations. The provision allowing IRA charitable donations is among the individual breaks at stake.

There is no indication that the Senate will fail to eventually pass HR 5771, or that the President will veto it, but politics are uncertain, and I’ll feel better about things when they do pass it. It appears the hope they would finish up today is wishful thinking, though; this Wall Street Journal story says the House is expected to pass a two-day funding bill today to give the Senate extra time to approve the spending bill.

The IRS faces a 3.1% funding cut in the bill. That’s a tribute to the tone-deaf and confrontational attitude of IRS Commissioner Koskinen, who has responded to the Tea Party scandals pretty much by saying “give us more money!” Given the increased responsibilities given the IRS by Congress, cutting their budget seems strange. Yet as long as the Commissioner keeps antagonizing his funders, and keeps finding money to fund his “voluntary” preparer regulation program to get around the Loving decision, he can expect similar appropriation success.

Related: Paul Neiffer, Tax Extender Bill May Be Punted to Weekend

 

Mileage rate goes to 57.5 centsWith gas prices falling, the standard IRS mileage rate is naturally going… up. The IRS yesterday released (Notice 2014-79) the 2015 standard mileage rates:

– 57.5 cents per mile for business miles. This is 56 cents for 2014.

– 14 cents per mile for charity miles, same as in 2014.

– 23 cents per mile for medical and moving miles. This rate is 23.5 cents for 2014.

Related: William Perez, How to Deduct Car and Truck Expenses on Your Taxes

 

20130819-1Peter Reilly, Iowa Corporation Not Liable For California Corporate Tax From Ownership Of LLC Interest. It discusses a California court ruling that mere ownership of a California LLC interest isn’t enough to make the corporate owner subject to California’s $800 minimum franchise tax. If it holds up, it will be good news for many taxpayers dinged by this stupid fee.

Jim Maule, Do-It-Yourself Tax Preparation? Better? Paid preparers didn’t do an impressive job handling the GAO’s secret shoppers.

Kay Bell, Mortgages offer nice tax breaks, but in limited parts of the U.S.

 

The new Cavalcade of Risk is up! at WorkersCompensation.com.  Always good stuff in the venerable roundup of insurance and risk-management blog posts; this edition features Hank Stern’s take on the “creepy” ACA 404Care.gov site.

 

Bryan Caplan, The Inanity of the Welfare State:

While taxes are highly progressive, transfers have an upside-down U-shape.  Households in the middle quintile get the most money.  The richest households actually get more money than the poorest.  Think about how many times you’ve heard about government’s great mission to “help the poor.”  Could there be any clearer evidence that such claims are mythology?

Eye-opening. Read the whole thing.

 

 

Robert Wood, Obama Justice Department Was Involved In IRS Targeting, Lerner Emails Reveal

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 581

 

EITC error chartAlan Cole, Treasury Report: Improper Payments Remain a Problem in EITC, Child Credit (Tax Policy Blog)

David Brunori, Mississippi’s Very Good Idea to Help its Poor (Tax Analysts Blog). It’s an earned income tax credit. Given the massive EITC fraud and error rate, I’m not convinced.

Tax Justice Blog, Update on the Push for Dynamic Scoring: Will Ryan Purge Congress’s Scorekeepers?

Joseph Thorndike, Wall Street Journal Prefers Ignorance to Expertise (Tax Analysts Blog). It’s about the CBO.

 

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Robert Goulder, Taxing Diverted Profits: The Empire Strikes Back (Tax Analysts Blog).  “The message is this: Once people realize what a functional territorial regime looks like, they suddenly become less enamored with the concept. One of several reasons why U.S. tax reform won’t be easy.”

Chris Sanchirico, A Repatriation Tax Holiday for US Multinationals? Four Contagious Illusions (TaxVox)

 

News from the Profession. The AICPA Can’t Figure Out Why Record Numbers of Accounting Grads Aren’t Taking the CPA Exam (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/3/14: House voting on extenders today. Are Senate, White House on board?

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20130113-3The House will likely pass one-year extender bill today. Will the Senate and White House go along? Multiple reports say that the House of Representatives is expected to approve HR 5771 today, reviving 55 perennially-resurected tax breaks through 2014. The breaks, which include bonus depreciation, the $500,000 Section 179 deduction, and the research credit, all expired at the end of 2013.

While the fate of the bill in the Senate and the White House are not entirely clear, I expect the House bill to pass, given the lack of alternatives.  The Wall Street Journal reports:

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden (D., Ore.) used a weekly Senate Democratic luncheon Tuesday to push for an alternative that would extend expiring tax breaks through 2015.

But his Republican counterpart on the committee, Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch, brushed that aside, saying time was running out. Mr. Hatch—on whom Mr. Wyden frequently relies when crafting deals—came out in favor of the short-term fix, saying the only alternative he would support at this point was the one worked out between Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.) and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp (R., Mich.) and drew a White House veto threat last week. If the Senate advanced a new version, “there will be no bill” because “the House is going to leave,” Mr. Hatch said.

The full text of Sen. Hatch’s statements can be found here.

The Hill reports that the White House appears ready to go along with the House bill. Given the way the White House threatened a veto of the House-Senate deal that would have extended some of the breaks permanently, I think the lack of a veto threat means the President is likely to sign this version. While there appears to be some unhappiness with the House bill — Senator Grassley is not a fan of the one-year approach —  I expect the lame-duck Senate to pass it anyway. Unfortunately, it’s not clear when the Senate will act.

Congress has for years passed these provisions for one or two years at a time because Congressional budget rules allow them to pretend they are less expensive than they really are. Unfortunately, that often leaves taxpayers uncertain as to what the tax law is for the year until the year is almost over — or, in 2012, until the year was over. That makes it hard to evaluate the economics of important fixed-asset decisions. The abortive House-Senate deal would have ended this game for several key provisions, but the White House chose scoring cheap political points over an improved business tax environment.

Related:

Paul Neiffer, Is an One-Year Extension of Section 179 all we get?!

Howard Gleckman, How To End the Tax Extender Drama: Stop Calling Them Extenders—And Make Congress Pay For Them

Kay Bell, Tax extenders compromise: OK expired breaks for 2014 only

 

20121108-1Peter Reilly, Repair Regs – A Hellish Tax Season And Refunds Of Biblical Magnitude. Peter discusses the need, or not, for massive filing of useless accounting method changes to implement the new “repair regulations.” He also touches on a potential boon for owners of commercial real estate.

Robert D. Flach, TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE 0% TAX RATE

William Perez, What You Need to Know about the Premium Assistance Tax Credit

Russ Fox notes A Rare Piece of Efficiency from the IRS

Tony Nitti, The Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2014: #4-IRS Rules on Self-Employment Income Of LLC Members.

 

Robert Wood, What IRS Calls ‘Willful’–Even A Smidgen–Can Mean Penalties Or Jail

TaxGrrrl, Feeling Spendy This Year? ’12 Days Of Christmas’ Slightly More Expensive

 

microsoft-appleSound Advice. David Brunori offers Advice for the New Republican Legislative Majorities (Tax Analysts Blog). It’s full of sound advice, but I especially like this:

Republicans should become the party of virtue, courage, and honesty when it comes to taxes. They should fight crony capitalism, as there is nothing more abhorrent to the free market than the government picking winners and losers. Yet state governments do just that all the time. The proliferation of tax incentives represents horrible tax policy. That politicians can decide economic policy through tax incentives is more akin to a Soviet five-year plan than to Adam Smith’s invisible hand. True conservatives should fight attempts to use tax policy to further economic objectives. Broad-based taxes and low rates will always serve the conservative cause better than the existing nonsensical tax laws. Standing on principle to ensure a broad tax base is hard — and neither party has been able to do it. But it is a stand worth taking.

That would be wonderful advice here in Iowa, but our newly re-elected GOP governor has been up to his mustache in crony tax breaks to chase high-profile businesses. Meanwhile Iowa’s home-grown businesses don’t get the big subsidies. They are dragged down by the highest corporation tax rate in the developed world, baroque complexity, and a bottom-ten business tax environment.

A real pro-business tax reform in Iowa might look something like The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 573.

 

lizard20140826Leslie BookH&R Block CEO Asks IRS To Make it Harder to Self-Prepare Tax Returns and Why That is Good for the Tax System.  “Yet, as I explain here, I think the changes he proposes would likely be good for the tax system because they could enhance visibility and accountability, principles the IRS should emphasize with issues that tend to have sticky error rates.”

H&R Block has been trying to pad its income for years on the backs of retail taxpayers. Its former CEO authored the illegal tax preparer regulations system the IRS tried to force on the industry — a system that would have run many of Henry and Robert’s competitors out of the buisness. Now they want to force the lowest-income earners through their doors.

I think the right approach to advice from an outfit that so shamelessly promotes its interests at the expense of taxpayers may be to carefully note it, and to do exactly the opposite.

 

Stephen Entin, No Mystery that Investment Slump Hurts Workers, Lowers Productivity and Wages (Tax Policy Blog)

 

News from the Profession. Why Is Everyone in Public Accounting Obsessed with Sports? (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/2/14: Dead provisions to arise for just a few weeks? And: Shocker! IRS Commissioner wants more $$$

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014 by Joe Kristan

lazarus risingCongress to let the Lazarus provisions make it to the end of 2014? The White House’s threat to veto the Senate’s deal to permanently extend some of the perennially expiring tax provisions has killed that proposal. Now it looks like Congress will take up a bill to extend the provisions, which expired at the end of 2013, through the end of this year. That means we get to do this all over again next year. The Hill reports:

The vote on a short-term extension, expected as soon as this week, would come after a veto threat from President Obama derailed a developing $400 billion deal between Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and House Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp (R-Mich.) that would have extended some expired tax breaks indefinitely, as well as others for two years.

Republicans on both side of the Capitol suggested the move showed that a one-year deal was the only proposal with a chance of becoming law.

The article says “practically all” of the provisions that expired at the end of 2013 will be included. The Lazarus provisions that will come back to life include, among many others:

– A $500,000 Section 179 deduction for asset purchases that would otherwise be capitalized and depreciated.

– 50% “bonus depreciation”

– The research credit

– The five-year built-in gain period.

– The allowance of tax-free distributions from IRAs to charities.

The full text of the bill is available here: (HR 5771)

So we will get a 2014 tax law just as 2014 comes to an end. Because there is no election, there is hope that we won’t have to wait until December 2015 to know what the tax law is for 2015. Not exactly a shining moment in tax policy.

The bill also includes technical corrections for tax bills going back to 2004.

Related:

How the White House torpedoed Harry Reid’s tax deal (The Hill)

The Politics and Policy of Tax Extenders (Len Burman, TaxVox). “In theory, allowing tax provisions to expire periodically could precipitate a careful reexamination of the effectiveness of each program in light of our fiscal situation and priorities. In practice, the expiration of popular temporary provisions such as the R&E credit creates a vehicle for all sorts of budget-busting mischief.”

 

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

TaxGrrrl has posted another installment of her interview with IRS Commissioner KoskinenYou may not be astounded to hear that he wants more money:

With spending cuts already taking a toll on taxpayer services, the agency is bracing itself for another tough season. In fact, Koskinen cites funding the IRS as his biggest challenge since taking office last December.

“It’s a serious problem for us,” he says. “I don’t know who got our $500 million but I’ll bet they’re not gonna give you back the $2-3 billion we would have if we had it.”

Given that the Congress has used the tax law as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy, with responsibilities including attempting to run the broken Obamacare machine, it’s not unreasonable to think IRS has increased needs for funds.

That said, the Commissioner has nobody to blame but himself. His tone-deaf and confrontational tone with Republicans investigating the political abuse of the Exempt Organizations function has earned him no friends in the party that controls the purse strings. The sudden appearance of 30,000 Lois Lerner e-mails that he insisted could not be recovered killed any credibility he had left. Only a new commissioner has any hope of turning that around.

The Commissioner also says he has cut spending to the bone:

The agency is already down 3,000 employees last year. Another 2,000-3,000 are on their way out by the end of this year. The current rate of replacement is one new employee for every five employees who leave… 
What gets cut next? The Commissioner is clear that it will be more personnel. That is, he noted, all that’s left.

Well, maybe. I’d be more convinced of that if he decided there just wasn’t enough cash lying around for his “voluntary” tax preparer initiative — a blatant attempt to get around the Loving decision shutting down mandatory preparer regulation.

Related: Robert Wood, Horrible Bosses, IRS EditionPeter Reilly, Restoring Trust In IRS Is A National Imperative

 

buzz20141017Robert D. Flach has posted his fresh Tuesday Buzz, including a link to his post at The Tax Professional on tax preparer civil disobedience in ACA enforcement. I will have more to say about this topic later this week.

William Perez explains Itemized Tax Deductions

Russ Fox, Mundane Tax Fraud Downs Friend of Cicero Town President

Keith Fogg, Appeals Fumbles CDP Case and Resulting Resolution Demonstrates Power of Installment Agreement (Procedurally Taxing)

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About Enrolled Agents

Jack Townsend, More on Willfulness. You can’t break the law if you aren’t trying.

Kay Bell, December to-do list: shopping, family visits and tax tasks

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 572

Andrew Lundeen, Kyle Pomerleau, Less Than One Percent of Businesses Employ Half of the Private Sector Workforce (Tax Policy Blog). “On the other hand, while only 0.4 percent of all firms have over 500 employees, this small group of businesses employs 50.6 percent of the nation’s private sector workforce, with most of those employees working for C corporations.”

News from the Profession. This Timesheet-Addicted Managing Partner Will Make You Grateful Not to Work For Him (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern). A charming threat of dismissal issued the day before Thanksgiving will always make you thankful for an updated resume.

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/25/14: Administration complicates extender negotiations. And: Instant Tax Service has to stay dead.

Tuesday, November 25th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Programming note: The Tax Update will be on the road for Thanksgiving starting Wednesday. Have a great weekend, see you Monday. 

 

Economic supergenius

Nice Section 179 deduction you have there. Hate to see something bad happen to it.

Extenders as extortion. The administration yesterday complicated the negotiations on the extension of the perpetually-expiring tax provisions by demanding an extension of the refundable child credit and a permanent expansion of the fraud-ridden earned income tax credit, the New York Times reports.

It’s obnoxious to throw a new welfare program provision into the extender negotiations at this late date, but a lame-duck administration has nothing to lose by trying. While I still think the $500,000 Section 179 deduction will be extended retroactively to January 1, this makes me a lot more nervous.

If anything good comes of this extortion attempt, it’s that it highlights the unwisdom of passing tax provisions temporarily if you don’t really want them to be temporary. Every time you need to re-enact them, you open yourself up to just this sort of shakedown.

Other coverage from The Hill: White House skeptical of possible deal on tax breaks and Lew: Avoid ‘wrong approach’ on tax breaks

Related:

TaxGrrrl, 10 Expired Tax Provisions That Might Affect You In 2014 and Kay Bell, Congress fighting over which business and individual tax extenders to make permanent

 

"Fez" Ogbasion, Instant Tax Service CEO.

“Fez” Ogbazion, Instant Tax Service CEO.

Appeals court says Instant Tax Service has to stay deadThe Sixth Circuit has upheld the 2013 ruling that put Instant Tax Service out of business. ITS, which had 150 franchise operations in a number of states, primarily in low-income inner-city locations, had shown up frequently in stories alleging shady tax prep practices (like this).

ITS was found to have encouraged its franchisees to prepare “stub returns.” These are returns preparered off of year-end pay stubs, rather than W-2 forms. The injunction also found that the franchisor used deceptive pricing and marketing practices.

ITS and its owner, Fez Ogbazion, argued the injunction was improper and overbroad. The appeals court considered the ITS appeal on the stub return issue:

Defendant Ogbazion agreed during his testimony that “[i]f you prepare a tax return using a pay stub, it’s not always accurate and does not always have all of the information on there,” and “[w]hen using a pay stub to prepare a tax return, the income information can be off for a variety of reasons.” …  And ITS employee Boynton, who had been a tax return preparer before she became a manager, agreed during her testimony that she was “aware that tax returns prepared using pay stubs are inaccurate more often than not,” that “the last paycheck stub varies from a W-2 more often than not,” and that “the income reflected on a return prepared on a pay stub can vary from income reflected on a return prepared based on a W-2.”

The court found that the District Court correctly evaluated the stub return issue:

It is clear from this evidence that pay-stub filing often results in understatement of tax liability, and ITS knew it. It is also clear from this and other evidence that pay-stub filing was common at ITS franchises. The district court’s conclusion that understatement of tax liability “inevitably results” may have gone further than we would go, but it is a plausible account of the evidence in the record as a whole.

The Moral? Wait for your W-2 before filing. Don’t try to file off of your pay stub. And if your preparer offers to prepare a return without waiting for your W-2, find another preparer.

Cite:  United States v. ITS Financial LLC et al (CA-6, Case No. 13-4341)

 

Tax Analysts has published a story covering the film tax credit panel I was on last week: NCSL Task Force Needs More Persuading on Merits of Film Incentives

 

20141125-2We’ve done a little blogroll updating. We’ve cut some blogs that haven’t been updated in months, and added Tax Litigation Survey and Forbes tax blogger Robert W. Wood.

Tony Nitti, The Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) of 2014: #5-Is The Sale Of A Right To Buy Land Ordinary Income Or Capital Gain?

William Perez, Excluding Foreign Wages from US Taxes

Robert Wood, Jersey Shore’s Mike ‘The Situation’ Sorrentino Tax Evasion Trial Delayed

Stephen Olsen, Summary Opinions for 11/07/14 & 11/14/14 (Procedurally Taxing). A roundup of tax procedure issues, including a report on IRS hiring of a private law firm to help it audit Microsoft.

Peter Reilly, AAA Does Not Revive With New S Election – Explained By Jelly Beans. Another reason not to terminate an S corporation election carelessly.

Jack Townsend, Credit Suisse is Sentenced: Is It just a Wrist Slapping (Harder than UBS But Is It Enough)?

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: Win a Home On TV, Find a Tax Collector in the Attic

 

Andrew Lundeen, Kyle Pomerleau, Pass-through Businesses Earn More Income than Corporations (Tax Policy Blog) “Pass-throughs now earn over 60 percent of all net business income.”  It includes this great chart:

20141125-1

This means higner income taxes on “the rich” are really higher taxes on business and employment.

 

Eric Toder, Reforming Corporate Taxation (TaxVox) “The U.S. corporate tax system is broken.”
Annette Nellen, EU’s New VAT “MOSS” – Relevance for MFA? “MFA” is the Marketplace Fairness Act, the effort by states to collect taxes on internet commerce.

 

Jeremy Scott, New GOP W&M Members Send a Mixed Signal (Tax Analysts Blog):

The House Ways and Means Committee is undergoing a major transition. Committee Chair Dave Camp is leaving Congress at the end of the year and will be replaced by Rep. Paul Ryan. That means the end of an era and a possible major reshuffling of committee priorities. But Ways and Means is also getting four new Republican faces. The backgrounds of the new members don’t really send a clear signal on what to expect from the House on tax policy next year.

I hope they figure things out fast.

 

The Wall Street Journal has posted an Expat Finance & Tax Guide. It collects in one place WSJ pieces on expat-related topics, including FATCA nighmares and renouncing citizenship.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 565.

 

News from the Profession. Why Public Accounting Is Really Just One Long Kegger (Leona May, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/6/14: You pretend to complete the form, we’ll pretend to care. And: election mania!

Thursday, November 6th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today visitorsthe godawful link you seek is here.

 

20120905-1Don’t worry about getting it right, just make it look good. IRS personnel trying to appease angry practitioners at an AICPA Tax Division gathering had some strange and annoying things to say yesterday.

Practitioners are upset at the IRS insistence on Form 3115 accounting method change applications with 2014 returns from everyone moving into compliance with the new rules on repair and capitalization costs.  Tax Analysts reports ($link):

Participants in the tax methods and periods panel at the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants fall Tax Division meeting in Washington said that some taxpayers don’t want to pay the high costs associated with going through years’ worth of records to calculate a precise section 481(a) adjustment required under the final regulations (T.D. 9636). The cost of that level of compliance could be more than the entire cost of preparing their returns, practitioners said, adding that the taxpayers are considering filing their method changes with corresponding section 481(a) adjustments of zero.

The piece cites Scott Dinwiddie, special counsel, IRS Office of Associate Chief Counsel (Income Tax and Accounting):

Taxpayers were taking aggressive positions, so the government didn’t want to provide an across-the-board cutoff in the final regulations, he said. Instead, it required 481(a) adjustments as a way to allow field agents to examine taxpayers’ aggressive positions, he said.

So because some taxpayers were taking positions you didn’t like, you want to require everyone to do a bunch of wasteful and meaningless busy work during our busiest time of the year. Got it.

Dinwiddie said that, barring a situation in which the taxpayer has taken aggressive positions in the past or has in no way applied a proper capitalization method, the IRS is unlikely to have much interest in examining a taxpayer’s section 481(a) adjustment now.

So we pretend to file an accurate Form 3115, and they pretend to care. Well, you have to admit that considering the budget and enforcement restraints on the IRS, this approach is… absolutely insane. Taxpayers have to pay for a bunch of nonsense compliance, and the IRS doesn’t care whether it’s right. The IRS still has to incur processing costs. I’d love to see the IRS cost-benefit worksheets on this one.

 

20120810-1The TaxProf has a roundup of observations on the whether tax reform can happen in the new Congress, including this from William Gale:

It is a good bet that the new Republican Congress will continue to talk about tax reform. That is safe ground for Republicans generally. And, of course, seemingly impossible things do sometimes happen. But I wouldn’t bet on tax reform. 

A wise non-bet.

 

TaxGrrrl, What Matters Most When It Comes To Tax Reform? Hint: It’s Not Control Of Congress:

What is interesting, however, is that most of the significant tax policy changes in the modern era are more closely tied to the length of presidential terms. Every president has a budget – and an agenda – but real shifts in rates and policies tend to happen during a second term (or en route to a second term) no matter which party is in control. 

I don’t expect it to happen this time.

 

Scott Drenkard, What Do the 2014 Midterm Election Results Mean for State Tax Policy? “My prediction is that this means that taxes will be one of the biggest, if not the biggest issue in state policy next legislative session, and that tax reform will become even more of a bipartisan issue.”  I’m afraid that’s not true here in Iowa.

Russ Fox, Nevada Goes Deep Red. “Do you remember 1928? Well, that was the last time Nevada had a Republican governor, a Republican State Assembly, a Republican State Senate, and Republicans holding all major statewide offices.”

Paul Neiffer, A Christmas Present?! “They will meet over the next six weeks or so and around Christmas time we will get the final tax package.”

 

 

20120702-2Arnold Kling’s characteristically wise observation on the election results:

Conventional wisdom is that, relatively speaking, Democrats have a structural advantage in Presidential elections, because those elections attract more turnout. In other words, they do much better among disengaged voters. One could spin this positively for the Democrats, saying that they get support from the weaker segments of society. One could spin this negatively and say that they rely on a segment of the electorate that is poorly informed and easily bamboozled, which I believe is the case. The counter to that would be that Republicans also rely on a segment of the electorate that is poorly informed and easily bamboozled, which I also believe is the case.

While I don’t agree with all of what he says, the whole post is brief and well worth reading. So is this from Don Boudreaux:

I advise freedom-loving and free-market-appreciating Americans (of which I am unashamedly one) to be good Tullockians about the results of yesterday’s landslide wins for the G.O.P.  The Republicans who won those elections are, after all, politicians – and it is the rare politician, of whatever party, who reliably puts principle above personal interest.  As a rule, politicians are untrustworthy, duplicitous, and cowardly; they are people who have an unusually powerful craving for power and fame; and the successful among them typically posses an unusual talent for camouflaging their craving for power and fame as a saintly calling to ‘serve the people.’

Pretty much. But some are less bad than others, enough so that I do bother to vote.

Renu Zaretsky, Don’t Call It a Comeback… Yet.  The TaxVox headline roundup is full of post-election links, including news of Berkeley, California, passing an idiotic soda tax. When they start taxing mocha lattes, I’ll believe they’re such taxes are about public health than moral vanity.

 

20141016-1

And some folks are actually talking about things other than the election:

Jana Luttenegger, Even Startups Need to Have the Conversation (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).

Jason Dinesen tells us A Little Bit About Sole Proprietorships, Part 1

William Perez, Dividends: Taxes and Reporting

Robert D. Flach recounts EXPLAINING MORTGAGE INTEREST AND INVESTMENT INTEREST FOR A CLIENT

Jim Maule discusses how Mortgage Loan Modification Can Imperil Interest Deduction

Stephen Olsen at Procedurally Taxing as a new round of Summary Opinions., with links to news from the world of tax procedure.

Jack Townsend, The Honorable Jed Rakoff on Why Innocent People Plead Guilty. He quotes Judge Rakoff: “…the guidelines, like the mandatory minimums, provide prosecutors with weapons to bludgeon defendants into effectively coerced plea bargains.”

Kay Bell, 5 tax record keeping questions … and answers!

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 546

News from the Profession. McGladrey Reminds Audit Staff to Stay Billable This Busy Season (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

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