Posts Tagged ‘Nicolas Xanthopoulos’

Tax Roundup, 3/24/16: Executors get until June to file basis reports. And: Don’t foot-fault that charitable deduction!

Thursday, March 24th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20160122-3Now it’s June. The IRS has again delayed (Notice 2016-27) the new requirement for executors of taxable estates to notify beneficiaries of their basis. The rule is meant to keep the IRS from being whipsawed by having taxpayers use lower values for estate tax filings than for income tax filings.

The rule, which would require the executor to provide Form 8971 to the IRS, has been delayed several times now. The form includes a schedule for each beneficiary of the assets they are inheriting, along with the asset basis reported on the Form 706 filed for estate tax purposes. Each beneficiary is to receive a copy of their own schedule.

The filing is mandatory for estates required to file an estate tax return when the return is filed after July 31, 2015. It had been due March 31. The deadline is now June 30, 2016.

 

Charitable contributions: paperwork or bust. The law isn’t willing to take your word for charitable contributions any more. If you make a charitable contribution of $250 or more, the tax law now says no deduction is allowed unless you have magic words in writing from the charity. From IRS.gov:

The written acknowledgment required to substantiate a charitable contribution of $250 or more must contain the following information:

-Name of the organization;

-Amount of cash contribution;
-Description (but not value) of non-cash contribution;
-Statement that no goods or services were provided by the organization, if that is the case;
-Description and good faith estimate of the value of goods or services, if any, that organization provided in return for the contribution; and
-Statement that goods or services, if any, that the organization provided in return for the contribution consisted entirely of intangible religious benefits, if that was the case.

In addition, a donor may claim a deduction for contributions of cash, check, or other monetary gifts only if the donor maintains certain written records.

Even if you have a cancelled check for your $250+ gift, if you lack the magic words, your deduction is zero. 

A taxpayer learned this lesson the hard way in a Tax Court opinion released yesterday. The taxpayer’s gift in this case was a conservation easement valued at $350,971. While there are complex additional requirements for deducting such property gifts, those weren’t the problem. The taxpayer never got past the magic words:

Although the conservation deed includes provisions stating that the intent of the parties is to preserve the property, those provisions do not confirm that the preservation of the property was the only consideration because the deed did not include a provision stating that it is the entire agreement of the parties. Without  such a provision, the IRS could not have determined by reviewing the conservation deed whether petitioners received consideration in exchange for the contribution of the conservation easement. We conclude, therefore, that the conservation deed taken as a whole is insufficient to satisfy section 170(f)(8)(B)(ii). Because petitioners’ contemporaneous written acknowledgment does not comply with section 170(f)(8)(B)(ii), petitioners are not entitled to any claimed carryover charitable contribution deductions,

Lacking the magic words, the deduction suddenly went from $350,971 to nothing. 

While this was a six-figure problem in this case, the rule is just as effective for a $250 gift to your church or your favorite charity.

I’ll just get the acknowledgment if I get audited. That doesn’t work. The acknowledgement has to be “contemporaneous.” Tax Court explains:

A written acknowledgment is contemporaneous if the taxpayer obtains the acknowledgment on or before the earlier of the date the return was filed or the due date (including extensions) for filing the return for the year in which the charitable contribution was made.

Many smaller charities, and even a few bigger ones, have been slow to realize the importance of these acknowledgements. If you don’t have one yet, it is wise to get it. If you want the charitable deduction, it’s worth extending your return for.

Cite: French, T.C. Memo 2016-53.

This is another of our irregular series of 2016 filing season tips. They’ll keep coming through the April 18 deadline!

 

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Paul Neiffer, Are You 70 1/2?. “If you have retirement or IRA accounts and you are approaching age 70 1/2, you must be careful to make sure to take your required minimum distributions (RMD) and April 1 can be a key deadline.”

Jason Dinesen, If I Turn 65 in August, Am I 65 on My Tax Return?

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2016): I Is For Inheritance

Robert Wood, Payroll Tax Violators Get Penalties Or Jail, And IRS Is Watching. “The IRS is especially vigorous in going after payroll taxes.”

Nicolas Xanthopoulos, Investigating Assets Prior to Submission of Collection Remedies (Procedurally Taxing). Important work from a practioner dealing with the hard end of the tax law, collections.

Jack Townsend, Interview of Acting Assistant Attorney General Ciraolo on Tax Enforcement. It sounds like they still want to shoot jaywalkers.

Kay Bell, $10,000 crowdsourcing prize available to designer of Future IRS taxpayer accounts website

 

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Howard Gleckman, Paul Ryan and The “Ridiculous Notion” of Tax Distribution (TaxVox):

Last week, House Speaker Paul Ryan said in a CNBC interview that the distributional analysis of tax plans done by the Tax Policy Center, the Joint Committee on Taxation, and others is based on the “ridiculous notion” that the effect of tax changes on different income groups  is important.

Mr. Gleckman thinks Speaker Ryan is wrong, that it is very important to show how much tax changes benefit “the rich.” While that is interesting information, Speaker Ryan is right in that notions of distributional fairness have an outsized impact on tax policy deductions. I get the impression from some people that they would be fine with executing people, seizing their property, and selling their families into slavery, so long as it only affected the top 1% of earners.

David Brunori, How to Save the Corporate Tax (Tax Analysts Blog). “First, get all the states in a big room and have them agree to end all targeted tax incentives.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1050. Today’s link: Chipping Away at the IRS Stonewall: A Federal Court Scores the Agency For its ‘Continuous Resistance’

 

Humor impairment is a lifestyle, not a crime! White-Collar Crime Watch: Polygamists, Fixed Tennis Matches, An Unfunny Accountant (Leona May, Going Concern).

 

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