Posts Tagged ‘Nicole Kaeding’

Tax Roundup, 3/10/16: Coupling deal may trade one-year Sec. 179 coupling for reduced manufacturing sales tax exemption.

Thursday, March 10th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

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Update, 10:23 a.m. The Senate Ways and Means Committee cleared SSB 3171 this morning unanimously, according to the Iowans for Tax Relief Twitter feed. They also report that House Ways and Means is meeting now to discuss HSB 642, which I believe is identical to SSB 3171.

Update, 11:30 a.m. O. Kay Henderson posted Statehouse leaders announce tentative deal on taxes. Looking at the statements, it appears that the deal is between leaders of the two legislative chambers, with Governor Branstad as a bystander. Makes me nervous, but I assume they wouldn’t go to the trouble without having the Governor on board somehow.

A deal, maybe. A bill rumored as the outline of a bi-partisan deal coupling 2015 federal tax changes to the Iowa income tax law was introduced by chief Senate taxwriter Joe Bolkcom yesterday. SSB 3171 would allow taxpayers to deduct up to $500,000 of equipment purchases on their 2015 Iowa returns that would otherwise be capitalized and depreciated over a period of years. This would match up the 2015 Iowa maximum “Section 179” deduction to the amount enact in December for 2015 and beyond in federal law. It would also enact for 2015 Iowa returns a number of other “expired” provisions, including:

Exclusion for IRA contributions to charity
Exclusion of gain from qualified small business stock
Basis adjustment for S corporation charitable contributions
Built-in gain tax five-year recognition period
$250 above-the-line educator expense deduction
Exclusion of home mortgage debt forgiveness
Qualified tuition deduction
Optional sales tax deduction
Conservation easement deductions
Deduction for food inventory contributions

The matching would only be for one year. The price to get Senate Democrats to go along would be repeal of the sales tax administrative rules for manufacturers set to take effect July 1. They would be replaced by a smaller sales tax break passed by the Iowa House in 2014 that died in the Senate.

Iowa is not expected to couple with federal bonus depreciation.

While rumors say that this is close, with legislative movement likely as early as today, there remains uncertainty. The Governor is said to be unhappy with the deal, and he will go along only grudgingly, if at all, according to people I’ve heard from.

Rod Boshart reports at TheGazette.com:

“We’re ready to move ahead with those three elements: the coupling, rescinding the governor’s rules and picking up the consumable supplies bill that the House passed in 2014. That would be in one package,” Bolkcom said.

Republicans who control the Iowa House and Democrats who hold a majority in the Iowa Senate also were working to resolve a dispute over state funding for schools with negotiators looking at a deal that could boost state aid in fiscal 2017 by 2.25 percent and provide other categorical increases that would bring the overall funding growth closer to 2.5 percent, according to legislators close to the talks.

“There’s no deal yet, but we are meeting with House Republicans on the big issues,” said Sen. Bob Dvorsky, D-Coralville, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, who declined to discuss specific numbers. “The good news is we are meeting and talking.”

The sales tax exemption has been a sore point with Senate Democrats since it was proposed by the Department of Revenue. Going with the 2014 house-passed language (HF 2443) reduces the break, giving the Senate Leadership a symbolic victory. Still, the 2014 death of HF 2443 indicates that they really didn’t want to keep any of the rule changes.

I haven’t figured out exactly what parts of the sales tax exemption will be lost under the bill introduced yesterday. The exemptions for items such as jigs, tools, dies, coolants and lubricants would survive.

This issue will be back next session. Even if the compromise passes, the section 179 coupling issue will be up again next year. SF 3171 is only for one year, while the federal legislation makes the federal change permanent. There seems to be no discussion yet of cutting back corporate welfare tax credits to “pay for” the Section 179 deduction used by 25,000 Iowa farmers and small businesses. Maybe next year.

I will update this post today as events warrant.

 

Scott Drenkard, Nicole Kaeding, How High Are Sales Taxes in Your State? (Tax Policy Blog):

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Tax experts generally recommend that sales taxes apply to all final retail sales of goods and services but not intermediate business-to-business transactions in the production chain.

That’s the tragedy about scaling back Iowa’s manufacturing exemption. Rather than scaling it back, the legislature should be looking to expand it to other business inputs.

 

Paul Neiffer, Two Opportunities for Farm and Estate Tax Education. While Roger McEowen will sadly no longer be part of the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation, he will continue to teach his summer seminars: this year in Alaska and North Carolina. These are excellent seminars in nice settings, and a nice way to mix continuing education with leisure.

 

Robert Wood, Cayman Companies Plead Guilty To U.S. Tax Evasion, Handing Over American Accounts. Bank secrecy is still dead.

Jason Dinesen, More on Business Proactive Planning in the Real World. “The thing the “experts” miss is, most of us are trying to be proactive … but it’s hard when the client won’t be an active participant in the process.” I find that some clients want you to be pro-active, as long as you don’t charge any time for it.

Tony Nitti, With Summer Olympics Nearing: Should Athletes Pay Tax On Their Winnings?. “Few people realize this, but with an Olympic medal comes a cash payout: $25,000 for a gold, $15,000 for  a silver, and $10,000 for a bronze.” Somehow I doubt that it covers costs for, say, the Modern Pentathlon champions.

Kay Bell, Is Trump ‘poor’ enough to get NY property tax break?:

Crain’s New York Business may have shed some light on why Donald J. Trump doesn’t want us to see his tax returns.

The magazine reports that the billionaire real estate developer got a property tax break designed for New Yorkers making less than $500,000 a year.

People with a lot of wealth in real estate investments can have surprisingly low taxable incomes, after depreciation and interest deductions. Of course, so can people who aren’t really so wealthy.

 

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Jeremy Scott, Romney Cared About the 47 Percent Because He Cared About Deficits (Tax Analysts Blog). “Unlike 2016’s candidates, Romney was trying to push economic and tax policy that didn’t add too much to the national debt, and made Democrats seem financially irresponsible.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1036

Cara Griffith, Should Tax Settlement Agreements Be Publicly Available? (Tax Analysts Blog). “Yet if it is conventional wisdom that good cases settle while bad cases go to trial, isn’t there a lot that could be learned if lawsuit settlements were made available for public scrutiny?” The good thing is that it would shine light on “secret” law. The bad news is that it might make deals harder to reach.

Renu Zaretsky, Schemes, Scams and States’ Fights. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup says some big company payroll departments fell victim to ID-theft scam emailers mimicking CEOs asking for employee information. Be careful, people.

 

Career Corner. Most Managers Would Prefer If You Could Just Read Their Minds (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern). We would, you know.

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/4/16: Discussing tomorrow’s obscure deadline today! And: Iowa think-tanker whiffs on Section 179.

Friday, March 4th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today Newsletter visitors, click here for “One year for you, forever for them.”

20151209-1Today is Day 64. Tomorrow is one of the more obscure deadlines in the tax law. Complex trusts have until tomorrow to make distributions to their beneficiaries that can be considered 2015 distributions under the “65-day rule” of Section 663(b).

“Complex” trusts are those that are taxed as separate entities, and which are not required to distribute all of their income at least annually. That is in contrast with the other two kinds of trusts:

“Simple” trusts, which are treated as separate taxpayers from their beneficiaries but which have to distribute their income at least annually; and

“Grantor” trusts, the earnings of which are taxed directly to the person who funded it, regardless of whether the earnings are distributed. The typical estate planning “living trust” is a grantor trust.

Complex trusts pay their own taxes under a system similar to the individual tax system, but with some important twists:

-The brackets are very compressed. Complex trusts pay the 39.6% top rate starting at $12,300 of taxable income in 2015. Single individuals don’t hit that rate until taxable income reaches $413,200, and joint filers go to $464,850.

-Trusts pay the 3.8% “net investment income tax” on “investment” income to the extent their adjusted gross income exceeds $12,300. The cutoff is $200,000 for single filers and $250,000 for joint filers.

-When complex trusts make a distribution, taxable income follows the distribution. While it’s a little more complicated than this, for this discussion assume that a distribution to a beneficiary of $100 reduces trust taxable income by $100 and increases the recipient beneficiary’s taxable income by the same amount.

Together, this means complex trusts are often highly motivated to distribute their taxable income, at least to the extent that it exceeds $12,300. This is true when beneficiaries are not top bracket taxpayers, and it’s especially true if their AGIs are below the 3.8% NIIT cutoff. Shifting taxable income from the highest trust tax bracket to the lower individual brackets can save taxes overall.

The 65-day rule is a mulligan for complex trusts. It gives them some extra time after the end of the year to distribute some cash — and some of that prior year taxable income — to their beneficiaries.

Of course, some trusts will choose to take the tax hit. Some trusts exist specifically to keep income out of the hands of beneficiaries, perhaps because the person who set up the trust wants the beneficiaries to wait until they are older and wiser before they get the cash. But in many cases, the 65-day rule is a handy after-the-fact trust planning tool.

Related: Overview of Fiduciary Income Taxation (IRS, AICPA)

 

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WrongIn his post Unspoken budget choices for Iowa, Peter Fisher errs on an important fact about coupling Iowa’s Section 179 limit to the $500,000 federal amount. Mr. Fisher is an Iowa City academic with the leftish think tank Iowa Policy Project.* He says (my emphasis):

On the other hand, the bill would reward decisions already made and give those investors a break they had not expected. It’s not an incentive to do something they would not have done anyway — and it’s very costly.

They certainly did expect it. It was clear from early in 2015 that there was powerful motivation in Congress to extend the $500,000 limit for a year, and possibly permanently; the permanent extension is what happened. The $500,000 limit had been renewed year-by-year since 2009, and Iowa had adopted the $500,000 limit every year since 2010. While past performance is no guarantee of future results with politicians, all indications were for a repeat, both at the federal and state level.

There was no indication that Iowa would do anything different until Governor Branstad came out against coupling in January of this year — surprising taxpayers and practitioners all over Iowa. It is simply wrong to say $500,000 Section 179 coupling wasn’t expected. And it’s indisputable that the alternative $25,000 limit represents a year-to-year tax increase for 2015.

One thing Mr. Fisher does get right: failing to couple does represent an unspoken budget choice. He just wants to choose to spend the money on his favored projects. But failure to couple really represents a choice to favor cronies, big businesses and insiders over small businesses across Iowa who lack lobbyists and clout.

Related: Complete Tax Update coverage of coupling issue.

*Disclosure: I have been disagreeing with the Founding Director of IPP since he was an Economics professor at Cornell College and I was a coffee-guzzling history major. 

 

Tony Nitti, Taxation Of Lawsuit Awards And Settlements: Getting To The Origin Of The Claim. “Thus, when determining whether a taxpayer’s award or settlement payment is excludable under Section 104, you’ve got to get to the bottom of the original claim: what caused the taxpayer to sue in the first place?”

Russ Fox, Math Is Hard, IRS Addition. I see what you punned there!  “To my clients and anyone else who receives an IRS notice: IRS statistics show that two-thirds of IRS notices are wrong in whole or in part.”

TaxGrrrl, IRS Reports Fewer Tax Returns Received, Higher Average Refund As Tax Season Rolls. “With about six weeks to go in the 2016 tax filing season, more than a third of all taxpayers expecting to file a tax return have already submitted tax returns.”

Jason Dinesen, Do I Have to Pay Self-Employment/FICA Taxes If I Think Social Security Will Go Bankrupt? Three guesses.

 

Nicole Kaeding, State Gasoline Tax Rates in 2016 (Tax Policy Blog):

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Iowa is higher than most, but Pennsylvania is the worst.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1030 “…what we explore here is more subtle, more pervasive, and hence, more invidious and threatening. It is the way in which the unexamined assumption of tax exceptionalism – the idea that tax is different – has produced a situation in which the tax law and its administrators are viewed by tax professionals, and eventually by the taxpaying public, as interpreting and enforcing tax law in ways that are not understood, are therefore misperceived, and are ultimately judged illegitimate.”

Len Burman, TPC Updates  Analysis of Ted Cruz’s Tax Proposal To Reflect a Change in His EITC Proposal. “Senator Cruz’s plan would increase all phase-in and phase-out rates of the credit by 20 percent.”

Kay Bell, Former IRS chief says Trump should release tax returns

 

Career Corner. Is Our Productivity Obsession Counterproductive? (Megan Lewczyk, Going Concern). What is this “productivity” of which you speak?

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Tax Roundup, 1/22/16: Tax scams for tax pros. And: How Des Moines got so cool once I moved here.

Friday, January 22nd, 2016 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today Visitors:  Click here for the post on Popular wisdom and tax rates.

 

Gone Phishing. It’s not just taxpayers that get scam emails. Scammers also aim at tax pros. For example:

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Of course the message is a fake. It was sent by the sketchy-sounding email address “info@tablerockbelize.com” and the link goes to something called “otadealsbox.com/irs.” Nothing good would happen from following that link. Be careful out there.

 

Nicole Kaeding, Map: State-Local Tax Burden Rankings for FY 2012 (Tax Policy Blog):

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While Iowa’s tax burden isn’t that out of line — it’s actually a little better than average — our business tax climate is one of the worst. It’s a result of how poorly designed Iowa’s tax system is. The good news is that there’s a lot of room to improve our tax system without increasing the overall tax burden.

 

Start your weekend right with fresh Buzz! from Robert D. Flach. Today’s links cover lots of ground on early filing, and a good explanation of why the talk of how “IRS now has six years to audit your taxes” isn’t right.

Jason Dinesen, Do I Need Form 1095-C to File My Tax Return? The next question: how many taxpayers even know to expect one?

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William Perez reminds readers to Communicate Effectively with Your Tax Preparer

Annette Nellen, Filing 2015 tax returns – help for practitioners

Kay Bell has 4 filing tips to ensure you get your tax refund ASAP

Robert Wood, What To Do If Form 1099 Reports More To IRS Than You Received

Paul Neiffer, Mr. Market Wants Its Excess Profits Back. “We know what happened after the 1970s and now Mr. Market is now trying to grab those excess profits back from farmers from the ‘ethanol’ boom.”  Of course, aging corn state politicians are fighting back by yelling at clouds.

Jim Maule, Deductions Arising from Constructive Payments. “The Tax Court explained that payment by an S corporation of a shareholder’s personal expense is a constructive distribution. It pointed out that this principle had previously been articulated by the court. Thus, explained the court, ‘It also follows that for purposes of claiming the deduction, the shareholder is treated as constructively paying the obligation.'”

Peter Reilly, Tax Planning In Bernie Sanders Land Would Feel Familiar To Elderly CPAs. Older than me, even.

E. Martin Davidoff, New Format of Notice of Intent to Levy Fails to Provide Sufficient Notice (Procedurally Taxing)

Russ Fox, Fail, Caesar! An Update. Implications for poker pros.

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 988. “Tax Agency Erased Hard Drive Despite Litigation Hold.” Don’t try that with your tax records.

Jeremy Scott, Furor Over Extenders and Rising Deficits Disingenuous (Tax Analysts Blog), my emphasis:

So the new CBO report is something of a bitter pill for Obama. But the president isn’t to blame, according to some observers. In fact, the CBO itself points out that about half the cost of rising deficits is from tax legislation enacted since August 2015. The biggest chunk, of course, comes from the extenders compromise, which made some expiring (or expired) tax provisions permanent. That hurts the budget outlook, which always assumed expiring tax provisions would stay expired.

But extenders have never been allowed to stay expired. They are always renewed — sometimes late and sometimes retroactively, but without significant exception. And that makes the CBO’s observations about extenders deceptive. It also highlights why previous CBO projections about the deficit were always too rosy. By assuming that extenders would go away once they expired, budget forecasters were always showing too much revenue. If the CBO had used a model that assumed Congress would continually renew popular provisions like the research credit, the deduction for state and local sales taxes, and bonus depreciation, the numbers would look almost identical to what the January 19 report is showing now.

Exactly. The extenders were an ongoing accounting scam, pretending provisions that were permanent in reality would go away. “By making some extenders permanent, Congress has finally allowed the CBO to paint a more realistic portrait of the federal deficit and the long-term budget outlook.”

Matt Gardner, After Years of Shrinking, Nation’s Deficit Set to Grow in 2016; Recent Tax Cuts a Contributor (Tax Justice Blog)

 

Howard Gleckman, What Are the Consequences of a Financial Transactions Tax? (TaxVox). Aside from moving exchanges offshore, damaging markets, erasing wealth, and making it harder for the little guy to close transactions, it’s a great idea.

 

Joseph Thorndike, Do Progressives Hate Tax Reform? (Tax Analysts Blog):

The Tax Reform Act of 1986 was far from perfect, but it made good on the lower rates/broader base mantra. Almost immediately, however, both parts of the bargain began to fray; rates began creeping up within a few years, and preferences (never vanquished entirely in the first place) also began to grow. By the mid-1990s, tax reform was starting to look like a disappointment, to both liberals and conservatives.

Today, classic tax reform has little real support outside the wonk community. So it’s fair to say, as Holtz-Eakin does repeatedly, that liberals don’t care about tax reform.

But neither do conservatives.

I think that’s always true, in a way. That doesn’t mean it’s not worth doing.

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News from the Profession. Report: CPAs Exaggerate Their Success at the Bar, Pretty Much Everywhere (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

Fun link: How America’s Dullest City Got Cool. I think they overstate how much of the revival of Des Moines was planned by anyone, but they are right to point out home much this town has improved since I moved here in 1985 (proving that correlation is definitely not causation). Thanks to @lymanstoneky for the link on Twitter.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/11/15: Extender battle extended to next week; efforts to make some breaks permanent continue. And: Tina, Accidental American.

Friday, December 11th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20151211-1Extending the week. Congress had been scheduled to go home today, but now it looks like the session will drag through the weekend while they try to agree on spending and tax legislation.

Whither the extenders? The Hill reports that hope lives for permanent enactment of several of the important Lazarus provisions that have repeatedly died – most recently at the end of 2014 — and that need to be revived to be used on 2015 returns. From the report:

I understand the current projection is for the House to post the omnibus Monday and vote on it by Wednesday,” Senate Republican Whip John Cornyn (Texas) told reporters. “The goal is to wrap things up by Wednesday evening.”

He said the omnibus would be linked to a package extending expiring tax provisions. Senate negotiators say that package is likely to make several important tax breaks open-ended and place a moratorium on two ObamaCare taxes.

“They seem to be linked, although I can’t tell you whether it will be one vote or two votes, but clearly they’re part of the overall negotiations,” he added.

What would be made permanent? At least the R&D Credit and the $500,000 Section 179 deduction. These would be accompanied by permanent, and maybe increased, earned income credits, child credits, and education credits. How likely is it? The Hill says “Senate sources on Thursday said the chances of reaching a deal on a major tax deal were greater than 50 percent.”

Nothing is certain, though. Tax Analysts reports ($link) Permanent Tax Extenders Deal Continues to Elude Lawmakers. It quotes Rep. Steve Israel (D-N.Y.) as insisting that the child credit be indexed to inflation, and that other obstacles to agreement remain:

Israel noted that ultraconservative Republicans object to including renewable energy tax credits and family credits in the extenders deal, so votes from House Democrats are still essential regardless of what deal Senate Democrats reach with Republicans.

Here I’ll just note that there appear to be no such thing as “ultraliberals” to reporters, while “ultraconservatives” abound.

Rep. Bill Flores, R-Texas, chair of the House Republican Study Committee, said December 2 that his group believes that renewable energy credits should be phased out. “Special interest giveaways like the wind production tax credit and the solar investment tax credit have overstayed their welcome and their usefulness,” he said.

Flores’s group also does not support family credits, which he called “stimulus legacy items” that should not be renewed without heightened verification and oversight.

These obstacles could result in another two-year extension of the expiring provisions, though complete failure remains an option.

Prior coverage:

Ways and Means Chair introduces a Plan B as permanent extender talks continue.

Extender week?

 

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Just how stupid is U.S. foreign taxation? This stupid. A heartbreaking and infuriating piece by Allison Christians shows the brain-dead Kafkaesque nightmare created by Congress and enforced by IRS to “crack down” on overseas taxpayers: Understanding the Accidental American: Tina’s Story. It tells the story of a 62 year-old woman who was born in the U.S. while her parents were students, but has lived all but her first six months in Canada. Ms. Christians makes a powerful case:

Related to that point, I think a taxpayer has a right to learn that her whole financial life is subject to harsh deterrents and penalties solely for the reason that it is not located in the United States, even and especially when she is not located in the United States. Again, I think she has the right to learn that not from blogs or word of mouth, but from the government that seeks to impose these rules on her. I think she’s got a right to be informed about a life-destroying force like PFIC by the government that seeks to unleash that force upon her, and a right to avoid that punishment by making different choices. And if that government can’t or won’t bother to inform her, or address the utter absurdity of stripping a person of their life savings as a consequence of inadequate form filling, I think she’s got a reason to complain that this is a pretty unfair administration of a very complex law — a law designed for millionaires with expensive tax accountants and not for Canadians carefully saving for retirement and not hiding anything from anyone.

When the IRS and the politicians crow about how effective their foreign enforcement efforts are, remember that a lot of it is coming out of the pockets of taxpayers like Tina.

(Via the TaxProf).

 

Kristine Tidgren, Iowa Court of Appeals Says LLC Corporate Veil Properly Pierced (The Ag Docket).

The court found that the trial court’s finding of inadequate capitalization was supported by substantial evidence. In so finding, the court noted the defendants’ history of moving funds between related entities, the lack of LLC assets and employees, and its failure to reduce losses to the plaintiff, despite knowing its funding was inadequate.

This sort of ruling will make businesses leery of using Iowa entities. An appeal to the Iowa Supreme Court is likely.

 

buzz 20151023-1Friday means Buzz day for Robert D. Flach. Today he covers the legislation requiring IRS to use private debt collectors, preparer regulations and more.

Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Delinquent Taxes May Mean No Passport. “ Imagine the problems for a taxpayer who is unaware of this new rule and not finding out until being stranded in the midst of traveling.”

Jason Dinesen, Choosing a Business Entity: Determining S-corporation Reasonable Salary. “A salary that’s considered reasonable for one corporation may not be reasonable for another corporation.”

Leslie Book, Tis the Season For Tax Procedure Legislation (Procedurally Taxing).  “Under the new legislation, the failure to file penalty may not be less than the lesser of $205 or 100 percent of the amount required to be shown as tax on the return (it used to be $135 or 100%).”

Robert Wood, Three Moves In December To Save Taxes Next April

TaxGrrrl, How Answering A Simple Question Makes You An Easy Target For Identity Thieves

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 946

Nicole Kaeding, Proposed Tax Increases in Alaska. Alaska may get an income tax.

Steven Rosenthal, Hillary Clinton Proposes Tough New Curbs on Corporate Tax Inversions (TaxVox). The “beatings will continue until morale improves” approach.

News from the Profession. Grant Thornton Hoping to Bring Soul-Crushing Disappointment to Charlotte Hornets With New Sponsorship (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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