Posts Tagged ‘Norton Francis’

Tax Roundup, 6/15/15: IRS declines to make estate tax easy for surviving spouses. And: New ID theft measures!

Monday, June 15th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Due Today: Second Quarter estimated tax payments; returns for U.S. citizens living abroad.

 

Funeral home signIRS declines to make the estate tax portability election easy. There’s no such thing as a joint estate tax return. That means if one spouse has all of the assets, the other spouse’s lifetime estate tax exemption — $5,430,000 for 2015 deaths — can be lost.

Congress changed the tax law to allow a surviving spouse to inherit the deceased spouse’s unused estate tax exemption, for use on when the surviving spouse files an estate tax return. unfortunately, this treatment is not automatic. It is only available if a Form 706 estate tax return is filed for the first spouse to die. The IRS on Friday issued final regulations rejecting any short-cuts in this process.

There are many problems with this approach. The most obvious is the lottery winner problem. A couple might be living in a trailer, and when the first spouse dies, there seems to be no point in filing an estate tax return when their combined assets are a small fraction of the amount triggering estate tax. Then the surviving spouse wins the Powerball, and suddenly the first spouse’s estate tax exemption becomes very valuable — but it’s lost, because no return was filed.

The IRS rejected allowing any pro-forma or short-cut estate tax returns for such situations:

The Treasury Department and the IRS have concluded that, on balance, a timely filed, complete, and properly prepared estate tax return affords the most efficient and administrable method of obtaining the information necessary to compute and verify the DSUE amount, and the alleged benefits to taxpayers from an abbreviated form is far outweighed by the anticipated administrative difficulties in administering the estate tax. In

The IRS did say it would be generous in allowing “Section 9100″ late-filing relief for taxpayers who die with assets below the exclusion amount, but they did not provide any sort of automatic election. The result is a trap for the unwary executors of small estates.

Cite: TD 9725

 

20130419-1IRS announces ID-theft refund fraud measuresThe IRS last week announced (IR-2015-87) steps it promised in March to fight refund fraud in cooperation with tax preparers and software makers:

The agreement — reached after the project was originally announced March 19 — includes identifying new steps to validate taxpayer and tax return information at the time of filing. The effort will increase information sharing between industry and governments. There will be standardized sharing of suspected identity fraud information and analytics from the tax industry to identify fraud schemes and locate indicators of fraud patterns. And there will be continued collaborative efforts going forward.

The most promising of the steps:

Taxpayer authentication. The industry and government groups identified numerous new data elements that can be shared at the time of filing to help authenticate a taxpayer and detect identity theft refund fraud. The data will be submitted to the IRS and states with the tax return transmission for the 2016 filing season. Some of these issues include, but are not limited to:

-Reviewing the transmission of the tax return, including the improper and or repetitive use of Internet Protocol numbers, the Internet ‘address’ from which the return is originating.

-Reviewing computer device identification data tied to the return’s origin.

-Reviewing the time it takes to complete a tax return, so computer mechanized fraud can be detected.

-Capturing metadata in the computer transaction that will allow review for identity theft related fraud.

These are important because they might actually prevent fraudulent refunds from being issued. Measures to help identify fraud after it happens don’t do much, especially when the fraud occurs abroad. Catching the fraudulent returns before the refunds are issued is the only way to really deal with the problem, and the only way to keep innocent taxpayers whose identification has been stolen from having to go through the annoying and sometimes lengthy process of recovering their overpayments.

The sad thing – I see nothing here that couldn’t have been done five years ago, when ID theft refund fraud was already becoming a problem. But the Worst Commissioner Ever was too busy trying to impose preparer regulations on behalf of the big franchise tax prep outfits to pay attention. Priorities.

 

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Bob Vineyard, Best Kept Secrets About Obamacare (Insureblog). “About half of those living in Kentucky and classified as poor were not aware of the basics of Obamacare.”

TaxGrrrl, Spain’s King Felipe Strips Sister Of Royal Title As Tax Evasion Charges Proceed. What good is being regal if things like this happen?

Annette Nellen, Tax reform for 2015? Seems unlikely

Kay Bell, Lessons learned from being tax Peeping Toms

Jason Dinesen, Marriage in the Tax Code, Part 10: Filing Statuses Arrive in 1948

Peter Reilly, Why Is Multi-State Tax Compliance So Hard? “Don’t get me wrong.  I believe that the prudent thing is to try to be in pretty good, if not perfect, compliance.  Just don’t expect anybody to make it really easy any time soon.”

Robert Wood, Beware Tax Cops At Farmers’ Markets

 

20120816-1Joseph Henchman, State of the States: Special Session Edition and Kansas Approves Tax Increase Package, Likely Will Be Back for More (Tax Policy Blog). Mr. Henchman rounds up end-of-session tax moves from around the country. Kansas may have made the biggest changes, including a small retreat from its exemption of pass-throughs from the income tax:

Kansas in 2012 completely exempted the income from such individuals, who now total over 330,000 exempt entities. Efforts to repeal this unusual and non-neutral total exclusion of pass-through income earned a veto threat from Governor Brownback. The guaranteed payments provision is estimated to generate approximately $20 million per year.

Taxing guaranteed payments will hardly plug the fiscal hole created by the blanket pass-through exemption. Joseph concludes: “But overall, it is a grab bag of ideas that does little to address the problems underlying Kansas’s tax and budgetary instability. Absent more fundamental changes, legislators will likely have to return in coming years to address budget gaps.”

 

Norton Francis, How Would the Kansas Senate Close the State’s Budget Gap? Mostly by Taxing Poor People (TaxVox)

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 765The IRS Scandal, Day 766The IRS Scandal, Day 767

 

Career Corner. Reminder: Parents Meddling in Your Careers Will Not Help You (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/24/15: Goldilocks and the medical practice. And: the spirit is willing, but the Tax Fairy is weak.

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20120511-2Reasonable Compensation and the Goldilocks Rule. The IRS has been fighting taxpayers over how much compensation is “reasonable” since Great-grandpa realized he could reduce his corporate tax by taking it out as a salary. The agency historically fought this war over whether taxpayers were taking too much compensation. The IRS has since opened a second front, arguing that S corporation owner-employees were improperly reducing their employment taxes by taking too little salary out of the corporation. Employee owners now need to find a comp level that is “just right.”

As in any two-front war, a victory on one front might cause problems on the other. A Tax Court victory yesterday for the IRS over an eye doctor who took “too much” compensation may give ammunition to S corporation professional practices that take corporate earnings out via their K-1s and distributions — free of Medicare taxes — rather than as salary and bonus.

Judge Kerrigan says Dr. Ahmad, the owner and principal employee of Midwest Eye Center, took four $500,000 bonuses in November and Decemeber of 2007. This wiped out corporate income, which would likely have otherwise been taxed at a flat 35% rate under the “professional corporation” tax rules. They even overdid the bonus a little, carrying a net operating loss into 2008.

The taxpayer failed to convince the judge that the bonus was “reasonable”:

Petitioner produced no evidence of comparable salaries. Instead, petitioner argues that there are no “like enterprises” under “like circumstances” from which to draw comparisons. Petitioner argues that Dr. Ahmad’s large bonus was reasonable for several other reasons. Petitioner points to Dr. Ahmad’s increased workload during 2007 and the various roles that Dr. Ahmad performed, such as CEO, CFO, and COO, and the corresponding managerial duties of those positions. However, petitioner did not provide any methodology to show how Dr. Ahmad’s bonus was determined in relation to these responsibilities.

This tells us that when you have a C corporation owned by a single professional, you have to do more to determine how much bonus is “reasonable” than estimate what the pre-bonus taxable income is. If you are going to suck the income out of such a corporation through bonuses, it is wise to have written bonus criteria that make sense when compared to other practices.

It might be even better to make an S corporation election. The medical practice C corporation was hit with over $320,000 in tax on $1 million “excessive” compensation (and some other items), and another $62,000 in penalties — all of which would have been avoided in an S corporation, where all income is taxed on the 1040 regardless of whether it is “excessive.”

In fact, this case helps S corporation professional practices a little, in that it is evidence that it is not “reasonable” to assume that all income of the practice has to come out as compensation subject to employment taxes.

Cite: Midwest Eye Center, S.C., T.C. Memo 2015-53.

 

tax fairyIRS says “Rabbi” had a tax practice that wasn’t entirely orthodox. A Department of Justice Tax Press Release tells a story of a man who sought the Tax Fairy in the Torah:

The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California, alleges that Lawrence Preston Siegel, aka Larry Lave, Yehuda Lave and Larry Easy, falsely represented that he is a licensed attorney and CPA in order to solicit business for his tax practice. 

According to the civil injunction suit, Siegel pleaded guilty to one count of tax evasion and two counts of subscribing false tax returns in 1994.  He subsequently resigned from the California bar in 1994, lost his CPA license in 1997, and never regained either accreditation, according to the suit.  The complaint alleges that following his release from federal prison in 2001 for additional convictions, Siegel established a tax practice and stated online that he is an “[i]interesting combination of a Tax Lawyer and CPA who is also a Rabbi trained in Spirituality.”  Siegel, the complaint alleges, claimed to others that his “goal as a spiritual Rabbi, Tax Attorney and CPA is to save people money without going to jail … Everybody wants to pay very little tax, I do it legally and morally under the Torah.” 

It never occurred to me that a Rabbi would require the qualifier “trained in Spirituality.” Isn’t that the whole idea? In any case, he isn’t well-trained in tax, if the Justice Department press release is to be believed (my emphasis):

According to the complaint, among his tax fraud schemes, Siegel falsely advised his customers, typically high earners who own profitable businesses, that they can establish companies in Nevada and treat their California home as an out-of-state corporate office.  Siegel falsely claimed that doing so would transform a vast array of non-deductible personal expenses into tax deductible business expenses, according to the suit.  According to the complaint, Siegel boasted about this tax fraud scheme in e-mails, including one where he falsely claimed that his customers are entitled to free housing as tax-free compensation from their out-of-state companies and that “[t]he housing can [b]e luxurious and cost thousands a [] month” because “[t]here is an assumption that corporations don’t waste money.”

What’s amazing to me is that (if the allegations are true) he had clients who actually believed this. Religious or secular, reform or orthodox, believer or non-believer, the desire to believe in the Tax Fairy is strong among all races, religions and belief systems. But there is no tax fairy.

 

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Kristine TidgrenExpanded Relief for Taxpayers Receiving Erroneous 1095-As:

On Friday, March 20, CMS announced that it had discovered additional 1095-A errors among those forms issued by both State-run exchanges and the federally-facilitated exchange. CMS is notifying taxpayers impacted by these errors with emails, phone calls, and messages in their Marketplace accounts. Because of these errors, Treasury is expanding the relief it offered in February.

Now, anyone who (1) enrolled in any type of marketplace coverage, (2) received an incorrect Form 1095-A, and (3) filed their return based upon that form, does not need to file an amended tax return. The IRS will not pursue the collection of any additional taxes based on updated information contained in the corrected forms. This relief applies to tax filers who enrolled through either the federally-facilitated marketplace or a state-based marketplace. As provided before, taxpayers who were harmed by the errors may file amended returns to collect the difference.

So the liability of a taxpayer for potentially thousands of dollars in taxes depends on two items:

1. Whether the exchange botched the 1095-A filing, and

2. Whether the taxpayer filed before the 1095-A was corrected.

These are whimsical criteria on which to stake thousands of dollars of tax credits.

 

Chicago Tribune, It’s Obamacare’s first tax season. Can the IRS handle it?Kristy Maitre of the ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation is quoted: “Overall, I do not believe they’re as prepared as they could have been.”

Hank Stern, The Best Laid Plans [Updated]. “In other words, a lot of folks with even rudimentary math skills have figured out that paying the fine penalty tax and “going bare” is a much more cost-effective choice than buying coverage.”

Robert Wood, Happy Anniversary Obamacare Taxes, Many Happy Returns.

 

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Norton Francis, Bobby Jindal’s Revenue Enhancements (TaxVox). “His trick: Turn refundable business credits into non-refundable credits.”

Kay Bell, Downton Abbey’s new tax connection via Rep. Aaron Schock

Tyler Cowen presents New arguments on a carbon tax, including one that suggests a way in which “…a carbon tax could make global warming worse.”

Martin Sullivan, U.S. Effective CorporateTax Rate Higher Than Foreign Competitors? Not Really (Tax Analysts Blog)

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 684

 

News from the Profession. Conducting Tax Return Update Meetings at the Gym Maybe Not the Best Idea (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern). “If a client requests a meeting at a location where heavy objects are laying around, and there’s an off-chance that the news you have may be anything other than positive, may we suggest an alternative venue.”

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/17/15: Iowa 2014 code conformity bill set to become final this week. And: tax season saved again!

Tuesday, February 17th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

IMG_1291Iowa Code Conformity Update. The bill updating Iowa’s 2014 tax law to include December’s retroactive “extender” bill, SF 126,  was officially transmitted to the Governor yesterday. He has three days to act; if he doesn’t sign within three days, the bill becomes law automatically. That means it will be official this week, unless the Governor shocks everyone with a veto.

The bill adopts almost all of the “extender” items, including the $500,000 Section 179 deduction, but it does not adopt 50% bonus depreciation for Iowa.

Update, 2:30 pm. The bill is signed.

 

 

The tax season is saved!  Covered California Sends Out Nearly 100,000 Tax Forms Containing Errors, Others Deal With Missing Forms (CBS San Francisco):

Stacy Scoggins gets plenty of mail from Covered California, but the one tax form the agency was required to send her by February 2nd still hasn’t arrived.

“After being on hold for 59 minutes, told me that the 1095-A was never generated,” Scoggins told KPIX 5 ConsumerWatch.

When they finally do get their forms, many of them will find out that they have to repay advanced premium tax credits, as Insureblog’s Bob Vineyard reports in Paybacks are hell, quoting a MoneyCNN report:

Some 53% of Jackson Hewitt clients who received subsidies have to repay part or all of it, with the largest being $12,000, said Mark Steber, chief tax officer. 

Clients love to hear that they owe.

Related: Oops (Russ Fox).

 

Kay Bell serves up 6 ways to get electronic tax help from the IRS

Accounting Today, IRS Eases Repair Regulations for Small Businesses

Josh Ungerman, IRS Expected To Issue Hundreds Of Deficiency Notices TO USVI Residents.

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Tony Nitti, Lance Armstrong Ordered To Repay $10 Million Of Prior Winnings: What Are The Tax Consequences?  They could be ugly.

Kristine Tidgren, Value of Closely Held Corporation Increased in Dissolution Proceeding (ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation).

Robert Wood, Marijuana Tax Up In Smoke? Don’t Worry, Feds Plot 50% Tax.

Peter Reilly, Islamic Teaching On Usury Kills Property Tax Exemption In Tennessee

Jack Townsend, ABA Tax Lawyer Publication Comment on FBAR Willful Penalty

 

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Matt Welch, Record Number of Americans Renounce Citizenship in 2014 (Reason.com). “Terrible tax law produces predicted results”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 649

 

Norton Francis, State Revenue Growth Will Remain Sluggish (TaxVox)

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown 2/13: Snow Way Forward (Tax Justice Blog). Developments in Oklahoma, Arizona, North Carolina, Mississippie and Massachusetts, from a left-side view.

 

Things that are better now. From Don Boudreaux, a reminder of one area where a dollar goes a lot further than it used to:

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I dare you to access taxupdateblog.com from the Olivetti.  More at HumanProgress.org.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 3/4/14: Des Moines votes on refunding illegal tax. And: life after football!

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20121002-2Des Moines voters decide today whether to approve a legal tax to refund a similar tax imposed illegally.  The Des Moines Register reports:

A special election Tuesday will determine how the city pays back a portion of a franchise fee it illegally collected from 2004 to 2009.

The Iowa Legislature gave Des Moines the authority to temporarily increase its franchise fee — a tax assessed on anyone who connects to electric and natural gas utilities — to pay off the judgment.

However, if voters reject the proposal, city officials will be forced to raise property taxes for at least 20 years in order to issue and pay municipal bonds to cover the court judgment.

When the tax was ruled illegal, the city appealed all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court before finally conceding that it would have to issue refunds — incurring enormous legal bills in the process, including a $7 million bill to the winning lawyers on the other side.  From the District Court opinion awarding the fee:

This case has been in our courts since 2004.  To say it was highly contested would be a gross understatement.  The history of this case shows that the City, while it was entitled to do so, erected one barrier after another in an attempt to prevent the class from being successful in obtaining a refund.  Almost without exception, class counsel was successful in dismantling each of those barriers.

It just goes to show that the city will do the right thing, once it has exhausted all appeals.  Maybe next time they won’t be so quick to enact an illegal tax.

The state legislature voted to allow Des Moines to impose the tax legally to repay the illegal tax.  Somehow I doubt the legislature would do a similar favor for taxpayers by letting them, say, legally not pay income tax for a few years to help them repay the taxes they had illegally avoided in prior years.  

 

William Perez, Deducting Work-Related Expenses

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): A is for Affordable Care Act

Leslie Book, EITC Snapshot: Overclaims and Commercial Preparer Usage (Procedurally Taxing).  “In fact, there is a steady decline in the use of paid preparers among EITC claimants, while the rate of paid preparer usage overall has remained fairly steady.”

Another reason why preparer regulation to cut fraud is like pushing on a string.

Jack Townsend, The Scariest Tax Form? Scary Is in the Eye of the Beholder.  I think the article he cites, which chooses Form 5471, makes a good case, considering the almost-automatic $10,000 fine for filing it late.

Kay Bell,  Tax moves to make in March 2014

 

TaxProf, Tax Court Issues 63-Page Opinion Debunking Cracking the Code Book

 

taxanalystslogoTax Analysts Blog is having a tax reform party:

Clint Stretch, 10 Reasons Republicans Should Embrace the Camp Tax Bill.  This is pretty faint praise:  “2. If they want a credible claim that Obama and Democrats are responsible for the failure of tax reform, they must pass a bill in the House.”

Jeremy Scott, Comparing the Camp and Obama Bank Taxes:

Including the bank tax in his plan is one of Camp’s most intriguing decisions, if only because the gain for him isn’t obvious, even after a closer look. The tax doesn’t raise much money. It is very similar to an Obama proposal that congressional Democrats didn’t really like, meaning it doesn’t buy the chair any bipartisan support. And it comes about four years too late to take advantage of widespread public anger at financial institutions. All Camp seems to have accomplished is legitimizing a revenue raiser for future use by the progressive caucus and undermining his own party’s opposition to this kind of tax increase.

Just… brilliant.  I prefer ending the “too big to fail” subsidy directly, if necessary by denying deposit insurance to such institutions.

Martin Sullivan, 25 Interesting Features of Camp’s New Tax Reform Plan.  “Biggest disappointment. Camp and fellow House Republicans all but promised to reduce the top rate to 25 percent. They failed.”

Christopher Bergin, Tax Reform Only a Mother Could Love:

Many political observers think the GOP has a good chance of not only increasing its majority in the House, but also taking the majority in the Senate. I’m among those who believe that the Republicans will shoot themselves in the foot before that happens. I’ll bet there are more than a few Republicans this week who fear that Camp just put a bullet in the chamber.

I think the Camp plan will be quietly forgotten long before November, but there is still plenty of time for the GOP to demonstrate its skills with a Glock 40.

Norton Francis, Camp Tax Reform Would Create New Challenges for States (TaxVox).  The repeal of the deduction for state and local taxes and limits on muni bonds won’t win friends in the state capitals.

 

National Review, via InstapunditThe IRS Is the Problem:

Representative Camp’s thou-shalt-not list is fine so far as it goes, and, unlike the IRS bureaucracy, Congress does have the authority to rewrite the law. But his proposal falls short in that it assumes that the IRS is a proper and desirable regulator of political speech. It is not. It is not even particularly admirable in its execution of its legitimate mission, the collection of revenue: Its employees have committed felonies in releasing the confidential tax information of such political enemies as the National Organization for Marriage and Mitt Romney, and the agency itself has perversely interpreted federal privacy rules as protecting the criminal leakers at the IRS rather than the victims of their crimes. 

Instapundit comments: “Abolish governmental immunity and make them personally liable for damages for misconduct.”  Hard to argue with that; it would be a good addition to my “Sauce For the Gander” reforms.  I still don’t understand why a nonprofit should lose its exempt status for being primarily political.  Isn’t freewheeling debate a good thing?  The IRS certainly hasn’t shown itself a neutral observer here.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 299

 

Scott Drenkard, Johannes Schmidt, Guess Which State Has the Highest Liquor Taxes in the Nation? (Tax Policy Blog).  Think coffee.

 

Preparing for life after football.  Two former members of a Sioux Falls indoor football league team may have to change their post-athletic career plans.  From the Sioux Falls Argus:

A federal grand jury has indicted six people for conspiracy to defraud the United States and aggravated identity theft.

Two of those indicted – Undra Stewart Franks, 27, and Donta Moore, 28 – are former Sioux Falls Storm players.

The new federal indictment says Moore, Franks and the others conspired to defraud victims by using names, Social Security numbers and dates of birth stolen from others to file fraudulent income tax returns that claimed false income tax refunds.

Identity theft isn’t just a Florida thing.  If you deal with Social Security numbers at work, treat them as valuable confidential data — because that’s what they are.  Guard your own identity by never giving out your social security numbers, protecting your bank account info, and being sure never to transmit those things in unencrypted e-mails.  If you need to send documents with that info electronically, use a secure file transfer site, like our rothcpa.filetransfers.net.

 

News from the Profession.  10 People Not Cut Out to Be Partner (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/12/13: Mason City is cold edition. But: a reprieve!

Tuesday, November 12th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

The ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School makes its Mason City stop today.  7 degrees and sunny.

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But we have a sold-out house today to keep us warm!  We are also sold out for Thursday in Ottumwa.  Meanwhile Paul Neiffer helps with the second day of the show today in Sheldon and tomorrow here.  Seats are going fast for our remaining sessions in Waterloo, Red Oak, Denison and Ames, so register today!  And if you come to one of the shows, please come up and say hi!

 

The first chart for any tax policy debate is in this post from Andrew Lundeen at the Tax Policy Blog,  Government at All Levels Redistributed $2 Trillion in 2012

 givers and takers

 From the study referenced in the post:

As Chart 1 illustrates, the typical family in the lowest 20 percent in 2012 (with market incomes between $0 and $17,104) pays an average of $6,331 in total taxes and receives $33,402 in spending from all levels of government. Thus, the average amount of redistribution to a typical family in the bottom quintile is estimated to be $27,071. The vast majority of this net benefit, a total of $21,158, comes as a result of federal policies.

Before considering any more taxes on “the rich,” it’s worth stopping to understand what is already happening, and to consider that if this isn’t solving the problem, maybe more of the same isn’t the answer.

 

You don’t get a “reprieve” from something you should look forward to: “Iowa gets Obamacare reprieve.”  Coming from Press-citizen.com, the party newspaper of the People’s Republic of Iowa City, that’s probably not the sort of headline to cheer up the administration.

 

train-wreck Megan McArdle, Hope Is All Obamacare Has Left :

When the tech geeks raised concerns about their ability to deliver the website on time, they are reported to have been told “Failure is not an option.” Unfortunately, this is what happens when you say “failure is not an option”: You don’t develop backup plans, which means that your failure may turn into a disaster.

Great idea!

 

Peter Suderman, Time to Start Considering Obamacare’s Worst Case Scenarios (Reason.com):

But it’s time to start considering the worst-case scenarios: that the exchanges continue to malfunction, that plan cancellations go into effect, that insurers see the political winds shifting and stop playing nice with the administration, and that significant numbers of people are left stranded without coverage as a result. Rather than reforming the individual market, which was flawed but did work for some people, Obamacare will have destroyed it and left only dysfunction and chaos in its wake. 

None of this makes me optimistic for a repeal of the inane 3.8% net investment income tax enacted to finance the debacle.  Cleaning up the disaster will be costly, and they’ll need the money for it.

 

Trish McIntire, The New January 21st.  “Despite the delay in the start of the tax season, taxpayers won’t get extra time to file their returns.”

 

Check out Robert D. Flach’s Tuesday Buzz!

Jack Townsend,  IRS Authority to Settle After Referral to DOJ Tax, a discussion of Ron Isley’s tax troubles.

Brian Mahany,  IRS Makes Important Changes For FBAR Appeals – FBAR Lawyer Blog

Fiduciary Income Tax Blog, Valuation of Indirect Ownership Through a Trust

Norton Francis, Narrow Tax Hikes Win Support in Several States (TaxVox)

 

All the news that’s fit to print.  NY Times: Estate Planning for Sex Toys (TaxProf)

News from the Profession.  Someone With Lots of Spare Time Has Doodled Big 4 Stereotypes (Going Concern).

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/11/2013: No, they aren’t paying attention. And it only gets harder.

Friday, January 11th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130113-3Don’t forgive them, because they have no idea what they’re doing.  Last night I taught a session on the Fiscal Cliff tax law and the Obamacare Net Investment Income tax to Iowa chapters of the Institute of Management Accountants over the Iowa Cable Network.  Using the controls to talk to remote classrooms in Marshalltown, Dubuque, Marion and Cedar Falls was a challenge, but a piece of cake compared to working with the tax law.

When they passed the Net Investment Income Tax as part of Obamacare, there were only two concerns for the guilty congresscritters:

Did it apply only to “the rich,” as defined that day?  and

Did it raise enough revenue for them to help them pretend that they weren’t raising the deficit?

Nobody who voted for the bill took the time to ask: “should we really set up an all-new tax, unlike anything we have ever done before, requiring all new regulations and recordkeeping requirements, just to collect 3.8% of something?”  And that’s exactly what they did.

If you have any illusions that they have any clue what they are doing, a look at the new bracket schedule for 2013 for single filers should cure you of that:

If taxable income is:                 The tax would be:
--------------------                  ----------
Not over $8,925                       10% of taxable income
Over $8,925 but not                   $892.50 plus 15% of the
  over $36,250                           excess over $8,925
Over $36,250 but not                  $4,991.25 plus 25% of the
  over $87,850                           excess over $36,250
Over $87,850 but not                  $17,891.25 plus 28% of the
  over $183,250                          excess over $87,850
Over $183,250 but not                 $44,603.25 plus 33% of the
  over $398,350                          excess over $183,250
Over $398,350 but not                 $115,586.25 plus 35% of the
  over $400,000                          excess over $398,350
Over $400,000                         $116,163.75 plus 39.6% of the
                                         excess over $400,000

Notice something funky about that 35% bracket?  It covers only $1,650.  While you have to earn $215,100 to get through the 33% bracket, you skip through 35% to 39.6% with only $1,650 of additional income.  Why?  Because the administration wanted to only tax “the rich,” and they decided for that day that “rich” starts at $400,000 income, if you are single.

The only sure cure is to make congresscritters, the President, and the Cabinet prepare their own returns in a live webcast, with a comment bar for viewers to mock them.  It would serve them right if they had to do it a la Robert Flach, with no computer.

 

TaxGrrrl,  Tax Code Hits Nearly 4 Million Words, Taxpayer Advocate Calls It Too Complicated:

What could you do with six billion hours?

Think hard. That’s the equivalent of 8,758 lifetimes. Yes, lifetimes.

It’s also how much time taxpayers spend every year trying to comply with tax filing requirements. That, according to the 2012 annual report as prepared by the National Taxpayer Advocate Nina E. Olson.

It’s not getting easier, either.

Martin Sullivan, Tax Reform Muddle (Tax.com):

Having agreed to tax increases, Republicans are now more insistent than ever that tax reform must be revenue neutral.

The big change is from Democrats– who have become so adamant on the need for tax increases in addition to the $600 billion raised by the fiscal cliff deal, and who realize additional rate hikes are absolutely impossible–are hell-bent on preserving the most politically feasible loophole closers for raising revenue.

It’s a hopeless game.  The deficit is too big to deal with by “loophole closers.”  Behind the push to raise taxes by closing loopholes is a delusion that you can pay for our incontinent government spending just by hitting “the rich” harder.  But the rich guy can’t cover the check.  Either spending comes down or everyone pays a lot more tax.

 

 

Nick Kasprak,  Chart: Effects of Marriage on Income and Payroll Tax Liability (Tax Policy Blog)

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Deborah Jacobs, A Married Couple’s Guide To Estate Planning (Forbes, via the TaxProf)

Paul Neiffer, Section 179 Can Create a Farm Loss (In Certain Cases)

Kay Bell,  Top taxpayer problem? Continuing tax code complexity

Christopher Bergin,  Permanent Insanity: “Only in Washington would you find folks who would brag that they did a good thing by making permanent an unfair and indecipherable tax system that wastes billions of dollars to administer.” (Tax.com)

Norton Francis, What the Fiscal Cliff Deal Means for the States (TaxVox):

The good news for states is that American Tax Relief Act of 2012 will  end much of the uncertainty that has plagued the income tax code in recent years. No longer will states have to guess what will happen to many provisions of the federal revenue code that were set to expire. The bad news is some states will lose revenue they were counting on from
scheduled changes in the federal estate tax that won’t happen.

Trish McIntire, Refund Loans

Patrick Temple-West,  Public goals, private interests in ‘Fix the Debt’ campaign, and more

Jack Townsend,  Bank Leumi Signals Cooperation with U.S. on Offshore Accounts.  Israili bank ready to spill the beans on U.S. taxpayers with accounts there.

A Friday Buzz from Robert D. Flach.

The Critical Question:  Shipping Wars’ Token Hot Chick Is a Former Accountant? (Going Concern)

 

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