Posts Tagged ‘Obamacare’

Tax Roundup, 3/16/16: Coupling heads to the Governor. And: Trainwrecks, brackets, and that dreaded DNA!

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

coupling20160213Almost Coupled. Both houses of the Iowa General Assembly passed the bill to couple the Iowa tax law to federal tax law for 2015, with the exception of bonus depreciation (HF 2433). The House of Representatives vote was overwhelming, and the Senate was unanimous.

The debates before the votes featured complaints about how school funding is suffering because businesses get the same Section 179 deduction on their Iowa returns as on their federal returns. Yet not one school-funder mentioned any other ideas about finding additional $97.6 million funding lost to the Fiscal 2016 budget. For example:

Iowa credits fy 2017

So apparently school kids are important, but less so than, say, the Geothermal Heat Pump tax credit. (Related: What Iowa considers more important than Sec. 179.)

The bill also repeals the manufacturing supplies sales tax rule set forth by the Department of Revenue that was set to take effect in July. It replaced it with the manufacturing supplies tax exemption passed by the house in 2014, only to die in the Iowa Senate.

In addition to Section 179 coupling, the bill also allows on Iowa 1040s a number of other provisions enacted by Congress in December, including:

Exclusion for IRA contributions to charity
Exclusion of gain from qualified small business stock
Basis adjustment for S corporation charitable contributions
Built-in gain tax five-year recognition period
$250 above-the-line educator expense deduction
Exclusion of home mortgage debt forgiveness
Qualified tuition deduction
Optional sales tax deduction
Conservation easement deductions
Deduction for food inventory contributions

The Des Moines Register coverage of yesterday’s votes makes it appear that the Governor is on board, though he hasn’t said so in so many words. It quotes spokesman Ben Hammes:

“As the chief executive, it is the governor’s job to look at how this bill fits into the bigger budget picture and how it will impact jobs and Iowa taxpayers and he will review it accordingly. The governor is pleased that the Legislature was able to come together and find resolution on these key issues,” Hammes said.

So he doesn’t exactly say he’ll sign. I think he will, but I will feel better when he does.

Unfortunately, the bill only applies to 2015, so we have to do it all again next year.

 

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Hank Stern, More (bad) trainwreck news (InsureBlog):

As we mentioned at the end of January, Open Enrollment v3.0 was pretty much doomed from the start:

“About 6 million people have signed up for health coverage that will take effect on Jan. 1 in the states that use the [404Care].gov enrollment.”

That was way off the (implausibly) predicted 21 million anticipated to sign up. But it’s also only part of the story…

It’s not affordable, and they don’t care.

 

Mitch Maahs, Tax Brackets: Revisiting the Tax on Gambling Winnings just in Time for the NCAA Tourney (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). “Note however that losses may only be deducted to offset gambling winnings, and are only deductible up to the amount of winnings for the year.”

William Perez, New Rules for Deducting Repairs and Maintenance. “The IRS increased the threshold for deducting repairs and maintenance expenses under the safe harbor election from $500 to $2,500.”

TaxGrrrl, FBAR, FATCA Filings Top 1 Million As IRS Increases Scrutiny On Foreign Accounts. “The penalties for noncompliance may, under the law, result in civil penalties, criminal penalties or both: the list of potential penalties that may apply is distressingly long. It’s all very draconian but it’s also very real.”

 

Jack Townsend, Tax Court Holds FBAR Penalty Collected Is Not in the $2,000,000 Threshold for Whistleblower Award under § 7623(b)

Jason Dinesen, What is a 501(c)(3) and What’s the Big Deal? “First of all, the terms not-for-profit and tax-exempt are not interchangeable.”

A. Levar Taylor, Update On The “Late Return” Dischargeability Litigation: 9th Circuit To Hold Oral Argument in Smith Case (Procedurally Taxing)

Robert Wood, What To Provide When IRS Requests Documents

 

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Caleb Newquist, That Time One of Donald Trump’s Companies Got in Trouble for Reporting Ludicrously Deceptive Non-GAAP Results (Going Concern).

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1042. Timely thoughts of what happens when the power to abuse taxpayers goes to a new abuser-in-chief.

David Brunori, Immigrants Continue to Be Good for Us (Tax Analysts Blog). “In a report, the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy says immigrants who entered the country illegally paid roughly $11.6 billion in state and local taxes in 2013.”

Renu Zaretsky, Budget Battles Continue. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers federal proposed budget and Pennsylvania’s no budget, among other news.

 

If you are perplexed by voter choices this year, this may help explain things. 80% of Americans Support Mandatory Labels on “Food Containing DNA” (Ilya Somin)

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Tax Roundup, 3/2/16: It’s your fault. You trusted us! And: don’t get phished.

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016 by Joe Kristan

coupling20160213Insults always convince the insulted. Those dumb small businesses, thinking Congress and the legislature would do what they have been doing every year. That’s apparently the take of Iowa Senator Robb Hogg, reports the Caffeinated Thoughts blog:

State Senator Robb Hogg (D-Cedar Rapids) was very critical of small business owners and farmers who have contacted their legislators urging their support on coupling with federal tax changes which encourage growth in Iowa’s economy. Even worse, Senator Hogg shifted the blame from the inaction of Senate Democrats to Congress.

“I understand there are a lot of big crocodile tears being shed over this issue,” Hogg said. “Congress is to blame.”

“Those investment decisions have been made and maybe people had this belief that it might or would happen, but that doesn’t justify their claim that they were counting on it.”

Congress has renewed the higher Section 179 limit every year since 2009, and Iowa has coupled with the $500,000 limit since 2010. There was no indication that Iowa would do anything different until the Governor said otherwise in January. Either way, it’s still a big tax increase just as the ag economy is sagging.

I’ll also add that Sen. Hogg misuses the term “crocodile tears.” Per phrases.org.uk:

Meaning

To weep crocodile tears is to put on an insincere show of sorrow.

Origin

The allusion is to the ancient notion that crocodiles weep while devouring their prey. Crocodiles do indeed have lachrymal glands and produce tears to lubricate the eyes as humans do. They don’t cry with emotion though. Whatever experience they have when devouring prey we can be certain it isn’t remorse.

There’s nothing insincere about the sorrow of finding your taxes increased. The term is better reserved for someone who says, gee, too bad we need to take more of your money, but we sure do need to spend it.

Still, the tactic of criticizing your constituents is an interesting approach. It does seems to work on a national level lately.

 

Kay Bell, March arrives not as lion or lamb, but as a fish phish:

In this latest phishing ploy, one of several the IRS has seen surging this tax-filing season, the faux corporate execs are asking for payroll data, including W-2 forms that contain Social Security numbers and other personally identifiable information.

“This is a new twist on an old scheme using the cover of the tax season and W-2 filings to try tricking people into sharing personal data. Now the criminals are focusing their schemes on company payroll departments,” warns IRS Commissioner John Koskinen.

“If your CEO appears to be emailing you for a list of company employees, check it out before you respond,” adds Koskinen. “Everyone has a responsibility to remain diligent about confirming the identity of people requesting personal information about employees.

Just this morning I got an email from someone I never heard of with a heading: “W2 Information EIN: 13-2655998.” Don’t click on this sort of thing. It’s bad news.

 

Kristine Tidgren, A New Farm Year Begins: Pay Taxes and Perfect Landlord’s Lien! (AgDocket)

Hank Stern, Aetna joins the parade (InsureBlog):

Aetna, and its Coventry affiliate, becomes the next major player to cry “no mas” on new business. In email this morning:

We will not pay commissions for sales with coverage effective dates after March 1, 2016, and continuing through December 31, 2016 effective dates.  This applies to on- and off-exchange business.”

If an insurance company doesn’t pay commissions, it’s a safe bet that they aren’t making money on the product.

Robert Wood, To Fight IRS Tax Bills, Go Step By Step

 

William Perez, Tax Advice for Cannabis Entrepreneurs. Interestingly juxtaposed with another post:

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It’s certainly conceivable that someone could find both posts useful.

 

Jason Dinesen, Sometimes I Wish I Could Just Prepare 1040-EZs.

 

 

Scott Drenkard, Celebrating 75 Years of Facts & Figures (Tax Policy Blog):

Today we released the 2016 edition of Facts & Figures, our pocket- and purse-sized booklet on quick tax facts. This publication has a long history—it dates back to 1941, when our think tank (which was just four years old at the time) published a booklet that was both a source of otherwise hard-to-find government data, and also a treasure trove of infographics to illuminate that information.

The Tax Foundation continues to be a valuable source of tax data and analysis, even though some folks don’t like the math.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1028

Renu Zaretsky, What comes after a big night for Clinton and Trump? The TaxVox headline roundup covers the Super Tuesday results and other tax news.

News from the Profession. FLASH: Sales, Accounting Personnel Face Pressure to Meet Revenue Goals (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

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Tax Roundup, 2/5/16: The IRS isn’t a bank, and a 1099 isn’t what makes income taxable. And: oil companies, money trees.

Friday, February 5th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20151217-1Nice Try. The tax law discourages taxpayers from tapping retirement savings too early with a 10% early withdrawal tax. The tax law also allows an above-the-line deduction for penalties imposed by banks for closing out a CD or savings account before maturity.

They aren’t the same thing.

A Mr. Martin learned that lesson this week in Tax Court. He was 54 years old when he pulled out $55,976.29 from his IRA. He reported the 10% penalty tax, but then he also deducted it on line 30 of his 1040 as a “penalty on early withdrawal of savings.”

I can see the logic, as it does look like, well, a penalty on an early withdrawal of savings. But that’s not how the Tax Court sees it (my emphasis):

Martin argues that the additional tax imposed by section 72(t) is deductible under section 62(a)(9). We disagree. Section 62(a)(9) provides a deduction for an amount “forfeited to a bank, mutual savings bank, savings and loan association, building and loan association, cooperative bank or homestead association as a penalty for premature withdrawal of funds from a time savings account, certificate of deposit, or similar class of deposit.” The section 72(t) additional tax is payable to the federal government, not to a “bank” or similar institution listed in section 62(a)(9). Therefore, it is not deductible under section 62(a)(9). Further, the additional tax imposed by section 72(t) is a federal-income tax. Section 275(a)(1) disallows any deductions for “Federal income taxes” (A deduction for certain other taxes, including State income taxes and some other federal taxes, is allowed by section 164(a).).

There was one other problem with the return. He won $1,000 at a casino, an amount arguably below the threshold for which casinos most report gambling winnings on a W2-G. They reported it anyway. Again, the Tax Court:

The casino reported on an information return its $1,000 payment to Martin. Martin argues that, because he earned entries into the lottery by playing slot machines, his gambling winnings should be subject to the $1,200 reporting threshold. Thus, Martin argues, the casino should not have reported the gambling  winnings of $1,000 because the payment fell below the $1,200 reporting-requirement threshold for gambling winnings from slot machines.

Martin assumes that gambling winnings that are not reportable on information returns are not includible in gross income. At trial he said that the IRS is “trying to separate the taxation from the reporting when it is undeniably one and the same”. Martin does not see, or refuses to see, the distinction between information-reporting requirements and the imposition of income tax. Whether the casino was required to report Martin’s winnings is irrelevant to the question of whether his winnings are includible in his gross income. The Internal Revenue Code does not exclude a payment from income when the payment is not large enough to require the payor to report the payment on an information return.

A lot of people think that when something doesn’t show up on an information return, it’s tax-free. It just doesn’t work that way.

Cite: Martin, T.C. Memo. 2016-15

 

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Obama seeks oil tax, destruction of self-driving car industryCNBC reports:

President Barack Obama will propose a $10-per-barrel charge on oil to fund clean transportation projects as part of his final budget request next week, the White House said Thursday.

Oil companies would pay the fee, which would be gradually introduced over five years. The government would use the revenue to help fund high-speed railways, autonomous cars and other travel systems, aiming to reduce emissions from the nation’s transportation system.

“Oil companies would pay the fee.” Such a kidder, that President. Apparently the oil companies will pay it by planting more carbon-absorbing money trees out behind their refineries.

It’s a credit to misguided persistence that the President is still pursuing high-speed passenger rail, an idea that California is busy proving once again to be ridiculously expensive and impractical. And somehow I’d feel much safer in an autonomous car from Google or Apple than one from the the same government that brings us the IRS.

 

Scott Hodge, New IRS Data: Wealthy Paid 55 Percent of Income Taxes in 2014 (Tax Policy Blog).

distribution 2014 income

“So while many politicians may argue that the wealthy don’t pay their fair share of income taxes, the data simply does not support that opinion.”

 

Russ Fox, Maryland Suspends Processing Tax Returns from 23 Liberty Tax Service Locations:

For consumers, the advice that Maryland noted in their press release is accurate: “Taxpayers should carefully review their returns for these issues and should be suspicious if a preparer: deducts fees from the taxpayer’s refund to be deposited into the tax preparer’s account; does not sign the tax return; or fails to include the Preparer Taxpayer Identification number “PTIN” on the return.” I’ll add, if you don’t own a business and see business income on your return, there’s a problem.

Indeed.

Kay Bell, Lesson from IRS hardware failure: Be prepared for the unexpected during tax filing season. The hardware went back on line yesterday afternoon. 

TaxGrrrl, Update: IRS Website Back Online, Tax Refunds Unaffected

Peter ReillyIRS And The Tea Party – Scandal Enters A New Millennium. Peter observes The TaxProf’s Day 1000 Tea Party Scandal entry.

Keith Fogg, Discharging Late Filed Returns – A Novel but Unsuccessful Approach. “The case shows the creativity that can come into play in the face of very long odds.”

Robert Wood, Bank Julius Baer Hit With $547M Criminal Tax Evasion Penalty, Two Bankers Plead Guilty

 

Me, Tax credits for a few vs. business deductions for everyone. I take my battle against cronyism and for conforming Iowa tax law to 2015 federal changes to IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record Business Professional’s Blog.

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1,002. Another supposedly-erased hard drive sought by investigators miraculously reappears.

Megan McArdle, Obamacare’s Cadillac Tax Will Not Survive. The way pieces of the machine keep falling off, you might wonder if it wasn’t very well designed.

Renu Zaretsky, A Budget, Capital, Growth, and TransparencyToday’s TaxVox news roundup covers the Obama oil fee, last night’s Sanders-Clinton debate, and lots more.

News from the Profession. Lying About Your Financial Statements Being Audited Still Frowned Upon (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/4/16. Confirmed: Governor opposes coupling to ALL 2015 changes. And: Are hipsters really flocking downtown?

Thursday, February 4th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

coupling20160129Worst Iowa tax policy decision ever. Governor Branstad doesn’t want to conform Iowa’s tax law to any of the extender provisions passed in December for 2015. A reliable source has confirmed our earlier report that the Governor wants to skip coupling entirely for 2015, and then conform to everything except Section 179 and bonus depreciation in 2016 and beyond.

It’s bad enough that he doesn’t want to conform with the $500,000 federal Section 179 for the first time in years — imposing a big tax increase on small businesses and farmers in every county. But conforming to nothing means a whole host of separate Iowa computations for 2015 returns — and 2015 only. Without spending a lot of time, I come up with these:

Exclusion for IRA contributions to charity
Exclusion of gain from qualified small business stock
Basis adjustment for S corporation charitable contributions
Built-in gain tax five-year recognition period
Educator expense deduction
Exclusion of home mortgage debt forgiveness
Qualified tuition deduction
Conservation easement deductions
Deduction for food inventory contributions

I have asked the Department of Revenue for a complete list of affected provisions, and I will provide it if they send one.

These will have effects on thousands of taxpayers ranging from minor annoyance and more expensive tax compliance to major unexpected Iowa tax expense. To take a common example, the exclusion fo IRA contributions to charity allows taxpayers aged 70 1/2 or older to have their IRAs make contributions to charity directly. This means the contributions bypass their federal 1040s altogether. But for Iowa, the Governor would have the IRA holder include the contribution in taxable income and then, presumably, add it to their itemized deductions — if the taxpayer itemizes in the first place.

Some of these can be very costly. For example, the exclusion of gain for qualifying C corporation stock sales can apply to up to $10 million of capital gain. The exclusion benefits start-up businesses, which Iowa allegedly supports with at least four separate tax credits. Failure to couple would clobber a $10 million 2015 gain with an unexpected $898,000 tax bill.

There is bipartisan support for coupling with all federal provisions other than bonus depreciation for 2015. The Iowa House of Representatives has already passed such a bill on a bipartisan 82-14 vote. But Governor Branstad and Senate Majority Leader Gronstal have apparently reached a little bipartisan deal of their own to keep the Senate from ever voting on 2015 conformity. The Senate tax committee meeting yesterday was cancelled, which I hope means the Senate leadership is getting pressure to back off this stupid policy.

If you are affected, or if your clients are (they are), I encourage you to let your Iowa Senator know how you feel.

Related Coverage:

Iowa House passes $500,000 Section 179, but prospects bleak in Senate.

Iowa Governor reportedly opposes 2015 coupling for anything.

Branstad budget omits $500,000 Section 179 deduction for Iowa; no 2015 conformity.

 

20130218-1What do you mean, IBM doesn’t stock the vacuum tubes anymore? IRS Systems Outage Shuts Down Tax Processing (Accounting Today):

The Internal Revenue Service said Wednesday evening its tax-processing systems have suffered a hardware failure and that tax processing could be affected into Thursday.

“The IRS experienced a hardware failure this afternoon affecting a number of tax processing systems, which are currently unavailable,” said the IRS. “Several of our systems are not currently operating, including our modernized e-file system and a number of other related systems. The IRS is currently in the process of making repairs and working to restore normal operations as soon as possible. We anticipate some of the systems will remain unavailable until tomorrow.”

The IRS says it’s confident that it will have the system restored by the weekend and that any refund delays will be minor.

Related: IRS Having One of Those Days (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern); TaxGrrrl, IRS Website Hit With Hardware Failure, Some Refund & Payment Tools Unavailable.

 

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Jason Dinesen, The Iowa Trust Fund Tax Credit is $0 for 2015

Robert Wood, Perfectly Legal Tax Write-off? Lawyer Fees — Even $1,200 An Hour

Russ Fox, A Tale of Three States. “Hawaii, Indiana, and Mississippi are three states where daily fantasy sports (DFS) is being debated. The three states are representative of what is likely to occur in every state.”

Keith Fogg, Verification of Bankruptcy Action in a Collection Due Process Case (Procedurally Taxing). “Because Appeals employees often have very little knowledge of bankruptcy, this case points out the need to pay careful attention in CDP cases that follow bankruptcy actions and challenge verifications where the Appeals employee fails to acknowledge the impact of the bankruptcy case.”

Bob Vineyard, Aetna Not Pulling Plug on Obamacare …. Yet (InsureBlog). Many Iowans get coverage through Aetna’s Coventry unit. But as the company expects to lose $1 billion over two years on Exchange policies, their willingness to continue to provide ACA – compliant policies on the exchange will be sorely tried.

Jack Townsend, Another Taxpayer Guilty Plea for Offshore Account Misbehavior

Peter Reilly, Tax Dependency Exemptions For Noncustodial Parents – It Is All About Form 8332. It really is. Form 8332 provides a way for couples to continue fighting long after the divorce is final.

Jim Maule, “Can a Clone Qualify as a Qualifying Child or Qualifying Relative?”

 

Scott Greenberg, The Tax Benefits of Having an Additional Child (Tax Policy Blog). In case your decision hinges on this.

Renu Zaretsky, Debates, Energy, Credits and PrepToday’s TaxVox roundup covers tonight’s Democratic Debate, energy tax policy, and a shutdown of 26 Liberty Tax franchise operations in Maryland.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1,001

 

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Is Hip, Cool Des Moines Really Attracting Migrants? (Lyman Stone). I haven’t seen any local media pick this up, but this is a fascinating look at migration and population patterns Downtown and across Polk County. It is inspired by the recent Politico piece on how hip and all we are (emphasis in original):

In fact, throughout the article, there’s an interesting claim made that the population of downtown Des Moines has risen from 1,000 at some unspecified time in the 1990s, to at least over 10,000 as of 2016. In fact, throughout the article, there’s an interesting claim made that the population of downtown Des Moines has risen from 1,000 at some unspecified time in the 1990s, to at least over 10,000 as of 2016.

The claim turns out to be exaggerated, but only a little:

Downtown Des Moines probably did not gain 10,000 residents from the late 1990s to 2016, nor does it seem likely that it had just 1,000 residents at any time in the last few decades. However, that doesn’t mean the essential claims of Woodard’s story are wrong. Au contraire, Des Moines has gained about 10,000 people since 2000, and has about 9,000 more people than we would expect had 1987 growth rates continued. That’s a meaningful acceleration in urban growth, and a significant number have been headed to the very center of the city.

It’s a great read with some surprising observations about how suburban and downtown growth complement each other.

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Tax Roundup, 1/21/16: Defying Governor, House conformity bill includes $500,000 Section 179 limit.

Thursday, January 21st, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20151118-1Reason to hope, reasons to despair. The Iowa House Ways and Means Chairman introduced a “code conformity” bill yesterday (HSB 535) that includes the federal $500,000 Section 179 limit. This defies the wishes of Governor Branstad, who says the state can’t afford the expanded deduction. He would only allow a $25,000 deduction for asset purchases that would otherwise have to be capitalized and depreciated.

The bill, as expected, does not adopt bonus depreciation for Iowa.

The Section 179 conformity proposal is is good news. It appears that Ways and Means Republicans sense that their business and farm constituents won’t appreciate a big tax increase, especially in a year that looks like it will be a down year around the state. Now attention will turn to the Senate, where Democratic Majority Leader Gronstal controls what legislation reaches the floor. If he supports the legislation, it is likely to pass. The Governor would probably be able to kill it with a veto, but would he?

That brings up my first reason to despair. Unless the Governor backs down or some compromise is reached, the conformity bill is likely to be delayed. Affected taxpayers will have to wait to file their 2015 Iowa returns until they know what the tax law is; if they guess wrong, they will incur the expense of amending their returns. It compresses the filing season into an ever-narrower window and delays refunds.

The biggest issue is likely to be the budget impact. While I haven’t seen a current figure, last year’s Section 179 conformity bill was estimated to reduce state revenues by $88.5 million.

capitol burning 10904I certainly have a list of possible pay-fors, starting with the newest proposed credit, a $10 million  “renewable biochemical tax credit” (SSB 3001). It is refundable, meaning it isn’t just a tax reduction, but an actual cash subsidy to taxpayers whose credit exceeds their Iowa tax. That easily could happen, as it is based on pounds of qualifying stuff produced. It will only go to taxpayers who “enter into an agreement” with the economic development administration. In other words, for insiders who know where to pull strings.

And here is another reason to despair. It appears this new boondoggle is going to slide right on through. From the Des Moines Register (my emphasis):

More than a dozen lobbyists representing businesses, farm organizations, economic development groups and other expressed support, and there was no opposition. Gov. Terry Branstad has listed renewable chemical manufacturing tax credits as a key item in his 2016 legislative agenda.

Under the bill, the maximum amount of state tax credits available annually to any one business for the production of renewable chemicals would be either $1 million or $500,000, depending how long the company has operated in Iowa.

Even Mark Chelgren (R-Ottumwa), who has in the past voted against corporate welfare tax credits, is on board with this one.

It will be very difficult to get the Governor to go along with the higher Section 179 limits without spending or tax credit cuts to offset the revenue loss. The Governor seems dead set against cutting cronyist tax credits. If the legislature agrees with him, Section 179 has a very difficult fight this session. Failure to adopt the federal Section 179 limit would represent a triumph of a handful of insiders over the businesses and farms in every county that would have their taxes increased to pay for subsidies.

 

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Iowa increases security to prevent tax fraud (thegazette.com):

The Iowa Department of Revenue has upped its security game after seeing more than 10,000 fraudulent tax returns last year.

This tax season, the agency will use technology to better track fraudsters, validate bank accounts before making direct deposits and share information with the IRS, other states, software providers and banks.

The story says Iowa stopped $11.6 million in fake refund claims last year on 10,600 fraudulent returns.

 

Hank Stern, O’Care in Real Life (InsureBlog):

So, one of my small group clients just lost the last person on his group plan. It had gotten so expensive that no one could really afford to stay on it. Shopping around didn’t help: everything we looked at was at least as expensive for comparable benefits. And the plan was pretty much bare-bones, not a lot of fat to trim.

Tom has been a client – and friend – for almost 30 years. A small business owner, he was proud to be able to offer his employees coverage. Now that’s gone.

He said “If you like your plan, you can keep your plan.” He didn’t say you could afford it.

Kristine Tidgren, Farm Lease Questions Often Arise This Time of Year (Ag Docket)

Robert D. Flach, A VERY IMPORTANT REMINDER. “Don’t listen to a broker, a banker, an insurance salesman, or your Uncle Charlie!   You wouldn’t ask your butcher for a medical opinion, so why would you accept tax advice from your MD?”

Keith Fogg, Public Policy Cases Accepted by the Taxpayer Advocate Service (Procedurally Taxing). “If you have an issue that raises policy issues for a group of taxpayers, you can bring this to the attention of the NTA in hopes that it will make the policy list and open the doors to TAS assistance.”

Paul Neiffer, Top 10 Reasons You Might Need Accrual Accounting. “Although this list is designed to be humorous, the reality is that all farmers should consider using accrual accounting to manage their farm operation.”

Kay Bell, Smooth tax season start? Not for some TaxAct users. “Just a few days before the filing season and Free File opened for business, the tax software manufacturer sent a letter to about 450 customers, notifying them of a data breach.”

Jack Townsend, Should Proof of No Tax Evaded Be Admissible as Defense in Crime Not Requiring Tax Evaded as an Element

 

Tony Nitti, An Ode To Tax Season: How To Bid Farewell To Your Family.

Tax season is here. Tax season is the worst. But don’t just abandon your family for the next three months with no explanation; make them aware of the series of mistakes that were set into motion long ago that led you to this self-imposed hell. And tell them with rhymes! 

That may be why my grown kid is a musician, and the high schooler wants to be one.

 

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David Brunori, Good Government Developments in the Tax World (Tax Analysts Blog). No Iowa items make the list.

David Henderson, The Economics of the Cadillac Health Care Tax, Part IPart II. “But now that I have done a more careful analysis with some plausible numbers, I am seriously undecided.”

Kyle Pomerleau, Senator Hatch To Introduce Corporate Integration Plan (Tax Policy Blog). “Not only does the double tax on equity investment increase the cost of capital, it creates economic distortions. The most obvious one is the distortion towards debt-financed investments.”

Renu Zaretsky, Market Woes and the Price of Breaks. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers stupid things from proposed financial transaction taxes to the ongoing Kansas budget and tax policy disaster.

 

Robert Wood, IRS Wipes Another Hard Drive Defying Court Order…But You Must Keep Tax Records. Darn right, peasant!

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 987.

 

Career Corner. Stop Doing Other People’s Work Because It Saves Time (Leona May, Going Concern). A classic symptom of Senior Accountant’s Disease.

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/15/16: Tax credits and their opportunity costs. And: a turnaround in IRS service!

Friday, January 15th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

haroldReport: Tax credit for me would benefit me. Report: Tax credit would help Iowa biochemical industry (Des Moines Register).

The argument that this industry, above the thousands of industries out there, deserves funding at the expense of other businesses in the state, and that Iowa’s elected officials are just the ones to figure that out, is hard to credit. It might almost be plausible if it came at the end of a careful and systematic process where the state looked at all of the possible industries that would be good for the state to have and then carefully selected finalists based on objective and unbiased review.

That never happens.

Instead, the Bio-renewables credit is following a path blazed by the film industry and other credit recipients. Somebody decides a tax credit would be a good thing. It’s never hard to get the industry that would receive the subsidy on board. Local business boosters climb on because they know of a local business that would benefit. They fund studies to prove that this industry offers extraordinary benefits. Economic development officials join in, because that’s what they do. Politicians like giving away money, and soon you have amazing results.

I don’t fault businesses for using state tax credits. If somebody gives you money, you take it. But that doesn’t make it good policy for the rest of us.

There are two little words that credit boosters never bring up: opportunity costs. The money spent on the favored industry isn’t conjured into existence out of thin air. It is taken from somebody else. This year it’s taken from every Iowa business that uses the $500,000 Section 179 limit, which the Governor says the state can no longer afford. There are businesses in every county that will pay higher taxes if Iowa reduces its Section 179 limit to $25,000. Those businesses lose the opportunity to use funds to grow their own businesses and hire their own employees.

If there is to be any benefit here, it’s that it might actually teach the General Assembly about the opportunity costs of benefiting sympathetic industries. Here, it’s the cost of the lost Section 179 benefit to constituents statewide.

Related:

LOCAL CPA FIRM VOWS TO SWALLOW PRIDE, ACCEPT $28 MILLION

List of Iowa incentive tax credits budgeted for 2017.

 

Service: It’s in our nameA new report from the Government Accountability Office documents the decline in IRS service that we’ve all experienced under Turnaround Artist John Koskinen:

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) provided the lowest level of telephone service during fiscal year 2015 compared to prior years, with only 38 percent of callers who wanted to speak with an IRS assistor able to reach one. This lower level of service occurred despite lower demand from callers seeking live assistance, which has fallen by 6 percent since 2010 to about 51 million callers in 2015. Over the same period, average wait times have almost tripled to over 30 minutes. IRS also struggled to answer correspondence in a timely manner and assistors increasingly either failed to send required correspondence to taxpayers or included inaccurate information in correspondence sent.

The picture they draw isn’t pretty:

 

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When you turn around, it’s important to turn in the right direction.

Related: TaxProf, GAO:  Only 38% Of Taxpayers Who Called IRS Got Through In 2015 (Down From 74% In 2010); Wait Time Increased From 11 To 31 Minutes

 

buzz20150804Robert D. Flach has your Friday Buzz! He covers ground from choosing a tax professional to extenders to a certain presidential candidate.

William Perez, How to Know if You Should Hire a Tax Attorney

Matthew McKinney, Iowa’s open records law – who, what, when, and why? (IowaBiz.com).

Kay Bell, N.J. Gov. Chris Christie kills film & TV tax credits. Good. 

Jack Townsend, Updated FAQs for SFOP and SDOP Streamlined Processes. “The IRS has updated the FAQs for the Streamlined Domestic and Streamlined Foreign Offshore Procedures.”

Leslie Book, State of the Union: Tax Administration a Small But Important Part of the Speech

Robert Wood, Beware: IRS Now Has Six Years To Audit Your Taxes, Up From Three. “The three years is doubled to six if you omitted more than 25% of your income.”

Peter Reilly, Conservation Easement Tax Deductions And Valuation Abuse. “I think this is another instance of what Joe Kristan calls using the Tax Code as the Swiss Utility Knife of public policy.”

 

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Megan McArdle, Gaming of Obamacare Poses a Fatal Threat. “The problem: People signing up during ‘special enrollment’ (the majority of the year that falls outside of the annual open enrollment period) were much sicker, and paying premiums for much less time, than the rest of the exchange population.”

Scott Greenberg, The Cadillac Tax will Now Be Deductible. Here’s What That Means. (Tax Policy Blog)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 981. “Today, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released two new reports regarding serious flaws in the Internal Revenue Service’s (IRS) audit selection processes. GAO confirmed that these flaws mean the IRS could continue to unfairly target American taxpayers based on their political beliefs and other First Amendment protected views.”

Robert Goulder, India’s Long Journey to a VAT (Tax Analysts Blog)

Renu Zaretsky, Winners, Losers, and Movers. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers last night’s presidential debate, Missouri earnings taxes, and  innovation boxes.

 

Jim Maule, Powerball, Taxes, and Math:

The expectation that widened my eyes is a meme circulating on facebook, and elsewhere, I suppose, that claims splitting the $1.4 billion evenly among all Americans would give each person $4.33 million. Good grief! This is just so wrong. The responses pointing out the error are themselves amusing, with the best one pointing out that it would generate $4.33 per person, enough to buy a calculator.

This meme:

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This explains more about the political process than I care to contemplate.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/29/15: No year-end basis, no S corporation loss. And: ACA 1095 deadlines extended.

Tuesday, December 29th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

S-SidewalkBasis or bust. With the re-enactment of bonus depreciation for 2015, some S corporations find themselves with taxable losses for 2015. That won’t do much for the 2015 tax returns of S corporation shareholders who have no basis in their stock at year-end. While they also have to get by the “at-risk” and “passive loss” limits, they don’t even get to those problems without basis.

A taxpayer’s initial basis in an S corporation is the amount paid for the stock. It is increased by capital contributions and by undistributed income of the S corporation. It is reduced by distributions of S corporation earnings and by S corporation losses. If there have been 2015 distributions, they count before the losses do.

A shareholder with no stock basis can still get deductions by loaning money to the S corporation by year-end. The loan has to meet the at-risk rules (it can’t be funded by another shareholder or by the corporation, for example), but if it meets those requirements, it can create basis for S corporation losses. But don’t do anything hokey like making a loan on December 31 and having the corporation repay it on January 3.

It’s a trap! Well, it doesn’t have to be, but remember that any losses you take against a loan reduce the basis of the loan. That means that if the loan is repaid before the losses are restored by S corporation income, the repayment will be taxable gain to the extent of the unrestored losses.

This is another installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series running through December 31. Collect them all!

 

1095-C cornerIRS delays due dates for 1095-B and 1095-C reporting2015 is the first year many employers are required to file a new form documenting insurance coverage, or offers of coverage, for their employees. Apparently many employers are still scrambling to figure out how to comply with the complex rules, because yesterday the IRS announced (Notice 2016-4) a delay in the deadlines for providing these forms to employees and to the IRS. A summary:

2016-4 deadlines

Employers are encouraged to file under the old deadlines if they can, but they now have a blanket extension, with no need to file any extension request.

While the IRS will be processing forms starting January 16, this announcement tells us that millions of taxpayers will lack the forms they need to properly report their ACA tax credits or penalties for inadequate coverage. The IRS says that employees can rely upon “other information received” from employers or insurers, and do not have to amend returns if the 1095s they receive later show that their original amounts are incorrect. What could possibly go wrong with this? Aside from rampant errors and outright fraud, I mean.

We are now approaching six years since the enactment of the ACA, and it’s still a mess.

Related: Russ Fox, IRS: We’ll Trust You on Health Insurance for 2015 Because… “We won’t have delays regarding filing returns because taxpayers haven’t received Forms 1095-B or 1095-C as long as they’re aware of their health insurance coverage. That’s a very good thing for all.”

 

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If you are trying to lose weight added by holiday treats, go to Robert D. Flach’s place for a “slender” Tuesday Buzz!

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2015: Red Paw Emergency Relief Team

Robert Wood, House Oversight Probes Hillary Speech Fees To Clinton Foundation. The assignment of income rules only apply to little people.

Leslie Book, PATH, CDP Venue and Berglund v Commissioner, A Recent Tax Court Case Where Venue Matters (Procedurally Taxing)

Jason DinesenFrom the Archives: Taxation of Emotional Distress Payments

Kay Bell, 10 tax-saving things to do by December 31

Jana Luttenegger WeilerLast Minute Tax Extenders – 2015 Edition (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

William Perez, Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015

Annette Nellen, Top Ten Items of Tax Policy Interest for 2015 – #6 and #7. Includes coverage of the return due date changes enacted this year.

Me, Forget April 15. Well, don’t, actually, but Dec. 31 matters more. My latest at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record Business Professionals’ Blog.

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 964.

Renu Zaretsky, Bans, Subsidies, Searches, and Bubbles. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers new EITC restrictions and Nevada’s corporate welfare cornucopia for Tesla, among other morsels.

Stephen Entin, Disentangling CAP Arguments against Tax Cuts for Capital Formation: Part 4 (Tax Policy Blog). “Most major tax bills of the last thirty years have provided serious tax reductions or refundable credits (resulting in negative taxes) for lower income families. These are extraordinarily expensive, but do next to nothing to promote capital formation to raise productivity, wages, and employment.”

 

Caleb Newquist, Opening Day of Tax Season Less Than a Month Away (Going Concern). “Anyone with a PTIN is due to report on January 4.” Haven’t renewed your PTIN yet? Get on it!

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/22/15: If you want a 2015 qualified plan, time to fly! And lots more.

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
The view from Tax Update world headquaters yesterday.

The view from Tax Update world headquaters yesterday.

10 days to get a qualified plan in place. Some of the best deductions for sole proprietors and one-owner corporations are found in the tax law’s “qualified plan” rules. A payment to a qualified pension or profit-sharing plan is deductible now, grows tax free, and is only taxable on retirement. For one-employee companies, it’s a deduction for taking money from one pocket and putting it in another.

One of the best of these opportunities is the “Solo 401(k),” which allows a deduction of up to $53,000 for contributions to a solo owner-employee’s retirement plan. But there’s one little catch: the plan has to be in place by December 31 of this year to allow a 2015 deduction.

If that sort of deduction sounds attractive, you should consult a qualified plan professional. Some brokerage houses can steer you the right way, as can the Vanguard mutual fund company.

Remember, though, that once money is in a qualified plan, expect it to stay there. Early withdrawals face a 10% penalty, as well as income tax liability. 401(k) plans generally can’t be investors in or lenders to the plan owner’s business. There are annual compliance costs that inevitably reduce the tax benefits. Still, for an annual deduction that size, some inconvenience can be tolerated.

This is the second installment of our 2015 year-end planning tips series. Collect them all!

 

Kay Bell, Upcoming filing season will start on time: Jan. 19, 2016. Almost none of my clients are ready by then. While I’m glad that the season isn’t delayed by a failure to pass an extender bill, I think identity theft requires a later start to issuing tax refunds. They shouldn’t be processed until W-2 and 1099 information is in the IRS system – preferably with special W-2 codes like those the IRS is experimenting with this season to catch fraudulent claims. 

Of course, that means the government will sit on overpayments longer. That should be addressed by changing the “I got a big refund!” culture. That could be done by lowering to 75% the amount of taxes that have to be paid in by April 15 to avoid a penalty and by changing the withholding tables to make refunds less likely.

 

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Robert D. Flach comes through with a “meaty” Christmas Week Buzz, with lots of Extender bill discussion and a hint of perhaps the most unusual Christmas Eve tradition ever.

Tony Nitti, Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2015: #4 – Who Can Qualify As A Real Estate Pro?

Russ Fox, Are Tips (Gratuities) at the Poker Table Deductible? “As long as the tip is reasonable, it’s clear that a professional poker player can deduct the tip as a business expense.” You’ll have to read the post to see whether it works for amateurs.

William Perez, All About the Earned Income Tax Credit. “The easiest way to find out if you qualify for the earned income credit is to use an application found on the IRS Web site called the EITC Assistant.”

Andrew Mitchel offers a True / False Quiz on FAST Act Passport Revocation Provisions

Hank Stern, Major O’Care Disappointment (Insureblog). “Now that the (disastrous) first phase of the 2016 Open Enrollment season is behind us, lets’ take a look at what a huge disappointment it was.”

Carlton Smith, Tilden v. Comm’r: Postal Service Tracking Data Determines Timeliness of Tax Court Petition (Procedurally Taxing)

TaxGrrrl, 12 Days Of Charitable Giving 2015: PACT For Animals

 

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Scott Greenberg, Fact-checking Hillary Clinton on Millionaires’ Taxes (Tax Policy Blog). “There are very few millionaires in the U.S. that pay “10 percent to nothing” in taxes.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 957. Today’s link goes to a Washington Post story that says “There is no love lost between Republicans in Congress and the Internal Revenue Service, whether it’s their dislike for the tax code, the current tax commissioner or their fury at the agency’s treatment a few years ago of conservative groups.” If you want to see increases in the IRS budget, you want Commissioner Koskinen to resign.

Howard Gleckman presents The TaxVox Lump of Coal Awards for the Ten Worst Tax Ideas of 2015. While I might quibble with one or two of the choices, it’s a strong list. For example:

8. Tax credits for what ails you. Hillary Clinton has taken a page out of Bill Clinton’s fiscal playbook: Identify a kitchen table problem and propose a modest tax subsidy to relieve the pain. She has tax credits for families burdened by the high costs of education, caring for aging parents, and high medical costs. And she’s proposed another credit to encourage employers to give workers a stake in their companies. My TPC colleague Gene Steuerle has a name for this: tax deform.

It’s more than a federal problem, for sure.

 

Matt Gardner, What Apple’s Tim Cook Gets Wrong About Its Tax Avoidance (Tax Justice Blog). Mr. Cook has the temerity to think that he has a duty to shareholders, instead of to grasping politicians.

 

Career Corner (or, News from the Profession). Former EY Employee Who Liked Secretly Filming People in the Bathroom Given Four Years to Think About His Choices (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/17/15: President supports extenders; bill stops IRS from taxing political donations as gifts. And: More ACA stuff!

Thursday, December 17th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

whitehouse logoWhite House announces support for extender bill. Things seem to be falling into place for passage of the extender bill with an announcement of support from the White House.

The bill has to pass Congress first, but Tax Analysts reports ($link) that passage is eased by splitting the extender bill from the “omnibus” spending bill:

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., said he expects the House to vote on the extenders package on December 17 and an omnibus spending bill, also introduced as an amendment to H.R. 2029, on December 18.  GOP leaders apparently decided to split the bills into two separate amendments to generate enough support for passage in the House. The spending bill may lose votes from conservative Republicans while the tax bill may lose votes from House Democrats. Those concerns are not shared in the Senate, where Democrats like both bills.

Losing votes from House Democrats doesn’t threaten the extender bill, as there are so few of them. So House vote tomorrow.

 

20150925-2Extender bill ends attempts to tax political donations as gifts. Before it was chastened by the Tea Party scandal, the IRS made moves to treat contributions to Sec. 501(c)(4) political organizations as taxable gifts. The legal justification for treating contributions to independent organizations was weak to begin with, but a provision in the extender bill (Sec. 408) settles the issue going forward by explicitly excluding such contributions from gift tax effective for gifts made after enactment.

What about old gifts?

Nothing in the amendment made by subsection (a) shall be construed to create any inference with respect to whether any transfer of property (whether made before, on, or after the date of the enactment of this Act) to an organization described in paragraph (4), (5), or (6) of section 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is a transfer of property by gift for purposes of chapter 12 of such Code.

So the IRS could continue to assert its weak position that pre-enactment gifts are taxable. I don’t think they will.

Related: TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 952. Today’s link goes to an op-ed complaining that the extender bill will make it too difficult for the IRS to restrict First Amendment rights by starting gift tax audits of political donors.

 

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IRS addresses more HRA and ACA questions. Yesterday the IRS issued Notice 2015-87, a 31 page bag of buzzwords addressing ACA issues. Disappointingly, the Notice doesn’t back off the extreme position that reimbursement of individual medical insurance premiums paid by employees will normally trigger a $100 per-day, per-employee penalty.

The bill does clarify that “opt-out” payments are normally not subject to the penalty, though they are taken into account to determine the employee cost in calculating whether an employer’s coverage is “affordable” (Q&A 9 of the Notice).

 

Paul Neiffer, Looks Like $500,000 Section 179 is Now Permanent. “One of the key provisions for farmers is to make Section 179 permanent at the $500,000 level.”

Kay Bell, Tax extenders 2015 winners and losers. “It’s a Christmas miracle! Weeks are left in 2015 and Congress has reached a deal on the 50+ tax breaks known as extenders.”

Howard Gleckman, The Hidden Agenda Behind This Year’s Tax Extender Bill (TaxVox):

What is going on here? Why would House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell put so much effort into making permanent a package of tax breaks that could be back on the chopping block a year from now?

Like much of what happens in Congress, it’s all about budget accounting. And in this case, it turns out you can buy bigger tax rate cuts by repealing permanent tax breaks than by swapping out temporary versions of the same subsidies.

I’d like to think this is all a 3-D chess play by geniuses to move the country closer to a better tax system, but I have nagging doubts, somehow.

Jason Dinesen, Glossary: Casualty and Theft Loss. “A casualty and theft loss is a deduction allowed on tax returns for people who suffer property damage or theft.”

Andy Grewal, The Management Fee Waiver Regulations May Be Doomed (Procedurally Taxing). “Prop. Reg. 1.707-2(b)(i) may reflect a good policy (a debatable point), but it does not square with the law.”

Robert Wood, Michael ‘The Situation’ Sorrentino’s Accountant Admits Tax Fraud Conspiracy. All over America, millions who don’t watch television ask, “who is Michael Sorrentino?”

 

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David Brunori, Some things worth pursuing in 2016 (Tax Analysts Blog). I don’t agrere with his support for the earned income tax credit, but he is correct on the importance of independent state tax tribunals, which Iowa lacks. And I think this is absolutely right:

Oppose tax incentives. I know — incentives are seemingly invulnerable in our political system. But the difficulty of the task should not deter the righteous. Tax incentives violate every principle of sound tax policy. They are unnecessary. They are unfair. Liberals should hate them because they waste money that could be used for schools and healthcare. Conservatives should hate them because they are the antithesis of a free market.

The cronies and insiders partnership of Central Iowa disagrees, which pretty much proves David correct.

 

I’m pretty sure the opposite wouldn’t help. Could Having a ‘Pro-CPA Culture’ Backfire on Accounting Firms Desperate for Talent? (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

Today is the big Star Wars release day. Blogger Syd Gernstein explains that WE HAVE TAXES TO THANK FOR STAR WARS:

To summarize briefly: This first episode of Star Wars started with a tax dispute. The “trade federation” did not like the fact that the republic had imposed a tax on its trade routes, and protested the tax by staging a blockade, and ultimately an invasion, of the peaceful planet of Naboo. Dissatisfied with the Republic’s inability to defend the planet, Naboo’s queen—at the urging of the planet’s then-Senator Palpatine—moved for a vote of no confidence in the Galactic Senate’s Chancellor. Palpatine then exploited the sense of sympathy for Naboo to get himself elected as Chancellor. Over the course of the next movies, Palpatine would then, essentially, transform the republic into a dictatorship, declare himself Emperor, convince Anakin Skywalker to become Darth Vader, build a couple Death Stars, and, evidently, abolish the galactic yellowpages, because it otherwise surely would have occurred to Darth Vader to streamline his epic quest to find his son, the “young Skywalker,” by looking under “S.” 

It’s a plot line convoluted enough to be worthy of The Code.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/16/15: Extender deal! Permanent R&D, $500,000 Sec. 179 limit; Bonus depreciation extended through 2019.

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150915-1It looks like we get a year off the extender watch. While normal people were asleep, someone posted the text of an extender bill agreement on the House Ways and Means Committee website. The bill would permanently several key provisions that have been only enacted for a year or two at a time up until now. It extends a few other of the Lazarus provisions through 2020, and the rest through 2016.

House Speaker Ryan requires that a bill be available for three days prior to a vote, which means the House won’t send anything to the Senate until at least Friday. The Hill reports that it’s not clear how the votes will fall, but the bill is expected to pass.

The provisions to be enacted permanently, retroactive to the beginning of 2015, include, among others:

-The $500,000 Section 179 deduction limit

-The five-year “recognition period” for built-in gains taxes for C corporations electing to be S corporations.

-The ability of IRAs of taxpayers reaching age 70 1/2 to make $100,000 annual charitable contributions that will not be included in the IRA holders income.

-The 100% exclusion for gains on certain original issue C corporation stock held for five years.

-The research credit.

-The alternative deduction for state and local sales taxes.

Other provisions to be made permanent include special breaks for conservation easements, the deduction for state and local taxes, and the above-the-line deduction for out-of-pocket educator expenses.

To get the Democratic leadership to sign off on the deal, Republican negotiators agreed to make permanent the child tax credit, the enhanced earned income tax credit, and the “American Opportunity Tax Credit” for college costs.

50% bonus depreciation is to be extended from the beginning of 2015 through 2019, along with the Work Opportunity Tax Credit. Also enacted through 2019 is the “New Markets Tax Credit,” a great geyser of corporate welfare.

Wind turbineI count 29 other provisions extended through 2016. The credits for biodiesel, renewable diesel, wind energy and residential solar are among these, along with the exclusion for qualified mortgage forgiveness and the above-the-line deduction for qualified college costs. These shorter-lived extenders also include special interest confections such as the 7-year depreciable life for speedways and special film expensing rules. I don’t know whether any extenders missed the cut.

There’s more than extenders here. This thing has 233 pages of stuff, much of which has nothing to do with extenders. A few of the major items I note at first glance are:

-A moratorium on the Obamacare medical device tax.

-Acceleration of the deadline for filing W-2s with the government to January 31, from the current February 28 deadline for paper copies and March 31 for electronic filers. This is to make it easier to match refund claims to W-2s before refunds are issued.

-Exclusion from income for payments made to wrongfully-incarcerated individuals.

-Allowing the purchase of computers for students as a qualified Section 529 plan expenditure, effective for 2015.

-A new charitable deduction for contributions to “agricultural research organizations.”

-Restrictions on tax-free REIT spin-offs.

-New restrictions on the ability to qualify as a tax-exempt small insurance company.

-Technical amendments to the new partnership audit rules.

Flickr image courtesy dave_7 under Creative Commons license.

Flickr image courtesy dave_7 under Creative Commons license.

While the tax bill doesn’t include a delay on the ACA “Cadillac tax” on high cost health insurance, The Hill reports that such a delay is included in the “Omnibus” spending bill that was also agreed to yesterday.

One item I hoped to find, but didn’t, is a provision providing relief to the ridiculous Obamacare $100 per day, per employee penalty for non-integrated health reimbursement plans. Also absent is any of the long-overdue penalty relief for non-willful compliance failures for owners of foreign bank accounts and foreign assets.

Failure remains an option. Something could happen in Congress to, or the President could stop the bill with a veto threat. Still, I expect the thing to pass as-is.

Other coverage:

Tony Nitti, Permanent R&D Credit, Increased Section 179 Expensing Highlight Tentative Deal On Tax Extenders.

Wall Street Journal, Congressional Leaders Reach Sweeping Deal on Tax and Spending Legislation

New York Times, House Reaches Accord on Spending and Tax Cuts

 

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Russ Fox, That’s A Lot of Roast Beef Sandwiches. “Nick’s Famous Roast Beef is in Beverly, Massachusetts. You can get a roast beef sandwich for $4.50 to $6.95, definitely a reasonable price. The Department of Justice is alleging that one reason the prices are low is that the owners skimmed $6 million from the business to lower their taxes.”

Robert D. Flach, YEAR-END AND HOLIDAY CHARITABLE CONTRIBUTIONS – PART II

Paul Neiffer, Iowa Land Values Drop 3.9% from 2014

Kay Bell, GOP presidential candidates’ final 2015 debate tonight. Written yesterday, of course.

William Perez, How Dividends Are Taxed and Reported on Tax Returns

Robert Wood, Why You Should Never Ask, ‘Where’s My IRS Form 1099?’

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 951. The Wall Street Journal notes the risk of political targeting in the proposed IRS rules requiring donors to supply social security numbers.

Harvey Galper, Why You Should Pay Attention to the Presidential Candidates’ Tax Proposals (TaxVox)

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