Posts Tagged ‘Obamacare’

Tax Roundup, 11/20/15: IRS issues workaround for absurdly complex “repair regs.” And: more good ACA news!

Friday, November 20th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

See update below. 

IMG_1218In a tacit admission that the new repair regs are nightmarishly complex, the IRS has issued a new “safe-harbor” procedure for allocating remodeling costs for restraurants and retail buildings between deductible repair costs and capitalized improvement costs.

Rev. Proc 2015-56 is available to most retail buildings and to restaurants.

(UPDATE: Brian Coddington notes correctly in the comments that this procedure only applies to taxpayers with an “applicable financial statement.” These are SEC statements, audited financial statements, or statements supplied to regulators other than the IRS. This seemingly gratuitous requirement greatly reduces the potential usefulness of this procedure. Why the IRS would restrict simplification to just those taxpayers least likely to need it is beyond me. I missed the applicable financial statement requirement in my initial take on the rule. My apologies, and my thanks to Brian for correcting me. Brian’s comment goes beyond this issue and is worth reading in full.)

It excludes vehicle dealers, gas stations, manufactured home dealers and “nonstore retailers.” It applies to business that own their own buildings and to landlords whose buildings hold qualifying businesses.

Under the procedure, 75% of “qualified remodel-refresh costs” are deductible, with the remaining 25% capitalized. The amount capitalized is depreciated over the life otherwise applied to the building. That generally means a 39-year life, but if the building is “qualified restaurant property” or “qualified retail improvement property,” the life can be as short as 15 years.

At first glance, it seems like a much more useful set of rules than the repair regs we were all fretting about this time last year. The biggest potential downside is that Rev. Proc. 2015-56 requires taxpayers to forego “partial disposition” treatment for buildings covered by the safe harbor. The taxpayer also has to elect “general asset account” depreciation for the building covered by the safe harbor.

The election will be made on Form 3115 as “automatic” accounting method change, as newly-designated automatic change number 222. It is available for years begining on or after January 1, 2014. As automatic changes have to normally be made with a timely-filed return, I don’t think we can change already-filed 2014 filings, but I will be digging into the lengthy procedure, and will amend this as needed as I get to understand it better.


The insurance markets aren’t doing what the President told them to do. 

First, Tyler Cowen, Further wounds for Obamacare: “To put it bluntly, I don’t think the mandate part of the bill is working.  These are mostly problems which decay and get worse, not problems which self-correct.”

Next, Megan McArdle, Obamacare Insurers Are Suffering. That Won’t End Well:

What UnitedHealth’s action suggests is that the company is not sure it can make money in this market at any price. Executives seem to be worried about our old enemy, the adverse selection death spiral, where prices go up and healthier customers drop out, which pushes insurers’ costs and customers’ prices up further, until all you’ve got is a handful of very sick people and a huge number of very expensive claims.

She adds:

This was part of a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad news cycle for Obamacare; as ProPublica journalist Charles Ornstein said on Twitter, “Not since 2013 have I seen such a disastrous stream of bad news headlines for Obamacare in one 24-hour stretch.” Stories included not just UnitedHealth’s dire warnings, but also updates in the ongoing saga of higher premiums, higher deductibles and smaller provider networks that have been coming out since open enrollment began.

I remember when we were told that the ACA would just get more popular over time as we all grew to love its benefits.


No, but they do make it easier to jack up tuition and administrative salaries. $23 Billion In Annual Federal Tax Credits For Higher Education Have No Effect On College Attendance (TaxProf). 




Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Quiet Changes to Social Security Could Have Big Impact (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog):

The file and suspend option was and still is used by couples when one spouse, typically the higher earner, files for benefits but then suspends receiving his or her own benefits. This allows the other spouse to file and receive spousal benefits based on the higher earning spouse’s record for a certain number of years while the higher earning spouse delays benefits and earns delayed retirement credits. The result is larger benefits for the higher-earning spouse at age 70, but still allowing the lower-earning spouse to take benefits. This option has been eliminated — though there may still be time to file and suspend in the next 180 days and be grandfathered in for those who are currently eligible to do so.

Jana expects additional guidance soon.


Gretchen Tegeler, Many Iowa public employees are better off in retirement than working ( In some cases, we’re better off that they’re retired too.

Tony Nitti, The Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2015: #7: Decoding The Mortgage Interest Limitation, “Cohabitation, of course, is not limited to same-sex couples, and so the Ninth Circuit’s decision to allow each taxpayer who co-owns a house to claim an interest deduction on the full $1,100,000 of debt — provided they are not married filing separately — should be a welcome one for many.”

Russ Fox, Update on the Future of Daily Fantasy Sports:

I still think we will end up with a dichotomy within the states. States that are notoriously anti-gambling or have constitutional provisions against gambling (including much of the South: Texas, Florida, and Tennessee; Utah, and Hawaii) will ban DFS, either by Attorney General rulings or by court actions. Other states will regulate DFS. Some states will order the DFS companies to shut down until regulations are in place. A very small number of states will just ignore the issue, and leave DFS in an unregulated state.

A very small number of states realize that fantasy sports aren’t one of the major problems plaguing the republic.

TaxGrrrl, ‘Real Housewives’ Stars Joe & Teresa Giudice Hit With Federal Tax Lien

Robert Wood, More Banks Spill Tax Evasion Secrets To Avoid Criminal Charges, Account Holders Beware. Bank secrecy is pining for the fjords.




Stephen J. Entin, Michael Schuyler, Some Tax Trip-Ups in the Democratic Debate (Tax Policy Blog):

Senator Sanders was asked how high he would raise the top tax rate. He answered, jokingly, that he would boost it a lot, although perhaps not to the 90% top tax rate in the Eisenhower Administration; that he, the Senator, was not as much of a socialist as Eisenhower!  In fact, the top tax rate was 91%…

One result of Ike’s policies was that he presided over three recessions in his eight years in office. Presumably, the Senator would not want to repeat that outcome.

I think Bernie would be willing to take that price to stick it to the man.

William Gale, David John, Two Important New Retirement Savings Initiatives from the Obama Administration (TaxVox) These guys think the MyRA program is important.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 925


Peter Reilly, Princeton University Will Have To Prove It Deserves Property Tax Exemption. I’d make them apologize for Woodrow Wilson first.



Tax Roundup, 10/23/15: Tax Court dispenses with pot dispensary deductions. And: IRS scam call, captured on tape!

Friday, October 23rd, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today newsletter visitors: click here to go directly to the rental loss story


Cannabis leaf image via Wikimedia Commons under Creative Commons license.

Cannabis leaf image via Wikimedia Commons under Creative Commons license.

Deductions get stoned. Not in a good way. Attitudes towards marijuana have changed a lot in the last 33 years. A recent Gallup Poll shows that 58% of respondents favor weed legalization. But a tax provision enacted in 1982 continues the Reefer War with full vigor, as the operators of a legal California medical marijuana dispensary learned yesterday.

Section 280E, enacted early in the Reagan Administration, is one of the more clear provisions of the income tax. It reads in full:

No deduction or credit shall be allowed for any amount paid or incurred during the taxable year in carrying on any trade or business if such trade or business (or the activities which comprise such trade or business) consists of trafficking in controlled substances (within the meaning of schedule I and II of the Controlled Substances Act) which is prohibited by Federal law or the law of any State in which such trade or business is conducted.

Marijuana remains a Schedule I controlled substance under federal law, despite its growing legalization at the state level. That means the only deduction allowed to state-legal weed dispensaries and dealers is their cost of goods sold — their direct cost of their inventory. No rent, salaries, benefits, security, depreciation, or any of the other obvious costs of doing business can be deducted.

Canna Care, Inc., a California dispensary, claimed about $870,000 in business deductions over a three-year period. The Tax Court explains (my emphasis, ditations omitted):

Petitioner argues that its actions cannot be considered “trafficking” for purposes of section 280E because its activities were not illegal under California law. Petitioner claims that this conclusion is supported by memoranda issued by the Department of Justice (DOJ) on October 19, 2009, and August 29, 2013, and guidance issued by the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) on February 14, 2014.

We have previously held the sale of medical marijuana pursuant to California law constitutes trafficking within the meaning of section 280E… DOJ memoranda and FinCEN guidance released after the years at issue that represent exercises of prosecutorial discretion do not change the result in this case. Petitioner regularly bought and sold marijuana. This activity constitutes trafficking within the meaning of section 280E even when permitted by State law.

The taxpayer also argued that its business activities weren’t entirely about marijuana, and that at least some of the activities should therefore be deductible. The Tax Court said that the taxpayer’s evidence wasn’t sufficient to make that case:

Aside from the sale of medical marijuana, petitioner’s only other source of income was the sale of books, T-shirts, and other items. On the basis of the evidence presented, we cannot determine what percentage of petitioner’s income was from the sale of medical marijuana and what percentage was from the sale of other items. Because of the parties’ stipulation, we find that the sale of medical marijuana was petitioner’s primary source of income and that the sale of any other item was an activity incident to its business of distributing medical marijuana.

No deductions. Victory for IRS.

The Moral: Sometime in the next few years I suspect weed will either cease to be a controlled substance or Section 280E will be amended to allow legal pot sellers to deduct their expenses. Until then, dealers will need to mark up their product a lot to cover the taxes on phantom income. If they have other business activities, they need keep records sufficient to separately track the non-pot profits.

The other moral: Don’t use the tax law to do anything other than measure income and collect taxes. Special carve-outs, whether punitive or beneficial, linger long after the moral panic surrounding their enactment passes. In addition to Section 280E, we remain stuck with other moral panic tax provisions. These include Section 409A, enacted in the Enron panic but punishing ordinary businesses and non-profits trying to compensate their employees, and FIRPTA, enacted to combat the threat of Japanese buying up our precious golf courses. The Japanese have moved on to other things, but FIRPTA still clobbers U.S. real estate buyers who fail to realize they need to withhold taxes on purchases from non-U.S. sellers.

Cite: Canna Care, Inc., T.C. Memo 2015-206.

Related: Russ Fox, Up In Smoke, Again. For more on taxes in the early ’80s, TaxGrrrl has Back To The Future: Taxes Now & Then.


Ed Brown’s fortress-house sells at auction, reports The winning bid was $205,000, though the story makes it appear that the winning bidder may also need to pay some accumulated property taxes.


buzz 20151023-1

It’s Friday, so celebrate with fresh Buzz from Robert D. Flach. Year-end planning, IRS inflation adjustments, and the S corporation vs. partnership conundrum figure prominently.

William Perez reports on the updated 401(k) Contribution Limits.

Tony Nitti, IRS Redefines ‘Husband’ And ‘Wife’ In Response to Landmark Same-Sex Marriage Decisions.

Caleb Newquist, Company Accused of Being ‘Pharmaceutical Enron’ Doesn’t Appreciate the Sentiment (Going Concern).

Robert Wood, Stock Options 2.0: Twitter CEO Gives His Own Stock To Employees

Peter Reilly, IRS Should Be Asking For Cooperation Not Volunteering. “Audits of non-compliant taxpayers will have them “busted” which is unpleasant, whereas non-compliant taxpayers not being audited make the rest of us feel like chumps.”

Kay Bell, As Ryan gets ready to take on House Speaker role, Ways & Means members jockey for tax-writing chairmanship




TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 897. Administration partisans urge continued political administration of the IRS, as they needed the encouragement.

Alan Cole, This Bill to Repeal Obamacare Taxes Would Grow the Economy (Tax Policy Blog). Just eliminating the ridiculous and costly paperwork of the ACA would be an economic boost.


Ever wonder what it sounds like to get a phone call from a scammer claiming to be from IRS? Well, you are in luck! A scammer was kind enough to leave a message on my phone at home, which I recorded and uploaded to the link in this sentence.  I believe it is typical of the recorded-message version of the scam, telling me that the IRS “is filing a lawsuit against you” and telling me to call a number to “get more information on this case file.”

The IRS does not call you to tell you they are suing you. They use the old-fashioned U.S. Postal Service, and if they can’t find you, they will use genuine U.S. Marshals to serve you papers. Believe me, if the IRS is after you, you will know you have a problem, and that knowledge won’t come over the phone.



Tax Roundup, 10/6/15: Tax Fairy fails to show up for Kansas ESOP. And: lots of other tax stuff.

Tuesday, October 6th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

tax fairyThe ESOP Tax Fairy Cult has long had Midwest adherents. The Tax Court told gave a Kansas believer the bad news yesterday — there is no tax fairy.

A successful Kansas orthopedic surgeon, a Dr. Prohaska, set up a new corporation, DNA Prof Ventures, with his wife. The surgeon and his wife were the only DNA employees. On the day it was incorporated, DNA created an employee stock ownership plan for its employees.

Problems arose. Tax Court Judge Dawson tells the story:

On December 31, 2008, DNA issued 1,150 shares of class B common stock to the trust with a par value of $10 per share. The trust then allocated the 1,150 shares of DNA stock to Dr. Prohaska’s ESOP account in 2008.

During 2008 DNA did not pay any salaries, wages, or other officer’s compensation. For 2009 DNA issued separate Forms W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, to Dr. and Mrs. Prohaska reporting the respective amounts of $4,500 (during its fourth quarter beginning October 1). DNA issued Forms W-2 for 2010 to Dr. and Mrs. Prohaska reporting the respective amounts of $3,000.

DNA deducted a $1,350 retirement plan contribution on its Form 1120, U.S. Corporation Income Tax Return, for 2009.

Although DNA was the sponsor of the ESOP, it did not file any Forms 5500, Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan, for plan years 2008, 2009, and 2010.

The IRS examiners found problems with this and other aspects of the way the ESOP was run (my emphasis):

    In this case, the ESOP had two separate failures to follow its plan document during 2008. First, the ESOP sponsored by DNA Pro Ventures allowed Dr. Daniel J. Prohaska and Amy Prohaska to participate in the ESOP as of the plan year ending December 31, 2008, in violation of the terms of the ESOP plan document regarding eligibility and participation. Second, the ESOP plan document required the ESOP to use appraisal rules substantially similar to those issued under I.R.C. sec. 170(a)(1) when it obtained annual appraisals for the same plan year. The ESOP, however, failed to obtain any appraisal for the 2008 plan year or for any plan year.

That led to a bad result:

For the reason stated above, it is determined that the ESOP is not qualified under I.R.C. sec. 401(a) for the plan years ending December 31, 2008 and all subsequent plan years. As a result, the Plan is not exempt from taxation under I.R.C. sec. 501(a) for trust years ending December 31, 2008 and all subsequent plan years.

A Google search reveals that the ESOP reported net assets of nearly $400,000 at the end of 2012. That would mean that much additional income for the ESOP participants over the term of the ESOP.  That’s an expensive sacrifice to the tax fairy. As the ESOP was set up the same day as the corporation, it appears likely that the purpose of the corporation was to feed the ESOP. Iowa has been a hotbed for bad ESOPs. While there is no evidence showing that this is linked to any other bad ESOPs, I note that the corporation had an Iowa mailing address.

The Moral: ESOPs aren’t easy. They can be useful under the right circumstances, but they require appraisals and careful compliance with the plan document an ESOP rules. They aren’t an easy tax shelter, and there is no ESOP Tax Fairy.

Cite: DNA Pro Ventures Inc. Employee Stock Ownership Plan, T.C. Memo 2015-195.




It’s Tuesday, so it’s Buzz-day for Robert D. Flach. He rounds up news ranging from the developments in the Section 105 $100-per-day penalty (Tax Update coverage here) to the ongoing problems in keeping EITC from squirting all over the place.

Kay Bell, IRS says ‘No’ to tax-exempt status for pet care group offering heated spa, massages and other animal amenities. My beagle would approve this exemption.

Jason Dinesen, Glossary: MACRS. “MACRS refers to “modified accelerated cost recovery system,” which is the default depreciation method used for tax purposes.”

Russ Fox, Well, That’s One Way to Avoid ClubFed. But fatal heart attacks have serious non-tax drawbacks.

Peter Reilly, Boston Bernie Backers Probably Not Bashing Bruins



Joseph Thorndike, The ‘Cadillac’ Tax Shows Why Obamacare Was Never Built to Last (Tax Analysts Blog). “All of which suggests that Obamacare will be in trouble for a long time.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 880

Joseph Henchman, California Supreme Court to Decide Fate of 48-Year-Old Multistate Tax Compact. (Tax Policy Blog). “Maybe it’s time we accept that the MTC isn’t working, and the Gillette case might be the first step of that realization.”

Renu Zaretsky, Evasion, Cuts, Hikes, and Drops. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers a planned “global crackdown” on tax evasion, business tax cuts in New Hampshire, and much more.

Leslie Book, District Court Hands IRS Loss in its Bid to Exclude Discretionary Treaty Benefits From Judicial Review (Procedurally Taxing).

Robert Wood, As IRS And DOJ Hunt Offshore Accounts, Banks Pony Up.


News from the Profession. Oh Great, Public Accounting Discovered the Selfie Stick (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)



Tax Roundup, 9/30/15: Taking from rich doesn’t give to the poor; state incentives favor the big.

Wednesday, September 30th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Today we have two instances where policy tanks that I usually disagree with make important tax policy points.

TPC logoFirst, The center-left Tax Policy Center, a project of the Brookings Institution (which I castigate below), makes an important observation about the overrated problem of income inequality in their paper, Would a significant increase in the top income tax rate substantially alter income inequality? The summary (my emphasis):

The high level of income inequality in the United States is at the forefront of policy attention. This paper focuses on one potential policy response: an increase in the top personal income tax rate. We conduct a simulation analysis using the Tax Policy Center (TPC) microsimulation model to determine how much of a reduction in income inequality would be achieved from increasing the top individual tax rate to as much as 50 percent. We calculate the resulting change in income inequality assuming an explicit redistribution of all new revenue to households in the bottom 20 percent of the income distribution. The resulting effects on overall income inequality are exceedingly modest.

I have zero hope that politicians will heed this. Just because you take from the rich doesn’t mean it goes to the poor. It goes to the well-connected, as in the next item.

Second, the not-so-center-left Good Jobs First takes the side of the angels in the battle against state tax incentives, with a survey of small businesses called In Search of a Level Playing Field:

A national survey of leaders of small business organizations reveals that they overwhelmingly believe that state economic development incentives favor big businesses, that states are overspending on large individual deals, and that state incentive programs are not effectively meeting the needs of small businesses seeking to grow. 

I think they have this exactly right. It’s not start-ups that get the big deals from the legislature and the Economic Development bureaucrats. It’s the well-connected and wealthy companies that know how to work the system. The rest of us get to pay for it.




Jason Dinesen, The Iowa School Tuition Organization Tax Credit. “Iowa offers dozens of obscure tax credits. The one I get asked about most is the tax credit available for donations to a ‘school tuition organization’ or STO.”

Kay Bell, Maryland issuing court-ordered county tax credit refunds. If you don’t want to repay illegal taxes, don’t collect illegal taxes.

Russ Fox, How to Wynne Your Money Back in Maryland

Paul Neiffer, IRS Provides List of Counties Eligible For Additional Extension on Livestock Replacement

Jim Maule, Taxation of Prizes, Question Two. He quotes a post from a sweepstakes message board:

 I won concert VIP tickets, there is no value on the tickets, so I can’t sell them. If no value is on them, why am I paying taxes on them? 

Mr. Maule explains that there is a value. If there isn’t, then why didn’t the winner give them away?





InsureBlog, Yes, The New York Obamacare Co-op [squandered*] $340 Million. *The actual headline uses a more colorful term.

Robert Wood, Hillary Backs Cadillac Tax Repeal


TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 874. Today’s edition features IRS agents abusing their power on everyday taxpayers. But we can trust them to regulate their tax preparer adversaries, right?

Arnold Kling, Hypocrisy and Cowardice at Brookings. Arnold addresses the firing by the Brookings Institution of Robert Litan, a scholar accused by Senator Elizabeth Warren of “writing a research paper to benefit his corporate patrons.” He is appalled:

1. Robert Litan is one of the most decent individuals in the whole economics profession.

2. Giving Litan’s scalp (sorry for the pun) to Elizabeth Warren does nothing to bolster the integrity of Brookings. It amounts to speaking cowardice to power.

There’s more. The episode is appalling, and it shows the totalitarian tendencies that are barely beneath the surface of Senator Warren’s populism.




Alan Cole, Donald Trump’s Tax Plan Will Not Be Revenue-Neutral Under Any Circumstances (Tax Policy Blog)

Jeremy Scott, Trump’s Tax Plan Is Pretty Much GOP Orthodoxy (Tax Analysts Blog)

Matt Gardner, How Donald Trump’s Carried Interest Tax Hike Masks a Massive Tax Cut for Wealthy Money Managers (Tax Justice Blog)

Peter Reilly, Trump Tax Plan Would Increase Deficit By Over $10 Trillion

Tony Nitti, Love Trump, Hate Romney, But Their Tax Plans Are One And The Same

Renu Zaretsky, Thirty days, goodbye September, shutdown talks—maybe in December. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers shutdown politics, plans to use reconciliation procedures to pass bills repealing pieces of Obamacare, and tax Trumpalism.


See you at Hoyt Sherman Place tonight!



Tax Roundup, 9/29/15: Iowa, worst of the worst in corporate taxes. And: Trump, CPA extinction events, more!

Tuesday, September 29th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20120906-1The U.S. Corporation tax is the worst in the OECD. So that makes Iowa… The Tax Foundation yesterday released its 2015 International Tax Competitiveness Index, an international counterpart to their State Business Tax Climate Index. The news isn’t good for the U.S. (my emphasis):

The United States provides a good example of an uncompetitive tax code. The last major change to the U.S. tax code occurred 29 years ago as part of the Tax Reform Act of 1986, when Congress reduced the top marginal corporate income tax rate from 46 percent to 34 percent in an attempt to make U.S. corporations more competitive domestically and overseas. Since then, member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) have followed suit, reducing the OECD average corporate tax rate from 47.5 percent in the early 1980s to around 25 percent today. In 1993, the U.S. government moved in the opposite direction, raising its top marginal corporate rate to 35 percent. The result: the United States now has the highest corporate income tax rate in the industrialized world.

Iowa’s 12% rate is the highest state corporate tax rate in the U.S. Iowa’s corporation tax ranks 49th out of 50 states in the 2015 State Business Tax Climate Index. That makes us extra-special.

The United States places 32nd out of the 34 OECD countries on the ITCI. There are three main drivers behind the U.S.’s low score. First, it has the highest corporate income tax rate in the OECD at 39 percent (combined marginal federal and state rates). Second, it is one of the few countries in the OECD that does not have a territorial tax system, which would exempt foreign profits earned by domestic corporations from domestic taxation. Finally, the United States loses points for having a relatively high, progressive individual income tax (combined top rate of 48.6 percent) that taxes both dividends and capital gains, albeit at a reduced rate.

Estonia gets the best scores:

Estonia currently has the most competitive tax code in the OECD. Its top score is driven by four positive features of its tax code. First, it has a 20 percent tax rate on corporate income that is only applied to distributed profits. Second, it has a flat 20 percent tax on individual income that does not apply to personal dividend income. Third, its property tax applies only to the value of land rather than taxing the value of real property or capital. Finally, it has a territorial tax system that exempts 100 percent of the foreign profits earned by domestic corporations from domestic taxation, with few restrictions.

Unfortunately, for some of the current presidential candidates, the worst features of the U.S. system are their favorite parts.




Robert D. Flach’s Tuesday Buzz rounds up topics from Blue-to-Red migration, saving too much (hard to do), and the tax costs of stock sales.

Russ Fox, Cash & Carry Your Way to Tax Evasion:

Mr. Kobryn was determined to lower his tax burden. Instead of making sure all expenses were noted on his tax returns and perhaps contributing to a SEP IRA, he decided to not deposit all of the cash into his business bank account. He knew about the currency transaction reporting (CTR) rules, so he made his cash deposits just under $10,000 and deposited them into several branches of his local bank.

That’s a reliable way to attract IRS attention.

Robert Wood, Lance Armstrong Legal Settlement Makes Tax Problem On Steriods. He paid tax on his biking income, but deducting the lawsuit costs isn’t so straightforward.

Stephen Olsen, Summary Opinions for the week ending 8/28/15 (Procedurally Taxing). This roundup of recent tax procedure developments includes a baby picture, no extra charge.




Megan McArdle, Obamacare’s Nonprofit Insurers Are Failing, Predictably. Iowa’s CoOportunity was only the first.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 873


Howard Gleckman, Trump Proposes a Huge Tax Cut. YUUUGE!

Peter Reilly, Trump’s Plan Inverts Traditional Tax Planning Makes Carried Interest Moot. “If you think that Trump will win and enact this program normal tax planning is the order of the day.”

Kay Bell, Trump’s ‘amazing’ tax plan zeroes out taxes for some.


News from the Profession. In Order Save the Accounting Profession, It Has to Be Destroyed First (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern). “I’ll even take it a step further and say a mass extinction is exactly what the accounting profession needs.”



Tax Roundup, 9/8/15: One Week to the 15th. And: First-world tax payment problems.

Tuesday, September 8th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150803-1September 15 is one week away. If you have extended partnership, corporation or trust returns, time is running short. There are many reasons to file on time:

  • Tax elections made on a late return, including automatic accounting method changes, may not count. With all of the “repair regulation” method changes this year, that could be a big deal.
  • If you owe money, late filing turns a 1/2% per month late-payment penalty into a 5% per month (up to 25%) late filing penalty.
  • If you have a pass-through entity, late-filing triggers a $195 per K-1 per month penalty.

Remember to e-file, or to document timely paper filing via Certified Mail, return receipt requested, or with a shipping bill from an authorized private delivery service.


Gretchen TegelerDART: A property tax funded amenity ( Disturbing trends on the inability of the Des Moines-area public transportation service to cover its operations through fares: does appear the service expansions are generating more ridership  However, as was noted last year, property taxes are basically covering the cost of these additional riders. Total operating revenue was 10.1 percent below projections for the year that closed June 30th, 2015; with fixed route operating revenue being 8.65% percent short of budget.

The overall trends have not changed much from a year ago. Total operating revenue is still less than it was four years ago despite substantial service expansions and improvements since that time. Basically, as it weighs future improvements for DART, the community will need to decide if it is willing to continue to raise property taxes to fund them.

The post includes this chart:


That doesn’t include the cost of the recently-completed $18 million Palace of Transit.


TaxGrrrl, Mega-Mansion Attracts Notice By Feds, Results In Criminal Charges:

According to local sources, federal agents flying in and out of Pittsburgh noticed the size and scope of a mansion belonging to Joe Nocito, Sr., and started asking questions. Those questions eventually led to a guilty plea last week from Ann E. Harris, the personal assistant, secretary and bookkeeper for Nocito, in a tax evasion scheme thought to involve as much as $250 million.

If you are a tax evader, it’s unwise to flaunt your wealth, especially to the point of attracting attention from passing aircraft. But maybe that would take the fun out of the thing.




Russ Fox, The Family that Commits Tax Evasion Together Goes to ClubFed Together. “This is yet another reminder for everyone who uses a payroll service to join EFTPS and make sure your payroll deposits are being made. Trust but verify is excellent practice in payroll.”

Kay Bell, Labor Day tax tip: Union dues might be tax deductible

Scott Greenberg, This Labor Day, How High is the Tax Burden on American Labor? (Tax Policy Blog). “In 2014, the average wage worker saw his or her labor income decrease by 31.5 percent due to federal, state, and local taxes, according to the OECD.”

Tony Nitti, Tax Geek Tuesday: Excluding Gain On Sale Of Home, And Recognizing Gain On Repossession

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: Tax Implications of the Unlicensed Daycare Provider

Jim Maule, “Who Knows Taxes Better Than Me?” Professor Maule notes that Donald Trump’s understanding of tax law and economics might not be all that Mr. Trump thinks it is.

Peter Reilly, From Russia With Built In Losses. “There is a certain irony to the whole thing as it seems like financiers were too focused on looting the US treasury with phony shelters to see the probably larger upside of distressed Russian assets.”

Robert D. Flach, DONALD TRUMP FOR PRESIDENT IS A LOT LIKE OBAMACARE, That isn’t meant as a compliment.




Leslie Book, Tax Court Opinion Reaffirming Validity of Regulations Addressing Foreign Earned Income Exclusion Illustrates Chevron Application (Procedurally Taxing)

Robert Wood, IRS Gets Tax Data From India As Black Money Hunt Hits Americans Too

Jack Townsend, IRS and DOJ Tax Conferences Before Indictment. That doesn’t sound like fun at all.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 849850851852


Renu Zaretsky, Deals, Dreams, and Data. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers the ground from A (Amazon’s sweet Illinois tax credit deal and Apple’s Irish strategy) to Zaretsky.

Cara Griffith, Why Is It So Hard to Find Information on the Sharing of Taxpayer Information? (Tax Analysts Blog). “Taxpayers are expected to blindly provide massive amounts of information to tax authorities, but are then not allowed to know the process through which one state or municipality shares information with another.”


I’ll make sure not to have this problem when I file in April:

Effective January 1, 2016, the IRS will not accept any payment greater than $99,999,999.00. Two or more checks will be required, or we recommend that the taxpayers use Fed Wire to make their payments.

If I did owe more than $100 million, I would be tempted to write one of the checks for $99,999,999.01, just to see if they are serious. Not to give away my income secrets, but I’m pretty sure my 2015 taxable income will spare me the temptation.

Cite: Announcement 2015-23.



Tax Roundup, 8/19/15: Even if it faxes, it’s still a printer in Iowa. And: the rich guy still isn’t buying.

Wednesday, August 19th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20150813-1All for one, one for all. Iowa has a sales tax exclusion for “Computers used in processing or storage of data or information by an insurance company, financial institution, or commercial enterprise.” But what is a computer anymore, now that everything has a computer in it?

Last week Iowa released a ruling (Document 15300028) holding that Principal Financial Group’s all-in-one devices count as computers and are exempt from sales tax. From the ruling:

The protest was filed due to the Department’s partial denial of a refund claim which involved, among other issues, several multi-function devices which provide copy, print, scan, and fax services.  Your position is that because the multi-function devices are connected to your company’s computers and used in the manner described that these devices qualify as exempt computer peripheral equipment under Iowa’s statutes and administrative code…

Rule IAC 701—18.58(1), which was written, in part, to implement that code section, defines computers as the following:

…stored program processing equipment and all devices fastened to it by means of signal cables or any communication medium that serves the function of a signal cable. Nonexclusive examples of devices fastened by a signal cable or other communication medium are terminals, printers, display units, card readers, tape readers, document sorters, optical readers, and card or tape punchers.

The Department of Revenue had argued that copiers and fax machines don’t qualify, and these functions disqualified the multi-function devices. Principal brought its considerable in-house tax expertise to bear:

However, since the filing date of the protest, you have provided the auditor with the “click count” information for each individual multi-function device included in the refund claim.  This documentation verifies that each unit individually qualifies for exemption because the majority of the usage for each of the devices is for exempt printing and scanning. 

Attached to the protest as Exhibit B was a summary schedule in which you determined that 96.67% of the usage of the devices was for exempt purposes.  This percentage was utilized by Principal to determine the amount of tax under protest ($145,134.80).  However, because each device qualified for exemption, the purchase prices of these units are fully exempt from Iowa sales tax.  Therefore, the Department will refund 100% of the sales tax paid on the purchases of these devices. 

So after a struggle, the Department settles on the right legal answer. The policy answer is only half-right, though. All business inputs should be exempt from sales tax, regardless of whether they are hooked up to a computer.

I rarely fax or copy anything anymore, and I think that this is true nowadays for most businesses. It could say something about how they do things at the Iowa Department of Revenue that they assumed otherwise. In any case, this ruling tells us that fax and copy capability doesn’t make an otherwise exempt scanner/printer subject to sales tax for an Iowa business.




Megan McArdle discusses presidential candidate Scott Walker’s Obamacare replacement (my emphasis):

In this debate, you can see the shape of where our politics may go over the next 20 years. Many Republicans would like a much smaller entitlement state; some Democrats would like a much bigger one, with Sweden-style universal coverage of virtually everything, crib to grave. Neither one is going to get what they want, because Americans are not prepared to give up their Social Security checks, or 60 percent of their paychecks either — and no, there is not enough money to fund these ambitions, or even our existing entitlements, by simply taxing “the rich.”

The discussion is becoming more urgent, as Obamacare as it stands is not working well; the big premium increases and the struggles of the “cooperatives” us that. It could be harder to fix the health insurance market than it was to wreck it in the first place.




Robert D. Flach brings the Tuesday Buzz on Wednesday, covering the tax blog ground from property taxes to the Get Transcript data breach.

Tony Nitti, Tax Court Reminds Us That You Should Never Toy Around With Your Retirement Account:

Section 72 clearly mandates that annuity income is ordinary income, rather than capital gains. Thus, it is immaterial whether, as the taxpayer asserted, the annuity generated most of its income in the form of capital gains. Because once the annuity distributed the cash generated from those capital gains on to the taxpayer, the tax law required it to be treated as ordinary income.



Jason Dinesen, Why is Self-Employment Tax Based on 92.35% of Self-Employment Income?

William Perez, These 6 states will waive penalties if you pay off your back taxes.

Paul Neiffer, Highway Use Tax Return Due August 31, 2015

Jim Maule, More Tax Fraud in the People’s Court. “It was an attempt to change a non-deductible cost of a boat into a business deduction.”

Kay Bell, A-list performers would get tax credit for New Jersey shows.

Republican Sen. Tom Kean, Jr. this week renewed a push for his bill that would provide a tax break for so-called A-list performers in the Garden State.

Not every problem is a tax problem. Especially this one.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 832.




David Brunori, Retroactive Tax Laws Are Just Wrong (Tax Analysts Blog):

There are two fundamental problems with changing the rules retroactively. First, it is patently unfair. People who follow the rules should not be penalized later. We would never stand for it in the criminal context. Why should we accept it for taxes? Second, retroactively changing the rules undermines confidence in the tax system. Most people try to do the right thing. Often they spend a lot of money paying lawyers and accountants to guide them to the right result. The good taxpayers might not be diligent in following the rules if those rules might change.

It’s harder to justify spending money on tax compliance when it doesn’t do any good.


Howard Gleckman, New Rules Will Require States to Be More Transparent About Tax Subsidies (TaxVox): “While local governments have complained that the new rules will be complicated and burdensome, it is frankly a scandal that governments have been able to keep these subsidies under wraps for so long.”


News from the Profession. Only 20% of Companies Using Creative Accounting to Its Full Potential (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern). “…it’s not technically fraud”



Tax Roundup, 6/26/15: Supreme Court saves ACA subsidies — and taxes.

Friday, June 26th, 2015 by Joe Kristan


supreme courtThe Supreme Court upholds new punitive taxes on thousands of Iowa employers and uninsured individuals. That’s the flip side of the decision yesterday ruling that tax credits remain available for health insurance purchased on the federal exchanges, despite the language of the Obamacare statute — a ruling characterized by the Des Moines Register as “Obamacare ruling protects 40,000 Iowans’ subsidies.

Here’s what it means to those footing the bill:

– The employer mandates will take effect in all states as scheduled. The “Employer Shared Responsibility provisions” require employers to purchase “adequate” health coverage for employees.  It applied in 2014 to employers with over 100 “full-time equivalent” employees in 2013.  In 2015, it applies to employers who had over 50 full-time equivalent employees in 2014. It applies to government and non-profit employers, as well as to businesses.

Employers who fail to offer coverage to 95% of their FTEs and dependents are subject to a $2,000 penalty, pro-rated for months where coverage is lacking, for non-covered FTEs, with a 30-employee exemption. “Full-time Equivalent” means 30 hours per week.

The penalties kick in only if at least one employee claims the coverage tax credit. Yesterday’s decision ensures the mandate applies in all states — rather than just the 14 with state-run exchanges — because the triggering credits will remain available nationwide.

The individual mandate tax applies fully in all states. The “Individual Shared Responsibility Provision” penalizes individuals who aren’t covered at work and who fail to purchase “adequate” and “affordable” coverage. The penalty for 2015 is the greater of $325 ($162.50 for those under 18) or 2% of “household” income. It is prorated if coverage is obtained for some months and not others.

Yesterday’s decision broadens the reach of the tax because the penalty only applies if available coverage is “affordable.” The tax credits are used in computing “affordability,” so the availability of the credits nationwide broadens the tax to many more taxpayers.

20121120-2The Section 36B tax credit remains available nationwide. This is the refundable credit that was the subject of yesterday’s decision. It is estimated when coverage is obtained and applied against coverage costs for the year. It is “trued up” when the taxpayer files their 1040 for the coverage year — a process that can sometimes mean more credit, but that sometimes triggers a big balance due.  Because the credit phases out in steps, one extra dollar of income can trigger thousands of dollars of additional taxes:

Consider a middle-aged married couple earning $62,040, 400 percent of the FPL for a two-person household ($15,510.) If the second cheapest Silver plan in their area costs $1,200 per month, they would receive a subsidy of $8,506 in order to cap that plan’s price at 9.5 percent of their income. However, if they earned $62,041—only a dollar more—the entire subsidy would evaporate. 

Because the $8,506 would have been applied to health premiums, the household would have to pay it back on April 15.

What do I think of the decision? In March I wrote:

In a less politically-sensitive context, one could expect a 9-0 or 8-1 decision against the IRS. That’s what happened in Gitlitz, where the court ruled that the IRS couldn’t regulate away a perceived misdrafting of the tax code’s S corporation basis rules that allowed a windfall to taxpayers whose S corporations had debt forgiveness income. “Because the Code’s plain text permits the taxpayers here to receive these benefits, we need not address this policy concern.” But because a decision against IRS here would invalidate key parts of Obamacare in most of the country, politics is a big part of the process.

That means I think the Scalia dissent gets it right, but we don’t get to file tax returns based on the dissent. It should give pause to those who write legislation, though — there’s no telling how the Supremes will read their work if they don’t like what it does.

Other coverage:

William Perez, What You Need to Know about the Premium Assistance Tax Credit

TaxGrrrl, Supreme Court Upholds King, Says Obamacare Tax Credits Apply To All States

Kay Bell, Let the Affordable Care Act repeal efforts begin (again)

Hank Stern, SCOTUScare Fallout. “Obamacare Ruling May Have Just Killed State-Based Exchanges

Andy Grewal, Grewal: King v. Burwell — The IRS Isn’t An Expert? (TaxProf Blog)

Tyler Cowen, King vs. Burwell, and other stuff. “So on net I take this to be good news, although arguably it is bad news that it is good news.”

Megan McArdle, Subsidies and All, Obamacare Stays

Alan Cole, James Kennedy, King v. Burwell: Supreme Court Upholds Subsidies to Federal Exchanges (Tax Policy Blog)

Roger McEowen,  The U.S. Supreme Court and Statutory Construction – Words Don’t Mean What They Say (AgDocket)




Stuff other than the Supreme Court decision:

Jason Dinesen, Choosing a Business Entity: Sole Proprietor

Joseph Thorndike, Rand Paul’s Tax Plan May Be Radical, But It’s Not Impossible (Tax Analysts Blog) “But radical doesn’t mean impossible. Since proportionality lies at the heart of Paul’s plan, history suggests it might have a shot.”

Ethan Greene, Net Investment Income Tax Handicaps Those Meant to Benefit (Tax Policy Blog). “The irony of the NIIT is it taxes the very demographic it was intended to aid; that is, retirees relying on their savings and investment, and those with disabilities, counting on trust income or estate inheritance to maintain their quality of life.”

Donald Marron, Everything You Should Know about Taxing Carbon. (TaxVox)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 778

Caleb Newquist, The Accounting Profession’s Murky Future (Going Concern)



Tax Roundup, 6/10/15: Canada finds tax freedom today. And: limits to states tax reach.

Wednesday, June 10th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

canada flagOh, Canada. The Tax Foundation determined that the U.S. “Tax Freedom Day” was April 24 this year. Our neighbor to the north has had to wait until today, reports the Fraser Institute:

Tax Freedom Day measures the total yearly tax burden imposed on Canadian families by the federal, provincial and local governments.

“Without our Tax Freedom Day calculations, it’s nearly impossible for Canadian families to know all the taxes they pay each year because federal, provincial and local governments levy such a wide range of taxes,” said Charles Lammam, director of fiscal studies at the Fraser Institute and co-author of Canadians Celebrate Tax Freedom Day on June 10, 2015.

The list of taxes includes income taxes, payroll taxes, health taxes, sales taxes, property taxes, fuel taxes, vehicle taxes, profit taxes, import taxes, “sin” taxes and more.

In 2015, the average Canadian family (with two or more people) will pay $44,980 in total taxes or 43.7 per cent of its annual income.

The lateness of the date may surprise some U.S. tax practitioners who are familiar with Canada’s low 15% top corporation tax rate — less than half the U.S. 35% top rate. But Canada more than makes up for it with high provincial taxes and a national sales tax.


iowa-illustrated_Page_01Fencing in state tax collectors. A proposed “Business Activity Tax Simplification Act of 2015” (H.R. 2584) would update the rules restricting the ability of states to tax interstate activity:

Business Activity Tax Simplification Act of 2015 Expands the federal prohibition against state taxation of interstate commerce to:

(1) include taxation of out-of-state transactions involving all forms of property, including intangible personal property and services (currently, only sales of tangible personal property are protected); and
(2) prohibit state taxation of an out-of-state entity unless such entity has a physical presence in the taxing state. Sets forth criteria for:
(1) determining that a person has a physical presence in a state, and
(2) the computation of the tax liability of affiliated businesses operating in a state.

Congress last addressed these rules in 1959. The world of multistate commerce today would hardly be recognizable to an Eisenhower-era tax planner. States constantly try to expand their reach to non-voters in other states. State taxes are becoming the largest portion of the tax compliance bill to more and more small businesses. Simplification is way overdue. Unfortunately, this bill will probably go nowhere.


Gretchen Tegeler, Public sector health plans are costly for taxpayers (

Health exchange plans try to encourage members to be conscious of the cost of services.  They require subscribers to pay 100 percent of the cost of nearly everything, up to the deductible. The deductibles are set deliberately high — $3,750 for a single plan and $7,500 for a family plan in our example. Public employee plans, on the other hand, which already cost employees very little in premiums, tend to have extremely low co-pays and deductibles. So employees have minimal exposure to the actual cost of services, and minimal incentive to stay healthy.

When you don’t have to compete to stay in business, this is what happens.


Another ACA Success Story. The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration reports that delays in getting information from insurance exchanges will make it impossible for the IRS to verify all health insurance subsidy claims.

Hank Stern, Yeah, about that promise… (InsureBlog).




Jason Dinesen, Are HRAs Always Appropriate for Sole Proprietors? Part 3

Timothy Todd, Ninth Circuit Vacates Tax Court Decision On Transferee Liability. The case involves a “Midco” transaction involving the use of a loss company to give a buyer an asset deal and a seller a stock deal in the sale of a C corporation.

TaxGrrrl, Footballer Lionel Messi To Face Trial On Tax Fraud Charges. That’s a soccer player, in case you are trying to remember what NFL team he’s on.

Robert Wood, Hastert Pleads Not Guilty, But Can Write Off Blackmail On His Taxes

Caleb Newquist, Who Wants to Work at a Small Accounting Firm? (Going Concern). If it’s you, let me know.

Jim Maule, The Return of the Lap Dance Tax Challenge. “Despite having a fairly good grasp of tax law generally, and a passable understanding of sales taxation, I would have struggled with this case because, as others can attest, I don’t quite understand art.”


20120816-1David Brunori, Brownback Can’t Catch a Break (Tax Analysts Blog).

I think Brownback had the right idea and the wrong approach. He wanted to reduce tax burdens on Kansas citizens. That is laudable for two reasons. First, in the long run, lower taxes will lead to greater economic growth. Second, the money belongs to Kansans. Politicians don’t have an inherent right to people’s property. And it doesn’t matter whether lawmakers’ motivations are noble or venal — it’s not their money.

But I think Brownback made a terrible error when he exempted from tax all income from passthrough entities.

That approach is exactly backwards. You should broaden the base when you lower the rates. And while you should make sure you don’t tax income twice, you want to catch it once.

Kay Bell, Louisiana lawmakers ask D.C. lobbyist for tax hike permission. “Spoiler alert: Americans for Tax Reform’s Grover Norquist says ‘no'”


Scott Greenberg, Progressive Policy Institute Calls for Cutting Corporate Tax Rates (Tax Policy Blog). “Right now, companies can take advantage of lower tax rates in Europe by relocating their legal location through an inversion. But, if new international tax rules force companies to actually move jobs overseas to take advantage of Europe’s lower tax rates, companies would likely shift jobs away from the U.S. as well.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 762. He links to a piece arguing “First, the IRS, while effective at collecting taxes, is a poor agency to task with regulating advocacy organizations, especially those, such as the advocacy groups covered under 501(c)(4), that cannot offer donors a tax deduction.” Actually, every non-revenue task assumed by the IRS weakens their effectiveness in collecting taxes.

Playing hard to get. Does Saying “No Chance” Increase the Chances of Reform? Renu Zaretsky’s TaxVox headline roundup covers tax reform, internet taxes, and patent boxes today.


News from the Profession. The Greatest Reality TV Accountants, Awarded and Ranked (Leona May, Going Concern). I’d love to see Robert D. Flach do this.




Tax Roundup, 3/23/15: ACA is five years old today. How’s that working out?

Monday, March 23rd, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Productivity wins! All three Iowa teams are out of the men’s NCAA basketball tournament. Back to those 1040s, fans!



President Obama signs the Affordable Care Act. Image via

Five years. The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was signed into law five years ago today. Thanks to many delays — some part of the original law, others done in spite of the law to get past the elections — taxpayers and preparers are just beginning to cope with key portions of the law.

This is the first year for returns with the individual mandate — officially, and creepily, the “Individual Shared Responsibility Provision.” While many taxpayers thought this would only amount to $95, taxpayers hit with the penalty are learning that their refunds will get dinged for up to 1% of their AGI over a relatively low threshold.

This is also the first year that taxpayers have to true up overpayments of the advance premium tax credit.  Many taxpayers who bought policies on the ACA exchanges had their monthly premiums reduced based on their estimates of 2014 earnings. This subsidy is actually a tax credit, and it has to be reconciled at year end with the actual earnings.  Taxpayers with earnings in excess of what they estimated are now learning from their preparers that they need to write checks.

20121120-2The premium tax credit is horribly designed, with a stepped, rather than gradual, phaseout. One additional dollar in income can result in a loss of thousands of dollars in premium tax credits, which then have to be repaid with the tax return. H&R Block reports that most taxpayers who claimed the credit have to repay an average of $530. The IRS has tried to patch over some of the unpleasantness, unilaterally waiving penalties this year for taxpayers who have to repay the credits.

Here in Iowa, smaller employers who want to offer ACA-approved health insurance can’t, in the wake of the failure of the heavily-subsidized CoOportunity health insurance carrier. The IRS will still allow Iowa businesses to claim the convoluted credit for small employers for 2015. It required carriers who had signed up with CoOportunity to scramble to find new coverage, and it required many families who had already reached their out-of-pocket limits to start them over with a new carrier.


Looming over all this is the Supreme Court’s impending decision in King v. Burwell. The IRS decided to allow the premium tax credit in the 34 states using federal exchanges, in spite of statutory language limiting the credits to exchanges created “by the states.” If the court goes with the way the law is drafted, the premium tax credit will be gone for those 34 states, including Iowa. Employers in those states will be suddenly exempt from the “employer mandate” that begins to take effect in 2015. Millions of taxpayers will also be free of the individual mandate penalty because their insurance will no longer be “affordable.”

If you want to celebrate, head over to Insureblog, where they are always updating the latest developments and unintended consequences of the ACA.



20150312-1William Perez, Did You Pay Interest on Student Loans? It May be Tax Deductible

TaxGrrrl, Understanding Your Forms: 1098-T, Tuition Statement

Roger McEowen, Are Payments Made to Settle Patent Violations Deductible? (ISU-CALT)

Kay Bell, Tax returns on hold while IRS asks ‘Who Are You?’

Peter Reilly, Ninth Circuit Rules Against War Tax Resister

Jim Maule, Tax Credit for Purchasing a Residence Requires a Purchase. “Nothing in the opinion explains why the taxpayer thought she had purchased the residence. Nor does it explain why the taxpayer, if not thinking that she had purchased the residence, would claim that she did.”

Peter Hardy, Carolyn Kendall, Between the National Taxpayer Advocate and the Courts: Steering a Middle Course to Define “Willfulness” in Civil Offshore Account Enforcement Cases Part 1 (Procedurally Taxing). “The OVD programs have netted many people who may have inadvertently failed to file FBARs, and who are not wealthy people with substantial accounts.”

In other words, shooting jaywalkers while giving international money launderers a good deal.


Robert Goulder, When All Else Fails, Blame a Tax Pro (Tax Analysts Blog) “OK, the tax code is a disgrace. I get it. But a member of Congress is blaming tax professionals? Really?”

Congress is sort of like the guy who leaves his food plate on the floor, falls asleep, and then blames the dog for eating it.




Joseph Henchman, 10 Remaining States Provide Tax Filing Guidance to Same-Sex Married Taxpayers. “After the IRS decision to allow gay and lesbian married couples to file joint federal tax returns, we noted that a number of states would have to provide guidance because they require two contradictory things: (1) if you file a joint federal return, you must file a joint state return, and (2) same-sex married couples cannot file jointly.”

Renu Zaretsky, Budget Battles and Filing Follies: The Sagas Continue. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup tells of abundant ACA tax filing headaches and more tax nonsense from the only avowedly-socialist senator, Bernie Sanders.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 683Day 682Day 681. “Commissioner John Koskinen, testifying before the House Appropriations subcommittee this week, admitted that nearly a dozen grassroots conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status are still awaiting determination.”

Robert Wood, Report Says Former IRS Employees–Think Lois Lerner–Can Still Peruse Your Tax Returns. Well, that’s reassuring.


Career Corner. Going Concern March Madness: More #BusySeasonProblems (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern). Brackets asking important work life questions like Which is the bigger busy season problem? Working Saturdays (#1 seed), or Colleagues who heat up smelly leftovers (16 seed).”

I’ll take the underdog.



Tax Roundup, 3/4/15: Big week for trusts. And: Iowa gets its own tax phone scam!

Wednesday, March 4th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

1041Friday is Day 65 of 2015. Though March 6 is just another day to most people, it has always meant something to me (happy birthday, Brother Ed!). It also means something to trustees. The tax law allows trusts to treat distributions made during the first 65 days of the year as having been made in the prior year. This allows complex trusts to control their taxable income with a distribution, because trust distributions carry trust taxable income out of the trust to beneficiary 1040s.

This has become more important since the enactment of the Obamacare 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax. This tax hits trusts with adjusted gross income in excess of $12,150 in 2014. If a trust has beneficiaries below the much-higher NIIT thresholds for individuals, it can make at least some of that tax go away with 65-day rule distributions.

This affects “complex trusts,” which are trusts that are not required to distribute their income annually and which are not otherwise taxed on 1040s. Distributions from such normally carry out ordinary income, but not capital gains. If the trust has income that is not subject to the NIIT, the distribution will be treated as carrying out some of each kind of income, so trustees have to take that into account in their NIIT planning.

Income subject to the NIIT includes interest, dividend, most capital gains, rents, and “passive” income from businesses or K-1s. Retirement plan income received by trusts is normally not subject to the NIIT. A 2014 Tax Court decision makes it easier for trusts to have non-passive income, but trust income is normally passive.


20120920-3An Iowacentric tax scamThe Iowa Department of Revenue warns of a scam targeted at Iowans:

The Iowa Department of Revenue has been made aware of a potential scam targeting Iowa taxpayers. The scam begins through an automated phone call, which shows on caller ID as being from 515-281-3114. That phone number is the Department’s general Taxpayer Services number; however, no automated phone calls can originate from that number.

When answering the call, the taxpayer is informed they are eligible for a refund from the Iowa Department of Revenue. The taxpayer is then asked whether the refund should be deposited into the account the Department has on file or if they’d like to donate the refund to an animal charity.

The Iowa Department of Revenue does not make these types of calls. We believe this is an attempt to steal bank account or other personal information. By fraudulently displaying the Department’s phone number on caller ID, the scammer is attempting to convince the taxpayer of the legitimacy of the call.

The Iowa Department of Revenue doesn’t phone you out of the blue. The IRS doesn’t phone you out of the blue — they barely even answer phones anymore. If you get a call from a tax agency, assume it is a scam. It is, unless you have already been in contact with the agency because of a notice you’ve received in the mail


Obamacare is again on the dock in the U.S. Supreme CourtThe IRS decision to allow tax credits for policies in the 37 states that did not set up ACA exchanges is up for debate. The law provides for credits only for exchanges “established by a state.”

In a less politically-sensitive context, one could expect a 9-0 or 8-a decision against the IRS. That’s what happened in Gitlitzwhere the court ruled that the IRS couldn’t regulate away a perceived misdrafting of the tax code’s S corporation basis rules that allowed a windfall to taxpayers whose S corporations had debt forgiveness income. “Because the Code’s plain text permits the taxpayers here to receive these benefits, we need not address this policy concern.” But because a decision against IRS here would invalidate key parts of Obamacare in most of the country, politics is a big part of the process.

Those arguing for the IRS interpretation say the chaos will ensue and thousands of people will dieMichael Cannon, a prime architect of the case against the IRS rule, has a more measured discussion of the consequences of a decision against the IRS rule in USA Today. Aside from upholding the rule of law, a decision against the IRS rule could have many benefits.

Related: Megan McArdle, Obamacare Will Not Kill the Supreme Court. For a roundup of posts on the topic, try King v. Burwell — The VC’s Greatest Hits, from the Volokh Conspiracy’s attorney-bloggers.

Update: From Roger McEowen, Would It Really Be That Bad If the U.S. Supreme Court Invalidated the IRS Regulation on the Premium Assistance Tax Credit?




William Perez, Self-employed? SEP IRAs Help Reduce Taxes and Save for Retirement

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2015): A Is For Actual Expense Method

Kay Bell, Some Ohio taxpayers stumped by state’s tax ID theft quiz

Jason Dinesen, Is Chamber of Commerce Membership Worth It?. Our local group functions as an alliance of crony capitalists.


TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 664. Today’s edition mentions my high school classmate and junior class president election opponent, Al Salvi, and his outrageous treatment at the hands of Lois Lerner when she was with the Federal Elections Commission. For the record, Lois Lerner had nothing to do with my electoral triumph.

Robert Wood, Warren Buffett To Al Sharpton, The 1% Makes 19% Of All Income, Pays 49% Of All Taxes

Alan Cole, Most Retirement Income Goes To Middle-Class Taxpayers (Tax Policy Blog).

Distribution of Pension Income-02

Clint Stretch wonders whether it is Time to Retire Income Tax Reform? (Tax Analysts Blog). “With income tax reform out of the way, we could focus the conversation on the important issue – the size and scope of government. If eventually we can agree on how much tax we need to collect, we can always ask tax reform to come out of retirement for a little consulting.”


Len Burman, Cutting Capital Gains Taxes is a Dead End, Not a Step on the Road to a Consumption Tax. As someone who thinks the proper capital gain rate is zero, I can’t agree.

Career Corner. Starting a CPA Pot Practice Is Your Next Opportunity (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern). “Consider a joint venture, at least.”



Tax Roundup, 2/23/15: 800,000 blown ACA reporting forms; tens of thousands of already-filed returns are wrong. And more!

Monday, February 23rd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
The Younkers Building ruins, morning, March 29, 2014.

Be calm. All is well.

Tax Season is Saved! 800,000 Taxpayers Received Wrong Tax Info from Health Insurance Marketplace (Accounting Today):

“About 20 percent of the tax filers who had Federally-facilitated Marketplace coverage in 2014 and used tax credits to lower their premium cost —about 800,000 (< 1% of total tax filers) —will soon receive an updated Form 1095-A because the original version they were issued listed an incorrect benchmark plan premium amount,” said a blog post on the Web site of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. “Based upon preliminary estimates, we understand that approximately 90-95% of these tax filers haven’t filed their tax return yet. We are advising them to wait until the first week of March when they receive their new form or go online for correct information before filing. For those who have filed their taxes—approximately 50,000 (< 0.05% of total tax filers) —the Treasury Department will provide additional information soon.”

It says something about how screwed up this tax season is that the IRS can issue:

– A blanket waiver for the $100 per-day penalty for health insurance reimbursement arrangements;

– A small business waiver the Form 3115 filing requirement for “repair reg” accounting method changes;

– A blanket waiver for late payment penalties for advanced Obamacare tax credit clawbacks;

And still have a filing season full of “mayhem.”


Caleb Newquist, You Won’t Mind if Your Tax Refund Is a Little Late, Will You? (Going Concern)

Ellen Steele, The Affordable Care Act Tax Filing Season: A View From the Trenches (TaxVox). “Filing is not simple, even for our volunteers who all undergo rigorous training in tax law.”

Paul Neiffer, Perhaps 800,000 or More Form 1095-A Are Wrong


Tax Season is saved! Ripping off your refunds: One little number fuels South Florida’s tax-fraud explosion (

Tax Season is saved! Wow! The IRS Will Pay Out This Much in Fraudulent Tax Refunds By 2016 (Motley Fool)

Iowa Public Radio, Administration Grants Tax Time Reprieve For Obamacare Procrastinators:

The Obama administration said Friday it will allow a special enrollment period from March 15 to April 30 for consumers who realize while filling out their taxes that they owe a fee for not signing up for coverage last year.The special enrollment period applies to people in the 37 states covered by the federal marketplace, though some state-run exchanges are also expected to follow suit.People will have to attest that they first became aware of the tax penalty for lack of coverage when they filled out their taxes.

Megan McArdle called it. So once again they bend the ACA rules because following the law as enacted would be unpalatable. It’s as if the entire legislation is optional. Here are other made-up-on-the-fly amendments to ACA decreed by the Administration that I can think of off the top of my head:

– Waiving the $100/day penalty for employer insurance reimbursement arrangements.

– Waiving tax penalties for failure to pay the premium credit clawbacks.

– Rolling back the employer mandate penalty by a whole year — two for smaller employers.

– Allowing premium tax credits in states using federal exchanges when the statute only allows them where there is an exchange “established by a state.”

You almost might conclude that they didn’t really think things through very well when they enacted ACA.


William Perez, Social Security Benefits are Partially Taxable: How Much Depends on Your Other Income.

Roger McEowen, Primer on the Income Taxation of Trusts and Estates (ISU-CALT)

Peter Reilly, You And Your Shadow Do Not A Partnership Make. “I don’t think it is news that you can’t create a partnership with yourself and a disregarded entity, but it is a point that bears repeating.”

Russ Fox, Solely a Way to Go to ClubFed. “As always, the usual warning applies: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. If you use a corporation sole as a vehicle to avoid taxes, you’re heading down a road that leads to ClubFed.”

Jack Townsend, Another UBS Customer Pleads

Rashia says "thanks, Commissioner!"

Someday this may seem quaint.

TaxGrrrl, What If Tax Refund Theft Isn’t Really About Refund Theft?:

In the case of Anthem, the hack was massive. Potentially 80 million customers had their data compromised, prompting the state of Connecticut to warn taxpayers that it might be to their advantage to file their taxes early.

That, security experts say, isn’t the work of a small time hack. It’s not folks working out of a van with stolen laptops or a teenage kid in a basement. It’s bigger. It’s been suggested that the hack could be related to an international crime group or perhaps even an international government. I spoke with experts in tech and security arenas – who, like Jim, wished to remain anonymous – and they’ve suggested that they would not be surprised to find that the hacks were orchestrated by the Chinese government.

Have a nice day.

David Henderson, From 2007 to 2012-13, The Income Share of Top 1% Fell (EconLog).

Andrew Lundeen, A Cut in the Corporate Tax Rate Would Provide a Significant Boost to the Economy (Tax Policy Blog). “The corporate tax rate is, in effect, a tax on corporate investment; a high corporate tax rate discourages investment, whereas a low corporate tax rate encourages investment.”


David Brunori ($link): 

A California company that makes cans is demanding a 20-year, 100 percent property tax exemption in return for opening a plant in Iowa. The plant will employ 120 people. The company, Silgan Containers, makes metal cans (think the containers that hold vegetables and dog food). I’m sure it’s a great company. But why should it be relieved of paying its just share of taxes? And if its demand is met, what does the Iowa government say to the companies that are already in place and employing 120 or more people? There is nothing good about this.

“Economic development” is pretty much taking money from you and your employees to lure and subsidize your competitors.


TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 653The IRS Scandal, Day 654The IRS Scandal, Day 655

Kay Bell, All of 2015’s best picture Oscar nominees got tax break help. We would like to thank all of the chumps, er, taxpayers of the various states that help us buy these $168,000 swag bags. We wouldn’t want to do it without you.




Tax Roundup, 2/17/15: Iowa 2014 code conformity bill set to become final this week. And: tax season saved again!

Tuesday, February 17th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

IMG_1291Iowa Code Conformity Update. The bill updating Iowa’s 2014 tax law to include December’s retroactive “extender” bill, SF 126,  was officially transmitted to the Governor yesterday. He has three days to act; if he doesn’t sign within three days, the bill becomes law automatically. That means it will be official this week, unless the Governor shocks everyone with a veto.

The bill adopts almost all of the “extender” items, including the $500,000 Section 179 deduction, but it does not adopt 50% bonus depreciation for Iowa.

Update, 2:30 pm. The bill is signed.



The tax season is saved!  Covered California Sends Out Nearly 100,000 Tax Forms Containing Errors, Others Deal With Missing Forms (CBS San Francisco):

Stacy Scoggins gets plenty of mail from Covered California, but the one tax form the agency was required to send her by February 2nd still hasn’t arrived.

“After being on hold for 59 minutes, told me that the 1095-A was never generated,” Scoggins told KPIX 5 ConsumerWatch.

When they finally do get their forms, many of them will find out that they have to repay advanced premium tax credits, as Insureblog’s Bob Vineyard reports in Paybacks are hell, quoting a MoneyCNN report:

Some 53% of Jackson Hewitt clients who received subsidies have to repay part or all of it, with the largest being $12,000, said Mark Steber, chief tax officer. 

Clients love to hear that they owe.

Related: Oops (Russ Fox).


Kay Bell serves up 6 ways to get electronic tax help from the IRS

Accounting Today, IRS Eases Repair Regulations for Small Businesses

Josh Ungerman, IRS Expected To Issue Hundreds Of Deficiency Notices TO USVI Residents.




Tony Nitti, Lance Armstrong Ordered To Repay $10 Million Of Prior Winnings: What Are The Tax Consequences?  They could be ugly.

Kristine Tidgren, Value of Closely Held Corporation Increased in Dissolution Proceeding (ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation).

Robert Wood, Marijuana Tax Up In Smoke? Don’t Worry, Feds Plot 50% Tax.

Peter Reilly, Islamic Teaching On Usury Kills Property Tax Exemption In Tennessee

Jack Townsend, ABA Tax Lawyer Publication Comment on FBAR Willful Penalty




Matt Welch, Record Number of Americans Renounce Citizenship in 2014 ( “Terrible tax law produces predicted results”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 649


Norton Francis, State Revenue Growth Will Remain Sluggish (TaxVox)

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown 2/13: Snow Way Forward (Tax Justice Blog). Developments in Oklahoma, Arizona, North Carolina, Mississippie and Massachusetts, from a left-side view.


Things that are better now. From Don Boudreaux, a reminder of one area where a dollar goes a lot further than it used to:


I dare you to access from the Olivetti.  More at




Tax Roundup, 1/28/15: President scurries away from plan to tax college savings. And: more hard-hitting journalism!

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

csi logoAccounting Today reports: Obama Said to Drop Proposal to Repeal 529 College Tax Break. Good.

This was perhaps the most obnoxious of the proposals in the President’s budget, and that’s saying something. Promoting “free” community college tuition, while punishing those who actually save for college to avoid government loans, is a model of awful incentives and policy.

I can’t let pass this item from the Accounting Today report (my emphasis):

The administration’s quick retreat on the proposal emphasizes the difficulty of changing popular tax breaks, even in ways that lower the overall tax burden.

Yes, hard-hitting journalism in the form of making excuses for the President. It what way does repealing the exclusion for Section 529 plan withdrawals from taxation help “lower the overall tax burden?” The CBO estimates the President’s proposals would increase taxes by over $1 trillion over ten years.

Speaking of hard hitting journalism, we have this from the Des Moines Register today:


For those who no longer take the print edition, be assured that this important story is also available to internet readers.

Related: Annette Nellen, President Obama’s 2015 Tax Proposals


William Perez, Tips for Green Card Holders and Immigrants Who are Filing a US Tax Return. “Being a resident for tax purposes doesn’t necessarily mean you actually live here full time. As long as you have a green card, for example, you are responsible for reporting and paying tax on your worldwide income.”

Jason Dinesen, Iowa Trust Fund Tax Credit for 2014 Tax Returns. $15 per person this year.

Kay Bell, New IRS Form 1095-A among tax docs that are on their way. ACA adds a new wrinkle to this year’s filings.



1099misc2014TaxGrrrl, Where Are My Tax Forms? Due Dates For Forms W-2, 1099, 1098 & More. Including a reminder that K-1s from S corporations, partnerships and trusts are not due when 1099s and W-2s are.

Leslie Book, Thumbs Up on No Income Even When IRS Serves up 1099 DIV: Ebert v Commissioner (Procedurally Taxing)

Robert Wood, Disagree With An IRS Form 1099? Here’s What To Do. “What happens if the issuer won’t cooperate?”


Jim Maule on The Taxation of Egg Donations. “The Court’s conclusion makes sense, and not simply because it reaches the conclusion I advocated for reasons I suggested relying on cases on which I relied.”

Russ Fox, One Good Crime Deserved Another:

Let’s say you’re involved in a 20-year scheme that has successfully evaded millions of dollars in payroll and income taxes for your largest client. However, you’ve only had minor profits from the scheme. So why not embezzle millions of dollars from that client?

Russ offers some pretty good reasons why not.


cooportunity logoHank Stern, CoOpportunity assumes room temp (InsureBlog). More on the demise of Iowa’s sole SHOP provider, set up with millions in government grants and loans. Underwriting is hard.

Jack Townsend asks Why the Lenient Sentencing for Offshore Account Tax Crimes. “But, from my perspective, it seems to me that one can fairly question the notion that commission of tax crimes via offshore accounts is any less blameworthy — i.e., punishable — than commission of tax crimes in other contexts.”



Kyle Pomerleau, Richard Borean, Pass-through Businesses Account for More than $1.6 Trillion of Payroll (Tax Policy Blog):

Today, Pass-through businesses pay a significant role in the United States Economy. They account for 95 percent of all businesses, more than 60 percent of all business income, and more than 50 percent of all employment.

These are businesses taxed on owner 1040s. Remember that when politicians want to raise rates on “the rich” even more — they are hammering employers when they do this.

Richard Auxier, Pitching, Defense, and State Tax Policy (TaxVox): “So is Max Scherzer saving money in DC? Yes. Are the District’s tax laws a big reason why he signed with the Nationals? I doubt it.”

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 629

News from the Profession. Jilted Girlfriend Has Totally Had It With Cheap Accountant Boyfriend and His Stupid Spreadsheet (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern).



Tax Roundup, 1/27/15: IRS waives late payment penalty for ACA tax credit recapture. And more!

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20140413-1Be thankful for small favors. Perhaps millions of taxpayers will face an unhappy surprise this tax season thanks to the Affordable Care Act. The ACA provides a tax credit to help taxpayers up to 400% of the poverty level pay for insurance purchased on an ACA exchange. The credit is computed based on an estimate of the taxpayer’s household income and paid directly to the insurance company; the premium paid by the taxpayer is reduced by the same amount.

At tax time, the policyholder-taxpayers have to compare their actual income to the income they estimated when they bought the policy. If the actual income is higher than what was estimated, they may have to repay thousands of dollars in credits paid to the insurers.

Yesterday the IRS provided some cold consolation (Notice 2015-9) for these folks, for 2014 returns only. If they can’t come up with the cash to pay the tax on April 15, the IRS will waive the penalty for late payment of taxes if the amount is reported on a timely return. They are also waiving penalties for underpayment of estimated tax attributable to the credit.

20121120-2Taxpayers claiming the waiver are just supposed to file the return without the payment for the recaptured excess credit. Then when the IRS sends an underpayment demanding payment with penalties, they are supposed to respond with a letter saying “I am eligible for the relief granted under Notice 2015-9 because I received excess advance payment of the premium tax credit.” That will go over well, I’m sure. They also have pay up by April 15, 2016, with interest.

These waivers don’t cover the separate penalty for failing to carry health insurance — the “individual mandate” — because the IRS can’t assess penalties for not paying it in the first place.

Unfortunately, the IRS has not yet issued a blanket waiver for the much more severe penalties on employers with non-compliant premium reimbursement arrangements (“Section 105 plans“). We’ll see if the IRS wants to tangle with the thousands of 2014 waiver requests they will receive if they don’t issue a blanket waiver, one-at-a-time.


Tony Nitti, IRS: No Penalties For Late Repayments Of The Premium Tax Credit

Megan McArdle, Reality Check on Obamacare Year Two

Me: The ACA and filing season. Be afraid.


Robert D. Flach brings you your fresh Tuesday Buzz, including advice about checking information returns and choosing a preparer.

TaxGrrrl, Credit Cards, The IRS, Form 1099-K And The $19,399 Reporting Hole. “Tucked in the middle of the housing bill was a provision that had absolutely nothing to do with housing: a new requirement that banks and credit card merchants to report payments to the IRS.”

Kay Bell, Don’t become a tax identity theft victim. Good idea.

William Perez, A First Look at TaxACT Free File Edition

Russ Fox, The Form 3115 Conundrum: “This year there’s a conundrum faced by tax professionals: Do we need to file a Form 3115 for every taxpayer who has equipment, depreciation, rental property, inventory, etc.?”

I think we will need many 3115 filings, but I don’t think they are required for everyone. As Russ notes, nobody seems to know for sure.

Robert Wood, How Yahoo’s Alibaba ‘Sale’ Skirts Tax Billions, Buffett-Like.

Peter Reilly, A Free Kent Hovind Might Have Backing For A Bigger Better Dinosaur Theme Park. It really is an amazing world.


Stephen Entin, The President Proposes a Second Tax on Estates (Tax Policy Blog):

The step-up in basis is no loophole. The step-up is needed to prevent double or triple taxation of the same assets. Without it, the president’s plan could result in a 68 percent tax rate on capital gains upon death (the inheritance would be taxed at the 40 percent estate tax rate plus the proposed 28 percent tax rate on capital gains).

It’s worse than that, considering inflation and the fact that those assets were purchased with after-tax income in the first place.

Jeremy Scott, Three Early Signs of What to Expect From Congress (Tax Analysts Blog): “It will be unpredictable.”

IMG_1116TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 628 “The pattern begins with blatant denials — bald lies — and stonewalling. … Next in the pattern, when the lies fail, comes the attribution of responsibility to the lowest level of bureaucrat. …”

Martin Sullivan, Is There Now a Window of Opportunity for Tax Reform? (Tax Analysts Blog). Spoiler: “We will have to wait until 2017 for any real progress on tax reform. And by no means is there any guarantee of movement then.”

Howard Gleckman, Is Dynamic Scoring of Tax Bills Ready For Prime Time?

Sebastian Johnson, Sam Brownback’s White Whale. “Little did Kansas voters know that in reelecting Sam Brownback they were actually voting for a vengeful old sea captain obsessed with one issue above all others – eliminating the state’s personal income tax.”


Career Corner. Stop Using These Played Out Words in Your LinkedIn Profile Immediately (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)



Tax Roundup, 1/16/15: Insurance reimbursements may trigger $100/day penalty, but at least they’re not on W-2.

Friday, January 16th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

20121120-2Letter to Congressman says insurance reimbursements that trigger $100/day Obamacare penalty still excludible from W-2. 

Small employers have long used “Section 105” plans to reimburse employee purchases of individual health insurance, in lieu of setting up an employer group health plan. Such reimbursements were excludible from employee W-2 taxable income.

Under the Administration’s interpretation of the Affordable Care Act, such plans trigger a $100 per-day, per-employee penalty starting in 2014. Many employers are just learning that they had disqualified plans last year and are scrambling to comply; fixing a plan within 30 days of compliance may enable such taxpayers to avoid the $36,500 hit for each employee on “reasonable cause” grounds.

One question that has hung over this is whether the employer has to put the reimbursements that trigger the penalties on employee W-2s as income. A letter to an Illinois Congressman reprinted today in Tax Analysts says they don’t. From the letter  (my emphasis and links):

Prior to the ACA, an employer could reimburse employees for the medical expenses of the employee and the employee’s family and exclude those amounts from the employee’s income and wages under section 105(b) of the Code. The ACA has not changed the tax treatment of the reimbursement for employee medical expenses. However, these arrangements, under the ACA, are considered to be group health plans and must satisfy the market reform rules for them.

The guidance that we provided in Notice 2013-54 did not change the tax results described in Revenue Ruling 61-146. This ruling says that under certain conditions if an employer reimburses an employee’s substantiated premiums for individual health insurance policies, the payments are excluded from the employee’s gross income under section 106 of the Code. This exclusion also applies if the employer pays the premiums directly to the insurance company.

W2Note that the exclusion “applies.” That’s present tense, meaning it’s still alive.

Some employers responded to Notice 2013-54 by treating reimbursements as taxable, but subsequent guidance issued in November last year said that didn’t work to make the $100/day penalty go away.

While they scramble to terminate their now horrifyingly expensive Sec. 105 reimbursement arrangements and figure out how to get out of the penalties, employers still have to issue W-2s this month. Now they know they can at least leave the reimbursements off employee W-2s. Given how widespread the problems seems to be, and how terrible the penalties, the IRS ought to just issue a blanket penalty waiver on this for everyone for 2014 if the non-compliance is disclosed.

Why wasn’t this printed as guidance? This letter went to Congressman Lipinski in September. A similar letter went to Kansas Congressman Goodlatte about the same time. Obviously the IRS knew from the Congressional inquiries that guidance was needed, but until Tax Analysts published this guidance, the IRS had never explained how to handle the W-2s. They still haven’t published guidance telling employers how to  “correct” the erroneous plans, as required on the penalty waiver instructions to the penalty reporting form, Form 8929.


IMG_0598Yeah, like he’d admit that. From Tax Analysts ($link):

The IRS is not pursuing a “Washington monument” strategy of discontinuing taxpayer services to protest recent congressional budget cuts, Commissioner John Koskinen told reporters at a press conference on January 15.

The Washington monument strategy refers to claims made by some media outlets during the October 2013 government shutdown that various federal agencies seemed to be closing highly visible public services as a protest against the shutdown.

Koskinen denied that any such calculations entered into the IRS’s decision-making regarding service and enforcement constraints that he said were induced by Congress’s $346 million cut (to $10.9 billion) to the IRS budget for fiscal 2015.

I’ll believe that he’s serious when he closes the “voluntary” preparer registration program and stops paying IRS employees to work full-time for the Treasury Employees Union.

James Taranto at the Wall Street Journal doesn’t deny that the IRS needs more money, but doesn’t have much sympathy anyway (WSJ subscription may be required to access original):

It’s all rather comical—but also galling. The IRS’s abuse of power in its harassment of conservative nonprofits aimed in substantial part at suppressing opposition to ObamaCare. That is, the IRS traduced the free-speech rights of citizens in order to preserve a law expanding IRS power and creating more work for IRS agents.

Now the commissioner complains that the IRS has too much work and not enough resources and threatens to make life even more difficult for taxpayers. It’s like the guy who killed his parents and then pleaded for mercy because he was an orphan.

And an unapologetic one.


Robert D. Flach has your Friday Buzz, with a warning for users of off-the-shelf software.

William Perez, The Penalty for Not Having Health Insurance. Don’t think it’s just $95.

Robert Wood. 3 Reasons Filing Taxes Sucks? Obamacare, Obamacare & Obamacare. I can think of a lot of others, myself, but these are definitely three of them.

Alan Cole, The Employer Mandate Reduces Hours Worked (Tax Policy Blog). Not by tax preparers, it doesn’t.


Kay Bell, IRS Free File opens Friday, Jan. 16, for eligible taxpayers, four days ahead of Jan. 20 full tax season start

Russ Fox, If You Do Government Work, It Pays to Treat the Government Well

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 617

Howard Gleckman, What To Make of the Senate Finance Committee’s Tax Reform Workgroups 


Keith Fogg, Eskimos and the IRS: A Winter’s Tale (Procedurally Taxing) “This post is not about tax procedure issues in the native American population in Alaska but a recent Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) report concerning frozen credits at the IRS made me think about the number of ways Eskimos have to say snow.”


News from the Profession. Ron Baker: You Can Put Lipstick on Billing by the Hour But Don’t Call It Value Pricing (Adrienne Gonzales, Going Concern).



Tax Roundup, 1/5/15: Early year-end planning edition. And: too cold for a film credit trial?

Monday, January 5th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today “In the Blogs” visitors: the tax and AMT article is here. You may also be interested in these thoughts on when prepaying tax is unwise, even without AMT.


20150105-1Now that you’re done with 2014 year-end tax planning, let’s get started on 2015. Procrastination is as human as liking sugar and shiny things. It’s natural to get serious about anything right at the deadline, whether it’s homework or tax planning.

But it’s often wiser to get started early. That’s especially true when looking at contributions to tax-advantaged savings accounts. You should look to fund these as soon as you can, rather than putting them off to the last minute. The sooner you fund your 2015 IRA, your Health Savings Account, or your Section 529 education savings account, the sooner your funds are earning their return tax-free.

So if you have the funds on hand, here’s a new year’s resolution to keep today — fully fund your tax-advantaged savings accounts. Your limits for 2015:

Contributions can not exceed the amount necessary to provide for the qualified education expenses of the beneficiary. If you contribute to a 529 plan, however, be aware that there may be gift tax consequences if your contributions, plus any other gifts, to a particular beneficiary exceed $14,000 during the year.

Taxpayers filing in Iowa can deduct their contributions to the College Savings Iowa Section 529 plan up to $3,163 per beneficiary, per donor on their Iowa income tax return. A married couple funding plans for their two children can therefore deduct up to $12,652 in 2015 CSI contributions.


Enjoying a short Des Moines winter commute.

Too cold for a film tax credit trial? A strange development in the Iowa Film Credit scandal, reported by the Des Moines Register:

A new fraud trial for a Nebraska filmmaker accused of using a fake purchase agreement to get tax credits should be delayed because two elderly witnesses have left Iowa for the winter, according to a prosecutor handling the case.

Yes, it’s cold here. We’re supposed to get a snowstorm today, and it’s supposed to be 1 on Wednesday. For a high temperature. And I can’t say I have a great deal of sympathy for somebody who got millions in tax credit money.

But a criminal trial is serious business, and the film scandal has been going since 2009. The prosecution says the witness is worried that he might fall. I think arrangements can be made to get him safely from the car.

What’s the case about?

Dennis Brouse, 64, has been waiting for a second trial after judges on the Iowa Court of Appeals overturned a felony fraud conviction against him in April. Brouse’s company, Changing Horses Productions, received $9 million in tax credits from Iowa’s scandal-ridden film tax credit program.

Brouse faces a single fraud charge and potentially a prison sentence, stemming from the purchase of a 38-foot camper trailer he bought from Prole couple Wayne and Shirley Weese. Prosecutors say Brouse paid the couple $10,500 in cash for the trailer, but he claimed it cost twice that amount in a statement for tax credits given to the Iowa Film Office.

The state auditor’s report on the Iowa Film Office showed a lot of creative accounting for Changing Horses, including the claim of a $1 million expense for non-cash “sponsorship” considerations. I am guessing that they are going after the trailer case because there are e-mails from the Iowa Department of Revenue blessing the “in-kind” expense concept. I’m pretty sure that there is no such endorsement of doubling expenditures.


Roger McEowen, Top 10 Agricultural Law and Taxation Developments of 2014 (ISU-CALT). The impact of Obamacare is #1.

20121120-2Alan Cole rings in the new year with New Year, New Individual Mandate Penalty and New Year, New Employer Mandate (Tax Policy Blog). What new individual mandate penalty?

However, it’s also worth remembering that the penalty will be doubled (or more than doubled) for 2015. 2014’s penalty is $95 or 1% of your household income, whichever is higher. 2015’s penalty is $325 or 2% of your household income, whichever comes higher.

And the employer mandate? It’s the penalty on taxpayers with 100 or more “full-time equivalent” employees. A blog post can’t really do it justice:

The IRS has issued a truly epic 56-question FAQ to help explain the even-more-epic final regulations for the employer shared responsibility provision. In case you are wondering, those final regulations total to over seventy thousand words – similar in size to the novel Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.

It will get more epic if the Supreme Court rules that the individual tax credit only applies in the 14 states that have established their own ACA exchanges. The employer mandate only applies if an employee has qualified for the credit, and the individual mandate penalty will not apply to taxpayers whose insurance becomes “unaffordable” if the credits go away.


Robert Wood, Think Filing Taxes Was Tough Before Obamacare? Just Wait. “This year for the first time, the Affordable Care Act has created a trickier tax season. It is more expensive too, as virtually all Americans filing tax returns will have to consider the law’s impact on them and their taxes.”

Annette Nellen, ACA – Affordability of health insurance and age

William Perez, Directory of tax extensions for each state

Russ Fox, 1099 Time (2015 Version). “It’s time for businesses to send out their annual information returns.”


Kay Bell, Cigarettes are a bigger state tax target than booze. I think that explains the hostility of state governments to e-cigs.

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About EAs, #4: The SEE Isn’t a Tax Prep Exam

Peter Reilly, IRS Revokes Exempt Status Of Faux Veterans Groups




Renu Zaretsky, Cap and Trade Plans, Tax Deadlines, and Rate Drops. The TaxVox headline roundup covers gas taxes, dynamic scoring, and an insane plan in Washington state for a state-only “cap and trade” carbon program.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 606

News from the Profession: Celebrate the New Year with Accounting Salaries Charted by Company Type, Role, Service Line and More (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)



Tax Roundup, 12/30/14: Is prepaying taxes a good bet even without AMT? And: CoOportunity failure ripples.

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

I’ll gladly pay you today for part of a hamburger tomorrow. In our zeal to pile deductions into this year’s return, it’s easy to overdo it. If you aren’t subject to alternative minimum tax, you can get a 2014 tax benefit by mailing your estimated 2014 state balance due by tomorrow. But does it really make sense to pay a dollar of tax now to get a 35-cent benefit on April 15? at the 35% bracket, the answer would be yes, but for lower brackets, the numbers don’t work as well.

The chart below shows compares the time value lost by sending $1,000 to the government early to the present value of the tax benefit received, using a 2% discount rate.

Green numbers show a present value benefit for prepaying 12/31/14 vs. the statutory due date indicated.

Green numbers show a present value benefit for prepaying 12/31/14 vs. the statutory due date indicated.

Every situation differs. This table should be used with caution. It does provide some tentative rules of thumb for individuals, assuming you will be in the same bracket in 2014 and 2015, that you itemize, and that AMT does not apply:

– It always makes sense to pay your fourth quarter state estimates in December instead of January.

– If you are an Iowa taxpayer, it makes sense to prepay fourth quarter federal payments at any bracket, but it never makes sense to pay your April 15 balance due in December.

– It only makes sense to prepay your state balance due for April 15 2015 by tomorrow only if you are in at least the 33% bracket, which kicks in for joint filers and $226,850 of taxable income, and for single taxpayers at $$186,350. For Iowa taxes due April 30, it’s about a push, or even a small present value loss.

– It makes sense for taxpayers in the 25% bracket ($73,500 joint, $36,900 single) to prepay their March 1 property tax installments.

– It never makes sense to prepay your September property taxes nine months ahead.

As we discussed yesterday, AMT can make prepayments a much larger blunder, so don’t do anything without running some numbers.


cooportunity logoThe failure of Iowa’s federally-funded CoOportunity health care insurance company is drawing national attention. The Wall Street Journal opines in Fannie Med Implodes: “Call it the Solyndra of ObamaCare.”

Meanwhile, Iowans covered by CoOportunity have to deal with the consequences. Des Moines Register, CoOportunity’s crisis could cost members thousands:

Customers who switch out of CoOportunity coverage won’t be able to start their new policies until Feb. 1, because Dec. 15 was the national deadline for obtaining insurance policies that start Jan. 1. In the meantime, many customers would have to start meeting CoOportunity’s annual deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums for 2015. Then, when they switch insurers in February, “they would have to start over, unfortunately,” Commissioner Nick Gerhart said Monday.

If you like your plan…

CoOportunity Health’s troubles could affect whether small Iowa employers can qualify for 2015 tax credits toward workers’ insurance premiums.

Employers with fewer than 25 full-time workers making an average of less than $50,000 are supposed to be eligible for the tax credits, which can amount to 50 percent of the cost of premiums. However, starting in 2015, those credits are to be applied only to policies that are sold on the employer side of the public marketplace, In Iowa, CoOportunity was the only carrier selling health policies to Iowa employers on the marketplace. The company has ceased selling new policies because of its financial crunch.

Iowa Insurance Commissioner Nick Gerhart said he’s checking with federal officials to see if there’s another way to let small Iowa employers obtain the tax credit.

The IRS has let taxpayers in some counties without a SHOP provider take the credit. We will see if they grant a similar waiver here.

Related: Hank Stern, SHOP Chop.


Robert Wood, 3 Quick Year End Steps Pay Off Big April 15old walnut

Kay Bell, 5 tax-saving moves you can make by Dec. 31

Tony Nitti, The Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2014: #1-Obamacare Endures Additional Attacks. Aw, poor thing.

Russ Fox, IRS Announces Tax Season to Start on January 20th

Robert D. Flach, THE YEAR IN TAXES 2014. “Once again the year ended with the idiots in Congress waiting until literally the last minute to pass an extension of all of the expired ‘tax extenders’.”

Melanie Migliaccio, 9th Cir. Rejects IRS’s Transferee Status Recharacterization Argument (Tax Litigation Survey)


Iowa Public Radio, Rep. Grimm To Resign After Guilty Plea On Tax Charge.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 600

Alan Cole, Au Revoir to the Millionaire’s Tax (Tax Policy Blog). “The French government will quietly allow its millionaire’s tax to expire.”



If you think I’m unsympathetic to Commissioner Koskinen’s pleas of IRS povertycheck out No Fat to Cut at the IRS? So Take a Chainsaw to the Rest of the Beast. (J.D. Tuccille,

Of course, Koskinen framed it in terms of customer service, and friendly media outlets immediately parroted the message that a $346 million cut, bringing the IRS budget down to $10.9 billion, inevitably means longer wait times on the phone for distraught taxpayers seeking answers for their pressing tax questions.

This is an all-hands-on-deck spin on IRS cuts, with National Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson (who is theoretically on the victims’ side, despite her government paycheck) recruited to caution that the IRS is “chronically underfunded” with unfortunate implications for taxpayer service and assistance.

Then again, that might not be so horrible an outcome, given that IRS assistance involved giving taxpayers bad advice 22 percent of the time back in 1987, 41 percent of the time in 1989, 22 percent of the time in 2002, and 43 percent of the time in 2003. And no matter the advice dispensed by the tax collectors themselves, taxpayers are on the hook for getting it right.

Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

I can’t help thinking that the cuts to service are an IRS version of the Washington Monument Strategy, where the government responds to budget cuts by closing the most popular and visible tourist attractions. I would find Commissioner Koskinen’s pleas of poverty more convincing if he weren’t spending money on the new “voluntary” preparer program to end-run the Loving decision that shut down the preparer regulation power-grab. It would also be a good signal to put the 200 IRS employees who spend their working days doing union work on the phones instead.

Related: Cromnibus cuts IRS budget, delays extender vote.


Career Corner. What If Your Job Title Were Brutally Honest? (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern). I don’t suppose it would be easy to fit “Chronic Blogger Who Does Taxes to Finance It” on a business card.


Tax Roundup, 12/26/14: Bad SHOP-ing day: Iowa SHOP health insurance provider goes into receivership.

Friday, December 26th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

cooportunity logoSmall businesses wanting to provide health insurance coverage for their employees got a lump of coal in their stocking Christmas Eve with the announcement that CoOportunity Health, Inc. was placed in receivership by the Iowa Insurance Division. The Omaha World Herald reports:

CoOportunity Health, the two-year-old Iowa health insurance cooperative set up with federal loans under the Affordable Care Act, is running out of money and may be liquidated, which raises questions for other health insurance cooperatives nationally.

The company’s 120,000 individual and group customers, most of them in Nebraska and the rest in Iowa, are still covered if they signed up before Dec. 15 and should continue paying premiums to keep coverage in effect, said Nick Gerhart, Iowa’s insurance commissioner.

When the insurance division takes over an insurer, their policies remain in force while the insurer is either reorganized, sold or liquidated. But that doesn’t apply to brand-new enrollees. From the Herald:

But he recommended that policyholders switch to other insurance companies during open enrollment, which ends Feb. 15. People who enroll in new health plans by Jan. 15 would have that coverage in place by Feb. 1.

People who signed up for the first time with CoOportunity after Dec. 15 will not have coverage and should find other insurers, he said. CoOportunity, one of 24 health insurance cooperatives set up under the federal health care law, cannot sell or renew policies.

CoOportunity provided coverage on both the individual marketplace and the “SHOP” marketplace for small businesses. A FAQ (.doc format) from the Iowa Insurance Division on the takeover has this for small businesses looking for coverage:

If I want to remain in the marketplace and change insurance companies, where do I go?

Contact your agent or broker or go to

In central Iowa the website isn’t much help. In our coverage area, CoOportunity was the only SHOP provider, as far as I can tell. I have entered sample information in the SHOP marketplace for our 50309 zip code, and I get this result:

shop plans 20141224

This makes life complicated for small businesses that don’t currently have “grandfathered” coverage. The “marketplace reforms” of the ACA have a long list of requirements for qualifying coverage. If you provide coverage that fails to meet these rules, you incur an insane penalty of $100 per day, per employee. You need to make sure your broker knows if you don’t qualify for a grandfathered plan.

This also causes problems for employers wishing to take the 50% tax credit for providing employee coverage, as the credit is only available for plans purchased through the SHOP.

Roth & Company considered a plan offered by CoOportunity at our renewal last fall. It was slightly cheaper than our current plan (for which we had a 30%+ premium increase), but we stuck with our grandfathered plan, thinking the disruption to our employees wasn’t worth the minor savings. Bullet dodged.

More coverage:

Des Moines Register, CoOportunity Health falters, taken over by state.

Bob Vineyard, Another One Bites the Dust (InsureBlog).


Peter Reilly, Tax Court Rules Wounded Warrior Can Take His Time With The Trash – Merry Christmas. Peter discusses a wonderful Tax Court case from earlier this week that treats a disabled veteran as “materially participating” in maintaining three rental properties as a real estate professional. His handicaps, which make his caretaking a slow process, actually helped him achieve better tax results, as Peter explains.

TaxGrrrl offers A Christmas Day Look At Santa’s Tax Bill.

Kay Bell, Merry Christmas 2014

Paul Neiffer, Merry Christmas – 2014

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: You Won a Home! Now What? Part 3 of the Series

Jim Maule, Enact Tax Laws But Break Them?:

Even if Representative Michael Grimm eventually gives in to the calls for his resignation or is removed in some way from holding office, his failure to step down as part of the plea is an affront to hard-working Americans who do their best to comply with the tax law.

Heck, it’s even an affront to lazy Americans.


buzz20141017Robert Wood, IRS Hid Conservative Targeting Until After 2012 Presidential Election. Smidgen Corrupt?

Stephen Olsen, Summary Opinions. It’s the Procedurally Taxing roundup of recent tax procedure developments.

Many folks are taking today off, but Robert D. Flach is Buzzing away with his usual good stuff from around the tax world.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 596


William McBride, Japan Plans to Cut Corporate Tax Rate, Leaving U.S. Further Behind (Tax Policy Blog):

Japan currently has a corporate tax rate of 37 percent, the second highest in the developed world after the U.S., which has a corporate tax rate of 39.1 percent (federal plus state). With this cut, Japan would be roughly tied with France for the second highest corporate tax rate in developed world, at 34.4 percent.

Iowa has the highest corporate rate in the U.S., which makes us Number 1 in a not-good way.

Howard Gleckman, House GOP Leadership Would Require Dynamic Scoring of Some Tax Bills. Will It Matter?


Scott Sumner, The French experiment: Laffer >>>>>>> Piketty. (Econlog). France imposed a 75% top rate. Mr. Sumner observes:

Even if you are not a devout supply-sider (and I am a moderate supply-sider, who believes tax increases usually lead to more revenue) it would be hard to deny that this particular tax increase cost revenue, after accounting for the impact of French economic growth.

There are people who seriously insist that a 75%-90% top tax rate would be a good thing. France is Exhibit A.


The Cavalcade no longer moves on. The Cavalcade of Risk, the long-running roundup of insurance and risk-management posts is ending. It’s guiding light, Hank Stern, posts the final edition, which includes his own contribution Green Mountain State Blues, on the demise of their attempt at single-payer coverage in one state.




Tax Roundup, 11/20/14: ACA and filing season pessimism revisited.

Thursday, November 20th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Programming note: The Tax Update will take tomorrow off. I will be in Phoenix tomorrow on a panel on state film tax credits sponsored by the National Conference of State Legislators.  The panel will include, among others, Joseph Henchman of the Tax Foundation. Normal programming resumes Monday.


guillotineACA frenzy! Thanks to a kind Twitter mention from Megan McArdle (who you really should follow at @asymmetricinfo), my Tuesday post on ACA and filing-season dread made it to a wider audience than usual, including the readers of Real Clear Politics. A cousin who I normally only see at family weddings and funerals saw it and sent me a note (Hi, Bob!), so I know it really got around.

It has also generated questions in the comments and the Twitterverse that are worth addressing. We’ll start with this from Alan in the comments:

In a few months when people receive their W2’s they will get a real shock when all the employer paid share of the company paid share of health care plan is included in their gross pay and now they must pay taxes on all that extra income.

Obamacare is ugly, but it isn’t that ugly. While many (but not all) employers will disclose the cost of coverage on W-2 box 12 (code DD), it will not be included in W-2 Box 1, “taxable wages.” From, Employer-Provided Health Coverage Informational Reporting Requirements: Questions and Answers:

Q1. Does the cost of an employee’s health care benefits shown on the Form W-2 mean that the benefits are taxable to the employee?

A. No. There is nothing about the reporting requirement that causes or will cause excludable employer-provided health coverage to become taxable. The purpose of the reporting requirement is to provide employees useful and comparable consumer information on the cost of their health care coverage.

20121120-2From Ms. McArdle on Twitter:

Any chance it won’t be that bad?

I suppose that depends on what “that bad” means. Blood seeping from the walls, shape-shifting brain-eaters from Planet Zargon, cats and dogs living together– probably not that bad. But there’s still plenty of bad to go around. The things that worry me:

– Many taxpayers will not have the information handy to determine their health insurance status for all 12-months of 2014. Only those who buy insurance on the exchanges will have Form 1095, the information return on insurance status.  Others are supposed to get information from employers, but they are likely to lose track of it, especially this first year.

– Lacking any matching documents, taxpayers will be tempted to claim coverage where there is none, or maybe wasn’t for part of the year, to avoid penalties. There won’t be an easy way to verify this. Preparers will either have to take taxpayers at their word or send them back for proof (or, inadvertently, to another preparer). It’s always bad when taxpayers feel they should lie to preparers. Yet as the IRS will often have no way to detect false claims of coverage, they will feel like chumps for telling the truth.

– Taxpayers with penalties for non-coverage will be irate when they find they get no refund. As Ms. McArdle wisely put it, “I do not have hard figures on this, but my basic experience in personal finance and tax reporting suggests that approximately zero percent of those affected will be expecting the havoc it will wreak on their tax refund.” Experience shows that the taxpayer’s first instinct is that the preparer screwed up.

– It will be even worse when we have to tell people to repay advance health-care tax credits paid to insurers to lower consumer out-of-pocket costs. This can happen when actual taxable income exceeds the amounts estimated when coverage was obtained on the exchanges. As the taxpayer never “saw the money” — it was paid to the insurer, not to the taxpayer directly — she may not be easily convinced that she has an excess benefit to repay.

20140521-1– Preparers haven’t had to deal with this before. Any new tax provision has a learning curve, and this is a complicated one that will apply to almost everyone. In many cases, preparers will mess up, being human. Getting it right will take extra time that is hard to come by during tax season.

– This doesn’t even touch the problems that many small employers are going to be dealing with as they realize their Section 105 individual coverage premium reimbursement plans, and their cafeteria plans funding premium payments on individual policies obtained by employees, are considered non-compliant under the ACA “market reforms.” At $100 per employee, per day, the penalties could be ruinous. While taxpayers are encouraged to report the penalties on Form 8928 and zero them out with a “reasonable cause” claim, we don’t know yet how generous the IRS will be in granting reasonable cause relief. Figuring out what to do here will be time-consuming and nerve-wracking for taxpayers and preparers, unless the IRS issues a blanket penalty waiver for 2014 (as it should).

On top of all this, we will probably have another late “extender” bill like we had two seasons ago, which made for an awful tax season by itself. Maybe things will go well this season, but so many things seem likely to go wrong that it’s hard to be optimistic.


Tony Nitti, The Top Ten Tax Cases (And Rulings) Of 2014: #6-The IRS (Finally) Figures Out The Real Estate Professional Rules. It’s an excellent lesson on the tax rules covering “real estate professionals” and passive losses — and by extension, the 3.8% net investment income tax.

TaxGrrrl, Al Sharpton Denounces Claims He Owes Millions In Taxes To IRS, New York.

Jack Townsend, Another UBS/Wegelin Related Indictment in SDNY

Peter Reilly, Kent Hovind And Creation Science Evangelism – How Not To Run A Ministry. When it gets you imprisoned, you may well be doing it wrong.

Kay Bell, Former GOP VP candidate Paul Ryan to head House tax panel

Jason Dinesen, I Don’t Have Time to Write Grant Proposals or Meet with Donors … But Give Me Money Anyway!  OK, then…


Work proceeds in clearing the ruins of the Younkers department store, which burned in March.


TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 560.

Cara Griffith, Bad News for State Public Pension Plans (Tax Analysts Blog). “New research has come out revealing the level at which state public pension plans are underfunded, and it’s not good news.”

The denial of reality in administering public pensions is amazing. Public defined benefit plans are a lie. Either the public is being lied to about how much current public services cost, or current employees are being lied to about their retirement benefits. Maybe both.


20140910-1Alan Cole, Extenders and the Opportunity for Tax Reform (Tax Policy Blog):

The Examiner characterizes many of the extenders as “repugnant carve-outs.” This is undeniably true, but it is also the case that some – but not all – of the tax extenders are genuinely good policy. Particularly, Bonus Depreciation and Section 179 are important for moving the tax code towards proper treatment of new investment.

In any case, the current system of pretending tax provisions are “temporary” to hide their true cost is dishonest and should end.

Renu Zaretsky, “Dead Reform Walking:” On Fairness, Immigration, and Spending. The TaxVox headline roundup covers developments in the Marketplace Fairness Act, extenders and immigration, among other things.


News from the Profession. KPMG Gives the Department of Homeland Security a Clean Audit Opinion Because of Course They Did (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern). “I don’t know about you but I feel safer already.”