Posts Tagged ‘Paul Neiffer’

Tax Roundup, 2/23/15: 800,000 blown ACA reporting forms; tens of thousands of already-filed returns are wrong. And more!

Monday, February 23rd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
The Younkers Building ruins, morning, March 29, 2014.

Be calm. All is well.

Tax Season is Saved! 800,000 Taxpayers Received Wrong Tax Info from Health Insurance Marketplace (Accounting Today):

“About 20 percent of the tax filers who had Federally-facilitated Marketplace coverage in 2014 and used tax credits to lower their premium cost —about 800,000 (< 1% of total tax filers) —will soon receive an updated Form 1095-A because the original version they were issued listed an incorrect benchmark plan premium amount,” said a blog post on the Web site of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. “Based upon preliminary estimates, we understand that approximately 90-95% of these tax filers haven’t filed their tax return yet. We are advising them to wait until the first week of March when they receive their new form or go online for correct information before filing. For those who have filed their taxes—approximately 50,000 (< 0.05% of total tax filers) —the Treasury Department will provide additional information soon.”

It says something about how screwed up this tax season is that the IRS can issue:

– A blanket waiver for the $100 per-day penalty for health insurance reimbursement arrangements;

– A small business waiver the Form 3115 filing requirement for “repair reg” accounting method changes;

– A blanket waiver for late payment penalties for advanced Obamacare tax credit clawbacks;

And still have a filing season full of “mayhem.”

Related: 

Caleb Newquist, You Won’t Mind if Your Tax Refund Is a Little Late, Will You? (Going Concern)

Ellen Steele, The Affordable Care Act Tax Filing Season: A View From the Trenches (TaxVox). “Filing is not simple, even for our volunteers who all undergo rigorous training in tax law.”

Paul Neiffer, Perhaps 800,000 or More Form 1095-A Are Wrong

 

Tax Season is saved! Ripping off your refunds: One little number fuels South Florida’s tax-fraud explosion (MiamiHerald.com

Tax Season is saved! Wow! The IRS Will Pay Out This Much in Fraudulent Tax Refunds By 2016 (Motley Fool)


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Iowa Public Radio, Administration Grants Tax Time Reprieve For Obamacare Procrastinators:

The Obama administration said Friday it will allow a special enrollment period from March 15 to April 30 for consumers who realize while filling out their taxes that they owe a fee for not signing up for coverage last year.The special enrollment period applies to people in the 37 states covered by the federal marketplace, though some state-run exchanges are also expected to follow suit.People will have to attest that they first became aware of the tax penalty for lack of coverage when they filled out their taxes.

Megan McArdle called it. So once again they bend the ACA rules because following the law as enacted would be unpalatable. It’s as if the entire legislation is optional. Here are other made-up-on-the-fly amendments to ACA decreed by the Administration that I can think of off the top of my head:

– Waiving the $100/day penalty for employer insurance reimbursement arrangements.

– Waiving tax penalties for failure to pay the premium credit clawbacks.

– Rolling back the employer mandate penalty by a whole year — two for smaller employers.

– Allowing premium tax credits in states using federal exchanges when the statute only allows them where there is an exchange “established by a state.”

You almost might conclude that they didn’t really think things through very well when they enacted ACA.

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William Perez, Social Security Benefits are Partially Taxable: How Much Depends on Your Other Income.

Roger McEowen, Primer on the Income Taxation of Trusts and Estates (ISU-CALT)

Peter Reilly, You And Your Shadow Do Not A Partnership Make. “I don’t think it is news that you can’t create a partnership with yourself and a disregarded entity, but it is a point that bears repeating.”

Russ Fox, Solely a Way to Go to ClubFed. “As always, the usual warning applies: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. If you use a corporation sole as a vehicle to avoid taxes, you’re heading down a road that leads to ClubFed.”

Jack Townsend, Another UBS Customer Pleads

Rashia says "thanks, Commissioner!"

Someday this may seem quaint.

TaxGrrrl, What If Tax Refund Theft Isn’t Really About Refund Theft?:

In the case of Anthem, the hack was massive. Potentially 80 million customers had their data compromised, prompting the state of Connecticut to warn taxpayers that it might be to their advantage to file their taxes early.

That, security experts say, isn’t the work of a small time hack. It’s not folks working out of a van with stolen laptops or a teenage kid in a basement. It’s bigger. It’s been suggested that the hack could be related to an international crime group or perhaps even an international government. I spoke with experts in tech and security arenas – who, like Jim, wished to remain anonymous – and they’ve suggested that they would not be surprised to find that the hacks were orchestrated by the Chinese government.

Have a nice day.

David Henderson, From 2007 to 2012-13, The Income Share of Top 1% Fell (EconLog).

Andrew Lundeen, A Cut in the Corporate Tax Rate Would Provide a Significant Boost to the Economy (Tax Policy Blog). “The corporate tax rate is, in effect, a tax on corporate investment; a high corporate tax rate discourages investment, whereas a low corporate tax rate encourages investment.”

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David Brunori ($link): 

A California company that makes cans is demanding a 20-year, 100 percent property tax exemption in return for opening a plant in Iowa. The plant will employ 120 people. The company, Silgan Containers, makes metal cans (think the containers that hold vegetables and dog food). I’m sure it’s a great company. But why should it be relieved of paying its just share of taxes? And if its demand is met, what does the Iowa government say to the companies that are already in place and employing 120 or more people? There is nothing good about this.

“Economic development” is pretty much taking money from you and your employees to lure and subsidize your competitors.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 653The IRS Scandal, Day 654The IRS Scandal, Day 655

Kay Bell, All of 2015’s best picture Oscar nominees got tax break help. We would like to thank all of the chumps, er, taxpayers of the various states that help us buy these $168,000 swag bags. We wouldn’t want to do it without you.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/10/15: Iowa House may vote on conformity today. And: pass-through isn’t the same as “small.”

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

IMG_1284Iowa Conformity Update: No action yesterday in the Iowa House on SF 126, the Senate-passed bill that conforms Iowa income to federal rules, except for bonus depreciation. The house version of the bill, HF 125, is scheduled for debate today in the Iowa House. That means we may have a vote today.

Update, 9:15 a.m. SF 126 passes Iowa House, 94-0. The Senate-passed bill was substituted for HF 125 on the floor and approved. It now goes to the Governor, who is expected to sign.

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Some Pass-Through Businesses are Significant Employers (Tax Policy Blog):

In the United States, most businesses are not C corporations. 95 percent of businesses are what are called pass-through businesses. These businesses are called pass-throughs because their income is passed directly to their owners, who then need to pay individual income taxes on it. Contrast this with C corporations that need to pay the corporate income tax on its income before it passes its earnings to its owners. Combined, pass-through businesses employ 55 percent of all private-sector workers and pay nearly 40 percent of all private-sector payroll.

When business income is taxed on the 1040 and income tax rates are raised, the business has less income to hire and grow.

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Not recognizing the fact that pass-through businesses can be large employers can bring about poor policy choices. For example, increases in the top marginal individual income tax rate will not only hit individuals with high wage income or business income, it may hit a significant number of large employers who are organized as pass-through businesses. Conversely, some policies that are aimed at helping small businesses, such as state-level pass-through business income tax exemptions, could incidentally benefit large established businesses.

Unfortunately, no individual rate is ever high enough for some people.

 

younker elevatorsHoward GleckmanTax Subsidies May Not Help Start-Ups as Much as Lawmakers Think (TaxVox):

But the biggest reason startups may be unable to take advantage of tax subsidies is that they often lose money in their early years. In theory, generous preferences such as Sec. 179, the research and experimentation credit, or even the ability to deduct interest costs are all available to startups. In reality, many cannot use them because they make no profit and, thus, pay no tax.

Firms can carry net operating losses forward for up to 20 years but these NOLs are far less valuable than immediate deductions for three reasons—money loses value over time, some firms never generate enough income to take full advantage of their unused losses, and some lose their NOLs when they are acquired. A 2006 Treasury study found that at least one-quarter of these losses are never used and others lose substantial value.

One way to help this problem would be to increase the loss carryback period. Businesses can only carry net operating losses two years. Corporations in Iowa and some other states can’t carry them back at all.

Consider a business that has income in year one, breaks even in years 2 and 3, and loses enough to go broke in year four. It never gets the year 1 taxes back, even though over its life it lost money.

An increased loss carryback period would be especially useful to pass-through owners, enabling some of them to get tax refunds to keep their businesses alive. But once the government has your money, they hate to give it back.

Loosening the “Sec. 382” restrictions on loss trafficking would also help. A struggling business would be more likely to get investment funds if the investor could at least count on using some otherwise wasted tax losses. But the government is more interested in protecting its revenue than in helping struggling businesses.

 

Department of Foreseeable Unintended ConsequencesTax Analysts Jennifer DePaul reports ($link):

 While a joint session of the New York State Legislature on February 9 heard Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s $142 billion budget proposal, the governor released more details about several tax measures included in his budget plan.

Among them was a proposal designed to crack down on tax scofflaws by suspending the driver’s licenses of debtors who owe the state as little as $5,000.

This means taxpayers with relatively small balances due will be deprived of their legal transportation to get to work. This means some taxpayers will have to quit their jobs and never get caught up with their debt, leading to a financial death spiral. Others will try to get to work, get locked up for driving on a suspended license, lose their jobs because they didn’t show up, and go into a financial death spiral. It’s a recipe for locking more people into the underclass because their Governor wants their money faster.

Related: Brian Doherty, Drivers License Suspensions Slamming the Working Poor for No Particular Good Reason in Florida  (Reason.com); Megan McArdle, Cities Dig for Profit by Penalizing the Poor

 

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Russ Fox, Harassing IRS Agents Isn’t a Bright Idea. “Speaking of ways to get in trouble with the IRS, one is to harass an IRS agent. They don’t like it (and it’s a crime).”

Tony Nitti, Are You Exempt From The Obamacare Insurance Penalty?

Robert Wood has 7 Reasons Not To File Your Taxes Early, Even If You’ll Get A Refund. “Measure twice, cut once.”

Paul Neiffer, How Do Repair Regulations Affect My Farm Operation? It does. Find out more when Paul helps present a webinar on the topic for the ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation February 18.

William Perez, How Dividends Are Taxed and Reported on Tax Returns

 

Peter Reilly, Tax Court Hammers IRS CI Who Went Out Into The Cold. The strange, sad saga of Joe Banister.

Leslie Book, Some More Updates on IRS Annual Filing Season Program and Refundable Credit Errors. Leslie thinks that preparer regulation would help. I believe the persistent high rate of incorrect EITC payments in spite of increasing IRS initiatives to bug preparers and force them to document due diligence for EITC clients shows that preparer regulation won’t solve this problem.

Jason Dinesen, Send a 1099-C to a Non-Paying Customer? Updated. Probably unwise.

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Jeremy Scott, Finance Committee Review of 1986 Act Smacks of Desperation (Tax Analysts Blog):

The Senate Finance Committee will try to use history as a guide to break the logjam on tax reform. The Republican-led body will hold a February 10 hearing featuring former Finance Chair Bob Packwood and former Sen. Bill Bradley, who will talk about the process that led to the historic legislation that redefined the tax code and has left its imprint on the minds of would-be tax reformers for almost three decades now. However, looking back at 1986 appears more desperate than inspired because most of the factors that existed then are almost totally absent now.

I think all this Congress can accomplish is to not make things work, and to lay the groundwork for a tax reform that might be enacted in a more congenial political climate.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 642.

 

Career Corner. Let’s Discuss: Wearing Headphones at the Office (Jesstercpa, Going Concern). You can tell you are moving up in the CPA world if you get an office with a door, and you can use actual speakers. Unless you are in one of those hideous “open offices,” of course.

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/9/15: New York questions its tax incentives. And: where’s the ‘no anthrax’ sign?

Monday, February 9th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

New York FlagNew York Comptroller: nobody tracks whether the state’s corporate welfare tax incentives do any good. Tax Analysts’ Jennifer DePaul reports ($link):

It’s unclear whether the $1.3 billion in incentives and credits doled out annually by New York is creating jobs, a February 5 report by State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli concluded.

The ESDC, which administers more than 50 economic development programs, provides little public information on taxpayer-funded investments in its initiatives, the report said.

“ESDC makes no public assessment of whether its disparate programs work effectively together, whether such initiatives have succeeded or failed at creating good jobs for New Yorkers, or whether its investments are reasonable in relation to jobs created and retained,” the report said.

Naturally the politicians disagree:

On February 5 Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) told reporters that he disagreed with the comptroller “fundamentally and on his concept of economic development” and said New York has lost its effectiveness to attract businesses over the past decade.

“We’ve come a long way in the past four years in terms of reversing that and bringing jobs back to New York,” Cuomo said. “To the extent that the comptroller thinks we should go back to the old way where we saw New York losing jobs, I couldn’t disagree more strongly.”

To politicians, the only job creation that matters is the kind that lets them hold issue press releases, hold press conferences, and cut ribbons.

For a brief shining moment in the Iowa’s Culver administration, the film tax credit fiasco made our politicians look at the Iowa’s tax credit programs. A panel of state officials issued a report finding no clear evidence that the tax credits do any good. So Iowa replaced them all and lowered individual and corporate tax rates with the savings.

Actually, no. They just continued enacting new credits. I can dream, though.

Link: The Comptroller Report.

 

dirtyThe Journal of Taxation has a summary of this year’s IRS “Dirty Dozen” tax scams. Number 1 with a bullet are phone call scams from people saying they are IRS agents. Just remember, if the caller claims to be from the IRS, he (or she) isn’t, unless you have been in touch with a specific agent by mail already.

 

Puzzling over the tangible property regulations and the 3115 requirements? The ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation wants to help solve the puzzles. They have scheduled a webinar on on the regs February 18Roger McEowen and Paul Neiffer will host. Registration info available here.

 

Russ Fox celebrates 10 — the tenth anniversary of his excellent Taxable Talk. Congratulations, Russ!

William Perez, How Is Interest Income Taxed and Reported?

Annette Nellen discusses the new IRS Directory of preparers and Annual Filing Season Program (AFSP). Another useless effort by the supposedly impoverished agency.

IMG_1271Leslie Book, Preparers and Due Diligence (Procedurally Taxing)

Kay Bell, Additions to the tax law name roll of [dis]honor? We at Roth & Company would like to claim rights to the name “Roth IRA,” but alas, we had nothing to do with it.

Jason Dinesen, I Like Mowing My Lawn and Shoveling Snow; Do You Like Preparing Your Tax Return?

I see no value in hiring someone else to mow my lawn or shovel my snow.

The same principle holds true for people who choose to prepare their own taxes. If they know what they’re doing and they enjoy doing it, then I encourage people to do it themselves because they won’t see value in the work of a tax professional.

I see no value in hiring someone else to do my lawn and driveway either. That’s what the teen-ager is for.

TaxGrrrl, Brady Passes On Super Bowl Prize As Butler Hauls In Truck & Tax Bill

Jim Maule, So Who Gets Taxed on the Super Bowl Truck?

Peter Reilly, Oil Rig Manager Does Not Qualify As Foreign Resident

Robert Wood, On-Demand Workers: It’s Tax Time, You’re Self-Employed, Audits Are Inevitable

Me, IRS issues 2015 vehicle depreciation limits, updates 2014 limits for Extension of Bonus depreciation

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 641. Judicial Watch says it has received emails showing the IRS Office of Chief Counsel delayed the investigation into the Tea Party scandal.

The tax law is obese. So the supergenius behind Obamacare, Jonathan Gruber, has floated the idea of taxing folks based on body weightArnold Kling is comments wisely: ” I know that many of my progressive friends would be disgusted by the obesity, but that does not make it a public policy problem.”

That’s right, not every problem is a tax problem. Or even the government’s problem.

David Henderson has more: Jonathan Gruber on Sin Taxes (Econlog)

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Worldwide Taxation is Very Rare (Tax Policy Blog):

At the beginning of the 20th century, 33 countries had a worldwide tax system. That number slowly dropped to 24 countries by the 1980s. By the 2000s, the number of countries switching to territorial systems accelerated, with more than 10 countries switching in 10 short years. Nearly all developed countries have moved to the superior territorial tax system. Today there are only 6 countries that tax corporations on their worldwide income. The President’s proposal would double-down on the U.S.’s current system and push the United States further out of line with the rest of the developed world.

The U.S. is even more of an outlier on worldwide taxation of individual income, with only Eritrea joining us in taxing citizens abroad.

Tracy Gordon, Go Team: Score 1 for Obama on Ending Tax Subsidies for College Sports (TaxVox).

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown 2/5: State of the States (Tax Justice Blog).

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Career Corner. Let’s Discuss: The Worst of Eating in the Audit Room (Marty, Going Concern)

Brian Gongol says “You’re not allowed to carry a bag of anthrax spores through a mall.” My bad. It won’t happen again.

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/6/15: Iowa pass-through top rate: 47.2%. And: a forgiving IRS!

Friday, February 6th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today visitorsThe post about the convicted filmmaker is here.

 

Taxing employers at high rates? That’s OK, they’re rich! Pass-through Businesses can Face Marginal Tax Rates over 50 percent in Some States (Kyle Pomerleau, Richard Borean, Tax Policy Blog):

Today, Pass-through businesses pay a significant role in the United States Economy. They account for 95 percent of all businesses, more than 60 percent of all business income, and more than 50 percent of all employment.

Iowa ranks at about the middle, with a 47.2% combined top rate on pass-through income.

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When lazy politicians think they can cover their incontinent spending just by sending the bill to the rich guy, they don’t tell you that they’re talking about leaving your employer that much less money to hire and pay you.

 

TIGTAI’m sure they’ll be just as forgiving to the rest of us. Accounting Today reports: IRS Rehired Hundreds of Misbehaving Employees with Conduct Problems:

The Internal Revenue Service rehired hundreds of former employees with prior conduct or performance issues, including employees who failed to file their taxes, falsified official forms and misused IRS property, according to a new report. 

The report, from the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration, acknowledged that most rehired employees do not have performance or conduct issues associated with prior IRS employment. However, TIGTA said it identified hundreds of former employees with prior substantiated conduct or performance issues ranging from tax issues, unauthorized access to taxpayer information, leave abuse, falsification of official forms, unacceptable performance, misuse of IRS property, and off-duty misconduct.

I like this “second chance” policy. I hope they roll it out to the rest of us.  Robert Wood has more: IRS Rehires Hundreds Of Problem Former Employees.

 

Conformity update: The Iowa House of Representaties went home for the weekend without approving SF 126. The Iowa Senate approved the bill this week. SF 126 continues through 2014 Iowa’s practice of conforming to the extender provisions other than bonus depreciation. This will mean Iowans will be able to claim the $500,000 maximum Section 179 deduction on their state returns. I expect the House to pass it next week.

 

1099-CTax Pros, the IRS isn’t your collection agentThat seems to be the implication of this item sent as an email by the IRS Office of Professional Responsibility to practioners yesterday. It addressed the idea of sending a 1099-C, reporting cancellation of debt income, to deabeats who fail to pay a tax return prep fee:

It is difficult to conceive of a situation in which a tax professional, principally engaged in providing tax services will be an “applicable entity” justifying the use of Form 1099-C to attribute income to an arguably scofflaw client for the nonpayment.

So it’s back to old standbys like cyberstalking and prank phone calls, then.*

*I kid! I kid!

 

TaxGrrrl, Minnesota Stops Accepting Returns Filed With TurboTax, Cites Fraud Concerns. It may be that Turbotax is just too popular with the wrong kind of customer. “Banned in Minnesota” can’t be good for Turbotax sales.

 

IMG_1232William Perez, Tax Refunds by Direct Deposit: How to Do It and Problems to Prevent. Some sage advice: “Triple Check Your Bank Account Information Before Filing Your Tax Return”

Kay Bell, Don’t forget local levies when adding up sales tax deduction

Paul Neiffer, Excessive Claims for Fuel Tax Credits Makes the IRS “Dirty Dozen List”. You mean you didn’t use 1000 gallons in your lawn tractor this summer?

 

Clint Stretch, Defining Tax Reform (Tax Anlaysts Blog):

To date, nearly everyone describing tax reform, from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to the White House, has called for “a simpler tax code.” Not so the Senate Democrats. When they use the words “tax reform,” those words do not mean simplification but do mean many things conservatives would leave out of their own definition, such as progressive taxation.

It is tempting to think that whoever drafted the letter merely forgot simplification, or assumed it to be understood. But the Democrats’ proposal to have tax incentives “take into account the varying cost of living differences among States and regions” makes it clear: Simplification is not one of their core values.

Oddly, Mr. Stretch doesn’t seem to be a fan of simplification. He spent many years as a lobbyist for a national accounting firm I once worked for, so I suppose that’s unsuprising.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 638

Howard Gleckman asks, How Will Jeb Bush Turn His Vision of Government into Tax Policy? Maybe by writing letters to his Congressman. It won’t be by becoming President, I’m pretty sure.

 

Peter Reilly has what seems to me an unnatural interest in the tax problems of “young earth creationist” Kent Hovind. In a long piece Peter explains his interest. It’s long, but this is worth noting:

Whenever I think about disputes that are really passionate, there is one thing that I never forget.  If something really awful were to happen in my community there would be an outpouring of support from people across the country.  Many of them would have views that I consider preposterous and dangerous.  Regardless, we are still in it together.

I’m still puzzled at the interest in this particular sad case, but Peter comes across as thoughtful and humane all the way through.

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Career Corner (?). Ex-Crazy Eddie CFO Now Judging Fellow Criminals on Their Criminal Talents or Lack Thereof (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern), quoting Sam Antar on conviction of New York representative Michael Grimm:

My former bosses running Crazy Eddie would never have let an amateur like Grimm participate in our tax-evasion schemes! If you are to engage in any scheme to skim money and evade taxes, there is one golden rule: Never leave an audit trail.

Michael Grimm left behind a body of evidence in the most convenient places for the federal investigators to help bury him.

We discussed that very issue in our discussion of the Arrow Trucking tax plea yesterday. I hate to think I’m starting to think like Mr. Antar.

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Tax Roundup, 2/2/15: Film trial sequel ends badly for a main character. And: Iowa conformity bills advance.

Monday, February 2nd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
Dennis Brouse

Dennis Brouse

They got him for the trailer. The filmmaker who got more transferable tax credits under the Iowa film tax credit program than anyone else was convicted Friday of first degree fraud with respect to the program. From the Des Moines Register:

Dennis Brouse, 64, could face up to 10 years in prison at a sentencing hearing scheduled for March 23. Brouse owned Changing Horses Productions, a company that received $9 million in tax credits from the scandal-ridden Iowa Film Office. Brouse starred in the company’s main series, “Saddle Up With Dennis Brouse.”

Prosecutors claim Brouse bought a 38-foot camper trailer from an elderly couple, Wayne and Shirley Weese, for $10,500 in cash. But prosecutors charged that Brouse claimed the trailer cost twice that much in a statement for tax credits that he turned in to the state.

The State Auditor’s Report on the program reported that Changing Horses claimed 50% tax credits for many other doubtful items. For example, they claimed a $1 million value for a “sponsorship” awarded to a feed company that had refused to sign a document with that value on the grounds that it was “grossly overvalued.” This enabled the company to get tax credits that likely were more than 100% of the money spent in Iowa by the filmmaker.

Mr. Brouse had a prior conviction on charges related to the film program overturned, and his attorney says he will appeal this conviction.

While Iowa’s film credit program was spectacularly mismanaged, it was only one extreme example of the unwisdom of the state legislature attempting to manage Iowa’s economy via the tax law.

 

Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

Iowa conformity bills advance The bill to update Iowa’s income tax to reflect the December federal “extenders” bill cleared both the House and Senate taxwriting committees. I think than means the bills won’t be delayed, and we can get on with Iowa’s tax season. Both bills conform for pretty much everything in the federal tax law, including the increased Section 179 deduction, but do not conform to federal bonus depreciation.

 

Dahls checks outThe central Iowa grocery chain was broken up Friday in a bankruptcy liquidation. Seven stores will re-open under another name.

Perhaps the greatest victims of the failure are longtime Dahls employees who owned the company through their Employee Stock Ownership Plan. They get nothing, or close to it.

Iowa passed a special break for sales of companies to ESOPs in 2012. Proponents pointed to the employee ownership of Dahl’s major competitor, Hy-Vee, in support of the bill.

The Dahls example shows a dark side of employee ownership — the way it concentrates a large portion of employee retirement assets in a single vulnerable asset.

 

Jason Dinesen, Do I Have to Have Form 1095-A Before I Can File? “Yes, you need the Form 1095-A if you got premiums through an insurance exchange.”

William Perez, Need More Time? How to File for a Tax Extension with the IRS

20150105-1Jim Maule, When Is A Building Placed in Service? “Because the taxpayer presented undisputed evidence that certificates of occupancy had been issued, that the buildings were substantially complete, and that the buildings were fully functionally to house the shelving and merchandise, they had been placed in service within the required time period.”

Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Sharing Financial Responsibility at Tax Time (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). “Whatever your situation, it is important to keep good records so that someone else can pick up where you left off, if needed.

Kay Bell, Is Belichick’s coaching style like tax avoidance or tax evasion?

Paul Neiffer, $500,000 Permanent Section 179 Could be Coming Soon! “The House Ways and Means Committee is expected to vote on seven expired tax provisions on February 4, including making permanent Section 179 expensing at the $500,000 level.” Given the politics involved, I’m not holding my breath.

Robert Wood: Receipts Rule IRS Keeps Quiet: They’re Optional. Well, sometimes they aren’t optional, and they always help.

TaxGrrrl, Salaries, Ads & Security: What’s The Real Cost Of Super Bowl XLIX?

Russ Fox, This Never Works…:

Patrick White is the owner of R & L Construction in Yonkers, New York. He liked his home and he liked to gamble. There’s nothing wrong with that. He took payroll taxes withheld from his business and used that money for his homes and for gambling. There’s a lot wrong with that, especially when it totals $3,758,000. Mr. White pleaded guilty to one count of failing to pay over payroll taxes to the government. He’ll be sentenced in May.

Russ throws in some good advice about using EFTPS.

Robert D. Flach regales us with THE TWELVE DAYS OF TAX SEASON

Stephen Olsen, “Summary Opinions for 1/6/15-1/23/15” (Procedurally Taxing). News from the tax procedure world.

 

IMG_0543Christopher Bergin, Robin Hood and Other Fables (Tax Analysts Blog):

When it comes to taxation, President Obama has his own particular points of view. He may use terms such as “middle-class economy” or say things like “the rich can pay a little more,” but at the core he views the tax system as either a mechanism that helps the rich hang on to their ill-gotten gains or as a “honey pot” to fund his political ideas and base. It’s all politics. And that’s why we will see no progress – regarding the gas tax, taxation of businesses, or any other kind of real tax reform – until there has been a change in administrations.

In fact, the major lesson we’ve learned from this latest episode is that when it comes to of tax reform, the Obama administration has the “tinnyist” of tin ears. Whether the merry men and women at the White House believe that section 529 tuition savings plans benefit the ”rich,” they should know that when American voters actually recognize and identify with a tax break by its code section number (in this case, 529), be careful — very, very careful. You usually can’t sneak a fast one into the tax code when taxpayers know the section by number.

Hard to argue with this.

 

Arnold Kling, 529: Popular != Good Policy. “529 plans subsidize affluent people for doing what they would have done anyway–send their kids to exclusive, high-priced colleges.” Maybe, but it still is better than rewarding borrowing by subsidizing it.

Howard Gleckman, Obama’s Failure to Kill 529 Plans May Say Less About Tax Reform Than You Think (TaxVox). “But the survival of these education subsidies does not mean that a rate-cuts-for-base-broadening swap will never be possible.”

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 634

Matt Gardner, Facebook’s Record-Setting Stock-Option Tax Break (Tax Justice Blog). 595 words on the evils of the deduction for stock option compensation without one word noting that every dollar of “phantom” deduction for the issuing corporation is also a dollar of “phantom” income to the employees — and usually at higher rates than the corporation pays.

Scott Drenkard, Gov. Kasich’s Plan May Be A Tax Cut, But It’s Still Poor Policy. (Tax Policy Blog) “Unfortunately, the plan which is set to be announced next Monday by Governor Kasich isn’t going to address any of these problems and will probably make them worse.”

 

Career Corner. You Should Take a Nap This Afternoon Because Science (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/23/2015: Egg donor compensation taxable payment for services. Meanwhile, kidney donor compensation is a felony.

Friday, January 23rd, 2015 by Joe Kristan
"White-&-Brown-Eggs" by Evan-Amos - Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

“White-&-Brown-Eggs” by Evan-Amos – Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

The big news in the tax world today is a Tax Court case ruling that payments to an egg donor were compensation for services. The case turned on the language of the contract of between the egg donor and the agency that procured the eggs. Tax Court Judge Holmes ruled that the payments were not excludible as payments for physical damages because there was no tort claim involved.

There are plenty of places you can read more details on this case, including Russ Fox and Tony Nitti. The TaxProf has a roundup.

So there is an organized and legal market for donor eggs, which, if all goes well, turn into an entire new human. That’s a good thing. But if an agency paid you for one of your kidneys to save the life of an already-born child on the kidney donor list, they would face a $50,000 fine and five years in prison under the Gore-Hatch National Organ Transplant Act of 1984.

The National Kidney Foundation reports that 12 people die daily waiting for a donor kidney, and that 4,453 died waiting for a kidney transplant in 2013.  It’s a felony to save any of those lives by buying a kidney from a healthy, willing and fully-informed seller. Meanwhile, nobody dies waiting for a donated egg.

Cite: Perez, 144 T.C. No. 4

Related: The Case for Paying Organ Donors (Sally Satel)

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Richard Borean, More than Half of all Private Sector Workers are Employed by Pass-through Businesses:

53.7% of Iowans work for pass-through businesses taxed on 1040s.

53.7% of Iowans work for pass-through businesses taxed on 1040s.

“Pass-through” income is income earned by S corporations and partnerships, including LLCs. This income is taxed on 1040s. Those who favor ever-increasing individual taxation of “the rich” by definition favor increasing the tax on employment.

 

buzz20140923Robert D. Flach has your Friday Buzz, including thoughts on avoiding scammers claiming to be from IRS and on Wal-Mart’s cash tax refund program: “My advice – avoid this program.”

Kay Bell, IRS gets $1.3 million for Darryl Strawberry’s Mets annuity

Paul Neiffer, IRS Scammers Net $14 Million from 3,000 Victims. If the e-mail says it’s from the IRS, it’s not. If you aren’t expecting a call from the IRS, the caller isn’t from the IRS.

Jason Dinesen, Ridiculous IRS Situations I’ve Recently Dealt With. A continuing series.

Leslie Book, Tax Court Addresses Verification Requirement in Trust Fund CDP Case (Procedurally Taxing)

Robert Wood, Washington Nationals $210M Pitching Contract For Max Scherzer Is About Taxes. “The Home Rule Act prohibits the District from imposing a commuter tax on non-residents.”

Peter ReillyExclusive – Kent Hovind Claims Congressmen Are Looking Into His Case. All you could possibly want to know about the case of the guy who thinks the Flintstones was actually a documentary series.

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Robert Goulder, Reading the Tea Leaves: China’s Jurisdictional Tax Claims (Tax Analysts Blog). Contrary to some reports, even Communist China doesn’t plan to tax worldwide income of non-resident Chinese. The U.S. stands alone in doing that.

Howard Gleckman, A Look at the Territorial Tax Systems in Four Countries Finds No Magic Bullets (TaxVox). No magic beans, either, I’ll bet.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 624

 

Career Corner. Here Are Just a Few Questions You’ll Be Asked in a Big 4 Interview (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/19/15: President announces doomed tax proposals. And: Iowa gets 2015 credit for non-SHOP plans.

Monday, January 19th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

 

Economic supergenius

No, he’s not serious. The President has put forth a new set of tax proposals. So much for any ideas that he would spend his lame-duck last two years reaching out to pass bipartisan bills. The President’s “fact sheet” is a tendentious, partisan collection of slogans and half-truths posing as policy.

The first proposal:

Close the trust fund loophole – the single largest capital gains tax loophole – to ensure the wealthiest Americans pay their fair share on inherited assets. Hundreds of billions of dollars escape capital gains taxation each year because of the “stepped-up” basis loophole that lets the wealthy pass appreciated assets onto their heirs tax-free.

This is just partisan class warrior nonsense. First, it has nothing to do with “trust funds.” That’s just content-free name-calling. It would, according to Peter Reilly, treat death as a taxable sale of assets at fair market value.

The “wealthiest” already pay estate tax at rates up to 40% on the value — not just the gains — on their assets at death. But stepped-up basis applies to everyone, not just the wealthiest. The President’s proposal, if it really does call for elimination the basis step-up at death, affects everyone who inherits property, not just the few who pay estate tax. Everyone would get to try to find out how much Mom and Dad paid for that land or that stock in 1967, not just the wealthy.

Raise the top capital gains and dividend rate back to the rate under President Reagan. The President’s plan would increase the total capital gains and dividends rates for high-income households to 28 percent.

Somehow this proposal omits restoring the Reagan-era 28% top ordinary income rate that was key to allowing the 28% capital gain rate. The proper capital gain rate, of course, is zero.

None of this has a remote chance of passing, so there’s no point in me spending a lot of time on it. If you want more coverage, TaxGrrrl and Robert D. Flach dive into the details.

I’ll just point out that this is all dishonest class warrior nonsense about making “the rich” pay their “fair share.” A fair look at the numbers indicates that the rich guy is already picking up more than his share of the tab.

First, the shares of all taxes paid by different income segments:

Tax foundation Distribution of Federal Taxes in 2014

Next, the share of federal taxes by the dreaded “top 1%” vs. the bottom 90% since 1980:

taxfoundation top 1 vs bottom 90 percent

Maybe you think that “the rich” may pay more tax, but they still don’t pay as much as the rest of us as a share of their income. Nope:

tax foundation income share vs tax share

Finally, the taxes (Federal, state and local) paid by different income levels compared to the government benefits received by those income levels:

tax foundation taxes vs benefits 2012

No matter how much “the rich” have to cough up, as far as the President is concerned, it will never be enough.

More coverage:

Paul Neiffer, Do Farmers Take Advantage of “Trust Fund” Loopholes

Peter Reilly, President Obama Would Make Death A Taxable Event. “The President’s proposal would close the stepped-up basis loophole by treating bequests and gifts other than to charitable organizations as realization events, like other cases where assets change hands.”

Len Burman. President Obama Targets the “Angel of Death” Capital Gains Tax Loophole. (TaxVox). So dying is a loophole now.

 

cooportunity logoIn case you missed it, the IRS announced Friday that it will allow taxpayers in 85 Iowa counties to claim the small employer health care tax credit in 2015 now that CoOportunity, the sole provider of “SHOP” policies in those counties, has been taken over by insurance regulators. Details here.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 620. Today’s installment quotes Friday’s Wall Street Journal:

If the IRS continues to stonewall the political targeting investigation, as Mr. Koskinen has, then the only tool Congress has to express disapproval is the power of the purse. In any case it’s hard to imagine the IRS could offer worse service than it already does.

Please, don’t tempt them.

 

Scott Hodge, Don’t Cry for the IRS, We’re Doing Their Work for Them (Tax Policy Blog)

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On the Martin Luther King holiday, a cautionary tale of politically-motivated tax prosecution from Robert Wood.

Annette Nellen, Due diligence for preparing 1040s for 2014

Kay Bell, Terrorism, not taxes, rank high on policy priorities survey. I’ll bet that changes in about two months.

Christopher Bergin, Frack It, Tax It (Tax Analysts Blog)

 

Career Corner. If Your Accounting Firm Uses Timesheets, For the Love of God, Track Your Time Daily (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/9/15: Senators: preparers aren’t doing a good enough job on the tax law we’ve butchered.

Friday, January 9th, 2015 by Joe Kristan
wyden

Senator Wyden

Senators get behind IRS preparer regulation power grab. Accounting Today reports:

Two Democrats on the Senate Finance Committee have introduced legislation to regulate paid tax preparers in response to the federal court decision that found the Internal Revenue Service had exceeded its statutory authority in regulating preparers.

Senate Finance Committee ranking member Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Senator Ben Cardin, D-Md., unveiled legislation Thursday that provides the Treasury Department and the IRS explicit authority to regulate paid tax return preparers. Wyden chaired the committee until control of the Senate changed after last November’s elections.

They call their yet unnumbered bill the “Taxpayer Protection and Preparer Proficiency Act of 2015.” A better name would be “A Bill to Boost the Revenue of the Major Franchise Tax Preparation Outfits.”

Whatever idealistic motives might be behind this bill (though I don’t give senators the benefit of the doubt for a second), the effect will be to protect and enhance the market share of the national tax prep firms. It was no coincidence that the overturned IRS preparer regulation program was drafted by a former H&R Block executive who came out the other side of the revolving door as a Treasury employee.

Regulation always favors the big. The national firms can spread the costs of compliance over a much bigger base of work, while a sole practitioner has to be her own regulation compliance department. A paperwork hangup or computer burp in the preparer regulation database can wreck a year’s business for a sole practitioner, but wouldn’t stop H&R Block or Liberty Tax for a moment.

It is argued that such regulation is needed to protect us from incompetents by imposing a “competency test.” As the test administered under the abortive IRS regulation program was more a literacy test than a competency test, this is hard to credit.  And anybody who has practiced in a regulated profession like accounting or law knows that while you can make someone pass a test, you can’t make him competent.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy.  Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The income tax, the Ultimate Swiss Army Knife of public policy. Flickr Image courtesy redjar under Creative Commons license.

The list of bills introduced this week in Congress in today’s Tax Notes shows what the real tax prep problem is: Congresscritters like Senator Wyden. In addition to his preparer bill, the Senator introduced a bill:

To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide a tax incentive to individuals teaching in elementary and secondary schools located in rural or high unemployment areas and to individuals who achieve certification from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, and for other purposes. 

This is just one more example of legislators using the tax law as the Swiss Army Knife of public policy. As the knife gets more unwieldy with every new gadget added to it, the tax law gets a little less better at collecting revenue with every new program added to it. Picture a Swiss Army Knife the size of a railcar.

 

And it’s not like Congress isn’t already doing enough for the national tax prep outfits, as Megan McArdle explains in Latest Tax Season Headache? Obamacare:

There’s been a lot of talk about the “hidden taxes” in the Affordable Care Act, but here’s one I hadn’t thought of before or seen mentioned anywhere: the sudden need for folks with simple tax returns to avail themselves of the services of a paid professional. If you have no income outside a modest salary, and not much in the way of potential deductions such as huge mortgage interest or state tax bills, then there was really no reason to use a tax preparer. Even the mathematically challenged should, with the aid of a calculator, be able to fill out their 1040EZ forms just fine. But Obamacare has introduced a significant level of complexity into the taxes of lower-middle-class wage earners.

That’s true. And a lot of folks who have used preparers will find their costs going up to pay for the extra work that will be required.

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Kay Bell, IRS contacts tax preparers about filing mistakes; Thousands warned of Schedule C business income & child tax credit errors. Funny, I thought preparers weren’t regulated at all.

Jason Dinesen, The IRS’s Preparer Directory Will Be Bad News for Enrolled Agents. EAs have less lobbying clout than CPAs or the national tax prep outfits, and it shows.

 

Paul Neiffer, Should I File By March 1? “Therefore, if your tax for 2013 was very low and your tax for this year will be very high, talk this over with your tax advisor to see if it makes sense to pay an estimated tax payment on January 15 and wait until April 15 to make the final payment.”

Remember, only farmers get this break, and many are finding that the need to wait on K-1s from other investments makes filing a correct March 1 return impossible.

William Perez, Tips for a Tax-Efficient Divorce, Plus a List of What to Do First. From what I’ve seen, it’s even more tax-efficient to stay married.

In spite of the cold, we can count on Robert D. Flach for a fresh Friday Buzz roundup of news from around the tax blog world.

 

20130130-4Tim Worstall, Tax Avoidance And Tax Evasion Are To The Benefit Of Us All, picking up on David Henderson’s post that we mentioned earlier this week:

The crucial point is really how one views the activities of government. And there’s two views that seem to be held. One that I regard as hopelessly naive and simplistic, the second something very much closer to reality. That first is that all of the things that government does for us are beneficial to us and that limiting what it does do harms us all. The second is that some parts of what government does are things which both must be done and can only be done by government, but that a rather large part of what it attempts to do shouldn’t be done at all, whether by government or not.

I think this point is correct, though I’m sure Jim Maule would disagree with vigor. I also agree with this point that he quotes: “Government maximizes revenues; it does not levy revenues only to produce genuine public goods.” I also believe tax avoidance and evasion can serve as a check on overreach, but I suspect it only works in pretty bad situations.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 610

Renu Zaretsky, Taxes: To Be Considered, Rejected, or Collected. Today’s TaxVox headline roundup covers the upcoming federal budget proposal, Cadillac taxes on health plans, and an “impossible dream” bill that purports to both abolish the imcome tax and balance the budget.

 

IMG_2535Cara Griffith, Mississippi Needs a Dose of Transparency (Tax Analysts Blog). “The Mississippi Department of Revenue does not publish opinions and decisions resulting from its audit appeals process, even though it may use those opinions and decisions as precedent.”

I notice Iowa hasn’t published any new rulings in two months now.

Liz Malm, Taxplainer: The State and Local Tax Impact of the Keystone Pipeline. “According to the analysis, property taxes collected during construction would amount to just under $4 million and would be spread out over seven counties in the three impacted states. ”

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown 1/8: All Eyes on the Governors (Tax Justice Blog)

 

Career Corner. Make the Best of Busy Season, You Big Babies (Amber Setter, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/24/14: Giving season edition! How to give, avoiding traps, and suggestions for the perplexed.

Wednesday, December 24th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

The extender bill was signed while I was away, as you have probably figured out already. While the extenders remain awful policy, at least we go into the year-end knowing what the tax law is. We should be grateful for our presents; even a lump of coal can help keep us warm.

Related: Kristine Tidgren, Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014 Revives Tax Breaks, But Only for 2014Paul Neiffer, It’s Official.

IMG_2493

 

Tax tips for the giving seasonAs the business week winds down early on Christmas Eve, many taxpayers find themselves feeling generous to charity. Here are some things to keep in mind as you go about your charitable gifting

Gifts of appreciated long-term capital gain property are often the most tax-efficient. Such gifts, done properly, give you a full fair market value deduction without ever taxing you on the appreciation. If you are not gifting publicly-traded securities, however, appraisal requirements for gifts over $5,000, and just the paperwork that may be involved in transferring ownership, may make it impossible to complete such a gift this year.

Even gifts of traded securities can be hard to pull off this late in the year. You have to get the securities into the donee’s brokerage account by the close of business December 31. I’ve seen attempts to get this done fail more than once. It is especially troublesome in dealing with small or unsophisticated charities, who might not even have a brokerage account available to use.

Congress renewed the IRA break in the extender bill, but it needs to happen by December 31, and there are some restrictions. The IRS explains:

  • If you are an IRA owner age 70½ or older you have until Dec. 31 to make a qualified charitable distribution, or QCD.
  • A QCD is direct transfer of part or all of your IRA distributions to an eligible charity. You may transfer up to $100,000 per year.
  • You may exclude the distributed amounts from your income. You can claim this benefit regardless of whether you itemize your deductions. If you do exclude the QCD from your income, you can’t also deduct it as a charitable contribution on Schedule A if you do itemize.
  • You can count your QCDs in determining whether you meet the IRA’s required minimum distribution.
  • The provision had expired at the end of 2013. The new law is retroactive for 2014. This means any eligible QCD in 2014 will qualify.
  • Not all charities are eligible. For example, donor-advised funds and supporting organizations are not eligible recipients.

If you want to give cash, the “mailbox rule” applies. The postmark date controls whether a mailed check is deductible this year.  If you don’t care to take chances, a gift by credit card is deductible in the year the credit card is charged, even if the credit card bill isn’t paid until next year.

If you give any charity a gift over of $250 or more, you need to insist on a written receipt declaring that you received no value for your contribution — or disclosing the amount of any value. No receipt, no deduction.

Of course, your gift has to go to an actual charity to be deductible. The IRS list of qualified Section 501(c)(3) organizations can help you make sure your intended donee qualifies.

If you feel generous, but don’t know what to do, I humbly submit for your consideration a few worthy organizations I donate to:

salvation armySalvation ArmyThey take care of many of the most needy and down-and-out with very little leakage to internal bureaucracy.

Institute for JusticeThis organization shut down the IRS preparer regulation power grab, winning a battle all good-thinking people considered hopeless and frivolous. They made the IRS give back the money they stole from the owner of a little restaurant in Arnolds Park, Iowa while forcing a change in their abusive use of their cash account seizure powers. They also support the little guy when the government abuses its eminent domain powers on behalf of the powerful and well-connected.

Tax FoundationThese guys do wonderful work in helping to form better tax policy. While it is difficult to get politicians to make tax policy for everyone, rather than just the well-lobbied, their 2014 successes in North Carolina, Indiana, Michigan and New York show that the good guys win sometimes.

ISU Center for Agricultural Law and TaxationRoger, Kristine, Kristy and Tiffany do great work helping keep the taxpayers and tax preparers of Iowa in compliance and out of trouble. If you use them, like I do, you should help them out.

 

William PerezQualified Charitable Distributions

Peter Reilly, The Wheels On The Easement Void The Deduction

 

 

20131209-1TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 594. This edition covers the new report by the House Oversight Committee on the scandal.

There is a lot to the report, which I hope to spend more time on. The item that jumps out at me is that 2011 IRS assessments of gift taxes on contributions to 501(c)(4) organizations were no accident, but were instead part of the IRS effort to fight conservative 501(c)(4) organizations.  The Wall Street Journal reports:

The then-IRS commissioner, Doug Shulman, denied at the time that the IRS was making a broad effort to assess gift tax on donors to such tax-exempt groups, which are formed under section 501(c)(4) of the tax code. Mr. Shulman said in a May 2011 letter to lawmakers that the audits were initiated by a single IRS employee and were “not part of any broader effort to look at donations” to these organizations.

The new report from GOP lawmakers says that “although the IRS denied any broader attempt to tax gifts to 501(c)(4) groups, “internal documents suggest otherwise.” It notes that in May 2011, an attorney in the IRS chief counsel’s office wrote to his superiors that the “plan is to elevate the issue of asserting gift tax on donors to 501(c)(4) organizations,” and seek a decision from the commissioner and the IRS chief counsel.

It’s clear that Shulman at best didn’t care enough to learn the truth before testifying. At worst he gave false information on purpose. Either answer burnishes his crown as Worst Commissioner Ever.

Related: Can political contributions really be taxable gifts?

 

Grimm tidings. A Congressman pleads guilty to tax fraud involving a restaurant he owned. From the New York Times:

Michael G. Grimm, the Republican representing New York’s 11th Congressional District, who carried the burden of a 20-count federal indictment to a landslide re-election in November, pleaded guilty on Tuesday to a single felony charge of tax fraud.

Representative Grimm said he had no intention of stepping down. “Absolutely not,” he said.

My limited experience with felons is that they are cursed with grossly excessive self-esteem. That certainly seems to be the case here.

 

20141201-1Robert D. Flach brings the Holiday Buzz! Good tax stuff from around the tax blogs just in time for Christmas.

Kay Bell, Christmas tree ‘tax’ delayed again. Effort to end it continues

Jason Dinesen, From the Archives: Tax Court: Vacant House Can Still Qualify as Rental

Robert Goulder, The Vatican Bank, Christmas Cheer, and FATCA (Tax Analysts Blog). “The pontiff is cool with tax transparency.”

Tony Nitti, IRS To Sell The Right To Collect Darryl Strawberry’s Remaining New York Mets Salary.

Russ Fox, Nominations Due for 2014 Tax Offender of the Year

 

Amy Frantz, How the Grinch Taxed Your Christmas Candy in Iowa (Caffeinated Thoughts)

Howard Gleckman, The Tax Vox Lump of Coal Awards: The 10 Worst Tax Ideas of 2014 (TaxVox). My list would differ, but there are so many worthy ideas from which to choose.

Career Corner. Be Social, Don’t Skip the Party, and Other Redundant Holiday Party Advice (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/12/14: Extenders by tomorrow? Don’t count on it.

Friday, December 12th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

IMG_2491They filed an extension.  Congress avoided a “shutdown” of the government blast night by passing a bill to fund the government for two more days. That presumably gives the Senate time to pass the “Cromnibus” train wreck to fund most of the leviathan for the rest of the fiscal year. Now it looks like they might wrap it up by Monday.

The Hill reports that Outgoing Majority Leader Harry Reid will have the Senate take up the one-year tax extender bill as soon as the spending bill passes:

“We’ll take up the long-term spending bill tomorrow,” Reid said on the floor shortly before 10 pm Thursday. “Senators will want to debate this legislation. We’ll have that opportunity. The Senate will vote on the long-term funding bill as soon as possible.”

The omnibus will have to wait, however, until the Senate casts a final vote on the annual Defense Department authorization bill, which may take place as late as 4:30 p.m. Friday.

Reid hopes to pass the omnibus on Friday or Saturday and then move immediately to a one-year extension of various expired tax provisions.

The expired provisions would be revived by HR 5771. The bill retroactively extends the $500,000 Section 179 deduction, 50% bonus depreciation, the R&D credit, and the 5-year S corporation built-in gain recognition period through the end of this month. It also extends the IRA charitable contribution break and the non-business energy credits, among many other things.

There is a chance this could drag out until Monday, according to The Hill:

Reid will need to get unanimous consent to stick to his plan to finish work by Saturday. If any of his colleagues object to moving the omnibus quickly, a final vote on it could be delayed until Monday. 

Given the strong dislike of the bill from parts of each party, that’s a real possibility.

Related: Paul Neiffer, Tax Extender Bill May Be Punted to WeekendRenu Zaretsky (TaxVox),  Everybody’s Working for the Weekend.

 

Scott Drenkard and Richard Borean offer a map of Corporate Alternative Minimum Taxes by State, as of July 1, 2014 (Tax Policy Blog):

state corp amt map

Iowa has one. It adds a lot of complexity and very little revenue. Sort of like the Iowa corporation income tax itself.

 

William Perez offers some Year End Tax Planning Ideas for Self Employed Persons

Annette Nellen discusses Filing status challenges and developments

Robert D. Flach brings a “meaty” Friday Buzz, including a discussion of which states are the most corrupt. The “winner” may surprise you.

Keith Fogg, Bankruptcy’s Bar to Filing a Tax Court Petition

Peter Reilly, With Amazon Facing $1.5 Billion Income Tax Bill, Bezos Too Busy To Testify.

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About EAs, #3: Two Ways to the EA

Breandan Donahue, Top Six Year-End Estate Planning Tips (ISU-CALT)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 582

Richard Phillips, Cutting the IRS Budget is a Lose-Lose for American Taxpayers (Tax Justice Blog)

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Kay Bell, Tax reform bill finally introduced in Congress’ waning days. If its going to pass never, it doesn’t hurt to start it late.

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Tax Roundup, 12/11/14: Cromnibus cuts IRS budget, delays extender vote. And: Mileage goes to 57.5 cents.

Thursday, December 11th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

The “Cromnibus” train-wreck spending bill process seems to be holding up everything else, including the extender vote. The 55 Lazarus provisions awaiting revival are on hold while Congress struggles to avert a government “shutdown” at midnight tonight.

Flicker image courtesy Michael Coghlan under Creative Commons license.

Flicker image courtesy Michael Coghlan under Creative Commons license.

Outgoing Senate Majority Leader Reid has said that the Senate will finish the Cromnibus before voting on the extender bill, HR 5771. The house-passed bill would extend dozens of tax breaks that expired at the end of 2013 retroactively through the end of this month. Business provisions in the bill include the $500,000 Section 179 deduction, 50% bonus depreciation, the R&D credit, and the 5-year built-in gain period for S corporations. The provision allowing IRA charitable donations is among the individual breaks at stake.

There is no indication that the Senate will fail to eventually pass HR 5771, or that the President will veto it, but politics are uncertain, and I’ll feel better about things when they do pass it. It appears the hope they would finish up today is wishful thinking, though; this Wall Street Journal story says the House is expected to pass a two-day funding bill today to give the Senate extra time to approve the spending bill.

The IRS faces a 3.1% funding cut in the bill. That’s a tribute to the tone-deaf and confrontational attitude of IRS Commissioner Koskinen, who has responded to the Tea Party scandals pretty much by saying “give us more money!” Given the increased responsibilities given the IRS by Congress, cutting their budget seems strange. Yet as long as the Commissioner keeps antagonizing his funders, and keeps finding money to fund his “voluntary” preparer regulation program to get around the Loving decision, he can expect similar appropriation success.

Related: Paul Neiffer, Tax Extender Bill May Be Punted to Weekend

 

Mileage rate goes to 57.5 centsWith gas prices falling, the standard IRS mileage rate is naturally going… up. The IRS yesterday released (Notice 2014-79) the 2015 standard mileage rates:

– 57.5 cents per mile for business miles. This is 56 cents for 2014.

– 14 cents per mile for charity miles, same as in 2014.

– 23 cents per mile for medical and moving miles. This rate is 23.5 cents for 2014.

Related: William Perez, How to Deduct Car and Truck Expenses on Your Taxes

 

20130819-1Peter Reilly, Iowa Corporation Not Liable For California Corporate Tax From Ownership Of LLC Interest. It discusses a California court ruling that mere ownership of a California LLC interest isn’t enough to make the corporate owner subject to California’s $800 minimum franchise tax. If it holds up, it will be good news for many taxpayers dinged by this stupid fee.

Jim Maule, Do-It-Yourself Tax Preparation? Better? Paid preparers didn’t do an impressive job handling the GAO’s secret shoppers.

Kay Bell, Mortgages offer nice tax breaks, but in limited parts of the U.S.

 

The new Cavalcade of Risk is up! at WorkersCompensation.com.  Always good stuff in the venerable roundup of insurance and risk-management blog posts; this edition features Hank Stern’s take on the “creepy” ACA 404Care.gov site.

 

Bryan Caplan, The Inanity of the Welfare State:

While taxes are highly progressive, transfers have an upside-down U-shape.  Households in the middle quintile get the most money.  The richest households actually get more money than the poorest.  Think about how many times you’ve heard about government’s great mission to “help the poor.”  Could there be any clearer evidence that such claims are mythology?

Eye-opening. Read the whole thing.

 

 

Robert Wood, Obama Justice Department Was Involved In IRS Targeting, Lerner Emails Reveal

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 581

 

EITC error chartAlan Cole, Treasury Report: Improper Payments Remain a Problem in EITC, Child Credit (Tax Policy Blog)

David Brunori, Mississippi’s Very Good Idea to Help its Poor (Tax Analysts Blog). It’s an earned income tax credit. Given the massive EITC fraud and error rate, I’m not convinced.

Tax Justice Blog, Update on the Push for Dynamic Scoring: Will Ryan Purge Congress’s Scorekeepers?

Joseph Thorndike, Wall Street Journal Prefers Ignorance to Expertise (Tax Analysts Blog). It’s about the CBO.

 

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Robert Goulder, Taxing Diverted Profits: The Empire Strikes Back (Tax Analysts Blog).  “The message is this: Once people realize what a functional territorial regime looks like, they suddenly become less enamored with the concept. One of several reasons why U.S. tax reform won’t be easy.”

Chris Sanchirico, A Repatriation Tax Holiday for US Multinationals? Four Contagious Illusions (TaxVox)

 

News from the Profession. The AICPA Can’t Figure Out Why Record Numbers of Accounting Grads Aren’t Taking the CPA Exam (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/10/14: Extender bill lives, permanent charitable extender bill doesn’t. And: don’t just buy it; install it!

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

lizard20140826Whither the extender bill? HR 5771, the bill to extend retroactively through the end of this month the 55 or so tax breaks that expired at the end of 2013, has been “placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar.” That means it appears to be proceeding to a vote, though I find nothing on when that will happen. Tax Analysts reports ($link) that outgoing Senate Majority Leader Reid says he will take up the extender bill ” after finishing work on a defense authorization bill and a government funding measure.”

Meanwhile, the President has threatened to veto a separate attempt to permanently extend three charitable breaks in the extender bill, including the break for IRA contributions. While that’s bad for those breaks, it implies that the White House will not oppose HR 5771’s one-year extension.

 

20130422-2Because it looks as though the “extender” bill will clear the Senate, taxpayers looking to add fixed assets have extra incentive to get it done this year. The bill extends through 2014 — and only through 2014 — the $500,000 limit on Section 179 deductions and 50% bonus depreciation. These breaks allow taxpayers to deduct over half (bonus depreciation) or all (Section 179) of the cost of fixed assets that are otherwise capitalized, with their deductions spread over 3 to 20 years.

Taxpayers should remember that it’s not enough to order or pay for a new asset by the end of 2014 to qualify for these breaks. The asset has to be “placed in service” by year end.

A Tax Court case from last December drives home the point, where a taxpayer lost an $11 million bonus depreciation deduction in 2003 because an asset bought at year-end wasn’t “placed in service” on time.  Judge Holmes takes up the story:

On December 30, 2003, an insurance salesman named Michael Brown1 took ownership of a $22 million plane in Portland, Oregon. He flew from there to Seattle to Chicago — he says for business meetings — and then back to Portland. Brown says these flights put the plane in service in 2003, and entitle him to a giant bonus-depreciation allowance. But a few days later he had the plane flown to a plant in Illinois where it underwent additional modifications that were completed about a month later.

The IRS argued that the need for modifications meant the airplane wasn’t “placed in service” before year end. The taxpayer argued that the airplane was “fully functional” as purchased, and therefore was “placed in service” when acquired and used for its first flight on December 30, 2003. The court agreed with the IRS:

While acknowledging in his briefs that those modifications made the Challenger “more valuable to him” and allowed him to “more comfortably conduct business” as a passenger, he says they have “nothing to do with the Challenger’s assigned function of transporting him for his business.” The problem is that this posttrial framing just doesn’t square with the trial testimony, in which Brown testified that those two modifications were “needed” and “required”. We therefore find that the Challenger simply was not available for its intended use on a regular basis until those modifications were installed in 2004. Brown thus didn’t place the Challenger in service in 2003 and can’t take bonus depreciation on it that year.

A new asset doesn’t actually have to be used during the year to be “placed in service,” but it has to be ready to go. A new machine should be on the floor and hooked up, not just in a crate on the dock, or in a trailer on the way in, if you want to depreciate it. If the new asset is a vehicle, you need to take delivery to get the deduction. If the asset is a farm building, it needs to be assembled and in place, not in boxes on the ground.

Cite: Brown, T.C. Memo 2013-275

 

20141210-1

 

The TaxProf reports on a new Treasury Inspector General report, TIGTA: IRS Has 25-30% Error Rate In Refundable Child Tax Credits, Mistakenly Pays $6-7 Billion:

The IRS has continually rated the risk of improper ACTC payments as low. However, TIGTA’s assessment of the potential for ACTC improper payments indicates the ACTC improper payment rate is similar to that of the EITC. Using IRS data, TIGTA estimates the potential ACTC improper payment rate for Fiscal Year 2013 is between 25.2 percent and 30.5 percent, with potential ACTC improper payments totaling between $5.9 billion and $7.1 billion. In addition, IRS enforcement data show the root causes of improper ACTC payments are similar to those of the EITC.

So at least 1/4 of the credit is claimed fraudulently or illegally. This is one of the provisions the President insists be made permanent as a price for permanently extending business provisions. He killed the permanent extender compromise when it didn’t also make the child credit permanent.

 

Wind turbineIowa Public Radio reports Grassley Wants Wind Tax Credit to Go Further. He should read Bryan Caplan’s review, The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels: We Owe Civilization to Fossil Fuels. “And despite decades of government favoritism, alternative fuels have yet to deliver.”

 

Peter Reilly, Seventh Circuit Will Not Let Tax Protester Blame His Lawyer For Conviction:

James Stuart thought that Peter Hendrickson had “cracked the code” – the Internal Revenue Code, that is. Joe Kristan would characterize it as finding the tax fairy – that magical sprite who make your taxes go away painlessly while your sucker friends send checks to the tax man.   

It’s always fun to be named-checked by a Forbes blogger.

Jana Luttenegger Weiler, Tax Tips for Gifts to Charity (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).

Robert D. Flach, DONOR ADVISED FUNDS. For at least 99.99% of taxpayers, these are far better than setting up a private foundation.

Kay Bell, Sen. Tom Coburn’s parting gift: a tax code decoder

Paul Neiffer, Watch Your Crop Insurance Form 1099s This Year

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things You Didn’t Know About EAs, #2: We Don’t Work for the IRS

Brad Ridlehoover, The Grinch That Stole Their Reasonable Cause… (Procedurally Taxing)

Tim Todd, IRS Erred in Making Notice of Tax Lien a Condition to Installment Agreement

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 580. Lois Lerner appears to have been scheming to sic the Justice Department on the Tea Partiers as early as 2010, according to newly-unearthed e-mails.

 

Howard Gleckman asks Why Does Congress Pay For Some Tax Cuts and Not Others? (TaxVox). “It can’t be the merits of the recipients. By now, TaxVox readers know that the expired tax breaks included such worthies as preferences for race horse owners, Puerto Rican rum manufacturers, and TV and film producers.”

Eric Cederwall asks What is the Simplest Tax System? (Tax Policy Blog). “Normative economics aside, a per-person tax is one of the most economically efficient taxes for raising revenue.”  Not happening, though.

 

Adrienne Gonzalez, Kids These Days Trust the IRS More Than Olds Do (Going Concern). Like Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy, they’ll figure it out eventually.

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Tax Roundup, 12/9/14: Just because your manager steals your payroll taxes doesn’t get you out of them. And: Rashia!

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

No news on extenders yet. 

 

EFTPSDouble the pain: Idaho business manager steals payroll taxes, but IRS still wants them. An implement dealer in Idaho hired a manager to run day-to-day operations. He learned the hard way that while you can delegate your payroll tax function, you can’t escape it.

The taxpayer, a Mr. Shore, hired Mr. Lewis to run Bear River Equipment, Inc. (BRE), a McCormick Tractors dealership. Mr. Lewis had managed the dealership before Mr. Shore acquired it, so it seemed a sensible hiring decision.

Things started to go wrong quickly. Mr. Lewis failed to remit payroll taxes in his first year running the dealership. Mr. Shore kept up with the business by phone and made quarterly visits, according to a U.S. District Court judge, and he also reviewed financial results. This process enabled him to note unpaid taxes in 2005, the first year of operations, and he had Mr. Lewis get them caught up.  As owner, Mr. Shore had checkbook authority, but he let Mr. Lewis take care of it for him.

The judge explains how things went very wrong (my emphasis):

In August 2007, Shore received notice from an Internal Revenue Service Agent that there were some serious issues with BRE’s employment taxes for 2006 and 2007. This notice was the first time Shore became aware that BRE’s 2006 and 2007 payroll taxes had not been paid. Shore subsequently learned that Lewis had been embezzling from BRE, failing to pay creditors or pay BRE’s taxes, and stealing BRE’s assets. Upon discovering Lewis’ fraud, Shore fired Lewis and took over management of BRE.

Not a good hire, in hindsight. It proved fatal to the business:

Shore ultimately decided to close BRE because he believed he could not pay all of the liabilities and contribute sufficient working capital to keep the company going. Before closing the company, however, Shore allowed more than $120,000 from BRE’s checking accounts to be paid to unsecured creditors other than the United States.

Via Wikimedia Commons

Via Wikimedia Commons

As it turns out, that was a false move. The tax man gets really, really upset when payroll taxes aren’t remitted to the IRS. The business was incorporated, which protects owners from most liabilities incurred inside the corporation. The tax law, though, allows the IRS to collect payroll taxes from “responsible persons,” regardless of the existence of the corporation, if there is a “willful” failure to remit. The court held that Mr. Shore was a “responsible person” even though he didn’t run the business day-to-day:

…despite delegating his authority to Lewis and permitting him to run BRE’s daily affairs, Shore remained a “responsible person” because he had effective control of the corporation and the effective power to direct the corporation’s business choices, including the withholding and payment of trust fund taxes.

It’s not enough to be “responsible.” The tax law requires “willful” nonpayment of employment taxes to assess them against a responsible person. The $120,000 payment was a bad fact, according to the court:

Here it is undisputed that Shore learned of BRE’s unpaid tax liability in August 2007. It is also undisputed that BRE paid more than $120,000 to unsecured creditors after Shore learned of BRE’s tax liability. Shores’ failure to remedy the payroll tax deficiencies upon learning of their existence in August 2007, while subsequently allowing corporate payments to be made elsewhere, including to unsecured creditors, constitutes “willful” conduct under § 6672.

The Moral? There are a number of lessons to be drawn here. One is basic accounting controls. It appears that the manager had far too much control over the accounting function and bank accounts, enabling him to loot the company, and the payroll tax account, before the owner caught on.

Even with poor accounting controls, though, the owner could have detected the non-payment of payroll taxes. These are supposed to be remitted under the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS). Users of EFTPS can log into their payroll tax account and monitor their payments. Had Mr. Lewis done so, he might have detected the failure to make payments that ultimately ballooned into a million-dollar payroll tax deficiency.

Cite: Shore v. U.S., DC-ID, No 1:13-cv-00220

 

Gas Tax Fever: Branstad Weighs Proposed Gas Tax (CBS2Iowa.com): “On Monday Governor Branstad said he would keep an open mind on raising the tax if a bipartisan plan came to his desk and he’s hopeful lawmakers can come to some agreement this coming year.”

 

Mason City Sundog Morning. It’s cold here today.

Peter Reilly, Chief Counsel Advice Provides Timely Warning About 1099 Filing Requirements. “A recently released memo from the IRS Chief Counsel – CCA 201447025 – drives home for me the point that there is probably a lot of exposure out there from not filing 1099s.”

Robert D. Flach has your Tuesday Buzz, with a typically rich set of tax links, including one to Prof. Maule’s thoughts on being nice to siblings.
 

Jason Dinesen, 5 Things About EAs: We’ve Been Around Since 1884
 

Paul Neiffer, Are We Getting Section 179 Fatigue? “After purchasing a lot of equipment over the last 4 years to take advantage of Section 179, I am not sure how much capital is still available to purchase even more equipment to get the Section 179 deduction.”
 

Kay Bell, Attention older IRA owners, your RMD is due by Dec. 31
 

Michael Schuyler, The Government’s Tax-Transfer System Is Extremely Progressive (Tax Policy Blog):

In November, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released the latest annual edition of its report on the distribution of household income and federal taxes, with data for 2011. The CBO study confirms that the federal tax system is progressive. It further shows that government transfers to households are also progressive.

It appears that way:

transfer-tax ratios

Chart from Tax Policy Blog

 

Jeremy Scott, The New GOP Congress and the Congressional Budget Office (Tax Analysts Blog). “If Republicans accept the premise that shaking up congressional staff would make it look like they are rigging the process in favor of their proposals, that undermines the logic behind their priorities to begin with.”

Isabel Sawhill, The Lee-Rubio Family-Friendly Tax Is a Disappointment (TaxVox)

Martin Sullivan, Rand Paul Puts Chokehold on Cigarette Taxes — He’s Got a Point (Tax Analysts Blog).:

But there are still 42 million smokers in the United States. Nicotine is extremely addictive. These folks should elicit our compassion, not our contempt. And if we are going to fine them for their sins, the revenues should not inure to our benefit.

State governments are loathe to give up their nicotine fix.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 579

 

Rashia says "thanks, Commissioner!"

Rashia says “thanks, Commissioner!”

Rashia gets time off. The self-proclaimed “Queen of IRS Tax Fraud” will return from exile a little sooner, thanks to an appeals court decision yesterday. From Tampa Bay Online:

A federal appeals court has thrown out Wilson’s two sentences, ruling that senior U.S. District Judge James S. Moody Jr. made procedural errors that may have increased her total prison term by more than 3 1/2 years.

Her convictions stand and Moody retains discretion. But he must recalculate the formula he used to determine punishment and he must resentence Wilson, now 29, at a future hearing.

Ms. Wilson is unlikely to be coming home right away. She is serving a 21-year sentence on charges related to identity theft refund fraud. She got in trouble after taunting the IRS on her Facebook, which also included photos of her posing with wads of stolen cash.  The article explains the background for the sentencing reduction:

The original sentencing was especially complex because Wilson was indicted twice in 2012. In one case, she pleaded guilty to possessing guns, illegal for a felon. In another, she admitted to netting more than $3 million through aggravated identity theft and wire fraud.

When using social media, sometimes it pays to be discreet.

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/8/14: Denison! And: Do-or-die week for extenders?

Monday, December 8th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

donnareedThe Tax Update comes to you today from Denison, Iowa, birthplace of actress Donna Reed. It’s also the fertile ground from which sprang the fertile imagination of Kennedy assassination figure Jim Garrison.

Today Denison hosts the seventh session of the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School. I’m helping out with the Day 1 panel. The last session is in Ames next Monday (register now!).  If you can’t be there in person, that session will also be webcast.

 

Congress wants to finish up its year Thursday, reports The Hill. This article says the Senate is expected to take up the “extenders” bill before it goes home. This could mean that Majority Leader Reid’s comments last week that he might be too busy to bring up the bill are no longer operative. I hope so.

This post from the Tax Policy Blog lists all of the extenders passed by the House last week in HR 5771. The bill revives these provisions through the end of this month, retroactively to the beginning of 2014. Prominent among them are the $500,000 Section 179 limit, 50% bonus depreciation, the research credit and the five-year limit on built-in gains. The bill also includes individual provisions like the exclusion for IRA donations for charity and the deduction for educator expenses and the non-business energy credit.

Paul Neiffer, Senate to Vote on Tax Extenders on Wednesday?

 

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Today in Denison, Iowa.

 

Tax reform on the Iowa legislative agenda? The Des Moines Register reports that legislators are at least thinking about it.

Income tax reform will be high on the agenda when the Legislature convenes in January, although many details have yet to be hammered out, key lawmakers said Friday.

However, Democratic and Republican legislative leaders told the Iowa Taxpayers Association they are welcoming a debate on revising Iowa’s income tax system.

This paragraph from the story is why I don’t expect much to happen this session:

State Rep. Tom Sands, R-Wapello, chairman of the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee, said his preference would be to examine corporate and individual income taxes while exploring ways to simplify the tax system. Senate Majority Leader Michael Gronstal, D-Council Bluffs, said any tax cuts should be focused on helping middle-class Iowans.

Nor does this bode well:

“If it is only to say really rich people get a break that nobody else can use; no, it doesn’t pass muster,” Gronstal told reporters.

If you have to “explore” ways to simplify Iowa’s byzantine tax system, you haven’t looked very hard. The whole thing about “really rich” taxpayers could guarantee that any reform of Iowa’s high rates and complexity won’t pass muster with Senator Gronstal, which is the same thing as not clearing the Iowa Senate.

If they do want to get serious, though, they could do a lot worse than starting with The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform plan, sweeping away vast swaths of deductions and crony credits, eliminating the corporation tax, and slashing rates.

 

Just a few quick links today:

 

20121108-1Russ Fox, Speaking of Efficiency. “Imagine what would happen if every Congresscritter did their own tax returns by hand. The Tax Code would unanimously be shrunk four hours later.”  I think they should have to do it on a live webcast with a running comments feature.

Robert D. Flach, EVERYBODY OUGHT TO HAVE AN IRA

Kay Bell, IRS holding millions of dollars in frozen taxpayer accounts

TaxGrrrl, Whistleblower Alleges Vanguard Cheated On Taxes, Costing Taxpayers More Than $1 Billion

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 578

 

20141208-2TaxSlayer Bowl! Iowa’s highest-paid state employee will lead the 7-5 Hawkeyes to Jacksonville to compete with 6-6 Tennessee in the TaxSlayer Bowl.  I understand the game will be played under standard college football rules. It would help the educational mission of the schools if they modified the rules to reflect the tax theme. If college football had rules like the tax law, we might see some different rules.

– Throughout the game, referees would audit completed plays, with the option of imposing penalties for infractions in the three prior games, with yardage charged in the current game.

– When the play clock runs down, the quarterback can call for one automatic extension.

– When calling an audible, the quarterback will have to request a change in method from the referee.

– When a penalty is called, the referees could not tell the opposing team what the penalty is for under confidentiality rules.

– Penalties can be imposed on coaches who are “responsible persons” with respect to the infraction.

– If you like your football, you can keep your football.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/5/14: Senate just too busy to pass extenders? And: grumbling about incentive tax credits.

Friday, December 5th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

lizard20140826Is the Senate just too darn busy to vote on the House-passed extender bill? Lame Duck Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid says it just might be, says a report in The Hill:

Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said Thursday night that the Senate might not be able to pass the House tax extenders bill before the end of the year.

“Everyone knows we have to do a spending bill. Everyone knows we have to do a defense bill,” Reid said on the Senate floor. “Everyone knows that we’re trying to do some tax extenders. We’re trying to do that but we’ll see.”

I hope he’s not serious. Given the stakes to individual and business taxpayers and to the IRS this filing season, I think Senator Reid coud fit an up-or-down vote into his busy, busy day.

This passive-aggressive foot-dragging could be an attempt to get some concession out of Senate Republicans while Senator Reid still is majority leader. Perhaps it’s a mere gesture to save face after his humiliation at the hands of the President, who shot down a compromise he had negotiated with House GOP taxwriter Dave Camp. Or maybe it’s just a poke at the GOP, which will take over the Senate next month.

The bill  (HR 5771) would extend 55 provisions that lapsed at the end of 2013 through the end of this month retroactively. The Lazarus Provisions include the $500,000 Section 179 limit, 50% bonus depreciation, the research credit and the five-year limit on built-in gains. It also includes individual provisions like the exclusion for IRA donations for charity and the deduction for educator expenses.

I still expect the Senate to pick up the bill soon. Accounting Today reports that the Senate is likely to vote on the House-passed “Extender” bill as soon as next week. Still, it is an unwelcome turn in the extenders melodrama, leaving taxpayers and the IRS hanging just a little longer.

Prior coverage: House passes extenders; Senate alternative appears dead. And: Gas tax fever!

Paul Neiffer, House Passes HR 5771 Tax Extender Bill

 

20120906-1Will corporate welfare tax incentives be an issue in the next Iowa legislature? A report by Iowa Public Radio’s Joyce Russell hints that it might be:

State assistance to attract Google, Microsoft, and Facebook to Iowa is under scrutiny by a statehouse committee.

The panel is looking at tax incentives the state hands out to attract industry, including the big datacenters which are making more than three billion dollars in capital investments in the state.

It appears chief Iowa Senate taxwriter Joe Bolkcom is involved:

“We need a better handle on the money being spent and the jobs being created,” says Iowa City Democrat Joe Bolkcom.

Officials with the Department of Revenue say the companies’ tax records are confidential . Lawmakers may sponsor legislation to get around that.

“Taxpayers have a right to know the exact cost,” Bolkcom says.

That’s the wonder of corporate welfare tax credits. Because tax returns are confidential, we can’t know exactly how much taxpayer money is thrown at any company. All we see are the phot0-ops and ribbon cuttings by the politicians who are being generous with other people’s money.

Senator Bolkcom says Iowa’s tax credits have doubled in four years. That’s true, though they are still below the $342 million record set in fiscal year 2007. The most recent Iowa Tax Credits Contingent Liabilities Report shows $248.5 million tax credits were issued in the last fiscal year.  The report attributes the decline to caps imposed on the credits in the wake of the Film Tax Credit Scandal.  That amount is expected to rise to $402 million for 2016. That compares to $428 million collected by the entire Iowa corporation income tax in 2013, according to this report (page 6).

I have an idea for a compromise. Get rid of Iowa’s highest-in-the world corporation income tax and all of the incentive tax credits. Enact The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform! That should make everyone happy, right?

 

20140826-1Robert D. Flach has some fresh Friday Buzz. It looks like I won’t have my extended comments on his thoughts on tax preparer civil disobedience until next week. Dang extenders.

Keith Fogg, Litigating the Merits of a Trust Fund Recovery Penalty Case in CDP When the Taxpayer Fails to Receive the Notice (Procedurally Taxing)

Robert Wood, Recovered IRS Emails Can’t Be Revealed Because Of Privacy…That Was Already Breached,

Kay Bell, NYC’s high cigarette tax blamed for Eric Garner’s death.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 575 (TaxProf)

 

Career Corner. Ex-Crazy Eddie CFO’s 10 Tips for Advancing Your Accounting Career (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern). Always trust a felon!

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Tax Roundup, 11/24/14: Report from the Battle of Scottsdale.

Monday, November 24th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

haroldBattle report from a skirmish in the state tax policy wars. I was in Scottsdale Friday to join Joseph Henchman of the Tax Foundation to talk about state film tax incentives. We were on a panel with three advocates for incentives — two from the film industry and one a retired head of a state film office. Our audience was a panel from the National Conference of State Legislators, mostly legislators heading state taxwriting committees.

Joseph did a nice job explaining that all of the studies not financed by the film industry show tax credits for films to at best an inefficient way to create jobs, and at worst job killers when other possible uses for the funds are considered.

The incentive boosters were big on stories, about all the jobs “created” by taxpayer money, all the happy stories of communities getting together to make a movie, and so on.

My role was to tell a different story — the story of Iowa’s embarrassing and disastrous Film Tax Credit program.  I told how the Iowa legislature enacted the program, with two different 25% transferable credits, with little debate and almost no opposition (three “no” votes out of 150 legislators) in 2007. By 2009, film trucks were everywhere and the local paper was running fanzine-like articles gushing over the “sightings” of celebrities.

But trouble was brewing. By spring 2009 the legislature was realizing that they had enacted an open-ended subsidy that threatened their ability to do anything but fund Hollywood. About the same time a tipster sent a letter to the Department of Economic Development saying a filmmaker was bragging around Los Angeles about how she was making money through the “Half-price Filmmaking” program, using pretend expenditures to get tax credit funding well in excess of her cost in making (bad) movies. An audit was commissioned, and soon the program collapsed in disgrace when the audit revealed amazing mismanagement and breathtaking looting of the program. A follow-up audit by the state auditors office showed that 80% of the credits that had been granted were either improper or fraudulent.  Good times.

The Tax Foundation crew was impressive. Joseph and his Tax Foundation colleague Elizabeth Malm seemed to know every legislator. Joseph seemed to be aware of every detail, even correcting my posture as I sat listening to the questions. I think he was a little concerned I might be a loose cannon and go off on the legislators; I can’t deny the temptation, but I knew that wasn’t my place.

The legislators agreed to set up a panel on setting standards for evaluating the cost-effectiveness of tax incentives. That’s a better response than I expected, and I hope something comes of it.

 

Only time for a few quick links today.

 

20140728-1Robert D. Flach starts the short holiday week with a special Monday Buzz!

Russ Fox tackles the important question: Would the Proprietors of “I Married an Idiot” Commit Tax Fraud?

Peter Reilly, Should President Obama Offer Amnesty For Legal Residents Behind On Taxes? I think he should offer a blanket amnesty for Americans abroad enmeshed in the FATCA/FBAR nightmare.

Paul Neiffer, Take Advantage of Low Rates! Low IRS minimum interest rates, that is.

 

Robert Goulder, Magnum Opus: “Paying Taxes 2015: The Global Picture” (Tax Analysts Blog)

Hauqun Li, An Introduction to Forms of Business Organization and Taxation (Tax Policy Blog)

Donald Marron, Bigger, Cleaner, and More Efficient: A Carbon-Corporate Tax Swap

 

TaxGrrrl, Those Not-So-Lost IRS Emails: Up To 30,000 Lerner Emails May Have Been Recovered

Kay Bell, Possible break in hunt for Lois Lerner’s lost IRS emails

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 564

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/19/14: Mayor of London, U.S. tax delinquent. And: sticks, stones, and IRS.

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
Boris Johnaon and an unidentified IRS agent.

Boris Johnson and an unidentified IRS agent.

I thought the Revolution was fought to get away from the English, not to tax them. From Robert W. Wood comes a story that says volumes about how absurd America’s system of worldwide taxation is:

London’s Mayor Boris Johnson is English, but being born in New York means he’s American too. Turns out he never gave up his U.S. citizenship, as the BBC confirmed. Sure, he threatened to renounce in a column for the Spectator, but he renewed his U.S. passport instead.

And on his recent book tour, in a Diane Rehm Show Interview, November 13, 2014, Mr. Johnson even said a thing or two about the American global tax regime. He thinks it is outrageous to tax U.S. citizens everywhere no matter what. He hasn’t lived in the U.S. since he was 5 years old, he notes. Still, the IRS wants money.

Only the U.S. tax law is stupid enough to consider Boris Johnson an American taxpayer. Of course, the U.S. tax law says he’s taxable on his worldwide income as a U.S. Citizen, and that means he’s delinquent on U.S. tax on everything he’s ever earned. Of course, the IRS also claims FBAR penalties on “foreign” financial accounts that would render the Mayor of London a pauper.  He could renounce his U.S. citizenship, but Mr. Wood notes that “When you exit you must certify five years of U.S. tax compliance to the IRS. And any tax for the current or prior years must be paid.”

Boris Johnson is only the most prominent victim of a system supposedly designed to catch international financial fraud, but that works much better in making financial criminals and paupers out of ordinary people for committing personal finance while abroad. And yet there seems to be no movement at all to fix this horrible system. Because Swiss banks, or something.

 

20140106-1William Perez, Excluding Foreign Wages from US Taxes

Paul Neiffer, Another Section 179 Update:

Whenever, I indicate that we should know what the final number should be around Christmas or even New Years, I get emails back saying doesn’t Congress know that taxpayers really can’t make informed equipment decisions without knowing what Section 179 is.

The quick answer is that “Congress does not care!”

So true.

 

Russ Fox, IRS Clarifies Electronic Signature Requirements:

The IRS released a new version of Publication 1345 today (html version only is available for now). Included in it is the following:

Note: An electronic signature via remote transaction does not include handwritten signatures on Forms 8878 or 8879 sent to the ERO by hand delivery, U.S. mail, private delivery service, fax, email or an Internet website.

Thus, if a client signs a signature document in ink, hands it to me, mails it to me, faxes it to me, or uploads it to me via our web portal (or even if he emails it to me), it’s not an electronic signature and I don’t have to check id, etc. (So, mom, I don’t need to see your ID.)   

That’s good news.

 

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Kay Bell, States continue efforts to tax e-cigarettes as vaping grows. E-cigs threaten the states’ tobacco settlement gravy train. That’s why politicians hate them. All of the vaporous public health claims used against E-cigarettes is just blowing smoke.

 Peter Reilly, What’s In A Name? Should Naming Rights Reduce Charitable Deductions?

TaxGrrrl, Top Ten Area Codes Making Spam Calls: Are They Dialing You Up? If you aren’t expecting a call from the IRS, it’s not the IRS.

Robert D. Flach, DON’T BE A NON-FILER! “It is much “more better” to submit a balance due return with no payment than to submit nothing at all.”

Jack Townsend, IRS Documents On OVDI/P From FOIA Request.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 559

Alan Cole, Obamacare’s Contradictory Tax Incentives (Tax Policy Blog):

All too often, the motives behind Obamacare’s taxes are incoherent. We don’t like the distortion towards employer-provided health insurance, so we levy taxes on it. But we also do like the distortion towards employer-provided health insurance, so much so that we will actually mandate it!

The real motivation was to pass something and let IRS work out the details.

Howard Gleckman, Will Obama’s Executive Action on Immigration Kill Tax Reform? Hint: You Can’t Kill Something That’s Already Dead (TaxVox)

 

Hello, IRS readers! Apparently the IRS reads the blogs. Legal Insurrection reports that the IRS is trying to avoid disclosing names of their personnel in a lawsuit because of things said about Lois Lerner in that blog’s comments:

In a federal FOIA lawsuit by Judicial Watch seeking records of Lerner emails and IRS efforts to retrieve the emails, the IRS used two of the comments to the Legal Insurrection Reader Poll post to justify the IRS no longer disclosing the identities of IRS personnel.

Here are the awful comments:

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Juvenile? Sure, but pretty tame stuff for political blogs. Go hang out at Daily Kos if you think otherwise. By the standard the IRS is using here, you would have to conceal the names of just about anybody remotely connected with the government or politics. I’ve been called a “hamburger chomping, malleable moron in the comments,” with no ill consequences other than now I’m self-conscious at McDonalds.

But all the same, be nice in the comments here.

 

Career Corner. Your Open Office May Be Making You a Crappy Worker (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/17/14: Sundog weather is shorts weather!

Monday, November 17th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

It’s 7F outside here in Mason City, Iowa. Warm enough for shorts, it seems.

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This gentleman was scraping his windows outside North Iowa Area Community College, where I am part of the Day 1 panel of the  Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School. I wonder what this guy wears in the summer.

It’s cozy and warm here in the conference room, where 165 attendees are beginning two days of the finest continuing education available today in Cerro Gordo County. There are two sessions left after today, in Denison and Ames; the Ames school will be webcast.  Register today!

 

Just links today.

Russ Fox, The Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Upcoming Tax Season:

If you’re a tax professional here’s a warning: The 2015 Tax Season will be one you’re almost certain to remember for all the wrong reasons. If you’re a client of a tax professional be forewarned: Your tax professional will be even more grouchy than usual next year. Why? The upcoming tax season will likely be the worst in 30 years.

There are four reasons for this: tax extenders, budget issues the IRS faces, the Affordable Care Act (aka ObamaCare), and the new property capitalization/repair regulations.

Are we excited yet?

 

Mason City Sundog Morning. It's cold here today.

Mason City Sundog Morning. It’s cold here today.

Robert D. Flach, IT AIN’T FAIR – SELECTIVE INFLATION ADJUSTMENTS. “If it is appropriate to index some tax items for inflation why shouldn’t ALL deductions, credits, thresholds, etc. be indexed for inflation?”

Paul Neiffer, Direct Deposit Limits. “In an effort to combat fraud and identity theft, new IRS procedures effective January 2015 will limit the number of refunds electronically deposited into a single financial account or pre-paid debit card to three.”

Jim Maule, Soda Sales Shifting? “Does anyone seriously think that the soda tax will reduce the number of obese people in Berkeley, or raise enough revenue to make the cost of administering and complying with the tax worthwhile?”

I’ll believe it’s about health when these people tax their own “unhealthy” habits, like double caramel lattes.

Kay Bell, Navajo lawmakers approve 2% sales tax on snacks, sodas

TaxGrrrl, NFL Flagged With Another Challenge To Tax-Exempt Status Because Of Redskins

Annette Nellen, The Election, 114th Congress and Fate of Tax Reform

Keith Fogg, TIGTA Report on ACS Details the Impact of Shrinking Budget on Tax Collection Efforts (Procedurally Taxing)

 

20131112TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 557

Robert Goulder, The Ghost of Captain Renault (Tax Analysts Blog). “What? There’s corporate tax avoidance going on in Luxembourg? You don’t say?”

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown 11/14: Here Comes the Judge (Tax Justice Blog). Kansas school funding and Maryland’s attempted double-taxation are on the docket.

Stephen Entin, Tax Policy Is Child’s Play (Tax Policy Blog). “The enactment of tax reductions or regulatory changes that make it possible to profitably employ more capital is like landing on a ladder… Enacting adverse policies that force a reduction in the amount of capital that people are willing to maintain is like hitting a chute.”

Renu Zaretsky asks How Quickly Can Lame Ducks Move Before the Holidays?  The Tax Vox headline roundup is heavy on gas tax talk and extenders.

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Tax Roundup, 11/13/14: Ottumwa Day! And: Elections and State Tax Policy.

Thursday, November 13th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

Ottumwa, Iowa: An old Southeast Iowa industrial and railroad town, home of fictional Corporal Radar O’Reilly, and today host of Day 1 of the Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School. I’m helping out on the Day 1 panel for this year’s schools, along with CALT Director Roger McEowen and former IRS Stakeholder Liaison Kristy Maitre.  We’ll spend the morning on the ACA and it’s compliance requirements and penalties. We’ll spend the rest of the day trying to distract everyone.

It’s cozy and warm in our conference room at Indian Hills Community College.  That’s good, as it’s chilly outside.

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We’re in Mason City on Monday, and in Denison and Ames next month. There’s still time to register! And if you can’t make it to Denison, Mason City or Ames, the December 15-16 Ames session will be webcast.

 

David Brunori, What Do the Recent Elections Mean for State Tax Policy? (Tax Analysts Blog):

Taxes mattered more in Kansas than anywhere else. Gov. Sam Brownback (R) won there comfortably. The tax cuts of Republican Govs. Rick Snyder in Michigan, Paul LePage in Maine, and Scott Walker in Wisconsin were the focus of opponents’ campaigns, and those governors survived as well. The GOP challengers in Illinois, Maryland, and Massachusetts promised to either cut taxes or never raise them. They won. The message was clear: Tax cuts sell politically. One need not be Nate Silver to predict that state political leaders seeking to reduce tax burdens will be emboldened by this election.

I don’t think that’s so true here in Iowa. Now safely re-elected to a sixth term, our GOP governor is making noises about increasing the gasoline tax. But maybe he will go bold and convince a split legislature to go big on income tax reform — maybe starting with The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan.

 

Greg Mankiw, Tax Fact of the Day::

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The big difference is the reliance on other countries on a Value Added Tax, which shows up in the Consumption Taxes bar.

 

Howard Gleckman, Now is the Perfect Time to Raise Gas Taxes (TaxVox).  “Gas prices are at their lowest levels in years and dropping. Consumers would barely notice if they had to pay a bit more now at the pump.”

 

Andrew Lundeen, Kyle Pomerleau, Economic Growth Has Slowed Since 2000 (Tax Policy Blog). “Since 2000, GDP growth in the U.S. has been persistently low, averaging about 2 percent. This is much lower than the economic growth we saw in the past.”

20141113-3Kay Bell, Tax extenders outlook cloudy in the 2014 lame duck session:

Will there still be some insistence by the GOP on longer-term approaches to expired tax laws in this Congressional session’s waning hours?

Just what is the level of Democratic support of permanence vs. temporary laws?

And just how much pressure will lobbyists be able to exert to gain support of their favorite provisions, especially since some of the members making decisions now will not be around next year?

We simply don’t know yet.

There’s a lot of incentive for congresscritters to pass temporary provisions. They get to pretend they are less expensive than they really are, and they force lobbyists to show up and genuflect every year or two.

Russ Fox, London Calling: The Real Winners of the 2014 World Series of Poker. The Royal Exchequer trumps a royal flush.

TaxGrrrl, Internet Tax Ban Ending Soon: Speaker Boehner Hopes To Keep Internet Tax Free

Keith Fogg, Reinhart Part II – Extending the Statute of Limitations on Collection by Virtue of Being Out of Country (Procedurally Taxing)

20140729-1Paul Neiffer, Final FUTA Tax Rates by State

 

A new Cavalcade of Risk is up at Terms and Conditions. This edition of the definitive roundup of insurance and risk-management posts covers a lot of ground, including Hank Stern’s Rubber, Road and Lyft: Insurance Crisis? on ride sharing and insurance.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 553

 

The Critical Question. Just What the Hell is Goodwill Anyway? (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going  Concern).

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/12/14: IRAs, IRS, and the Liar’s Paradox. And: mass benefit, class tax.

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014 by Joe Kristan
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You trusted us.

The Liar’s Paradox, IRS Version. If somebody says “I am lying,” can he be telling the truth? It’s a puzzler. So are many tax law rules, like the rules governing IRA rollovers.

The tax law does not subject an IRA withdrawal to tax if it is reinvested in an IRA within 60 days. It can only be done once each year. The IRS publication on such “rollovers” said from 1984 though 2013 that the one year restriction applied to each IRA, so a taxpayer with multiple IRAs could make multiple rollovers.

Alvin Bobrow made multiple IRA rollovers in 2008 consistent with this guidance. On examination, the IRS said the once-a-year rule applied per taxpayer, not per IRA, and assessed him tax and penalties.  The Tax Court upheld the assessment and penalties, in spite of the published IRS position. This is a classic example of the unfair, penalty-happy nature of the IRS examination process, too often abetted by the courts.

While manifestly unfair, the IRS long ago won the right to bait-and-switch via its publications. As the Tax Court said years ago, “well established precedent confirms that taxpayers rely on such publications at their peril.”

Even the IRS apparently is a little embarrassed by this. On Monday it issued Announcement 2014-32, saying it would not enforce the position it took in Bobrow for distributions before 2015. That seems fair to other taxpayers, if not to the Bobrows.

But here is where the liars paradox comes in. Announcement 2014-32 is mere “administrative guidance,” just like an IRS publication, and it has no more legal standing. Technically, nothing but a sense of self-restraint keeps the IRS from saying “fooled you!” on examination, just like they did in Bobrow. Does that make anyone else a little nervous?

 

The Tax Foundation has issued a wonderful new publication, A Visual Guide to Business, Taxes, and the Economy. It is full of wonderfully-illustrated insights on the economy and taxes. I love this illustration:

 

Source: Tax Foundation, "Business in America Illustrated"

Source: Tax Foundation, “Business in America Illustrated”

The chart shows that most business income subject to tax is reported on 1040s, not on corporate returns. That means every increase in taxes on high-income individuals is a tax on businesses and a tax on employers — not just on some guy lighting cigars with $100 bills.

 

20131209-1Paul Neiffer, Sheldon Iowa is Cold. It is indeed, at least this week.

Andrew Mitchel, New Rules for Canadian RRSPs & RRIFs

Kay Bell, A question for Congress on Veterans Day: Will the business tax break for hiring returning military members be renewed?

Jason Dinesen, Same-sex Marriage, Amended Tax Returns and Filing Status. “So if you’re in a same-sex marriage and you’re amending a 2011 or 2012 tax return, you can file that amended return as married or keep your filing status as single.”

Peter Reilly, Tax Court Goes To Webster For Definition Of Construction – And Watch That NAICS Code. The courts have been placing an undeserved significance on the business code you put on your tax return.

TaxGrrrl, 14 Ways To Show Your Thanks To Our Military On Veterans Day. “Here are 14 ways to show your thanks to our vets – and some of them come with a nice tax benefit to boot.”

 

20130121-2Good. IRS Power To Regulate Tax Practitioners Slipping Away (Christopher Rezek, Procedurally Taxing). The author appears to think this is somehow a bad thing.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 552

 

Joseph Thorndike, Democrats Getting What They Deserve on Medical Device Tax (Tax Analysts Blog):

If Democrats eventually face a funding crisis for Obamacare, they have only themselves to blame. After all, they should have known better. It was a Democrat, Franklin Roosevelt, who conclusively established that broad spending programs deserve broad taxes.

Precisely. You can’t fund a mass entitlement with a class tax, but that’s exactly what Obamacare tries to do.

 

 

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