Posts Tagged ‘Roburt Goulder’

Tax Roundup, 3/6/2013: Tax return numerology, and similar economic development science. Plus rapper tax tips!

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130306-1Tax tip: IRS doesn’t buy this numerology stuff.  A strange story out of New York:

A tailor who counted star athletes including Rickey Henderson and Wilt Chamberlain among his clients has pleaded guilty to skirting about $2 million in sales and income taxes.

Mohanbhai Ramchandani pleaded guilty on Tuesday, state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said. His company, Mohan’s Custom Tailors Inc., also has had local stars Patrick Ewing and Darryl Strawberry among its clients and made an appearance on Bravo’s “The Real Housewives of New York City.”

The charges say that he failed to pay $1.7 million in sales taxes starting in 2001, and he failed to pay $256,000 of income taxes from 2007 through 2009.  I didn’t know tailoring could be so lucrative.  But this is unusual:

Authorities said a whistle-blower first raised concerns over Ramchandani’s tax practices. They said one indication of fraud was the use of numbers on his tax forms that added up to multiples of 10, an outgrowth of his belief in numerology.

Once in a while you prepare a return that happens to foot to a round number somewhere.  It looks funny, but it will happen occasionally just by chance.  But when they are all round, apparently the tax people might notice.

 

As strange as Mr. Ramchandani’s approach to numbers is, Iowa gives him a run for his money.   Iowa’s lead tax credit pusher, Debi Durham, has issued a press release touting the economic wonders of enormous tax credits granted Orascom, an Egyptian company, to build a fertilizer plant in Southeast Iowa.  The release bases its conclusions on ” the Regional Economic Modeling Inc. (REMI) analysis for the Iowa Fertilizer Co. project.”  From the release:

“The  REMI analysis of the Iowa Fertilizer Co. project speaks for itself,” said Debi Durham, director of the Iowa Economic Development Authority (IEDA).  “On the front end, Iowa Fertilizer Co. will inject $1.4 billion of capital investment into our state and create at least 165 permanent jobs and thousands of construction-related jobs.  Now we know that the benefits of that project will serve Iowans for years to come.”

It speaks for itself and it says nothing.    It says nothing about whether the project would have gone ahead without the credits, but Iowa’s claims that Illinois was hot after the plant with its own incentives lack credibility.

The analysis really betrays itself by omitting two key words: “opportunity cost.”  It claims every projected benefit from the project without asking whether any benefits would be available if the money were used for something else.  It certainly doesn’t say what Iowa loses by having a complex tax system with high rates to pay big subsidies to the well-connected.

I’ve said it before: using taxpayer money to lure businesses is like a guy taking his wife’s purse to the bar to buy drinks for the girls.  It’s not impressive.  They might let the guy buy the drinks, but they realize he’ll treat them like he is treating his wife if he gets the chance.  And anybody he goes home with isn’t likely to be much of a prize.

 

Egypt taking a different approach to Orascom.   The Orascom executives do better in Iowa than back home, reports SiouxCityJournal.com:

An Egyptian billionaire behind one of the largest and most controversial projects in the state is being investigated for tax evasion and has been barred from leaving his country.

According to an article published Tuesday in Construction Week Online, Orascom Construction CEO Nassef Sawiris and his father, Onsi Sawiris, are barred from travel until a resolution is reached regarding the sale of an Orascom subsidiary and the taxes from that sale.

As hard as it is to deal with Iowa and federal tax authorities, they are probably downright reasonable compared to Egyptian revenuers.  I suspect that the “resolution” being sought is much like that sought by a kidnapper.

 

The TaxProf links to this from the New York Times Dealbook: Why Carried Interest Is a Capital Gain.  It is as good an explanation as I’ve seen of why capital gain on private equity isn’t a crime against humanity:

Typically private equity investors are paid a 2% management fee, on which they pay ordinary income tax rates, and a 20% carried interest of the partnership’s profits that is only paid after limited partners receive a preferred return of 8%.

Carried interest, therefore, is the profits share on the sale of a capital asset and not “ordinary income” as some would have it treated.  In other words, it is a capital gain within a partnership and is rightfully taxed at the long-term capital gains rate  — provided that  the asset, or company, is held for more than one year.

The underlying principle is no different than two friends who partner together to purchase a restaurant.  One might bring capital and the other brings expertise.  The restaurant could be in disrepair or a great concept that needs additional capital to expand.  The chef identifies the restaurant to buy and possesses the skills to manage the restaurant and add value to the enterprise over time.  The friend has the capital to invest, but doesn’t possess the operational or investment skills to generate a return.

When they sell the restaurant years later, both partners receive capital gains treatment on their long-term investment.  A private equity partnership works in the same way.  This is Partnership Law 101.

Exactly.  And it’s not like a salary, where somebody writes you a check.  The private equity investor is taking a risk, and on any given investment is likely to get nothing.  It’s not like, say, a tenured law school faculty paycheck that comes every two weeks.

 

 

It’s not just the rich guy?  Obamacare Tax Increases Will Impact Us All (Andrew Lundeen, Tax Policy Blog).

Howard Gleckman, Changing Government’s Inflation Measure Would Raise Taxes as Much as it Would Cut Spending (TaxVox)

Jason Dinesen,  Greatest Hits: Enrolled Agents, The Liechtenstein of the Tax World.  “When people hear ‘enrolled agent,’ they think either ‘what the hell is
that?’ or ‘he must work for the IRS, flee for your lives!'”

Anthony Nitti,  Business Owners Could Find Their Tax Deferral Backfiring.  Deferring income into higher-rate years works badly.

Russ Fox,  Did the IRS Write Law?  “I suspect the IRS has erred.”  I agree, the IRS can’t change statutory rates to deal with budget issues.

 

Jack Townsend,  Proposed New FBAR Form And Explanation

Brian Strahle,  Will Maryland Match Virginia’s Corporate Income Tax Rate?

Patrick Temple-West,  Tax-exempt bonds get scrutiny, and more

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2013): C Is For Carpooling

Robert Goulder, Will EITI Kill Transfer Pricing? (Tax.com).  First ask yourself: what is EITI?

 

David Brunori, Remember the Alamo, Buy a Gun (Tax.com)  On the unwisdom of sales tax holidays, even for guns.


ProTip: Don’t take your tax advice from rappers.  This from Going Concern:

As you might expect, TMZ has the scoop and it quotes a number of artists who are currently considering tips for strippers as a legit deduction and therefore a serious tax strategy. And who doesn’t love creative tax planning? But how might they rationalize this idea? 

Well, Bizzy Bone considers these young ladies to be like his family:

Bizzy Bone tells TMZ, “I’m giving charity to females who need their light bills paid.  So, of course, that’s a write-off.  You write off your kids, don’t you?”

Um, no.  Mr. Bone might want to ponder the stories of Ja Rule, Fat Joe, and Beanie Sigel, to name a few, before he gets too smug about his tax deductions.

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 1/28/2013: Should Iowa rebate its budget surplus? And PTIN limbo.

Monday, January 28th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1Iowa is collecting more tax money than it is spending.  Iowa House Republicans propose to give the money back as a one-time tax credit.  The Des Moines Register reports:

The proposal would capture the state’s estimated $800 million budget surplus, divide it equally among the state’s income tax payers and issue an income tax credit to every taxpayer for his or her share. Senate Republicans said last week the credit amounts to $375 for individuals or $750 for couples who file jointly.

That means, for example, if a married couple’s state income tax liability was $1,000, they would receive a $750 tax credit, reducing the amount they were actually required to pay to $250. If a payer’s burden was less than $375, he would receive a credit equal only to his actual bill.

It’s a simple plan that treats the surplus as a non-recurring event.  Unfortunately, there is nothing simple about Iowa’s tax law otherwise.  I’d prefer to see it returned as part of a tax reform plan.

House Democrats prefer to spend the money, and the Governor wants some of it to fund his education reform plan.  ISU economist David Swenson says the money should be run through the government:

Drawing on a statistical model that predicts economic impacts, he said  $780 million in government spending could support roughly 2,000 more jobs than the same amount of spending by households.

Yes, the magical power of the government to transform your money into jobs.  If we just gave the government infinite money, we’d get infinite jobs.   If that worked, you’d think we’d have more jobs than ever, considering that Federal and state governments are spending more money than ever.

20130128-1

Link: Text of HF 1.

 

Tax Notes, Preparers in Limbo as IRS Shutters PTIN System After Loving Decision ($link):

     Tax return preparers who just recently were rushing to get their preparer tax identification numbers from the IRS before it starts accepting 2012 tax returns on January 30 are in limbo after a federal district court enjoined the Service from enforcing requirements under the registered tax return preparer (RTRP) designation.

     The IRS’s online PTIN system appears to be unavailable. People familiar with the system are uncertain why the IRS took it offline and what its unavailability means for the hundreds of thousands of potential PTIN registrants.

     “From a practical point of view, [the IRS] has already shut the [PTIN] system down,” said Dan Alban of the Institute for Justice and the lead attorney for the plaintiffs in Loving v. IRS, No. 1:12-cv-00385 (D.D.C. 2013)  “Whether they are legally required to do so is the question.”

Well done, IRS!  Preparers are required to have a PTIN.  The IRS apparently tied it’s PTIN software to the preparer regulation system overturned earlier this month.  Another triumph for tax administration.

TaxProf,  What’s FATCA Got To Do With It? Tina Turner Renounces U.S. Citizenship.  It’s always easier for the wealthy to avoid the ridiculous paperwork the tax law imposes on Americans abroad.  It’s the little jaywalkers that get shot to ensure the serious money-launderers get slapped on the wrist.

Andrew Mitchel has posted two videos explaining Form 5471.  Think that sounds dull?  If you fail to report your interest in a foreign corporation, the $10,000 fine will make it interesting.

Martin Sullivan, UK Conservative Policies in Trouble (Tax.com)

Brian Mahany, Tiger Woods and Tax Migration – The Wealthy Flee High Tax States (tax planning post)

Patrick Temple-West,  Republican governors open new front in tax debate, and more

Paul Neiffer,  AMT Causes a Few More Capital Gains Tax Rates!

Robert Goulder, The Pepperdine Papers: Advice for Obama’s Second Term (Tax.com)

Kay Bell, Deducting sales tax on your new car … or boat or airplane or home

Jim Maule,  Tax Planning: A Chore That Never Sleeps.  I think it works better if it does.

Trish McIntire,  Who Do You Believe?.  If your tax advisor contradicts your bar buddy on a tax issue, go with the tax advisor.

Dan Meyer, Will Tax Benefits Later Cost You Now?

Robert D. Flach,  THE RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CREDIT IS BACK FOR 2012 (AND 2013)!

Joseph Henchman,  Municipal Bankruptcies Since 1988. (Tax Policy Blog).  He lists about 43.

Russ Fox,  Cash and Carry Doesn’t Work for Strip Club Owner.  I don’t think it’s allowed for the patrons either.

Worth a try.  Shop Till Your Taxes Drop  (TaxGrrrl)

 

Share