Posts Tagged ‘Russ Fox’

Tax Roundup, 2/12/16: I want my K-1. I want it now, Daddy!

Friday, February 12th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today visitors, click here for the post on password hygiene.

20160212-1No, your K-1 isn’t late. As even late 1099s are arriving, more and more taxpayers are ready to file their 2015 1040s. So why is that stupid partnership or S corporation taking so long to get me that 1099? Isn’t there a penalty for not getting that to me by the end of January?

No, there isn’t. First, it’s not a 1099, it’s a K-1. The earliest any K-1s are due is March 15, and that’s only for “electing large partnerships”  — typically publicly-traded ones (and if you own a bunch of these, expect a dirty look from your tax preparer, as they are time-consuming and therefore bill-increasing).

K-1s for S corporations are due March 15 for calendar-year corporations. Unlike with 1099s, though, the S corporation can get an automatic extension of the filing deadline until September 15. This is often needed because preparing a business return is a more complicated project than computing someone’s wages or interest income. It can be more complex still if the S corporation itself has to wait on…

Partnership K-1s. For 2015, these have an April 15 deadline that can be extended to September 15 (except for the publicly-traded partnerships due March 15). Preparing partnership returns can be devilishly complex, especially when partners come and go. The deadline becomes March 15 next tax season, but that just means more extensions will be filed.

Trust K-1s are also due April 15. Most bank trust departments can get their trust returns and K-1s filed in January and February, as they have all of the information at hand. If the trust has business or rental property, or is waiting on K-1s of its own, though, expect delays.

Remember, almost all pass-throughs are calendar year taxpayers. That means everybody is trying to get their returns done at once. We preparers do our best, but the pipe is only so wide.

Tax is hard. If you think preparing your 1040 is painful, it’s minor compared to doing a return for an operating business.  Look at the IRS publications for partnerships or S corporations if you don’t believe me. If you have to wait on your K-1, it’s not because the partnership, S corporation or tax preparer is indolent or incompetent. It just takes time to get it right — and when you have a bunch of 1040s that will be thrown off if you goof, you really want to get it right.

This is another in our irregular series of 2016 filing season tips

 

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Taxable Talk, Phishers Target Tax Professionals:

Tax professionals, be wary. There are phishing emails supposedly from the IRS targeting tax professionals. Now, we have supposed new clients emailing tax professionals. My mantra, if it sounds too good to be true it probably is, holds for tax professionals, too. Do not click on links that you do not know for certain are valid.

Read the whole thing for more good advice on protecting yourself.

 

William Perez, 3 States are Delaying Tax Refunds

Kay Bell, Full, permanent Internet access tax ban approved

Stuart BassinDistrict Court Certifies Class Action in Tea Party Challenge to IRS (Procedurally Taxing).

Robert Wood, IRS And Justice Department Push Tax Prosecutions

TaxGrrrl, Ask The Taxgirl: Solar Panels & Tax Credits

Kristine Tidgren, Iowa Court Denies Private Condemnation of Right of Way (AgDocket). “Iowa Code § 6A.4(2) confers the right to take private property for public use ‘upon the owner or lessee of lands, which have no public or private way to the lands, for the purpose of providing a public way which will connect with an existing public road.'”

 

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Howard Gleckman, Rubio’s Ambitious Consumption Tax Would Reduce Revenue by $6.8 Trillion, Give Most Benefits to the Highest-Income Households (TaxVox):

Senator Marco Rubio would convert the income tax into a progressive consumption tax, an ambitious idea that would eliminate the income tax’s penalty on saving. However, a new Tax Policy Center analysis finds that Rubio’s version would slash federal tax revenues by $6.8 trillion over the next decade with most of the benefits going to high-income households.

The “mostly benefits high-income households” is the most tiresome and useless cliché in tax policy. Considering that the high earners pay almost all the income taxes, any improvement to the (awful) system will inevitably benefit them disproportionately. But the possible revenue loss is a serious issue, if Rubio remains a serious candidate.

Alan Cole, The Most Important Chart from Tax Policy Center’s Analysis of the Rubio Plan (Tax Policy Blog). “Our latest estimates, calibrated for Washington’s traditional ten-year budget window, showed the plan reducing overall tax revenues by $6.1 trillion on a static basis, while TPC shows a reduction in revenue of $6.8 trillion.”

If only there was a candidate with a plan that would improve the tax system and not increase the deficit

 

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Megan McArdle, Obama’s Oil Tax Is Running on Empty. “The administration has made some gestures toward mitigating this opposition, notably by claiming that the tax will be paid by oil companies. But this is obvious nonsense.”

Carl Davis, More Details Emerge on President’s Proposed Oil Tax (Tax Justice Blog)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1009

Alex Durante, High Corporate Taxes May Increase Debt, Study Finds (Tax Policy Blog). “A new paper published in the Journal of Financial Economics finds that countries with high tax rates on corporate income also have higher corporate leverage ratios. This paper improves upon the methodologies of prior research that had struggled to confirm a link between tax rates and corporate structure.”

 

News from the… Profession? Area Police Department Offers Help to Drug Dealers Struggling With Tax Season Preparations (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

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Tax Roundup, 2/11/16: C corporation law firm hammered for bonusing all income. And: PTIN class action certified.

Thursday, February 11th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20150403-3Incorporated professional businesses are darned if they do, darned if they don’t. If they do elect S corporation treatment, the IRS pushes them to treat as much of the business income as possible as salaries, to maximize employment tax receipts. If they don’t, and operate as C corporations, the IRS likes to argue that the salaries are excessive, triggering tax on the “excessive” part at the highest corporation tax rate.

A Tax Court case yesterday reminds us that of these risks, the C corporation has the most to lose. A big Chicago intellectual property firm routinely paid its year-end earnings as bonuses, running its income down to zero. Professional C corporations like to do this because the “personal service corporation” rules deny professional corporations the benefit of the lower corporate tax rates; they pay a flat 35% on dollar one. Any dividends paid are non-deductible and are taxed again at a 20% individual rate.

S corporations typically make the reasonable argument that some of their income is from invested capital and accumulated goodwill, and therefore can properly be treated as corporate distributable earnings – which, incidentally, aren’t subject to FICA or Medicare taxes. The IRS turned this argument against the Chicago firm, arguing that a C corporation law firm with 65 shareholders and 150 attorneys would have such earnings not strictly attributable to the shareholder wage compensation.

The law firm conceded the tax, but argued that it shouldn’t have to pay penalties because it had “substantial authority” for bonusing out all the income. The court found otherwise:

We do not doubt the critical value of the services provided by employees of a professional services firm. Indeed, the employees’ services may be far more important, as a factor of production, than the capital contributed by the firm’s owners. Recognition of those basic economic realities might justify the payment of compensation that constitutes the vast majority of the firm’s profits, after payment of other expenses — as long as the remaining net income still provides an adequate return on invested capital. But petitioner did not have substantial authority for the deduction of amounts paid as compensation that completely eliminated its income and left its shareholder attorneys with no return on their invested capital.

The Moral? Professional corporations should usually be S corporations. The few additional fringe benefits available to C corporations don’t pay for the chance that you will get hit with 35% tax on a big chunk of corporate income.

Cite: Brinks Gilson & Lione A Professional Corporation,  T.C. Memo. 2016-20

 

IRS certifies class action for suit on excessive PTIN fees. Text here. Still pushing back on the IRS preparer regulation power grab.

 

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Is there anything they can’t do? Tax credit could spur biochemical revolution (Sen. Rita Hart, Rep. Mary Ann Hanusa, Des Moines Register). Presumably just like they spurred the Iowa film industry revolution. And who better than statehouse politicians to pick  the next great industry? My thoughts here.

 

Tony Nitti, Just Three Years Later, President Seeks To Expand Obamacare Tax On Business Owners. It’s going nowhere for now, but Tony cautions: “As a reminder, Hillary Clinton has not offered much of a tax plan of her own, and has shown a willingness to leverage off of proposals posited by the President. Which means this might not be the last we see of a mulligan on the net investment income tax.”

Jason Dinesen, Can Married Same-Sex Couples Claim Their Spouse as a Dependent?

TaxGrrrl, Understanding Your Tax Forms 2016: Form 1099-C, Cancellation of Debt

Robert Wood, Lawyer Fees Soar To $1,500 An Hour, But Tax Write-Offs Cut It To $900

Kay Bell, Hackers try, but fail, to get into IRS e-filing PIN system

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David Brunori, Base-Broadening and Rate-Lowering Remains a Good Idea (Tax Analysts Blog). “Whether you’re a liberal, a conservative, or a Martian, you must admit that net worth taxes are horrible tax policy.”

Scott Greenberg, More Americans than Ever are Renouncing Their Citizenship, and Taxes are to Blame (Tax Policy Blog)

Howard Gleckman, The White House Quietly Rolls Out Its Last Tax and Budget Plan (TaxVox).

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1008

 

Career Corner. Reminder: Don’t Let Inside Information Turn Into a Career Limiting Move (Leona May, Going Concern). “Regardless of how you learn the inside information, don’t trade on it. Regardless of whether or not you’ll explicitly benefit, Don’t share the information -– especially not with your greedy brother-in-law.”

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Tax Roundup, 2/10/16: Tax Court rules out super-duper bureaucrat deduction. And: Don’t rob the preparer!

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20120801-2You are fined $50 court costs. My accountant prefers it that way.  A good lawyer can make you seriously consider a position that seems absurd at first glance. An Arizona judge whose case showed up in Tax Court yesterday must be a good lawyer.

The case is based on the difference between the tax treatment of business expenses and employee expenses. Business expenses are normally fully deductible. In contrast, expenses incurred by an employee, and not reimbursed by the employer, are only deductible as itemized deductions, and then only to the extent they — when added to other “miscellaneous” deductions — exceed 2% of adjusted gross income. Worse, even if you have enough employee expenses to show up on Schedule A, they are non-deductible in computing alternative minimum tax. That often makes them useless.

Arizona state judge Michael Jones had a clever accountant who saw a potential way around this problem. According to the Tax Court, Judge Jones incurred some out-of-pocket expenses to run his chambers when state budget cuts began to pinch. His tax preparer, a CPA, said that Section 62(a)(2)(C) made these “above the line” business expenses:

(C)Certain expenses of officials

The deductions allowed by section 162 which consist of expenses paid or incurred with respect to services performed by an official as an employee of a State or a political subdivision thereof in a position compensated in whole or in part on a fee basis.

So how did that affect Judge Jones? From Tax Court Judge Holmes (my emphasis, citations omitted):

Maricopa County Superior Court is funded in part by the collection of fees. Individuals must pay the superior court clerk fees for various case filings, petitions, writs, the filing of any documents, and the issuance of any licenses or certificates. The county does not, however, receive fees paid for wedding ceremonies — judges are allowed to collect those directly (although Judge Jones himself did not charge for weddings during the years at issue).

Judge Jones argues that “in a position compensated in whole or in part on a fee basis” means something like “a position funded in whole or in part by fees paid by members of the public for services rendered by judges.” Neither the Code nor the regulations define what “fee basis” means, and the case law is similarly stubborn in its silence.

Judge Holmes ponders the arguments and reaches his decision:

We also have to conclude that the Commissioner’s position is the more reasonable one. An enormous number of government agencies, courts, departments, and boards receive fee income. If Judge Jones’s construction of section 62(a)(2)(C) were correct, all the positions in all these government bodies would be “position[s] compensated in whole or in part on a fee basis.” This would create a caste of employees — those employed as government “officials” — who would be exempt from the rule Congress chose to enact that limits the deductibility of unreimbursed employee expenses. Maybe Congress could do that, but it didn’t do so plainly. Business expenses are also usually thought deductible because they are an ordinary and necessary requirement for producing income. But Judge Jones’s reading of section 62 would uncouple the deductibility of an expense from the income it produces — once a position was funded in part by fees, any employee holding that position would be entitled to unlimited deduction of his unreimbursed business expenses regardless of whether those expenses had anything to do with those fees.

I think Judge Holmes comes to the right conclusion dealing with this obscure provision. If he concluded differently, every public official would be running to their preparers to amend all the open years. Though when it comes to a privileged “caste” of public employees, we’re further down that road than we should be already.

The moral? It’s important to handle business expenses properly. Many taxpayers who own S corporations, for example, pay some business expenses themselves without being reimbursed by the S corporation. Such expenses become “employee” expenses and are routinely lost. By submitting the costs to the employer — their own S corporation — for reimbursement, they become corporation expenses and fully deductible.

Cite: Jones, 146 T.C. No. 3

 

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Accounting Today, Obama Budget Includes Tax Increases and Tax Preparer Regulation. Of course it does.

We need IRS employees to oversee preparers to prevent fraud. IRS Employee Pleads Guilty to $1 Million ID Theft Tax Fraud Scheme (Department of Justice).

Kay Bell, Obama’s final budget is full of big, but unlikely to be fulfilled, tax and spending ideas. It will go over well as his prior budgets.

 

Paul Neiffer, We Knew It Was Coming!:

In doing various tax classes over the last few years, I almost always stated that it would only be a matter of time before the President would ask for this net investment income tax to be applied to S corporation and partnership income whether passive or material.  In the new budget proposal issued by the President, that time has come.

His budget proposes that all income of S corporations and partnerships be subject to the net investment income tax of 3.8%.  This would include any gains from selling any assets inside of these entities or selling the stock or partnership interest.  This will affect farmers who have large gains in the future.

Somehow I don’t think the momentum is there to expand Obamacare taxes.

 

Russ Fox, Can a Resident of a Non-Tax Treaty Country (With Respect to Gambling) Get His Withheld Funds Back? “Canadians are allowed to file a Form 1040NR and claim gambling losses up to the amount of wins, and get a refund. New Zealanders are not.”

Peter Reilly, Is Tax Foundation Unfair To Bernie Sanders? Only if it’s unfair to focus on the destruction that would result from his confiscatory taxes, rather than the magical results he promises when he gives you some of your money back through those wonderful and always efficient government programs.

Lany Villalobos, Patrick Tohomas, The Struggle to Obtain Individual Taxpayer Identification Numbers (Procedurally Taxing). The government is doing its best to increase tax burdens on offshore investors, while at the same time making it hard for them to even start complying.

TaxGrrrl, Ask The Taxgirl: The Child Tax Credit

Robert Wood, New Excuse: ‘Fear Of IRS Audit Made Me Cheat On My Taxes’ Huh?

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1007. After five years, one of the prominent 501(c)(4) applications slow-walked through the IRS process is finally approved. Nope, no politics here.

Tax Policy Blog, 2015 Outstanding Achievement in State Tax Reform Awards. None awarded to Iowans, unsurprisingly.

Ajay Gupta, Hillary Clinton’s Wall on the Border (Tax Analysts Blog):

Turns out the inevitable Democratic nominee, Hillary Clinton, would also build a great, great wall. Unlike Trump’s wall, hers would not deter foreign individuals lacking proper documentation from coming into the country. Instead, it would dissuade U.S. corporations stuck with domestic charters from leaving. And she would have U.S. investors and workers pay for that wall.

Something about grasping politicians loves a wall.

 

Career Corner. Which Popular Accounting Hashtag Should You Use? An Explainer (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

Jim Maule, Stupid Criminals, Tax Version. “According to several reports, including this one, a woman and her son walked into a Liberty Tax Services office in Toledo, Ohio, pointed what appeared to be a gun over which a towel was draped, demanded money, and made off with $280… It turned out that the “gun” was a curling iron. And it also turned out that the staff recognized the two as customers who had used Liberty’s services a few days earlier.”

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Tax Roundup, 2/9/16: Cam Newton lost more than a game in California. And: cats with pink bows!

Tuesday, February 9th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20130819-1Welcome to California, Cam! The quarterback for the losing team in this year’s Super Bowl earned a $51,000 bonus for his trouble. Did he really lose money on the deal, after taxes? K. Sean Packard reports that he loses money on the deal. Is that even possible?

Before we get into the numbers, let’s do a quick review of the jock tax rules applied to professional athletes (similar tax rules apply to anyone doing business across state lines, but they are rarely enforced). States tax a player based on their calendar-year income. They apply a duty day calculation which takes the ratio of duty days within the state over total duty days for the year. That ratio is then multiplied by the player’s salary to arrive at a state’s allocable income.

According to the story, Cam Newton will have about 206 “duty days” this year. Cam Newton’s 2016 salary is $20 million. The Super Bowl gave Mr. Newton 7 California duty days. So, the numbers, as I compute them:

7/206=.0339805825.

$20 million x 0339805825 = 679,612 income allocated to California

California’s tax on $679,612 x 13.3% 90,388. Add the 13.3% on his $51,000 allocated to California, which is not included in the $20,000,000 base, and he owes another $230, for a total California hit of $90,618. That will reduce his federal taxes by about $35,885 (39.6% x 90,618), so his net California hit for the 7 Super Bowl days is $54,733. Considering the 40.5% federal tax on his additional $51,000 of wages ($20,655), Mr. Newton takes a $75,388 net tax hit on his $51,000 earned — a combined 147.8% marginal rate.

If Mr. Newton is a North Carolina resident, he would have paid some of that money in resident state taxes. If he is a tax-savvy Florida resident, it’s all loss. Sort of like the game Sunday.

20141208-2We are all Cam Newton. Not all of us can play football at a high level, but all of us can face similar issues working in another state. Contrary to what the article above says, taxes on cross-border visits aren’t just “rarely” enforced. Some states, including California and New York, enforce these taxes with vigor. Entertainers and corporate executives are the easiest targets, but improved data-mining has allowed states to go downmarket in pursuit of income from workers in-state on short assignments — whether on a consulting or accounting job, or on a sales call.

This creates a potential compliance nightmare for employees who work in multiple states. And if you are a resident of a high-tax state, it’s a nightmare that may not even cost you additional tax, because of credits allowed for non-resident state taxes. Just additional time and prep fees — and potentially ugly penalties if you fail to file in a state you visit briefly.

That’s why the Mobile Workforce State Income Tax Simplification Act would be a good thing. By limiting state taxes on most employees to situations where they spend at least 30 days in a state,  H.R. 2315 would save employees and employers a great deal of pointless compliance hassle. By going to http://www.mobileworkforcecoalition.org/contact-congress/#/ you can tell your Senator to get behind the bill. As Senator Grassley is on the Senate taxwriting committee, he especially needs to hear about it.

Unfortunately for Mr. Newton, it wouldn’t apply to athletes (an unfair exemption, apparently required politically), but it at least H.R. 2315 would keep itinerant accountants out of multi-state tax purgatory.

 

Seventh Avenue, Des Moines, this morning.

 

Russ Fox, IRS Must Pay Fees in Civil Forfeiture Case. “I am not a fan of civil forfeiture as currently practiced: It’s being abused widely by the government. Indeed, some government police agencies consider it a part of their normal funding!” Institute for Justice is also pursuing fees in the case of the Northwest Iowa restaurant owner whose cash was confiscated by IRS. Russ encourages contributions to IJ; I’m a donor.

William Perez, Free Tax Preparation and Tax Problem Resolution Services

Kay Bell, Previous Year of the Monkey stamp offers collectors a nice profit, but a higher capital gains tax rate

Jason Dinesen, Why Yes, I Am “Just” An Enrolled Agent. The EA designation is impressive, and contrary to the attitude of an accountant Jason encountered, CPAs have no cause to be snotty to EAs.

Robert Wood, Hillary’s Wall Street Speech Fees: Hers Or Clinton Foundation’s?. I think that’s a distinction without a difference.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1006

Joseph Thorndike, Bernie Sanders Wants to Soak the Poor — Just Like FDR (Tax Analysts Blog). “Ultimately, however, the most revealing linkage between Sanders and FDR resides not in a shared impulse to tax the rich, but in a common willingness to soak the poor.” You can’t have a mass welfare benefit paid for only by a class tax.

 

What the Northwest Iowa Community College looked like on my visit two years ago.

 

I can’t find this tax rule in the code. A taxpayer brought a novel approach to determining his income to Tax Court in a case released yesterday. The gentleman is of the tax defier persuasion, feline variation (my emphasis):

The Court inquired whether he had any evidence to submit regarding his receipt of income during 2011 from BDL Films, Partizan Entertainment, Avatar Films, or Western Federal Credit Union. He replied: “I don’t even know what you mean by ‘income.’ I have my own definition of income.” Asked what that definition was, he replied: “It’s a cat with a pink bow. I earned no income. I’m in my own jurisdiction. * * * I am not part of the legal society; I have my own society.”

I suspect that his earnings were not routinely paid in cat, with bows of any color. The Court wasn’t persuaded, either:

The petition that petitioner filed in this Court consists solely of frivolous arguments. We warned petitioner four times — twice in advance of trial and twice during trial — that he risked incurring a significant penalty if he persisted in advancing frivolous arguments. He persisted. He has deluged this Court with gibberish and has wasted the resources of respondent’s counsel and this Court. We will accordingly require that he pay to the United States under section 6673(a) a penalty of $3,500.

$3,500 is a lot of kitty litter.

Cite: Bruhwiler, T.C. Memo. 2016-18

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Tax Roundup, 2/8/16: When your password is a key for thieves. And: More Tax Credits!

Monday, February 8th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20150910-2You need more than one password. Another home tax software company reports that its customers may have had their data stolen. Marketwatch.com reports:

In its letter to affected customers, TaxSlayer said it became aware Jan. 13 that hackers had accessed some of its customers’ accounts. The illegal access took place between Oct.10, 2015, and Dec. 21, 2015.

The letter said an “unauthorized third party may have obtained access to any information you included in a tax return or draft tax return saved on TaxSlayer, including your name and address, your Social Security number, the Social Security numbers of your dependents, and other data contained on your 2014 tax return.”

In its statement, TaxSlayer said it doesn’t believe its own systems were breached. Instead, “user credentials, stolen from other sources, were then used to misrepresent our customers and therefore access our program.”

They’re saying that they got passwords from another site and tried them on TaxSlayer, and they worked. That kind of breach is on the user, not the software company.

Reusing passwords is poor data security hygiene. McAfee Software offers some great tips for good passwords. The tips include a list of things people do that make them vulnerable to data theft, including:

Reuse of passwords across multiple sites: Reusing passwords for email, banking, and social media accounts can lead to identity theft. Two recent breaches revealed a password reuse rate of 31% among victims.

If you use different passwords for your different important accounts, one data breach won’t expose your entire financial life.

Related: TaxSlayer data breach is the 3rd tax software-related security issue so far this filing season (Kay Bell)

 

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Brent Willett, Iowa’s next economic frontier (IowaBiz.com). An unintended but useful followup to my IowaBiz post on Friday on the unwisdom of targeted tax credits, the post boosts a proposed new tax credit that I criticized by name. The post touts a new report promising “Fifty thousand jobs” to Iowa if we just enact a new “Bio-Based Chemicals” tax credit.

The post neatly checks off several items I note in my post:

Might these special favors be better for the economy than some farmer or small business who buys a new tractor or machine? You could make that case, but it would be plausible only if these favors were enacted by a process where the state looked at the vast menu of possible industries to support and carefully evaluated which ones were more persuasive. That never happens. Instead, the credits follow the path of the notorious Iowa film industry credits, where an industry gets some legislators and business boosters excited and builds support — sometimes with “studies” funded by booster groups. There is no evaluation of the opportunity costs, of whether the funds would be better used elsewhere.

No comparison to other industry opportunities? Check. Studies funded by booster groups? Check. Ignoring opportunity costs? Check.

I encourage your to read the Willett post and ponder why a government subsidy is needed if the industry is such a slam-dunk.  Also, consider whether you would get the same article by substituting other industries for bio-chemicals in the post.

 

 

Andrew Mitchel: New Expatriate Record for 2015 – Nearly 4,300 Expatriations:

2015 expatriations

“The escalation of offshore penalties over the last 20 years is likely contributing to the increased incidence of expatriation.”

Related: Record Numbers Renounce Their U.S. Citizenship (Robert Wood)

 

Jason Dinesen, Lots and Lots of Scam E-mails this Year. Jason posts many helpful examples. Be very skeptical of emails you don’t expect, and delete any purporting to come from IRS.

Annette Nellen, Ideas for Retirement Savings Reform. “One overall reform Irecommend is to change the focus of retirement plans from the employer to the employee, making them truly portable from job to job and if in employee or contractor status or both.”

Jim Maule, The Biggest Tax Refund?. Overwithholding will do the trick.

Leslie Book, The Limits of the “One Inspection” of Taxpayers’ Books and Records Rule (Procedurally Taxing). “One limitation on IRS powers is the Code itself, as Section 7605(b) provides that ‘only one inspection of a taxpayer’s books of account shall be made for each taxable year unless ․ the [Treasury] Secretary ․ notifies the taxpayer in writing that an additional inspection is necessary.'”

Robert D. Flach, TAX GUIDE FOR NEW HOMEOWNERS

Russ Fox, It Was Only a 13.33% Kickback. A police chief breaks the tax law.

TaxGrrrl, So About Those Cam Newton ‘Sunday Giveaway’ Game Balls…

 

Only the form of your destructor. What Would Be At Stake In A Trump v. Sanders Election? How About $24 Trillion in Tax Revenue (Tony Nitti).

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1003Day 1004Day 1005

Scott Greenberg, White House Calls for Targeting the Cadillac Tax by Location:

Why would the White House propose changes that would weaken the Cadillac Tax – a central part of the administration’s most significant policy achievement? In fact, these changes might be necessary to secure the continued existence of the tax. The White House has been fighting a losing battle to defend the Cadillac Tax, and these proposed changes may placate some of the tax’s opponents, particularly employers in states with high healthcare costs.

We must destroy the Cadillac Tax to save the Cadillac Tax!

Renu Zaretsky, Budget Hearings, Saving, and Entertaining (TaxVox). “There is almost always something perfunctory about the last budget of an outgoing president, but this year’s will generate even less interest than usual. In the ultimate insult, the GOP-run congressional budget committees won’t even invite White House officials to describe their fiscal plan.” And lots more in today’s TaxVox headline roundup.

I reject this false choice. Kentucky Can Attract Tourists Who Like Bible More Than Bourbon Without Violating First Amendment  (Peter Reilly)

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/5/16: The IRS isn’t a bank, and a 1099 isn’t what makes income taxable. And: oil companies, money trees.

Friday, February 5th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20151217-1Nice Try. The tax law discourages taxpayers from tapping retirement savings too early with a 10% early withdrawal tax. The tax law also allows an above-the-line deduction for penalties imposed by banks for closing out a CD or savings account before maturity.

They aren’t the same thing.

A Mr. Martin learned that lesson this week in Tax Court. He was 54 years old when he pulled out $55,976.29 from his IRA. He reported the 10% penalty tax, but then he also deducted it on line 30 of his 1040 as a “penalty on early withdrawal of savings.”

I can see the logic, as it does look like, well, a penalty on an early withdrawal of savings. But that’s not how the Tax Court sees it (my emphasis):

Martin argues that the additional tax imposed by section 72(t) is deductible under section 62(a)(9). We disagree. Section 62(a)(9) provides a deduction for an amount “forfeited to a bank, mutual savings bank, savings and loan association, building and loan association, cooperative bank or homestead association as a penalty for premature withdrawal of funds from a time savings account, certificate of deposit, or similar class of deposit.” The section 72(t) additional tax is payable to the federal government, not to a “bank” or similar institution listed in section 62(a)(9). Therefore, it is not deductible under section 62(a)(9). Further, the additional tax imposed by section 72(t) is a federal-income tax. Section 275(a)(1) disallows any deductions for “Federal income taxes” (A deduction for certain other taxes, including State income taxes and some other federal taxes, is allowed by section 164(a).).

There was one other problem with the return. He won $1,000 at a casino, an amount arguably below the threshold for which casinos most report gambling winnings on a W2-G. They reported it anyway. Again, the Tax Court:

The casino reported on an information return its $1,000 payment to Martin. Martin argues that, because he earned entries into the lottery by playing slot machines, his gambling winnings should be subject to the $1,200 reporting threshold. Thus, Martin argues, the casino should not have reported the gambling  winnings of $1,000 because the payment fell below the $1,200 reporting-requirement threshold for gambling winnings from slot machines.

Martin assumes that gambling winnings that are not reportable on information returns are not includible in gross income. At trial he said that the IRS is “trying to separate the taxation from the reporting when it is undeniably one and the same”. Martin does not see, or refuses to see, the distinction between information-reporting requirements and the imposition of income tax. Whether the casino was required to report Martin’s winnings is irrelevant to the question of whether his winnings are includible in his gross income. The Internal Revenue Code does not exclude a payment from income when the payment is not large enough to require the payor to report the payment on an information return.

A lot of people think that when something doesn’t show up on an information return, it’s tax-free. It just doesn’t work that way.

Cite: Martin, T.C. Memo. 2016-15

 

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Obama seeks oil tax, destruction of self-driving car industryCNBC reports:

President Barack Obama will propose a $10-per-barrel charge on oil to fund clean transportation projects as part of his final budget request next week, the White House said Thursday.

Oil companies would pay the fee, which would be gradually introduced over five years. The government would use the revenue to help fund high-speed railways, autonomous cars and other travel systems, aiming to reduce emissions from the nation’s transportation system.

“Oil companies would pay the fee.” Such a kidder, that President. Apparently the oil companies will pay it by planting more carbon-absorbing money trees out behind their refineries.

It’s a credit to misguided persistence that the President is still pursuing high-speed passenger rail, an idea that California is busy proving once again to be ridiculously expensive and impractical. And somehow I’d feel much safer in an autonomous car from Google or Apple than one from the the same government that brings us the IRS.

 

Scott Hodge, New IRS Data: Wealthy Paid 55 Percent of Income Taxes in 2014 (Tax Policy Blog).

distribution 2014 income

“So while many politicians may argue that the wealthy don’t pay their fair share of income taxes, the data simply does not support that opinion.”

 

Russ Fox, Maryland Suspends Processing Tax Returns from 23 Liberty Tax Service Locations:

For consumers, the advice that Maryland noted in their press release is accurate: “Taxpayers should carefully review their returns for these issues and should be suspicious if a preparer: deducts fees from the taxpayer’s refund to be deposited into the tax preparer’s account; does not sign the tax return; or fails to include the Preparer Taxpayer Identification number “PTIN” on the return.” I’ll add, if you don’t own a business and see business income on your return, there’s a problem.

Indeed.

Kay Bell, Lesson from IRS hardware failure: Be prepared for the unexpected during tax filing season. The hardware went back on line yesterday afternoon. 

TaxGrrrl, Update: IRS Website Back Online, Tax Refunds Unaffected

Peter ReillyIRS And The Tea Party – Scandal Enters A New Millennium. Peter observes The TaxProf’s Day 1000 Tea Party Scandal entry.

Keith Fogg, Discharging Late Filed Returns – A Novel but Unsuccessful Approach. “The case shows the creativity that can come into play in the face of very long odds.”

Robert Wood, Bank Julius Baer Hit With $547M Criminal Tax Evasion Penalty, Two Bankers Plead Guilty

 

Me, Tax credits for a few vs. business deductions for everyone. I take my battle against cronyism and for conforming Iowa tax law to 2015 federal changes to IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record Business Professional’s Blog.

 

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1,002. Another supposedly-erased hard drive sought by investigators miraculously reappears.

Megan McArdle, Obamacare’s Cadillac Tax Will Not Survive. The way pieces of the machine keep falling off, you might wonder if it wasn’t very well designed.

Renu Zaretsky, A Budget, Capital, Growth, and TransparencyToday’s TaxVox news roundup covers the Obama oil fee, last night’s Sanders-Clinton debate, and lots more.

News from the Profession. Lying About Your Financial Statements Being Audited Still Frowned Upon (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/4/16. Confirmed: Governor opposes coupling to ALL 2015 changes. And: Are hipsters really flocking downtown?

Thursday, February 4th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

coupling20160129Worst Iowa tax policy decision ever. Governor Branstad doesn’t want to conform Iowa’s tax law to any of the extender provisions passed in December for 2015. A reliable source has confirmed our earlier report that the Governor wants to skip coupling entirely for 2015, and then conform to everything except Section 179 and bonus depreciation in 2016 and beyond.

It’s bad enough that he doesn’t want to conform with the $500,000 federal Section 179 for the first time in years — imposing a big tax increase on small businesses and farmers in every county. But conforming to nothing means a whole host of separate Iowa computations for 2015 returns — and 2015 only. Without spending a lot of time, I come up with these:

Exclusion for IRA contributions to charity
Exclusion of gain from qualified small business stock
Basis adjustment for S corporation charitable contributions
Built-in gain tax five-year recognition period
Educator expense deduction
Exclusion of home mortgage debt forgiveness
Qualified tuition deduction
Conservation easement deductions
Deduction for food inventory contributions

I have asked the Department of Revenue for a complete list of affected provisions, and I will provide it if they send one.

These will have effects on thousands of taxpayers ranging from minor annoyance and more expensive tax compliance to major unexpected Iowa tax expense. To take a common example, the exclusion fo IRA contributions to charity allows taxpayers aged 70 1/2 or older to have their IRAs make contributions to charity directly. This means the contributions bypass their federal 1040s altogether. But for Iowa, the Governor would have the IRA holder include the contribution in taxable income and then, presumably, add it to their itemized deductions — if the taxpayer itemizes in the first place.

Some of these can be very costly. For example, the exclusion of gain for qualifying C corporation stock sales can apply to up to $10 million of capital gain. The exclusion benefits start-up businesses, which Iowa allegedly supports with at least four separate tax credits. Failure to couple would clobber a $10 million 2015 gain with an unexpected $898,000 tax bill.

There is bipartisan support for coupling with all federal provisions other than bonus depreciation for 2015. The Iowa House of Representatives has already passed such a bill on a bipartisan 82-14 vote. But Governor Branstad and Senate Majority Leader Gronstal have apparently reached a little bipartisan deal of their own to keep the Senate from ever voting on 2015 conformity. The Senate tax committee meeting yesterday was cancelled, which I hope means the Senate leadership is getting pressure to back off this stupid policy.

If you are affected, or if your clients are (they are), I encourage you to let your Iowa Senator know how you feel.

Related Coverage:

Iowa House passes $500,000 Section 179, but prospects bleak in Senate.

Iowa Governor reportedly opposes 2015 coupling for anything.

Branstad budget omits $500,000 Section 179 deduction for Iowa; no 2015 conformity.

 

20130218-1What do you mean, IBM doesn’t stock the vacuum tubes anymore? IRS Systems Outage Shuts Down Tax Processing (Accounting Today):

The Internal Revenue Service said Wednesday evening its tax-processing systems have suffered a hardware failure and that tax processing could be affected into Thursday.

“The IRS experienced a hardware failure this afternoon affecting a number of tax processing systems, which are currently unavailable,” said the IRS. “Several of our systems are not currently operating, including our modernized e-file system and a number of other related systems. The IRS is currently in the process of making repairs and working to restore normal operations as soon as possible. We anticipate some of the systems will remain unavailable until tomorrow.”

The IRS says it’s confident that it will have the system restored by the weekend and that any refund delays will be minor.

Related: IRS Having One of Those Days (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern); TaxGrrrl, IRS Website Hit With Hardware Failure, Some Refund & Payment Tools Unavailable.

 

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Jason Dinesen, The Iowa Trust Fund Tax Credit is $0 for 2015

Robert Wood, Perfectly Legal Tax Write-off? Lawyer Fees — Even $1,200 An Hour

Russ Fox, A Tale of Three States. “Hawaii, Indiana, and Mississippi are three states where daily fantasy sports (DFS) is being debated. The three states are representative of what is likely to occur in every state.”

Keith Fogg, Verification of Bankruptcy Action in a Collection Due Process Case (Procedurally Taxing). “Because Appeals employees often have very little knowledge of bankruptcy, this case points out the need to pay careful attention in CDP cases that follow bankruptcy actions and challenge verifications where the Appeals employee fails to acknowledge the impact of the bankruptcy case.”

Bob Vineyard, Aetna Not Pulling Plug on Obamacare …. Yet (InsureBlog). Many Iowans get coverage through Aetna’s Coventry unit. But as the company expects to lose $1 billion over two years on Exchange policies, their willingness to continue to provide ACA – compliant policies on the exchange will be sorely tried.

Jack Townsend, Another Taxpayer Guilty Plea for Offshore Account Misbehavior

Peter Reilly, Tax Dependency Exemptions For Noncustodial Parents – It Is All About Form 8332. It really is. Form 8332 provides a way for couples to continue fighting long after the divorce is final.

Jim Maule, “Can a Clone Qualify as a Qualifying Child or Qualifying Relative?”

 

Scott Greenberg, The Tax Benefits of Having an Additional Child (Tax Policy Blog). In case your decision hinges on this.

Renu Zaretsky, Debates, Energy, Credits and PrepToday’s TaxVox roundup covers tonight’s Democratic Debate, energy tax policy, and a shutdown of 26 Liberty Tax franchise operations in Maryland.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 1,001

 

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Is Hip, Cool Des Moines Really Attracting Migrants? (Lyman Stone). I haven’t seen any local media pick this up, but this is a fascinating look at migration and population patterns Downtown and across Polk County. It is inspired by the recent Politico piece on how hip and all we are (emphasis in original):

In fact, throughout the article, there’s an interesting claim made that the population of downtown Des Moines has risen from 1,000 at some unspecified time in the 1990s, to at least over 10,000 as of 2016. In fact, throughout the article, there’s an interesting claim made that the population of downtown Des Moines has risen from 1,000 at some unspecified time in the 1990s, to at least over 10,000 as of 2016.

The claim turns out to be exaggerated, but only a little:

Downtown Des Moines probably did not gain 10,000 residents from the late 1990s to 2016, nor does it seem likely that it had just 1,000 residents at any time in the last few decades. However, that doesn’t mean the essential claims of Woodard’s story are wrong. Au contraire, Des Moines has gained about 10,000 people since 2000, and has about 9,000 more people than we would expect had 1987 growth rates continued. That’s a meaningful acceleration in urban growth, and a significant number have been headed to the very center of the city.

It’s a great read with some surprising observations about how suburban and downtown growth complement each other.

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Tax Roundup, 2/1/2016: Caucus day, and other plagues.

Monday, February 1st, 2016 by Joe Kristan

20160131-1Is there such a thing as snow locusts? Today is the last day Iowa will be plagued by presidential candidates and their relentless ads and emails. Tonight, blizzard and winter storm warnings across the state.

Lots of things go into choosing a candidate. We kid ourselves if we think it is all rational. Many voters put as much thought into their political preferences as they do into choosing a favorite sports team. Most voters are much more informed about their sports teams than their votes.

But Tax Update readers are different!  You especially want to know about candidate tax policies. Fortunately, the Tax Foundation has an excellent Comparison of Presidential Tax Plans and Their Economic Effects. I like this chart they provide:

taxplanchart

You’ll notice that only one plan is projected to have positive economic effects while reducing the budget deficit over 10 years. I like that one.

 

Other Caucus-related links:

Tax Policy Center Major candidate tax proposals, a center-left analysis.

TaxProf, Clinton (47%), Sanders (54%) Propose Highest Capital Gain Tax Rates (Now 24%) In History

Tyler Cowen, My favorite things Iowa (Marginal Revolution). “The bottom line: Who would have thought ‘jazz musician’ would be the strongest category here?” Speak for yourself, buddy!

 

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Russ Fox, The Liberty to Commit Tax Fraud:

This story does show two things. First, requiring every tax professional to obtain a license won’t stop tax fraud. The alleged fraud here was started by an individual with a PTIN, someone who assuredly could obtain the former RTRP designation or the current AFSP “seal of approval.” Second, the Department of Justice news release notes, “In the past decade, the Tax Division has obtained injunctions against hundreds of unscrupulous tax preparers.” This is absolutely true, and the DOJ should be commended for their work. It also shows that licensing every tax professional isn’t needed to get rid of unscrupulous ones.

Amen.

William Perez, When Does an 83(b) Election Make Sense? 

Paul Neiffer, Pre-1977 Purchases May Get 100% Step-up or Not! Involving old joint interests in property.

Kay Bell, W-2, 1099 forms delivery deadline is here

Jack Townsend, 60 Minutes Exposé on Money Laundering Into the U.S.

Jason Dinesen, Not All Donations to Charity Are Deductible. Time, for example.

Kristine Tidgren, Des Moines Water Works Lawsuit Gets More Complicated (AgDocket)

Peter Reilly, NorCal Tea Party Patriots V IRS – Grassroots Or Astroturf?

Leslie Book, Migraine Caused by Improper IRS Collection Action During Bankruptcy Stay Triggers Damages for Emotional Distress

Robert Wood, Worst Lottery To Win Is IRS Audit Lottery, So Decrease Your Odds

TaxGrrrl, Understanding Your Tax Forms 2016: 1098-T, Tuition Statement

Tony Nitti, IRS Rules On Whether Trade-In Of Private Jet Qualifies For A Tax-Free Like-Kind Exchange

Happy Blogiversary! to Hank Stern for 10 years of Insureblog.

 

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Matt Gardner, International Speedway Reaps Benefits of Revived “NASCAR Tax Break” (Tax Justice Blog). In which the Tax Justice people sctually make a lot of sense: “In the context of our growing budget deficits, the annual cost of the NASCAR giveaway is a drop in the bucket at less than $20 million, making it a small part of the $680 billion extenders package. But because its benefits are narrowly focused on a few privileged companies, the damaging effects of this tax break go way beyond its fiscal cost.”

Donald Marron, What Should We Do with the Money from Taxing “Bads”? (TaxVox)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 996Day 997, Day 998. Day 997 links to  IRS’s New Ethics Chief Once Ordered Records Be Illegally Destroyed. These are the people who think they need to regulate tax preparers to keep us in line.

 

Scott Drenkard, David Bowie: Tax Planning Hero (Tax Policy Blog). “Taxes really matter, especially for an artist like Bowie who had a lot of options for where to reside and earn income.”

Robert D. Flach, THE TWELVE DAYS OF TAX SEASON

 

Finally, in honor of the Iowa Caucuses I quote the great Arnold Kling, who captures my feelings about these proceedings perfectly:

To me, political campaigns are not sacred events, to be eagerly anticipated and avidly followed. They are brutal assaults on reason. I look forward to election season about as much as a gulf coast resident looks forward to hurricane season.

Only the beginning of a wise and profound post. Read it all.

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Tax Roundup, 1/26/16: Tempt not your tax pro. And: Airbnb, Buzz, and inspiring emails from the boss!

Tuesday, January 26th, 2016 by Joe Kristan

dimeIf only she had taken an IRS-approved ethics continuing education course. Accountant charged in $1M embezzlement case (Herald-Dispatch.com):

HUNTINGTON – A local accountant is charged with 953 criminal counts accusing her of embezzling more than $1 million from at least one client’s account over a five-year period, according to criminal complaints filed by the West Virginia State Police.

Kimberly Dawn Price, 57, of Huntington, was arraigned Friday on 302 counts of embezzlement, 326 counts of forgery, and 325 counts of uttering at Cabell Count Magistrate Court.

There’s so much that has gone wrong here. For example:

According to criminal complaints, Price, while employed as a staff accountant at the Huntington-based firm Hess, Stewart, and Campbell, PLLC, was directly in charge of the account of Elizabeth Caldwell, a Huntington woman who died in the fall of 2015.

That’s a lot of authority for a staff accountant. I don’t understand, though, why anybody would give their outside accountant full access to their checking accounts. Or why any accounting firm would ever want its employees to deal with that sort of temptation. To be sure, the partners may not have known she had the client checkbook.

When hiring a tax pro, you want them to do a good job of preparing your return, helping you comply with the tax law, and getting you refunds when they are due. It’s not their job to spend it for you. They don’t need your checkbook.

 

Let us operate in your town, you’ll be glad you did. Airbnb, the online facilitator of private short-term rentals, not long ago announced that it would work with states and localities to collect lodging taxes. I suspected that they would use the lure of revenue to convince reluctant municipalities to allow them to operate. Yes, there are silly municipalities, like my own West Des Moines, who prevent people from renting their homes out for, say, the Iowa Caucus crowd.

Now Airbnb seems to confirm my suspicions with their new report, AIRBNB: Generating #2 BILLION IN POTENTIAL TAX REVENUE FOR AMERICA’S CITIES.

Just the sort of argument that carries weigh in city halls everywhere.

 

buzz20150827The bees may be quiet for the winter, but Robert D. Flach is Buzzing! Today’s Buzz covers 1095-Cs, retirement savings, state anti-fraud measures, and a certain national tax prep franchise.

Russ Fox, FTB’s New MyFTB Impresses; Will the IRS Take Heed?:

If you’re a tax professional who deals with California clients or a California taxpayer, I urge you to enroll in MyFTB. I’m very impressed. I may rag on the FTB (especially in the enforcement area) but from my point of view MyFTB is a model to be emulated by the rest of the country.

California has made it easier for practitioners to get powers of attorney online.

Robert Wood, Married Filing Joint Tax Returns? IRS Helps Some Couples With Offshore Accounts. “The new rules are a welcome change. But they should still underscore the importance of deciding which disclosure program is right for you.”

Emily CaubleReforming the Non-Disavowal Doctrine (Procedurally Taxing) “I will refer to courts’ resistance to taxpayers’ attempts to invoke substance-over-form as the ‘Non-Disavowal Doctrine.'”

Jason Dinesen, Glossary: 529 Plan. “The term “529 Plan” is a generic name given to tax-advantaged savings accounts for college expenses.”

William Perez, Tips for a Tax-Efficient Divorce, Plus a List of What to Do First

Annette Nellen, Recent Tax Law Change Cautions

Kay Bell, Arizona proposal: a state tax credit for gun classes. Tax credits. Is there anything they can’t do?

 

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Scott Greenberg, How the Tax Code Discourages Investment, in One Statistic (Tax Policy Blog). “The results are disheartening: over time, U.S. corporations will only be able to deduct 87.14 percent of the cost of investments they made in 2012, in present value terms.”

Renu ZaretskyOutlooks, Deficits, Breaks and Moves. Inversions, deficits forever, and state budget battles.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 992

Sebastian Johnson, State Rundown 1/25: State of the States (Tax Justice Blog). “Read all about the latest tax debates in West Virginia, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, and North Carolina. Plus a listing with links to State of the State addresses.”

 

News from the Profession. Confidential to a Certain Deloitte CEO: Millennials Don’t Need Any More Emails (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern)

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Tax Roundup, 1/22/16: Tax scams for tax pros. And: How Des Moines got so cool once I moved here.

Friday, January 22nd, 2016 by Joe Kristan

Accounting Today Visitors:  Click here for the post on Popular wisdom and tax rates.

 

Gone Phishing. It’s not just taxpayers that get scam emails. Scammers also aim at tax pros. For example:

Phishing message 20160122

Of course the message is a fake. It was sent by the sketchy-sounding email address “info@tablerockbelize.com” and the link goes to something called “otadealsbox.com/irs.” Nothing good would happen from following that link. Be careful out there.

 

Nicole Kaeding, Map: State-Local Tax Burden Rankings for FY 2012 (Tax Policy Blog):

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While Iowa’s tax burden isn’t that out of line — it’s actually a little better than average — our business tax climate is one of the worst. It’s a result of how poorly designed Iowa’s tax system is. The good news is that there’s a lot of room to improve our tax system without increasing the overall tax burden.

 

Start your weekend right with fresh Buzz! from Robert D. Flach. Today’s links cover lots of ground on early filing, and a good explanation of why the talk of how “IRS now has six years to audit your taxes” isn’t right.

Jason Dinesen, Do I Need Form 1095-C to File My Tax Return? The next question: how many taxpayers even know to expect one?

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William Perez reminds readers to Communicate Effectively with Your Tax Preparer

Annette Nellen, Filing 2015 tax returns – help for practitioners

Kay Bell has 4 filing tips to ensure you get your tax refund ASAP

Robert Wood, What To Do If Form 1099 Reports More To IRS Than You Received

Paul Neiffer, Mr. Market Wants Its Excess Profits Back. “We know what happened after the 1970s and now Mr. Market is now trying to grab those excess profits back from farmers from the ‘ethanol’ boom.”  Of course, aging corn state politicians are fighting back by yelling at clouds.

Jim Maule, Deductions Arising from Constructive Payments. “The Tax Court explained that payment by an S corporation of a shareholder’s personal expense is a constructive distribution. It pointed out that this principle had previously been articulated by the court. Thus, explained the court, ‘It also follows that for purposes of claiming the deduction, the shareholder is treated as constructively paying the obligation.'”

Peter Reilly, Tax Planning In Bernie Sanders Land Would Feel Familiar To Elderly CPAs. Older than me, even.

E. Martin Davidoff, New Format of Notice of Intent to Levy Fails to Provide Sufficient Notice (Procedurally Taxing)

Russ Fox, Fail, Caesar! An Update. Implications for poker pros.

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TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 988. “Tax Agency Erased Hard Drive Despite Litigation Hold.” Don’t try that with your tax records.

Jeremy Scott, Furor Over Extenders and Rising Deficits Disingenuous (Tax Analysts Blog), my emphasis:

So the new CBO report is something of a bitter pill for Obama. But the president isn’t to blame, according to some observers. In fact, the CBO itself points out that about half the cost of rising deficits is from tax legislation enacted since August 2015. The biggest chunk, of course, comes from the extenders compromise, which made some expiring (or expired) tax provisions permanent. That hurts the budget outlook, which always assumed expiring tax provisions would stay expired.

But extenders have never been allowed to stay expired. They are always renewed — sometimes late and sometimes retroactively, but without significant exception. And that makes the CBO’s observations about extenders deceptive. It also highlights why previous CBO projections about the deficit were always too rosy. By assuming that extenders would go away once they expired, budget forecasters were always showing too much revenue. If the CBO had used a model that assumed Congress would continually renew popular provisions like the research credit, the deduction for state and local sales taxes, and bonus depreciation, the numbers would look almost identical to what the January 19 report is showing now.

Exactly. The extenders were an ongoing accounting scam, pretending provisions that were permanent in reality would go away. “By making some extenders permanent, Congress has finally allowed the CBO to paint a more realistic portrait of the federal deficit and the long-term budget outlook.”

Matt Gardner, After Years of Shrinking, Nation’s Deficit Set to Grow in 2016; Recent Tax Cuts a Contributor (Tax Justice Blog)

 

Howard Gleckman, What Are the Consequences of a Financial Transactions Tax? (TaxVox). Aside from moving exchanges offshore, damaging markets, erasing wealth, and making it harder for the little guy to close transactions, it’s a great idea.

 

Joseph Thorndike, Do Progressives Hate Tax Reform? (Tax Analysts Blog):

The Tax Reform Act of 1986 was far from perfect, but it made good on the lower rates/broader base mantra. Almost immediately, however, both parts of the bargain began to fray; rates began creeping up within a few years, and preferences (never vanquished entirely in the first place) also began to grow. By the mid-1990s, tax reform was starting to look like a disappointment, to both liberals and conservatives.

Today, classic tax reform has little real support outside the wonk community. So it’s fair to say, as Holtz-Eakin does repeatedly, that liberals don’t care about tax reform.

But neither do conservatives.

I think that’s always true, in a way. That doesn’t mean it’s not worth doing.

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News from the Profession. Report: CPAs Exaggerate Their Success at the Bar, Pretty Much Everywhere (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).

Fun link: How America’s Dullest City Got Cool. I think they overstate how much of the revival of Des Moines was planned by anyone, but they are right to point out home much this town has improved since I moved here in 1985 (proving that correlation is definitely not causation). Thanks to @lymanstoneky for the link on Twitter.

 

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