Posts Tagged ‘SF106’

Tax Roundup, 2/15/2013: Governor couples Iowa taxes to fiscal cliff bill. Also: 19 years for municipal thief.

Friday, February 15th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1Governor Branstad has signed the bill conforming Iowa’s tax law to federal changes enacted last month.  The Governor signed SF 106 yesterday afternoon.

The bill allows taxpayers to use several federal provisions in computing their 2012 Iowa taxes, including:

- The federal Section 179 deduction of up to $500,000.

- The federal above-the-line deductions for tuition and educator expenses.

- The exclusion for IRA distributions to charity for taxpayers who have reached age 70 1/2, and the transitional rules for January 2013 charitable rollovers of IRA distributions.

- The optional deduction for state and local sales taxes.

The bill does not conform Iowa to federal bonus depreciation; Iowa filers will normally use federal standard MACRS depreciation instead.

 

Tony Nitti,  Senate Proposal for Tax Reform Part II: Democrats Seek To End S Corporation Payroll Tax Loophole.  It’s similar to nonsensical proposals put forward in prior years to tax S corporation K-1 income when 75% or more of revenues are “attributable” to three or fewer shareholders — an impossible standard to evaluate in many cases, and one that discriminates against the smallest S corporations.  It shows they are lazy — the problems with the approach are well known, yet the won’t make the effort to correct, instead trotting out the same old bill.  It just shows they aren’t serious.

David Cay Johnston finds the cuts to IRS funding that would result from the impending sequester “Particularly Devastating” (Tax.com)

 

Going Concern,  Former Dixon Comptroller Rita Crundwell Gets Nearly 20 Years.  She stole over $50 million from an Illinois municipality of 15,000 people going back to 1990.  And nobody noticed for over 20 years.

Kay Bell,  IRS’ Where’s My Refund? site swamped by impatient refund tracking taxpayers.

Taxpayers overwhelmed with compliance demands, asks government to slow down.  IRS Overwhelmed With Refund Requests, Asks Taxpayers To Slow Down(TaxGrrrl)

Paul Neiffer, Another Bill to Reduce Farm Payments is Introduced!

Jack Townsend, Swiss and US Sign IGA.  An agreement under the “FATCA” foreign bank reporting rules.

Patrick Temple-West, Married couples face tough taxes, and more (Tax Break)

Russ Fox, Nevada Looks to Tax Online Poker Tournaments

Donald Marron,  The Balanced Budget Amendment’s $300 Billion Error

News you can use.  Retire Rich: The Forbes 2013 Antiretirement Guide (Janet Novack)

Nick Kasprak,  Happy Valentine’s Day! Will You Marry Me (For Tax Reasons?) (Tax Policy Blog).

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Some people are just incurable romantics!

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Tax Roundup, 2/7/2013: Iowa Code Conformity Bill goes to Governor. And: West Des Moines denture tax evasion

Thursday, February 7th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1The Iowa House of Representatives  passed without changes SF 106, the bill updating Iowa’s income tax to incorporate last month’s Fiscal Cliff tax bill.  The bill conforms to all federal changes except for bonus depreciation, which remains unavailable on Iowa returns.

Now the bill goes to Governor Branstad.  The Governor vetoed a prior conformity bill because it adopted bonus depreciation; he is expected to sign this one.

The early passage of these bills is a relief to taxpayers affected by the federal changes.  Now they know how to file their Iowa 2012 returns.  Among the items affected by the bill:

- Section 179 depreciation.  Iowa now adopts the federal $500,000 limit for 2012 and 2013.

- IRA charitable distributions up to $100,000

- The above-the-line deductions for educator expenses and college tuition

- The optional deduction for state and local sales taxes.

No word yet on when the Governor will act on the bill.

 

West Des Moines denture-maker pleads to tax evasion.  The West Des Moines Patch reports:

Charles R. Barbour, who entered his plea to one count of income tax evasion in a proceeding before U.S. Magistrate Judge Celeste F. Bremer, will be sentenced on May 9.

In it, Barbour admitted that he understated tax year 2006 income in the amount of nearly $81,000, tax year 2007 income in the amount of nearly $51,000, tax year 2008 income in the amount of nearly $52,900 and tax year 2009 income in the amount of $11,300.

From the plea agreement it appears that the charges involve diversion of business receipts from his denture-making business to a personal bank account, and improper deductions:

Barbour willfully claimed false business expenses on the Schedules C for tax years 2007, 2008 and 2009; deducting internet and cable expenses for his residence as advertising expense; rent payments on a condominium and an apartment as rent expense; loan repayments to his parents as equipment repairs and maintenance expense; payments for his daughter’s medical expenses as medical supplies; payments to a local country club as professional development; and child support payments as professional fees and contract labor expenses.

The standard IRS audit programs for business expenses look for personal expenses disguised as business expenses, and an experienced examiner knows where to look.  That makes sneaking personal expenses onto a business return a bad bet — and if you make a habit of it, it can become a much bigger problem than back taxes and penalties.

 

Tyler Cowen,  Will health insurance premia rise for young males?

 Look at Table 1– where it says that the average premium for young healthy males will go from $2,000 to a little over $5,000. Yikes.

When the largely-optional penalty for not buying insurance is $695, it doesn’t seem likely that healthy young males will buy a lot of insurance — especially when they can buy it when they get sick because of the rules against pre-existing condition limits.  It’s hard to imagine this working well.

 

Jack Townsend,  Article for Canadians with Unreported Canadian Retirement Plans and Accounts.  More news from the foreign tax compliance jaywalker-shooting front.

Linda Beale,  Soon-to-be Google litigation with IRS over 2003-4 returns?  A disclosure in their 10-K.

Kaye Thomas,  Gaps in Cost Basis Reporting.  Don’t just take as gospel what the broker tells you.

Ellen Kant, Super Bowl Loophole (Tax Policy Blog).  On how the hugely-profitable NFL, and other sports leagues, are tax-exempt.

Elaine Maag, The Immigration Debate: Another Reason We Ought to Separate Work and Family Credits (TaxVox).

Have you ever tried to shoot one?  Oh, I thought you said “Quail.”  There Is Nothing Perplexing About Quill (Cara Griffith, Tax.com):

By saying that Quill created a perplexing inquiry gives credence to the idea that states can get around the physical presence requirement, but they can’t.

Try telling that to Iowa.

 

Russ Fox has a new book out, Tax Strategies for the Small Business OwnerCool!

Yeah, that will solve the deficit. Obama repeats call to end tax break for corporate jets, and more. (Patrick Temple-West, Tax Break).  I’m sure that will be wonderful news at the HondaJet North Carolina production facility that is newly up and running.

TaxGrrrl, Taxpayer Alleges IRS Agent Offered Sex In Exchange For Lower Tax Penalties On Audit.  Sounds far-fetched, but based on what I have seen of IRS agents, it would be a human rights offense.

 

You expected “Days of Our Lives?” The Situation Around the Registered Tax Return Preparer Program Has Become a Really Bad Soap Opera (Going Concern)

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Tax Roundup, 2/5/2013: Iowa conformity bill clears Senate. Also: the uses of GPS navigation!

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1The Iowa Senate approved the Iowa tax code conformity bill, SF 106, yesterday.  The bill was approved 48-0, which is a good sign that it will pass quickly — enabling Iowans to get on with filing their 2012 business returns.

The bill updates Iowa’s income tax for the Fiscal Cliff tax bill changes passed last month by Congress.    Key items updated to match federal rules include:

- Conforming with the $500,000 federal Section 179 deduction limit for 2012 and 2013.

- Allowing the optional deduction for state and local sales taxes for 2012 and 2013.

- Conforming to federal research credit rule changes

- Continuing the IRA charitable distribution exclusion

- Adopting the federal “above the line” deductions for college tuition and for out-of-pocket expenses of educators.

The bill does not adopt federal bonus depreciation for 2012 and 2013.  The bill does not show up yet on the calendars for the House Ways and Means Committee or for House floor debate, so it may not get to the Governor this week.  Update, 9:00 am: An e-mail from the House floor manager for the bill says the House may take it up as soon as tomorrow.

 

More boffo reviews for the shutdown of the IRS preparer regulation program! 

The Weekly Standard raves:

It’s hard to choose just one IRS knee-slapper, but here goes. The agency insists IJ’s “suggestion that the return preparer program is the product of a tainted lobbying effort is belied by support for the program from the Taxpayer Advocate, the Electronic Tax Administration Advisory Committee, numerous consumer advocacy groups, and comments from individual practitioners.”
The ETAAC is an IRS-administered panel whose members include lawyers and CPAs—who weren’t subject to the regulations—and people with connections to H&R Block and Jackson Hewitt, big businesses happy to help the government force the little guys out of the industry.

Protecting the taxpayers has never been the point.

The Wall Street Journal weighs in:

Rather than continuing to fight in court, the agency would do better to cashier the rules on legal and economic grounds. They are a classic example of big business harnessing government power to aid the powerful at the expense of small-business competitors. Meantime, won’t someone in Congress tell the IRS to stop exceeding its legal authority?

Sadly, no.

Meanwhile, the IRS has re-opened its PTIN registration system. It appears the IRS will still charge for them, though it’s not clear why anymore.

 

Nick Kasprak, Weekly Map: Sources of State and Local Tax Revenue: Sales, Excise, and Gross Receipts Tax:

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Leave Gennifer Flowers Alone!  Clinton woman pleads guilty to false tax returns.  Clinton, Iowa, that is.  From the Clinton Herald:

Regina Jimenez, 60, of Clinton pleaded guilty to two counts of filing
false tax returns. She faces up to three years of prison, a fine of up
to $1 million and costs of prosecution on each count.

According to court documents, Jimenez operated AA Accounting & Tax
Services, Inc. in Clinton from approximately 2007 through 2011. Jimenez
used the business to facilitate the theft of more than $200,000 from a
client who believed that Jimenez would use the money to pay the client’s
taxes.

There’s never a good reason to have your tax preparer pay your income taxes for you.  If your preparer tries to get cash from you “to give to the IRS,” ask many questions.

 

Paul Neiffer, Hedging Versus Speculation:

Remember, if the farmer purchases a corn call option as part of this hedging strategy, this no longer qualifies as a hedge (even though is a normal strategy of selling actuals and buying the “board”, for tax purposes, it is not a hedge)  and is considered speculation.  In many cases, the tax treatment can be harsh since if the option produces income, the IRS will treat it as ordinary and if it produces a loss, it will be considered a capital loss (the worst of both).

 

Because partnership tax isn’t screwed up enough?    Why the IRS Should be Taxing the Profits of Private Equity Funds as Ordinary Income (Steven Rosenthal, TaxVox).

Robert D. Flach, tax man of La Mancha New Jersey Pennsylvania, chases his favorite windmill: BEFORE I GO – MY “CRUSADE”

Windmills everywhere!  Carl Levin Continues to Play the Role of Don Quixote (Jeremy Scott, Tax.com)

Patrick Temple-West,  Democrats target corporate tax breaks, and more

TaxGrrrl, Guess What Turned 100 This Weekend?

Kay Bell,  Happy 100th birthday federal income tax

Brian Strahle,  The Maryland Wynne Case is Decided, Will The State Appeal Further?  A possible refund for Maryland residents with taxes in other states.

Brian Mahany,  OVDI – It’s Not Just For Unreported Foreign Accounts

 

Why you should spring for a good GPS unit.  You might get lost otherwise, like a star-crossed couple in my home town of West Des Moines.  The Des Moines Register reports:

The incident occurred at about 2:12 a.m. Friday, when a car pulled into a police station driveway at 250 Mills Civic Parkway marked for “Authorized Personnel,” according to a police report.

Police said the car passed two patrol cars and drove up a private drive before turning around when it reached a garage. An officer in one of the patrol cars then turned on his top lights and stopped the car.

The driver told officers they were trying get to Beach Girls, an adult entertainment venue at 6220 Raccoon River Dr., West Des Moines, according to the report.

The two officers reported that both the driver and passenger had bloodshot, watery eyes and that the vehicle smelled of marijuana.

If they mistook the West Des Moines cop shop for a strip club, either they already had enough fun for the night, or strip joints have changed a lot since my bachelor days.

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/1/2013: What’s Iowa’s 2012 tax law? And you thought 50 years was bad? How about 351?

Friday, February 1st, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1Iowa legislature goes 0-for-January.  The Iowa General Assembly has been completed the first three weeks of its 2013 session without settling what Iowa’s tax law is for last year.  The legislation needed to update Iowa’s 2012 tax law for the retroactive federal changes enacted in the Fiscal Cliff bill at the beginning of this year hasn’t cleared either house of the legislature.  The Senate Ways and Means Committee at least moved its bill (SF 106) out of committee Wednesday, while House Ways and Means hasn’t even done that much with its bill (HF 110)

Many Iowans were affected by the retroactive changes, including educators and people who made energy-saving home improvements.  Almost all businesses are affected by the Federal extension of $500,000 Section 179 expensing of depreciable property for 2012.  Yet these taxpayers can’t complete their Iowa 2012 tax returns until the legislature decides what parts of the federal changes to accept.

The silliest part: we pretty much know what the bill will look like.  It’s almost certain that it will adopt federal Section 179 rules and the other “extender” rules, without adopting federal “bonus depreciation.”  That means there’s no reason to dawdle.  But dawdle they do.

50 years for Wasendorf.  The Wasll Street Journal reports:

Russell Wasendorf Sr., was sentenced to the maximum 50 years in jail after admitting to orchestrating a fraud at his futures brokerage and misleading regulators for almost 20 years.

Mr. Wasendorf, 64 years old, pleaded guilty last September to the fraud at Peregrine Financial Group Inc. that federal prosecutors said had cost clients $215.5 million and masked a business that never was profitable.  He also was ordered to pay the full amount of missing funds in restitution.

Mr. Wasendorf got away with it by forging paper bank statements for the regulators and auditors.  The scam blew up when Peregrine was forced to move to electronic account verification.  Sadly, the chances of full restitution being paid to his victims are less than the chances he will walk out of prison at the end of his sentence.

 

But it could be worse.  Florida woman faces potential 351 years in prison for tax fraud (CPA Practice Advisor)

 

Kay Bell, Congressman wants answers from IRS regarding tax preparer registration

 

TaxGrrrl,  Wrong Side Of An Audit: Memo Argues IRS Inflated Numbers, Exaggerated Figures.  My favorite part (my emphasis):

The IRS also claimed that it would suffer unspecified “costs associated with . . . finding other positions for the 167 Service employees currently working on the return preparer project.” [Institute for Justice attorney Dan] Alban noted, in response, that just over two weeks ago, the IRS complained about understaffing, since “[o]verall full-time staffing has declined by more than 8% over the last two years, and staffing for key enforcement occupations fell nearly 6% in the past year.” You’d think that the IRS would welcome, not rue, the idea of having nearly 200 employees available for other tasks – like answering the phone (at current staff levels, they only do that about 70% of the time).

The preparer regulation program has always seemed a frivolous use of IRS resources when tax complexity and identity-theft fraud are making the tax law almost impossible to administer.

That time already?  It’s Time for Independent Certification for Tax Preparers (Robert D. Flach in Accounting Today)




David Cay Johnston, Tax To Defend a Tax Haven (Tax.com)

Ben Harris,  Deficits After ATRA (TaxVox)

Patrick Temple-West,  U.S. is preparing more tax-evasion cases, and more.  Bad news for Swiss bank account holders who haven’t come forward.



Jim Maule,  Another “Flat Tax” Proposal That Falls Flat.  The professor slays more straw men.

I hate extra apostrophes.  Careful Tax Update readers know that I have a terrible habit of inserting extra apostrophes, creating an unintended possessive.  I know the rules, but my fingers betray me when typing.  Fortunately I can easily change a blog post to turn “it’s” to “its.”  Not everybody is so fortunate.

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Unless, of course, Steven owns “Steven’s” building.
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