Posts Tagged ‘structuring’

Tax Roundup, 7/19/2013: You can run a red light edition. And saving the republic, one tail light at a time.

Friday, July 19th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

gatsoThe first central Iowa town to install revenue cameras has turned them off.  The Des Moines Register reports:

 The Clive City Council on Thursday night voted to discontinue the use of red-light cameras to enforce traffic violations.

The council voted 3-2 to reject a contract with Redflex Traffic Systems Inc., which has provided the city red-light camera service since the program began in 2006. The nine cameras positioned along Hickman Road now will no longer be in service.

So carnage on Hickman Road, now, right?  Yeah, right.  But it’s not over yet:

Mayor Scott Cirksena said after the meeting that city staff would work to reach an agreement with the camera provider that could gather a majority vote.

Council members Ted Weaver and Michael McCoy said they would like to see the city wean itself away from using red-light revenue for general fund expenditures. City Manager Dennis Henderson said the city expects the red-light camera program to bring in approximately $700,000 during the current fiscal year, which began July 1

It’s obviously about the money, though you find the pro-forma claims that ticketing people who don’t quite stop when making a right turn on red at an empty intersection makes us all safer, if you read down to paragraph nine.  Let’s hope Des Moines and Polk County follow suit, but don’t hold your breath.

 

 

Of course they do.  Four Cedar Rapids-Metro Area Mayors Support Local Option Sales Tax Extension (KCRG.com). And RAGBRAI riders support free beer extension.

 

I bet the IRS heard about this guy through the grapevine.  From Star-Telegram.com:

Larry Lake, part owner of Grapevine Drug Mart, and his son, Travis Lake, who managed the drug store, each failed to report income on their federal tax returns, according to a news release from the U.S. Attorney’s office.

Larry Lake was sentenced to 14 years in prison and ordered to pay a $550,000 fine as well as taxes, interest and penalties, which equal about $25 million, the release said.

The Texas men may well have gotten in trouble not just from evading taxes, but from the way they did their banking:

From August 2006 to November 2009, Larry Lake and his spouse, Kathy Lake, agreed to structure hundreds of currency deposits into at least 13 bank accounts, according to a federal indictment. The couple created at least two shell companies that were used to open up the accounts involved in the structuring scheme, which amounted to $9.3 million, federal officials said.

“Structuring” involves breaking cash deposits up into amounts under $10,000 to avoid the rules requiring banks to report currency transactions.  But banks are also required to report if it looks suspiciously like somebody is trying to get around the $10,000 reporting rule.  You come into a bank enough times with wads of cash, but never $10,000, and the tellers will remember you.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 71.  A bad day for the “nothing to see here” folks.

Robert W. Wood, IRS Inspector Shellacs Oversight Committee About Tea Party Scandal

 

Kay Bell, Tax reform’s chances are better than 50 percent:

Rep. Dave Camp (R-Mich.), head of the Houses Ways and Means Committee, and Sen. Max Baucus (D-Mont.), leader of the Senate Finance Committee, each put the possibility of tax reform passage at greater than 50 percent.

The gung-ho comments were made during an appearance today at the Economic Club of Washington.

I’d agree, if you are talking about in the time before the sun curls into a cold cinder.  If you are talking about this Congress, I’ll bet the other way.

Kyle Pomerleau, Japan to Lower its Corporate Rate Further? (Tax Policy Blog)

David Cay Johnston, More Tax Dollars There, Not Here (Tax Analysts Blog)

 

Jason Dinesen, Patient-Centered Outcomes Trust Fund Fee – An Exercise in Bureaucratic Futility $100 of cost to compute a $3 tax.

Peter Reilly, Real Estate Pro Status Does Not Mix With Full Time Day Job.   Back from the Civil War, Peter has been busy with new tax posts.  This one explains the difficulty of being a “real estate professional” when you have other work.

 

Sean Raisch,  Medicare Taxes on High Earners (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

William Perez, IRS Update for July 19, 2013.  Sort of a web weekly bulletin of IRS releases.

 

Greg Mankiw, The Changing Distribution of Income:

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Mark Perry points out:  “Yes, the middle class has been disappearing, but they haven’t fallen into the lower class, they’ve risen into the upper class.”

It’s Friday, so it’s Buzz Day at Robert D. Flach’s place!

 

The Critical Question:  Do Low-Income Taxpayers Cheat? (TaxVox)  He has a lot more faith in the good nature of humankind than I do.

 

TaxGrrrl, How To Stay Out Of Jail: Lessons Learned From The ‘Queen Of IRS Tax Fraud’:

If you do steal, and you talk about it, don’t do it on Facebook I don’t care what you think you know about privacy settings, when you put something out there on Twitter or on Facebook, it’s not protected. As a taxpayer, that means you should avoid posting personally identifying information like tax ID numbers and your address (the IRS Facebook page won’t allow you to post comments for that reason). And you should certainly avoid posting photos of yourself surrounded by stacks of cash with such gems as:

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Hard to argue with that advice.  Russ Fox has more.

 

Nude drunk guy saves the republic. Police: Drunk naked man broke out car tail lights (press-citizen.com, via The Beanwalker):

According to the complaint, Flaherty broke out the tail lights to three cars and told officers that he was breaking the red in the tail lights because red means danger to the republic.

I’ll have what he’s having.

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Tax Roundup, 1/25/2013: Only a few days left for IRA distribution mulligan. And: A $750 check for each Iowa household?

Friday, January 25th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

A proposal to refund part of the state budget surplus.  The Des Moines Register reports:

Iowa House and Senate Republican leaders today proposed to give a flat $750 to every Iowa household in an effort to return to taxpayers the state’s $800 million budget surplus.

The money would be returned to taxpayers in the form of a tax credit, said Senate Republican Leader Bill Dix, R-Shell Rock, and House Speaker Kraig Paulsen, R-Hiawatha.

20120504-1That seems pretty straightforward.  Better still to give it back as part of simplifying the tax code, but better that than just spending it.  Yet just spending it has its advocates:

Senate Democrats who control their chamber said that since it’s early in  the session they are open to talking about the Republicans’ proposal, but they have other ideas.

Sen. Joe Bolkcom, D-Iowa City, who chairs the tax-writing Iowa Senate Ways and Means Committee, said Democrats are interested in providing earned income tax credits for lower-income Iowa families and raising the threshold for filing state income taxes. He added that Iowa needs to invest more tax money to clean up dirty rivers and streams, repair crumbling roads and bridges, upgrade the state’s education system and make other improvements.

The earned income credit is a welfare program run through tax returns, with a tremendous rate of fraud.  It’s also a poverty trap.  The phase-out of benefits with rising income serves as a stiff tax on improving your income.  And spending doesn’t become something else just because you call it “investing.”

Elaine Maag,  Earned Income Tax Awareness Day (TaxVox)

 

Kay Bell reminds us that taxpayers who failed to make a 2012 required minimum distribution from the IRA have a January 31 mulligan.   The tax law imposes a stiff penalty on taxpayers who have reached age 70 1/2 who fail to take a minimum amount out by year end.  Taxpayers who failed to take their 2012 withdrawal last year can roll the RMD amount to charity by January 31 and avoid the 50% penalty.

Taxpayers who took an IRA distribution in December can also roll that into a charity by January 31 and avoid having the distribution included in 2012 income.

These provisions were part of the Fiscal Cliff tax bill, which extended the tax-free status of IRA rollovers to charity along with a bunch of other expired provisions.

 

Just because your bank is a country bank doesn’t make the banker a bumpkin.  Four Nebraskans have been charged with “structuring” — breaking deposits into chunks under $10,000 to avoid federal cash reporting requirements.  Federal law requires banks to report cash transactions over $10,000.  Folks who don’t want the government to know about their cash sometimes attempt to use multiple smaller transactions to fly under the radar; that’s illegal.    Theindependent.com reports:

 Randy L. Evans, 59, of Grand Island is charged in a 15-count indictment.  In the first 14 counts, it is alleged that between March 29, 2010, and Dec. 27, 2011, Evans structured financial transactions to evade reporting requirements when he made deposits in the amount of $210,381 at Five Points Bank. Count 15 charges him with structuring financial
transactions to evade reporting requirements when he made 449 transactions between Jan. 4, 2010, and Feb. 28 at Five Points Bank in the amount of $2,030,322.

Bankers are required to report suspicious transactions, and if you make yourself a regular, they’ll notice — especially in a small-town bank.

 

Regrettably, yes.  Libertarian writer Sheldon Richman breaks the bad news: just because the income tax is a bad thing doesn’t make it unconstitutional:

Where does this leave liberty’s advocates? First, we have to face the facts. Like it or not, the U.S. Constitution empowers the Congress to levy any tax it wants. Anyone is free to come up with a contrary interpretation, but the constitutionally endowed courts have spoken. Reading one’s libertarian values into the Constitution is futile. For better or worse, the Constitution means what the occupants of the relevant constitutional offices say it means.

In other words, it doesn’t matter if you think the income tax is unconstitutional if the IRS, the federal judge, the Marshals Service and the Bureau of Prisons think otherwise.  Fighting the income tax by not filing ruins your finances without hurting the Leviathan one little bit.

 

Luring and subsidizing your competitors with your tax money.  Left-side advocacy group Good Jobs First has released a report slamming “incentive” tax breaks like those used for two fertilizer companies in Iowa last year.  The report doesn’t mention Iowa’s programs, but it provides a depressing list of corporate bribery in other states, including subsidies to lure employers from Kansas City, Kansas across the river to Kansas City, Missouri, and vice-versa.  Their press release gets it right:

Interstate job piracy is not a fruitful strategy for economic growth, [report author Greg] LeRoy noted: “The costs are high and the benefits are low, since a tiny number of companies get huge subsidies for moving what amounts to an insignificant number of jobs.” LeRoy added: “The flip side is job blackmail: the availability of relocation subsidies makes it possible for companies that have no intention of moving to extract payoffs from their home states to stay put.”

For all the abuse, the organization’s recommendations are modest.  I would eliminate all such subsidies and replace them with a simple low-rate tax system for everyone.  The Tax Update Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform would be a great start here.

 

TaxProf,  House Ways & Means Chair Proposes Mark-to-Market Tax on Financial Derivatives

IRS Asks Judge To Suspend Injunction Barring It From Regulating Tax Preparers

Jim Maule,  A Tax Question: So What Do You Do With Your Time?. A good discussion of the “material participation” rules that take on extra importance under the new Obamacare Net Investment Income Tax.

Anthony Nitti,  The Tax Impact of Obamacare On The Passthrough Income of Small Business Owners

Patrick Temple-West,  Firms keep stockpiles of ‘foreign’ cash in U.S., and more (Tax Break)

Joseph Henchman,  Tax Foundation and CBPP Agree: States Need Strong Rainy Day Funds (Tax Policy Blog)

Jamaal Solomon, Tax Organizer for Entertainers.  Independent entertainers who cross state lines can find their taxes complicated, so good recordkeeping is essential.

Robert W. Wood, Shhh, Home Office and other IRS Audit Trigger Secrets

David Cay Johnston, Missing Half the Cash (Tax.com)

Start your weekend early with a Friday Buzz from Robert D. Flach!

News you can use:  Stuff Creepy Accountants Like (Going Concern).  Wisconsin!

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Girlfriend’s financial maneuvers get Cedar Rapids landlord jailed while awaiting tax evasion sentence

Wednesday, May 13th, 2009 by Joe Kristan

She was only trying to help, no doubt. But now Robert Miell gets to await his tax evasion sentence in jail. The Gazette Online reports that a judge granted a prosecution request to jail him as a flight risk:

The motion to revoke Miell’s pre-sentence release and a request for an arrest warrant were unsealed in which the government alleged structuring of deposits.
“Intentional structuring” is when cash deposits are made in a such a way to avoid filing currency transaction reports. Any cash deposited of more than $10,000 must be reported to the government.

Two transactions stood out. On March 23, four deposits totaling $8,765 were made at more than one bank branch. All the deposits were made by Miell and his former employee/girlfriend, Cindi Peacock. Peacock then attempted to make one more deposit at the end of the day that would have brought the day’s total to more than $10,000. When the teller asked Peacock for her driver’s license to file the required report, she refused, and when the teller insisted, Peacock asked that the deposit be reversed and the cash returned.
On the following day, Peacock made two cash deposits into Miell’s business account, each one minute apart, totaling $2,679.

The moral? If you want to get a teller’s attention, come in four or five times in a day making $1,000+ deposits that add up to more than $10,000.
Link: Prior Tax Update coverage.

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