Posts Tagged ‘Tax Prof’

Tax Roundup, 4/8/15: It’s all due a week from today. The case for extensions.

Wednesday, April 8th, 2015 by Joe Kristan

4868 bigThe tax deadline is a week from today. An extension might be a great idea. 
It’s all real at your local tax pro’s office. Late nights, new information, complex returns, tight deadlines — all ingredients for something to go wrong. Is it really a good idea for you to want your tax filing to come out of that?

You tax return isn’t a trivial item. That’s why you are paying for it, or why you are spending hours slaving over it. The consequences of a seemingly minor mistake can be shockingly expensive. You own 10% of a Canadian partnership with some fishing buddies and you didn’t report it on the right form? That’s a $10,000 penalty for you!

That’s why it’s unwise to try to rush it through at the deadline, when you can easily get an extension and have it prepared by somebody who has had some sleep and nutrition.

Here are things I hear from people who don’t want to be extended:

This means I will get audited! No it doesn’t. I have seen zero evidence that extending a return increases the risk of audit. I have filed my own 1040 on extension every year since at least 1990, and have yet to be audited (*knocks wood*). A return with a mistake, on the other hand, definitely increases your risk of audit.

But this means they get an extra six months to look at my return! Yes it does. That doesn’t mean much. While I’m sure it’s happened, I have yet to see a case where a taxpayer had to pay an amount on audit on an extended return that wouldn’t have been caught had the return not been exended in 30 years of tax practice. I have seen cases where we were able to get refunds because we found an error on the return three years after the original due date, but before the extended filing date. It can work both ways.

I always file on time! Extended returns are still filed on time. It’s just a different time. This is usually more an assertion of the individual’s self-importance. It really means “you should drop everything else you are doing and finish my return.” It asserts ego over wisdom and practicality.

Now, the positive things about extending:

It gives you more time to make certain tax return elections. Automatic accounting method changes can be filed with extended returns. For many taxpayers, especially those with real estate investments on their 1040, an extension may give your preparer extra time to find new deductions that are “biblical” in scale under the new “repair” regulations. These aren’t available on amended returns.

It may give you more time to fund deductions. If you have a Keogh or SEP retirement plan, extending your 1040 gives you until October 15 to fund your 2014 deductible retirement plan contributions. Remember, though, that some deductions still have to be funded by April 15 even on extended returns, including IRA and HSA contributions.

20150326-3It may give you more time to find deductions. More than one taxpayer has found a charitable contribution receipt or tax payment that they missed when they sent their pre-extension information in.

Extensions may avoid an amended return. It’s not unknown for a taxpayer who is already filed a complex return to get a late K-1 or a 1099 from a new investment that they didn’t think would issue one. That means they have to file an amended return. The IRS does look at these. It’s always better to extend than amend. 

Extensions can turn a 5% per month non-filing penalty into a 1/2% per month late payment penalty. If you are caught short and can’t pay, it’s a lot cheaper to extend than to blow off the payment.

Finally, and most importantly, an extended return is likely to be more accurate. Workload compression is something tax preparers talk about with each other, if not so much in public. Tired people make more mistakes, and that includes preparers. If you really want to attract IRS attention, drop a digit from a six-figure 1099 or K-1 number.

If you extend, you still need to have 90% of your tax paid in when you file Form 4868 to avoid penalties. Many taxpayers extending 2014 returns will include the amount they would pay as their 2015 first-quarter estimate with the extension payment; that payment is due April 15 too, and it gives them a little cushion against surprises on the extended return.

This is another in our series of 2015 Filing Season Tips. Come back every day for a new one through April 15!


Russ Fox, Bozo Tax Tip #4: Procrastinate! “What happens if you wake up and it’s April 15, 2015, and you can’t file your tax? File an extension.”

Robert Wood, 9 Innocent Tax Return Mistakes That Trigger IRS Problems. Nine more good reasons to extend and get your return right.

TaxGrrrl, 13 Quirky Beer And Tax Facts On National Beer Day. They say that was yesterday, but any tax pro will tell you it’s really April 15.

Kay Bell, Chaffetz goes after tax-delinquent federal employees (again)




The Des Moines Register reports: Bill advances to exempt bees from sales tax

 The [Iowa] House Ways and Means Committee passed a bill Tuesday that would exclude the sale of honey bees from state sales tax laws.

Honey bees have been the subject of much concern in recent years as their numbers have mysteriously declined. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, total losses to managed honey bee colonies was 23.2 percent nationwide during the 2013-2014 winter.

Those honey bee losses – which have been occurring for the last decade – have been linked to many things, including the use of pesticides, disease and loss of habitat.

As far as I know, this is the first time the decline in bees has been linked to sales taxes.

I’m sympathetic to this, in a way, in that I think business inputs should not be subject to sales tax. Still, this is the wrong way to go about it. While I love bees, there’s nothing about apiculture that makes it different from, say, raising earthworms, from a tax policy viewpoint. A group with good lobbyists gets the ball rolling, and everyone else gets left behind.




TaxProf, Brown: The IRS Should Report on Tax Returns Filed by All 535 Members of Congress. I have a better idea: The President, every member of Congress, every cabinet member, and the IRS Commissioner should all have to prepare their 1040s by hand on a live webcast with a running comment bar. The webcasts should be archived on the Library of Congress website, along with the completed tax returns. I think tax simplification would follow in a hurry.


Andrew Lundeen, The Estate Tax Provides Less than One Percent of Federal Revenue (Tax Policy Blog). The rich guy isn’t buying.

Howard Gleckman, One Solution to California’s Drought: Tax Water. Oh, so close. How about markets?

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 699


Career Corner. #BusySeasonProblems: Inflatable Sharks; Late-night Checklists; Unexpected Taxable Income (Caleb Newquist, Going Concern).



Tax Roundup, 12/11/14: Cromnibus cuts IRS budget, delays extender vote. And: Mileage goes to 57.5 cents.

Thursday, December 11th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

The “Cromnibus” train-wreck spending bill process seems to be holding up everything else, including the extender vote. The 55 Lazarus provisions awaiting revival are on hold while Congress struggles to avert a government “shutdown” at midnight tonight.

Flicker image courtesy Michael Coghlan under Creative Commons license.

Flicker image courtesy Michael Coghlan under Creative Commons license.

Outgoing Senate Majority Leader Reid has said that the Senate will finish the Cromnibus before voting on the extender bill, HR 5771. The house-passed bill would extend dozens of tax breaks that expired at the end of 2013 retroactively through the end of this month. Business provisions in the bill include the $500,000 Section 179 deduction, 50% bonus depreciation, the R&D credit, and the 5-year built-in gain period for S corporations. The provision allowing IRA charitable donations is among the individual breaks at stake.

There is no indication that the Senate will fail to eventually pass HR 5771, or that the President will veto it, but politics are uncertain, and I’ll feel better about things when they do pass it. It appears the hope they would finish up today is wishful thinking, though; this Wall Street Journal story says the House is expected to pass a two-day funding bill today to give the Senate extra time to approve the spending bill.

The IRS faces a 3.1% funding cut in the bill. That’s a tribute to the tone-deaf and confrontational attitude of IRS Commissioner Koskinen, who has responded to the Tea Party scandals pretty much by saying “give us more money!” Given the increased responsibilities given the IRS by Congress, cutting their budget seems strange. Yet as long as the Commissioner keeps antagonizing his funders, and keeps finding money to fund his “voluntary” preparer regulation program to get around the Loving decision, he can expect similar appropriation success.

Related: Paul Neiffer, Tax Extender Bill May Be Punted to Weekend


Mileage rate goes to 57.5 centsWith gas prices falling, the standard IRS mileage rate is naturally going… up. The IRS yesterday released (Notice 2014-79) the 2015 standard mileage rates:

– 57.5 cents per mile for business miles. This is 56 cents for 2014.

– 14 cents per mile for charity miles, same as in 2014.

– 23 cents per mile for medical and moving miles. This rate is 23.5 cents for 2014.

Related: William Perez, How to Deduct Car and Truck Expenses on Your Taxes


20130819-1Peter Reilly, Iowa Corporation Not Liable For California Corporate Tax From Ownership Of LLC Interest. It discusses a California court ruling that mere ownership of a California LLC interest isn’t enough to make the corporate owner subject to California’s $800 minimum franchise tax. If it holds up, it will be good news for many taxpayers dinged by this stupid fee.

Jim Maule, Do-It-Yourself Tax Preparation? Better? Paid preparers didn’t do an impressive job handling the GAO’s secret shoppers.

Kay Bell, Mortgages offer nice tax breaks, but in limited parts of the U.S.


The new Cavalcade of Risk is up! at  Always good stuff in the venerable roundup of insurance and risk-management blog posts; this edition features Hank Stern’s take on the “creepy” ACA site.


Bryan Caplan, The Inanity of the Welfare State:

While taxes are highly progressive, transfers have an upside-down U-shape.  Households in the middle quintile get the most money.  The richest households actually get more money than the poorest.  Think about how many times you’ve heard about government’s great mission to “help the poor.”  Could there be any clearer evidence that such claims are mythology?

Eye-opening. Read the whole thing.



Robert Wood, Obama Justice Department Was Involved In IRS Targeting, Lerner Emails Reveal

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 581


EITC error chartAlan Cole, Treasury Report: Improper Payments Remain a Problem in EITC, Child Credit (Tax Policy Blog)

David Brunori, Mississippi’s Very Good Idea to Help its Poor (Tax Analysts Blog). It’s an earned income tax credit. Given the massive EITC fraud and error rate, I’m not convinced.

Tax Justice Blog, Update on the Push for Dynamic Scoring: Will Ryan Purge Congress’s Scorekeepers?

Joseph Thorndike, Wall Street Journal Prefers Ignorance to Expertise (Tax Analysts Blog). It’s about the CBO.




Robert Goulder, Taxing Diverted Profits: The Empire Strikes Back (Tax Analysts Blog).  “The message is this: Once people realize what a functional territorial regime looks like, they suddenly become less enamored with the concept. One of several reasons why U.S. tax reform won’t be easy.”

Chris Sanchirico, A Repatriation Tax Holiday for US Multinationals? Four Contagious Illusions (TaxVox)


News from the Profession. The AICPA Can’t Figure Out Why Record Numbers of Accounting Grads Aren’t Taking the CPA Exam (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern).



Tax Roundup, 9/19/14: Brutal Assault on Reason Season Edition. Arrggh!

Friday, September 19th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20121006-1Brutal Assault on Reason Season is underway. Elections depress me. Arnold Kling sums up my feelings:

To me, political campaigns are not sacred events, to be eagerly anticipated and avidly followed. They are brutal assaults on reason. I look forward to election season about as much as a gulf coast resident looks forward to hurricane season.

Very few of us are in a position to have more than intuitions on the great issues of the day. Rarely are voters health-care economists, trade experts, military or foreign policy specialists, etc., and most of us have little basis to tell when the politicians are lying about these issues (though that is a good default assumption). Doing taxes for a living, though, I feel competent to identify bogus tax claims by politicians. William McBride does so in a Tax Policy Blog Post,  U.S. Corporate Tax Revenue is Low Because High Taxes Have Shrunk the Corporate Sector.

He quotes the U.S. Senate’s only unabashed socialist, Bernie Sanders:

“Want to better understand why we have a federal deficit? In 1952, the corporate income tax accounted for 33 percent of all federal tax revenue. Today, despite record-breaking profits, corporate taxes bring in less than 9 percent. It’s time for real tax reform.”

There is a truly brutal assault on reason, and Mr. McBride fights back:

The share of U.S. business profits attributable to pass-through businesses has grown dramatically as well, as they now represent more than 60 percent of all U.S. business profits. The second chart below shows that C corporation profits, while extremely volatile, have generally trended downward in recent decades, while the profits of S corporations and partnerships have trended upwards. In the 1960s and 1970s, C corporation profits were about 8 percent of GDP, while partnership profits were about 1 percent and S corporation profits were virtually nil. Now C corporation profits hover around 4 percent of GDP (4.7 percent in 2011), while partnership profits are almost at the same level (3.7 percent in 2011) and S corporation profits are not far behind (2.4 percent in 2011). Partnership and S corporation profits are growing such that they will each exceed C corporation profits in the near future if not already. When commentators claim that “corporate profits are at an all-time high”, they are referring to Bureau of Economic Analysis data that combines C corporations and pass-through businesses, whether they know it or not.

In sum, the Senator’s statement is flat out false. It is completely misleading to claim that corporate profits are up while corporate tax revenues are down, essentially implying there is some mischief going on via “loopholes”, etc. The truth is corporate tax revenue has been falling for decades because the corporate sector has been shrinking, and not just by corporate inversions. The most likely culprit is our extremely uncompetitive corporate tax regime.

In other words, high rates are driving businesses out of the corporate form and to pass-throughs of one sort or another.


As we head into election season, expect the brutal assaults to continue. Here are a few phrases commonly seen in assaults on reason when taxes are involved, enabling you to spot them even if you don’t know a 1040 from a hole in the ground:

“Politician X voted for tax breaks to ship jobs overseas.”

“This tax cut will pay for itself.”

“I believe in free markets, but tax credit X is needed to level the playing field.”

“I don’t want to punish success; I want X to pay his fair share.”

“This tax credit created X jobs”

I know I’m missing many. If you point out more in the comments, I’ll be happy to talk about them.


It’s Talk Like a Pirate Day, so Kay Bell comes through with Avast, me hearties! The IRS wants its cut of your illegal income, be it pirated or otherwise criminally obtained.


Peter Reilly, Professional C Corp Denied Deduction For Uncashed Salary Check To Owner.  He covers a story I covered earlier this week where a professional corporation deducted a year-end bonus “paid” through an NSF check that was “loaned” back to the corporation.  His take: “I’m not sure that the Tax Court was right to deny any of  deduction, but I really question whether the whole deduction should be denied.”


TaxGrrrl, Back To School 2014: Deducting Student Loan Interest (Even If You Don’t Pay It)

20140826-1Robert D. Flach has fresh Friday Buzz, including links on the cost of tax compliance and “7 deadly tax sins.”

William Perez, When are State Refunds Taxed on Your Federal Return?

Jason Dinesen, IRS Says Online Sorority Is Not Tax Exempt. Social media apparently isn’t social enough for them.

Jim Maule, An Epidemic of Tax Ignorance. He covers one of my pet peeves — people who use the term “the IRS code” for the Internal Revenue Code. It’s Congress that came up with that thing, not the IRS.

Russ Fox, Hyatt Decision a Win for FTB as Far as Damages, but Decision Upheld that FTB Committed Fraud. FTB is the California Franchise Tax Board. Tax authorities should get in trouble for fraud to the same extent they hold taxpayers responsible for fraud.


A. Levar Taylor, What Constitutes An Attempt To Evade Or Defeat Taxes For Purposes Of Section 523(a)(1)(C) Of The Bankruptcy Code: The Ninth Circuit Parts Company With Other Circuits (Part 1) and (Part 2).


20140801-2Joseph Thorndike, Should We Tax Away Huge Fortunes? (Tax Analysts Blog). “In other words, if you like the estate tax, talk more about revenue and less about dynasties.”

Richard Philips, House GOP Bill Combines Worst Tax Break Ideas of 2014 for Half-a-Trillion Dollar Giveaway. (Tax Justice Blog). When they know that the Senate will ignore whatever they do, it’s easy to accommodate anyone lobbying for a tax break.

Renu Zaretsky, Will Tax Reform See Light at the End of the Next Tunnel? This TaxVox headline roundup covers Tax Reform, Treasury’s plans on inversions, and the continuing resolution passed before the congresscritters left D.C. to assault reason some more.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 498

Me, IRS issues Applicable Federal Rates (AFR) for October 2014

News from the Profession. Grant Thornton Has a Fight Song and It’s As Awful As You Might Expect (Adrienne Gonzalez, Going Concern).



Tax Roundup, 7/2/2013: Apologies, newlyweds and civil wars!

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan
Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

Kay Bell doesn’t much care for the Taxpayer Advocate’s “apology payment” proposal,  where the IRS would pay $1,000 as a token of apology to taxpayers who had gotten the runaround from the agency:

In order to avoid spurring an apology payment, employees could be reluctant to challenge taxpayers in situations where such added attention is warranted. The ensuring refusal by workers to aggressively, but fairly, go after taxpayers will make for a less, not more, effective tax enforcement agency.

So instead of establishing an apology payment system, the $1 million should instead go to the IRS for it to do its job, albeit do it better. That’s also recommended by Olson in her report.

So Kay probably wouldn’t much care for my “sauce for the gander” rule, which would impose penalties on the IRS, payable to the taxpayer, anytime the IRS maintains an unreasonable position on audit.  I would also apply it automatically anytime the IRS asserts an accuracy-related penalty and then loses in court on the underlying issue.


Jana Luttenegger, IRS Statement on DOMA and Tax Tips for Newlyweds (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).

The IRS quietly issued a statement on June 27. Quite, likely because it was of little value to any taxpayers. The statement is available from the IRS Newsroom, and essentially states they are reviewing the recent decision, and will “move swiftly to provide revised guidance in the near future.”

In what may or may not be a coincidence, the IRS Summer Tax Tip released today relates to Tax Tips for Newlyweds.

So maybe the IRS does have a sense of humor.

TaxGrrrl, As Taxpayers Scramble To Make Sense Of DOMA, IRS Issues Statement


Russ Fox,  Licensing Stops All Tax Preparer Fraud…Well, No.  But it does make it fraud with a government seal of approval.


Howard Gleckman,  New Study: Tax Subsidies Do Little To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions.  But they do help keep stray birds out of foreign airspace.

Missouri Tax Guy, Travel Expenses.  Why these expenses are not like the others.

TaxProf, IRS Scandal, Day 54.

Jack Townsend, Depositor Pleads to Failse Return; Depositor in Luxembourg Branch of Israeli Bank

William Perez, “Blank-Slate” Tax Reform Proposed by Baucus, Hatch

Tax Justice Blog, Top Senate Tax-Writers’ Call for “Blank Slate” Approach to Tax Reform Avoids Most Crucial Issue

Martin Sullivan, Tax Reform: Coming Around the Clubhouse Turn? (Tax Analysts Blog)

Clint Stretch, Tax Reform or Shotgun Wedding? (Tax Analysts Blog)

Tax reform, we are told, will encourage economic growth by reducing complexity, inefficiency, and unfairness.  It probably could, but there are no guarantees.  I have had to read most of the tax legislative histories written in the past 40 years.  I cannot recall any instance in which the committee reports confessed that the wrong balance of fairness, economic growth, and simplification was struck.

Yet it would have been true every time.


Kyle Pomerleau, Misleading Corporate Tax Talk: (Tax Policy Blog)

When a company pays employees, either through wages or stock options, they are legitimately allowed to deduct that compensation.

It is not like this money is never taxed. This compensation is taxed as ordinary income at the individual level.

A point often overlooked when they talk about stock option “loopholes.”


Janet Novack, GAO: Big Companies Paid A 12.6% Effective Federal Income Tax Rate

Jeremy Scott, Obama’s Climate Change Proposals Lack Major Tax Component (Tax Analysts Blog).  They also lack a snowball’s chance in a high-carbon Hades.

TaxDood, GAO: Bitcoin Presents Tax Compliance Risks

It’s Tuesday, so it’s time for a fresh Buzz from Robert D. Flach. 



Grant at work.

Peter Reilly is taking a few days off from his usual tax topics to cover commemorations of the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, which occurred July 1-3, 1863:Hopes of Our Country Were on Our Bayonets

Gettysburg Day 1 – First Shot – Where Fate Meets History

Gettysburg Day 1 – Passing Into Legend And History With The Iron Brigade

I’m sure there will me more great posts.  But remember that this week is also the 150th anniversary of the fall of Vicksburg to General Grant  — a more spectacular campaign and arguably a more important achievement, but not so well-remembered as Gettysburg.




Tax Roundup, 1/2/2013: Yay, we didn’t fall off the cliff! Too bad we’re still doomed.

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

So tax season can go on.  The IRS will have to activate some of the “reserved” boxes on its forms, but with the passage of HR 8 yesterday, filing season should be able to continue without catastrophic disruption.  I summarized the key pieces yesterday here.

So what did they accomplish?  They permanently “patched” the alternative minimum tax, and that is a real accomplishment.  Far better to repeal a deeply dishonest tax, but at least now they have stopped placing a time bomb in the tax law set to go off every year or two.

They raised the top marginal rate on “the rich” to something over 40%, with a stated top rate of 39.6% and the dishonest phase-outs of itemized deductions and personal exemptions.  They redefined “rich” as single filers with incomes over $400,000 and married taxpayers over $450,000.

They raised the top dividend and capital gain rate to something over 24%, taking into account the 3.8% Obamacare levy, the 20% rate on the rich, as newly defined, and the phase-outs of deductions and personal exemptions.  In doing so, they left the top rate at 15% (or 18.8%) for other taxpayers.

They delivered another kick in the teeth to successful entrepreneurs.  Taxpayers who operate successfully as pass-through entities represent much of the income hit by the new tax rates, and much of business income in general.  They have that much less after tax income to take chances on new locations, new employees, new products.  That means there will be less of all of these.


Source: Tax Foundation, “Putting a Face on America’s Tax Returns: A Chartbook

Most people don’t realize just how big a part of the economy pass-throughs run by “the rich” are.  This might give you an idea:


Source: Tax Foundation, ‘Putting a Face on America’s Tax Returns: A Chartbook”

This isn’t exactly going to help hiring.

They once again passed the dishonest batch of “expiring provisions.”  These provisions, from the windmill subsidy and research credits to special breaks for speedways, are passed with annual expiration dates, enabling the politicians to pretend that they are temporary so they don’t have to face the real costs of these breaks for their freinds.

What they failed to accomplish is just as important.  They failed to pass the wretched ideas of dollar caps on itemized deductions or a limit on the rate benefit of the deductions.  They failed to apply the top rates to incomes of $200,000 and up, which was their initial plan.

Most importantly, they utterly failed to address the ongoing fiscal catastrophe.  The new revenues will barely touch the $1.2 trillion annual deficit.  It’s not clear whether there will even be any deficit reduction when all of the pieces of the deal are added together.  That means we careen almost immediately to a new debt-ceiling battle and ultimately to a confrontation with arithmetic.

Perhaps that will ultimately be the benefit of this deal, though not one that is intended.  The President finally got his tax hikes on “millionaires and billionaires,” and they won’t do a thing to deal with the fiscal crisis.  If people finally realize that the choice is between bringing spending and entitlements under control or higher taxes on everybody, there might actually be some value to this mess.  After all, the rich guy isn’t buying.


Fiscal Cliff Notes

TaxProf, House Approves Fiscal Cliff Tax Deal

Tyler Cowen, Ross Douthat asks

If a newly re-elected Democratic president can’t muster the political will and capital required to do something as straightforward and relatively popular as raising taxes on the tiny fraction Americans making over $250,000 when those same taxes are scheduled to go up already, then how can Democrats ever expect to push taxes upward to levels that would make our existing public programs sustainable for the long run?

Greg Mankiw, President rejects his bipartisan commission

Stephen Entin, Measuring the Economic and Distributional Effects of the Final Fiscal Cliff Bill (Tax Policy Blog)

Howard Gleckman, Congress Kicks the Fiscal Can off the Front Stoop (TaxVox)

William Perez,House Approves the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012

Journal of Accountacy, Congress passes fiscal cliff act

Andrew Mitchel, Senate Fiscal Cliff Bill Includes Retroactive Reinstatement of CFC Look-Thru Rule

Kay Bell, House passes tax bill to avoid fiscal cliff

Paul Neiffer, Some Major Tax “Goodies” in Senate Bill For Farmers!


Joseph Thorndike, Is Obama the Worst Legislative Negotiator of the Last Century?

Finally, this from Daniel Shaviro, a tax man of the left, on the fiscal cliff and the larger budget picture:

The biggest problem, as others have noted, is that Obama appears to be a once-in-a-generation lame and inept bargainer, who can take even a strong hand and not get all that much, because he is so predictably ready to fold.  But again this is not mainly an issue about the New Year’s Eve deal itself, which is more or less defensible as a one-off solution.  Rather, it’s about the debt ceiling crisis to come in a few weeks.

That is the one that really counts.  I think the Administration should play that, not merely as hard as they are saying they will now, but about 20 levels harder.  I would not just refuse to negotiate, but would have Administration officials use words such as treason, sabotage, and terrorism.

Mr. Shaviro is a very bright man.  He knows that the present fiscal course is unsustainable.  The solutions are some mix of spending less or taxing more.  If a guy that smart is ready to equate “spending less” with “treason, sabotage and terrorism,” the debate will get very ugly.  Maybe we aren’t far behind Argentina and Greece.