Posts Tagged ‘Tax Prof’

Tax Roundup, 7/2/2013: Apologies, newlyweds and civil wars!

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan
Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olsen

Kay Bell doesn’t much care for the Taxpayer Advocate’s “apology payment” proposal,  where the IRS would pay $1,000 as a token of apology to taxpayers who had gotten the runaround from the agency:

In order to avoid spurring an apology payment, employees could be reluctant to challenge taxpayers in situations where such added attention is warranted. The ensuring refusal by workers to aggressively, but fairly, go after taxpayers will make for a less, not more, effective tax enforcement agency.

So instead of establishing an apology payment system, the $1 million should instead go to the IRS for it to do its job, albeit do it better. That’s also recommended by Olson in her report.

So Kay probably wouldn’t much care for my “sauce for the gander” rule, which would impose penalties on the IRS, payable to the taxpayer, anytime the IRS maintains an unreasonable position on audit.  I would also apply it automatically anytime the IRS asserts an accuracy-related penalty and then loses in court on the underlying issue.

 

Jana Luttenegger, IRS Statement on DOMA and Tax Tips for Newlyweds (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog).

The IRS quietly issued a statement on June 27. Quite, likely because it was of little value to any taxpayers. The statement is available from the IRS Newsroom, and essentially states they are reviewing the recent decision, and will “move swiftly to provide revised guidance in the near future.”

In what may or may not be a coincidence, the IRS Summer Tax Tip released today relates to Tax Tips for Newlyweds.

So maybe the IRS does have a sense of humor.

TaxGrrrl, As Taxpayers Scramble To Make Sense Of DOMA, IRS Issues Statement

 

Russ Fox,  Licensing Stops All Tax Preparer Fraud…Well, No.  But it does make it fraud with a government seal of approval.

 

Howard Gleckman,  New Study: Tax Subsidies Do Little To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions.  But they do help keep stray birds out of foreign airspace.

Missouri Tax Guy, Travel Expenses.  Why these expenses are not like the others.

TaxProf, IRS Scandal, Day 54.

Jack Townsend, Depositor Pleads to Failse Return; Depositor in Luxembourg Branch of Israeli Bank

William Perez, “Blank-Slate” Tax Reform Proposed by Baucus, Hatch

Tax Justice Blog, Top Senate Tax-Writers’ Call for “Blank Slate” Approach to Tax Reform Avoids Most Crucial Issue

Martin Sullivan, Tax Reform: Coming Around the Clubhouse Turn? (Tax Analysts Blog)

Clint Stretch, Tax Reform or Shotgun Wedding? (Tax Analysts Blog)

Tax reform, we are told, will encourage economic growth by reducing complexity, inefficiency, and unfairness.  It probably could, but there are no guarantees.  I have had to read most of the tax legislative histories written in the past 40 years.  I cannot recall any instance in which the committee reports confessed that the wrong balance of fairness, economic growth, and simplification was struck.

Yet it would have been true every time.

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Misleading Corporate Tax Talk: (Tax Policy Blog)

When a company pays employees, either through wages or stock options, they are legitimately allowed to deduct that compensation.

It is not like this money is never taxed. This compensation is taxed as ordinary income at the individual level.

A point often overlooked when they talk about stock option “loopholes.”

 

Janet Novack, GAO: Big Companies Paid A 12.6% Effective Federal Income Tax Rate

Jeremy Scott, Obama’s Climate Change Proposals Lack Major Tax Component (Tax Analysts Blog).  They also lack a snowball’s chance in a high-carbon Hades.

TaxDood, GAO: Bitcoin Presents Tax Compliance Risks

It’s Tuesday, so it’s time for a fresh Buzz from Robert D. Flach. 

 

grant126

Grant at work.

Peter Reilly is taking a few days off from his usual tax topics to cover commemorations of the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, which occurred July 1-3, 1863:Hopes of Our Country Were on Our Bayonets

Gettysburg Day 1 – First Shot – Where Fate Meets History

Gettysburg Day 1 – Passing Into Legend And History With The Iron Brigade

I’m sure there will me more great posts.  But remember that this week is also the 150th anniversary of the fall of Vicksburg to General Grant  — a more spectacular campaign and arguably a more important achievement, but not so well-remembered as Gettysburg.

 

 

Share

Tax Roundup, 1/2/2013: Yay, we didn’t fall off the cliff! Too bad we’re still doomed.

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

So tax season can go on.  The IRS will have to activate some of the “reserved” boxes on its forms, but with the passage of HR 8 yesterday, filing season should be able to continue without catastrophic disruption.  I summarized the key pieces yesterday here.

So what did they accomplish?  They permanently “patched” the alternative minimum tax, and that is a real accomplishment.  Far better to repeal a deeply dishonest tax, but at least now they have stopped placing a time bomb in the tax law set to go off every year or two.

They raised the top marginal rate on “the rich” to something over 40%, with a stated top rate of 39.6% and the dishonest phase-outs of itemized deductions and personal exemptions.  They redefined “rich” as single filers with incomes over $400,000 and married taxpayers over $450,000.

They raised the top dividend and capital gain rate to something over 24%, taking into account the 3.8% Obamacare levy, the 20% rate on the rich, as newly defined, and the phase-outs of deductions and personal exemptions.  In doing so, they left the top rate at 15% (or 18.8%) for other taxpayers.

They delivered another kick in the teeth to successful entrepreneurs.  Taxpayers who operate successfully as pass-through entities represent much of the income hit by the new tax rates, and much of business income in general.  They have that much less after tax income to take chances on new locations, new employees, new products.  That means there will be less of all of these.

20121019-1

Source: Tax Foundation, “Putting a Face on America’s Tax Returns: A Chartbook

Most people don’t realize just how big a part of the economy pass-throughs run by “the rich” are.  This might give you an idea:

201130102-1

Source: Tax Foundation, ‘Putting a Face on America’s Tax Returns: A Chartbook”

This isn’t exactly going to help hiring.

They once again passed the dishonest batch of “expiring provisions.”  These provisions, from the windmill subsidy and research credits to special breaks for speedways, are passed with annual expiration dates, enabling the politicians to pretend that they are temporary so they don’t have to face the real costs of these breaks for their freinds.

What they failed to accomplish is just as important.  They failed to pass the wretched ideas of dollar caps on itemized deductions or a limit on the rate benefit of the deductions.  They failed to apply the top rates to incomes of $200,000 and up, which was their initial plan.

Most importantly, they utterly failed to address the ongoing fiscal catastrophe.  The new revenues will barely touch the $1.2 trillion annual deficit.  It’s not clear whether there will even be any deficit reduction when all of the pieces of the deal are added together.  That means we careen almost immediately to a new debt-ceiling battle and ultimately to a confrontation with arithmetic.

Perhaps that will ultimately be the benefit of this deal, though not one that is intended.  The President finally got his tax hikes on “millionaires and billionaires,” and they won’t do a thing to deal with the fiscal crisis.  If people finally realize that the choice is between bringing spending and entitlements under control or higher taxes on everybody, there might actually be some value to this mess.  After all, the rich guy isn’t buying.

 

Fiscal Cliff Notes

TaxProf, House Approves Fiscal Cliff Tax Deal

Tyler Cowen, Ross Douthat asks

If a newly re-elected Democratic president can’t muster the political will and capital required to do something as straightforward and relatively popular as raising taxes on the tiny fraction Americans making over $250,000 when those same taxes are scheduled to go up already, then how can Democrats ever expect to push taxes upward to levels that would make our existing public programs sustainable for the long run?

Greg Mankiw, President rejects his bipartisan commission

Stephen Entin, Measuring the Economic and Distributional Effects of the Final Fiscal Cliff Bill (Tax Policy Blog)

Howard Gleckman, Congress Kicks the Fiscal Can off the Front Stoop (TaxVox)

William Perez,House Approves the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012

Journal of Accountacy, Congress passes fiscal cliff act

Andrew Mitchel, Senate Fiscal Cliff Bill Includes Retroactive Reinstatement of CFC Look-Thru Rule

Kay Bell, House passes tax bill to avoid fiscal cliff

Paul Neiffer, Some Major Tax “Goodies” in Senate Bill For Farmers!

Robert D. Flach, SURPRISE! SURPRISE! SURPRISE!

Joseph Thorndike, Is Obama the Worst Legislative Negotiator of the Last Century?

Finally, this from Daniel Shaviro, a tax man of the left, on the fiscal cliff and the larger budget picture:

The biggest problem, as others have noted, is that Obama appears to be a once-in-a-generation lame and inept bargainer, who can take even a strong hand and not get all that much, because he is so predictably ready to fold.  But again this is not mainly an issue about the New Year’s Eve deal itself, which is more or less defensible as a one-off solution.  Rather, it’s about the debt ceiling crisis to come in a few weeks.

That is the one that really counts.  I think the Administration should play that, not merely as hard as they are saying they will now, but about 20 levels harder.  I would not just refuse to negotiate, but would have Administration officials use words such as treason, sabotage, and terrorism.

Mr. Shaviro is a very bright man.  He knows that the present fiscal course is unsustainable.  The solutions are some mix of spending less or taxing more.  If a guy that smart is ready to equate “spending less” with “treason, sabotage and terrorism,” the debate will get very ugly.  Maybe we aren’t far behind Argentina and Greece.

Share