Posts Tagged ‘Trish McIntire’

Tax Roundup, 7/8/14: Not in Kansas Anymore edition. And: the latest on bonus depreciation for 2014.

Tuesday, July 8th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

20140409-1What’s the matter with Kansas?  Economist Scott Sumner looks at the controversy over the recent Kansas tax reforms:

The past two years Kansas reduced its state income tax rates. As a result, the top rate of income tax faced by Kansas residents (combined state and federal) rose from 41.45% in 2012 to 48.3% in 2013 and then fell a tad to 48.2% in 2014 (if they don’t itemize.) That’s a pretty tiny drop in the top marginal tax rate in 2014, and a much bigger rise in 2013.


I can’t imagine any serious economist predicting that the Kansas rate cut would boost Kansas GDP by 25% or more. Why did I pick that figure? Because the Kansas state income tax top rate fell from 6.45% in 2012 to 4.8% in 2014, which is roughly a 25% rate cut. In order for that rate cut to boost Kansas tax revenues, you’d have to see Kansas GDP rise by more than 25%. That’s obviously absurd.

The Sumner post is there to refute a straw-man argument made by tax fans:

“Why am I even discussing such crazy ideas? Because Paul Krugman seems to want to convince his readers that lots of supply-siders believe such nonsense…”

Actually, supply-siders do not claim that tax cuts pay for themselves, except in very unusual cases. Kansas is not one of those cases. The Laffer curve effect is typically applied to cases of extremely high marginal tax rates.

kansas flagI have long pushed for a combination of rate cuts for Iowa, combined with comprehensive elimination of deductions and cronyist tax credits.  That would keep the state budget from getting clobbered, while making the tax system much easier and cheaper to run and to comply with.  Kansas couldn’t let go of the loopholes, and in fact added new ones.  Joseph Henchman of the Tax Foundation discusses the Kansas tax changes in Governing.com (my emphasis):

Good tax reform broadens the tax base and lowers rates. That’s what Gov. Brownback wanted to do. But the legislature took out the “broaden-the-base” part. They just passed a tax cut, which can be justifiable if you want to reduce the size of government or expect other revenue sources to go up. But they didn’t cut spending and they don’t expect revenue to grow, so it’s just a hole. With the exemption for pass-through entities, if you’re a wage earner, you’re taxed at the top rate, which is currently 4.9 percent in Kansas. If you’re a partnership, an LLC or any form of recognized business entity with limited liability that’s not a corporation, your income is taxed at zero percent. That’s an incentive to game the tax system without doing anything productive for the economy. They think things like the pass-through exemption will encourage small business, and to be fair, it might. But they are doing it in a way that violates the tax principle of neutrality.

So what would happen if my Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan were enacted in Iowa?  My plan would eliminate corporation taxation and allow S corporation owners to elect to be taxed on distributions, rather than on pass-through income.  Properly structured, it wouldn’t hurt Iowa’s tax revenue, as the rate cuts would be offset by fewer deductions and elimination of tax credit giveaways.  I like to think that without a corporation tax and without a culture of begging for tax credits, Iowa would over time do well, considering that its regulatory and labor environment is already business-friendly.  But I don’t expect miracles, and I would not want the rate cuts to be so deep as to depend on a short-term economic boom to keep the state solvent.

 

20130113-3Richard Borean, House to Consider Bonus Depreciation (Tax Policy Blog). “It turns out that  adding permanent bonus expensing to the Camp Plan would boost GDP, wages, job creation, and federal revenue.”

Bonus depreciation is one of the many perpetually-expiring provisions that get renewed every year or two, after enough lobbyists make their offerings to the congressional fundraising idols.  The congresscritters love enacting proposals temporarily because that way they don’t appear to cost as much as officially-permanent provisions, and because it makes the lobbyists come and visit them regularly to get yet another extender bill passed.

Ways and Means Committee Chairman Camp is calling out this game by trying to get some of these provisions extended permanently, officially.  He notes that they really are permanent, and that pretending that they are temporary isn’t fooling anybody.  His opposition in the Senate wants to keep pretending the provisions are temporary, and that the honest step of treating them as permanent is “budget busting.”

None of this helps businesses pricing investment decisions for 2014.  Anyone buying equipment has to guess at the deduction schedule in order to forecast cash flows from the purchase.  Unfortunately, nothing is likely to happen until after the November elections, when a temporary retroactive extension is likely to pass — but might not.

 

Trish McIntire discusses The New Voluntary Tax Preparer Program.  “I’m interested in seeing the numbers of the Filing Season Program come January 2015. Honestly, I don’t think they are going to be as high as the IRS hopes.”

Roberton Williams, IRS Help Line Is Out Of Service (TaxVox) “I needed to double-check an issue concerning withdrawals from my nonagenarian father’s IRA. IRS Publication 590 wasn’t clear so I decided to call the IRS. The experience was illuminating. Not helpful mind you, but illuminating.”

William Perez, What’s Form W-9?  “Independent contractors and other people who work for themselves will often need to give a Form W-9 to their clients. Clients will then use the information on Form W-9 to prepare Form 1099-MISC to report income paid to the independent contractor.”

Jim Maule continues his Tax Myths series with “I’m Getting a Refund and Not Paying Tax.”  He notes “Whether a person has a tax liability cannot be determined simply from the existence of a refund.”

Kay Bell assigns 5 easy tax tasks to take care of in July.

 

20140708-1Brian Mahany, Are FBAR Penalties Unconstitutional? In Many Cases Yes.  “It’s one thing to assess a 50% or 75% penalty but when penalties exceed the total tax owed by a multiple of 50 times like in the Warner case, we believe the penalties are clearly unconstitutional.”

Martin Sullivan, Will States Get a Multibillion-Dollar Windfall From Corporate Tax Reform? (Tax Analysts Blog).  Only if there is actually corporate tax reform.

TaxGrrrl, The Real Cost Of Summer Vacation: Don’t Get Buried In Taxes

Stephen Olsen, Summary Opinions for 6/27/14. (Procedurally Taxing)  Don’t let the date fool you, this roundup of tax procedure news was posted yesterday.

Peter Reilly, City Taxes Trip Up Investment Advisor Restructuring.  Beware New York City.

Jack Townsend, Convicted Politician Did Not Lay a Proper Foundation For Proferred Indirect Testimony of Lack of Intent.  “How does a defendant unwilling to testify as to his intent — thus invoking his Fifth Amendment privilege — introduce indirect evidence of his lack of intent to blunt the Government’s indirect proof of his intent?”

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 425

 

Robert D. Flach brings the Tuesday Buzz.  I like this:

Item #10 on the new IRS-issued Taxpayer Bill of Rights is “The Right to a Fair and Just Tax system”.

In order to assure this right to taxpayers the Tax Code would need to be totally rewritten and all current members of Congress would have to be replaced by competent and intelligent legislators who actually give a damn about the American public.

It’s right as far as it goes, but some members of the executive branch would also need to go, starting with the Commissioner.

 

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Tax Roundup, 5/9/14: Worst-ever edition. And: It’s Scandal Day 365!

Friday, May 9th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

I was grumpy yesterday when I noticed Tax Analysts correspondent @Meg_Shreve’s live-tweeting of a speech by Doug Shulman, the Worst IRS Commissioner Ever.  So I tweet-grumpted, adding “#worstcommissionerever (fixed)” to one of her posts — the “(fixed)” as a perhaps inadequate attempt to inform the Twitterverse that the tag was my addition, not hers (apologies to Meg Shreve).  That earned this response:

 

20140509-1

 

Ah, where to begin?  How about with identity theft?  Doug Shulman took office with a reputation as an information systems maven.  He then presided over an historic IT debacle.  Tax refund fraud — fundamentally a systems failure —  has let two-bit grifters like Rashia Wilson steal tens of billions of dollars in fraudulent refunds over the years.

This problem has been ramping up for years, and only now, with Shulman gone, is the IRS beginning to take effective action to prevent it.  My wife can’t go shopping in Chicago without me getting a call from the credit card company warning me of a suspicious transaction, but Doug Shulman’s IRS could send 655 refunds to the same apartment in Lithuania without batting an eye.

Rashia says "thanks, Commissioner!"

Rashia says “thanks, Commissioner!”

While the theft of taxpayer billions is outrageous enough, the inept treatment of ID theft victims makes it even worse.  Only after Doug Shulman left did the IRS even begin to get this right.

The Worst Commissioner Ever was just too darned busy to stop ID theft.  He was busy trying to increase IRS power over preparers with a useless, expensive and unilateral preparer regulation regime.  He reversed the longstanding IRS position that the agency had no such regulatory power, only to be unceremoniously slapped down by the courts.   In the meantime, the prospect of the regulations drove thousands of preparers out of the business, increasing taxpayer costs and driving many taxpayers to self-prepare — and surely causing some to fall out of the system altogether.  The IRS wasted enormous resources on this futile power grab — resources that might have been better-devoted, to, oh, maybe the fight against identity theft.

 

He was also busy shooting jaywalkers.  International tax enforcement is considered Doug Shulman’s greatest success — but there was no reason the pursuit of wealthy international money-launderers had to also terrorize American expatriates whose offenses were to commit everyday personal finance.  Many folks have been hit with ridiculous penalties for not filing FBAR reports that they had no idea existed.  These folks are often people who married overseas or moved out of the U.S. as children, but were presumptively treated as international money-launderers when they tried to come into the system, and were hit with enormous penalties — often when little or no tax had been avoided.

It’s hard to imagine that an agency that can find ways to simply wave away the ACA employer mandate couldn’t find a way to allow expats and individuals without criminal intent to come into the international reporting system without risking financial disaster.  The states that allow non-resident non-filers to come in by paying five years of back taxes provide an obvious model.

 

Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how big is legacy is.

Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how big is legacy is.

Then there is the scandal.  When Tea Party groups complained about absurd and abusive IRS information requests, sympathetic Congresscritters asked Doug Shulman if the IRS was targeting Tea Party groups.  The Worst Commissioner Ever testified before Congress that the IRS was doing nothing of the sort:

“There’s absolutely no targeting. This is the kind of back and forth that happens to people” who apply for tax-exempt status, Shulman said.

That statement, of course, became inoperative when the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration reported that the IRS was, in fact, picking on the Tea Party groups.  Subsequent revelations have shown that it was exactly a partisan attempt to fight anti-administration groups.  So Doug Shulman either was too lazy and ineffective to know what his own agency was doing, or he knew, or he didn’t care.  He destroyed the credibility of the agency as a nonpartisan enclave of competent technicians.

Now the party controlling the House of Representatives is on notice that the agency wants to see it lose.  That agency can hardly expect generous appropriations as long as that perception remains (and the new Commissioner has done nothing reassuring on that score).   This will damage the agency’s effectiveness for years — all because The Worst Commissioner Ever was unwilling or unable to run a professional, non-partisan agency.

This is a record of administrative ineptitude and negligence that is unbeaten.  No IRS commissioner has so squandered agency resources and reputation.  If another Commissioner has even come close, I’d sure like to know who it was.

 

Meanwhile, the TaxProf has reached a milestone: The IRS Scandal, Day 365.  The biggest item in this edition is the report that the IRS had not destroyed Tea Party donor lists — after saying it had — and that the IRS has audited 10% of Tea Party donors.  This is a staggering audit rate, if true, and is a tremendous scandal in itself if the IRS doesn’t come up with a good explanation.

TaxGrrrl, House Finds Lerner, Central Figure In Tax Exempt Scandal, In Contempt Of Congress

 

20140509-2Jana Luttenegger, Deadline Approaching to Avoid Losing Tax Exempt Status (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog). Get those 990-series reports filed!

Trish McIntire, EFTPS – Inquiry PIN.  “The Inquiry PIN will allow taxpayers to check and make sure that their federal tax deposits have been made and catch a problem before it becomes a major issue.”  This should be used by all employers.

Peter Reilly, Former Tampa Bay Buccaneers Owner Scores Touchdown In Tax Court.  “It may seem odd to look at a case that ends up with a charitable deduction dis-allowance of nearly $4 million as a victory, but when you consider how taxpayers generally fare in easement cases it really is.”

Leslie Book, Tax Court Jurisdiction to Determine its Jurisdiction: Foreign Taxes and Credits (Procedurally Taxing)

Mindy Herzfeld, International Tax Trending (Tax Analysts Blog)

 

Richard Borean, Tax Freedom Day Arrives in Final Two States: Connecticut and New Jersey (Tax Policy Blog)

Howard Gleckman, Taxing Employer-Sponsored Insurance Would Hike Social Security Benefits But Boost Federal Coffers (TaxVox)

 

Kay Bell, IRS employee arrested after inadvertently following Obama daughters’ motorcade onto White House grounds.  Oops.

Tax Justice Blog, Déjà vu: Oklahoma Enacts Tax Cut Voters Don’t Want.  I’m not sure about the “don’t want” part.

Robert D. Flach has your Friday morning Buzz!

 

News from the Profession.  Deloitte CEO Prefers Traditional Photo Op Over Selfie  (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 4/1/14: Two weeks to go edition. And: neglected spouses!

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014 by Joe Kristan


4868
April 15 is two weeks from today.  You should already be well along the way in getting your taxes done.  If you aren’t,  you need to get to work – and you should be pondering an extension.

Even an extension isn’t a free lunch.  As Trish McIntire explains below, extensions extend the filing deadline, not the payment deadline, so you need to have at least an idea of your current tax situation even to extend.

Start with your 2012 return.  Make sure you have all of the items you reported on that return — W-2s, K-1s, 1099s.  Then think through what might have changed since last year.  New kid?  New spouse?  Lose an old spouse?  Won the lottery?

Then pencil out a return, or hurry down to your preparer.  If your preparer tells you to extend, don’t fight it.  An extended return is not a “red flag” to the IRS.  And when figuring out how much to pay with your Form 4868, round up.  This time of year, it seems most surprises are the bad kind, so assume the worst.

 

20120511-2If you want to know what does work as a red flag for the IRS, the Tax Court yesterday had a good example:

Petitioner’s 2010 Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, was prepared by H and R Block. On Schedule C, Profit or Loss From Business, petitioner reported gross income of $1,274, office expense of $142, and car and truck expenses of $17,978, for a net loss of $16,846.

A schedule C with just a little income and a big loss caused mostly by car and truck expenses probably goes straight to the “audit me” bin, because the IRS knows that many taxpayers are like this one:

Although petitioner provided his 2009-10 mileage log, he nevertheless failed to provide any corroborating receipts or other records that substantiated the statements made in the log. Petitioner’s mileage log did not address the business purpose of each trip. Guessing as to where he may have gone in 2010, petitioner added the places of business travel to his log in 2012. The log was thus not contemporaneous, and the reconstruction was not reliable.

If you want to take car deductions, you need to keep track of them as you go, in a log, a calendar, or a smart-phone app.  Otherwise you, like the taxpayer in this case, won’t stand much of a chance against the IRS.

Cite: Houchin, T.C. Summ. Op. 2014-29.

 

20140401-1William Perez, Retroactive Charitable Donations for Typhoon Haiyan Relief:

Taxpayers can take a deduction on their 2013 tax return for cash donations made between March 26, 2014, and April 14, 2014, to charities providing disaster relief to areas impacted by Typhoon Haiyan.

Normally, charitable donations can be deducted only if the donation is made by the end of the year. But the recently enacted Philippines Charitable Giving Assistance Act (HR 3771) gives taxpayers the option of deducting donations for Typhoon Haiyan relief on their 2013 tax returns.

William explains what you need to do to claim the retroactive deduction.

TaxGrrrl, Taxes From A To Z (2014): Q Is For QDRO

Trish McIntireThe Annual Extension Post:

So what if you can’t get your return done in time to file by then? You can file an extension. It can be done electronically or by filing a paper Form 4868 by April 15th. And it does have to be postmarked or electronically filed by April 15th. After that time, the extension won’t help you.

Remember, an extended return does not attract IRS attention; a late or erroneous return does.

 

Kay Bell, America’s pastimes: Baseball, ballpark proposals and taxes

 

Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp Won’t Seek Reelection (Accounting Today).  That can’t be a good sign for his misconceived tax reform plan.

Jeremy Scott, Fair Shot for Everyone’ Contains Details for No One (Tax Analysts Blog):

Setting a new low for lack of detail and specificity, Senate Democrats unveiled their “Fair Shot for Everyone” agenda last week. Only loosely a set of real proposals, the agenda is merely a series of talking points designed to distract voters from President Obama’s lagging approval numbers and the continuing unpopularity of the Affordable Care Act.

Not a glowing review.

Howard Gleckman, Should Tax Reform Be Sold on Values Instead of Economics?

 

20120906-1Paul Brennan, In Iowa, your taxes help corporations not pay theirs (Iowa Watchdog.org):

Of course, $950,000 isn’t much more than chicken feed to a company like Tyson, which posted $583 million in profits in 2013. It also doesn’t compare with the tens of millions of tax dollars the state paid out to big companies through the Research Activities Credit last year.

But it is probably enough to leave tax payers feel well and truly plucked.

Nobody notices a few missing feathers.

Des Moines Register, Branstad will sign Iowa Speedway tax break in Newton ceremony Wednesday.  Because NASCAR has better lobbyists than you do.

Tax Justice Blog, State News Quick Hits: State Lawmakers Not Getting the Message

 

BitcoinAlan Cole, Bitcoin’s IRS Troubles (Tax Policy Blog:

The price of the virtual currency Bitcoin has fallen to about $461 from a closing price of $586 last Monday. This decline of about 21% came in the wake of an IRS ruling that net gains from Bitcoin transactions will be taxed as capital gains.

Nobody wants a Schedule D item for every purchase.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 328.  April Fools edition, unfortunately.

News from the Profession: The Forgotten Spouses of Public Accounting (Going Concern).  I’m sure mine is around here somewhere.

 

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Tax Roundup, 2/27/14: Doomed Tax Reform Frenzy Edition.

Thursday, February 27th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

President Reagan signs PL 99-514, the Tax Reform Act of 1986.
When I think of income tax reform, I think big.  I think of massive elimination of tax deductionPresident Reagan signs PL 99-514, the Tax Reform Act of 1986.s, with great big rate reductions as consolation for taxpayers that lose their breaks.  I look for elimination of alternative ways of tracking income and deductions, with the idea that one way that everyone can understand is better than special breaks for different industries.  I look to eliminate double taxation of income everywhere, including elimination of capital gain taxes and integration of the corporate and individual systems.

By these standards, the tax reform plan put forth by Dave Camp, the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, is a disappointment.  While it would make many simplifying changes to the tax law while rates, it would leave behind a system that would still be very recognizable to a Rip Van Taxman who fell asleep in 1993.  It prunes tax complexity, but it doesn’t begin to clear the forest.

Still, politics being what it is, trimming the weed sanctuary is probably the best we can expect.  Maybe better than we can expect.

 

Tony Nitti has already posted detailed walk-throughs of the individual and business parts of the proposal, so there’s no point in me repeating his work.  Instead I will list some of the bigger changes proposed, with my commentary.  I don’t expect anything like the Camp plan to be enacted during the current administration, but I think it gives us an idea of the kinds of changes that could happen after 2016, if the stars align.

Individual Rates.  The bill would have a three-bracket tax system: 10%, 25%, and 35%.  The 35% bracket would replace the current 39.6% bracket, and would only apply to income other than “qualifying domestic manufacturing income.”  Lowering rates is fine, but this would retain the stupid difference between manufacturing income and other income embodied in the current Section 199 deduction.  It’s a complex and economically illiterate break for a favored class of income paid for by higher rates on all other income.

Capital gains and dividends would be taxed as ordinary income, but only after a 40% exclusion.  That would be a 21% net rate on 35% taxable income. (Initially I said 14%, math is hard).

Against the forces that have risen on K Street, there is no victory.

Against the power that has risen on K Street, there is no victory.

Deductions would be trimmed back.  The maximum home mortgage interest debt allowed for deductions would be $500,000, instead of the current $1.1 million.  Medical deductions would go away.  Standard deductions would increase to $11,000 for individuals and $22,000 for joint filers.  Many itemized deductions would reduce taxes only at the 25% rate, rather than the 35% top rate.  Charitable deductions would be simplified, but only deductible to the extent they exceed 2% of AGI.  The deduction for state and local taxes would be eliminated.

The increase in the standard deduction is an excellent idea.  I’m fine with reducing the mortgage interest deduction.   The limiting of deductions to the 25% rate is pointless revenue-raising complexity.  The elimination of the medical deduction will be a real burden on people in skilled nursing care; they are the people who generally can take this deduction.  Taxing them while they burn through their assets paying nursing home costs  will only put them into title 19 that much sooner.

While I am sympathetic with the policy reasons for not allowing a deduction for state and local taxes, those reasons don’t apply to taxes arising from pass-through business income.  State taxes are a cost of doing business for those folks, and should be deductible accordingly.

Alternative Minimum Tax would go away.  About time.

Corporate rates.  The proposal replaces the current multi-rate corporate tax with a flat 25% rate.  Excellent idea, as far as it goes, but it is flawed by the 35% individual top rate; it provides a motivation to game income between the individual and corporate system.

The proposal eliminates a number of energy credits while retaining the research credit.  I think that it would be better to get rid of the research credit and lower rates.  I think the IRS is no more capable of identifying and rewarding research than it is of fairly administering political distinctions.  Unfortunately, the credit seems to be a sacred cow among taxwriters.

Incredibly, the Camp corporate system gets rid of the Section 199 deduction while retaining a similar concept for individual rates.  Here it doesn’t get rid of pointless and economically foolish complexity; it just moves it around in the code.

LIFO inventories go away under the proposal.  As this comes up every proposal, it’s going to happen sometime.

Carried interests become taxable as ordinary income.  This is more complexity, apparently a sop to populist rhetoric.

Pass-throughs would be tweaked.  S corporation elections would be easier to make, and could be delayed until return time.  Built-in gains would only be taxable in the first five years after an S corporation election, instead of ten years.  Basis adjustments on partnership interest transactions would be mandatory, instead of elective.

Fixed assets would have mixed treatment.  While the Secti0n 179 deduction would permanently go to $250,000, depreciation would go to a system more like the pre-1986 ACRS system than the current MACRS system.

20120702-2Cash basis accounting would be more widely available, and fully available to Farmers and sole proprietors.  This is a step in the wrong direction.  Advocates of cash accounting say that it provides “simplicity,” implying that poor farmers just can’t handle inventory accounting.  Meanwhile these “poor” bumpkins play this system like a fiddle, manipulating cash method accounting to achieve results that are only available through fraud to the rest of us.  Modern farm operations with GPS, custom planting and nutrient plans, and multi-million dollar asset bases are as able to handle accrual accounting as any other business of similar size.

There’s plenty more to the plan, but you get the idea.  I find it disappointing that they don’t replace the current system of C and S corporations with a single system with full dividend deductibility.  I find the treatment of preferences and tax credit subsidies half-hearted.  I think there should be fewer deductions, fewer credits, and a much bigger standard deduction.  That’s why I’d never get elected to anything, I suppose.

The TaxProf rounds up coverage of the proposal.  Other coverage:

Peter Reilly, The Only Comment On Camp Tax Proposal You Need To Read – And Some Others

Paul Neiffer, Tax Reform – Part ?????!!!!!  “Since this is a mid-term election year, it has little chance of passing this year, but it is important to note possible changes that Congress is pondering.”

Annette Nellen, Congressman Camp’s Tax Reform Act of 2014 Discussion Draft

Leslie Book, Quick Thoughts on Procedural Aspects of Camp’s Tax Code Overhaul Proposal and the Spate of Important Interest Cases (Procedurally Taxing)

Joseph Thorndike, Democrats and Tax Reform: Can’t Do It With ‘Em, Can’t Do It Without ‘Em (Tax Analysts Blog).  “If you’re a left-leaning populist, what’s not to like?  Well, at least one big thing: The bill doesn’t raise taxes.”

TaxGrrrl, Camp’s Tax Proposal: The First Thing We Do, Let’s Kill All The Lawyers 

Kyle Pomerleau, Andrew Lundeen, The Basics of Chairman Camp’s Tax Reform Plan (Tax Policy Blog).  “We’ll have more analysis on the plan soon – it will take us days to get through the 979 pages of legislative text – but in the meantime, here are the basics.”  They note that the plan uses tax benefit phase-outs based on income — a bad idea that creates hidden tax brackets.

Renu Zaretsky, Tax Reform: one foot in front of the other (TaxVox)

 

Other Things:

William Perez, Last Year’s State Tax Refund Might Be Taxable

Jason Dinesen, Glossary of Tax Terms: Depreciation 

Trish McIntire, Brokerage Statements.  “Actually, my problem is clients who don’t bring in the whole statement.”

 

Jack Townsend, Wow! Ty Warner Is Ty Warner is Not Quite the Innocent Abroad 

Janet Novack, Senate Offshore Tax Cheating Report Skewers Credit Suisse And U.S. Justice Department 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 294.  I note that Lois Lerner won’t testify without being immunized from prosecution.  “Not a smidgeon” of wrongdoing, indeed.

 

Finally, Seven People Who Have a Worse Busy Season Than You, from Going Concern.  That’ll cheer you right up.

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/31/14: Earned Income Tax Credit Awareness Day party edition! And: e-filing begins.

Friday, January 31st, 2014 by Joe Kristan


EITC error chart
Yes, for those of you not already taking the day off to observe it, today is Earned Income Tax Credit Awareness Day!  Let’s celebrate with a true story of EITC awareness.

Cedar Rapids tax preparer Demetries Johnson displayed her awareness of the credit in a big way:

Defendant DEMETRIES JOHNSON notified some taxpayers seeking her services that she could obtain larger tax refunds than they would otherwise receive.  To obtain refunds, defendant DEMETRIES JOHNSON would knowingly report false information on taxpayers returns. The claims made in the tax returns were false, fictitious, and fraudulent in that the claims for refunds, for example: 1) falsely reported income when little or no income was earned, thereby substantially and materially overstating taxpayers’ income in a manner that made the taxpayer appear eligible for a refund by virtue of the EITC; and 2) falsely included a child or children on taxpayers’ returns who did not in fact qualify under the EITC.  Through submission of these false claims, defendant DEMETRIES JOHNSON increased payments made by the Internal Revenue Service to the taxpayers or to bank accounts controlled by the defendant.

Her awareness ended up earning a two-year prison sentence after she pleaded guilty to tax charges.  Her keen level of awareness isn’t uncommon; a recent Treasury Inspector General analysis showed that 21-25% of the $13 billion of the credit issued annually is claimed “in error.”  No small amount of those errors are deliberate.

Those who scam the system are especially aware that the credit is “refundable.”  If you claim more credit than you owe in taxes, the IRS will send you a check for the excess.  Like all refundable credits, it attracts fraudsters.

Come to think of it, maybe “awareness” isn’t the real problem with the Earned Income Credit.

 

Flickr image courtesy Shock264 under Creative Commons license

Flickr image courtesy Shock264 under Creative Commons license

When you buy a round, it’s always popular Wind industry fears slowdown as Congress considers future of popular tax credit  (Des Moines Register).  The recipients of wind subsidies delivered through the tax law are annoyed that there is a delay in getting their free stuff.

The headline says the wind turbine subsidy is “popular,” but nothing in the article backs that up, or even repeats the claim.  I suppose it’s as popular with the Warren Buffet-controlled utility that is a big recipient of the credit as the Earned Income Tax Credit was with Demetries Johnson’s clients.

 

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

Lois Lerner, ex-IRS, ex-FEC

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 267.  He highlights today’s Peggy Noonan piece:

 Meanwhile, back in America, conservatives targeted and harassed by the Internal Revenue Service still await answers on their years-long requests for tax exempt status. When news of the IRS targeting broke last spring, agency officials lied about it, and one took the Fifth. The president said he was outraged, had no idea, read about it in the papers, boy was he going to get to the bottom of it. An investigation was announced but somehow never quite materialized. Victims of the targeting waited to be contacted by the FBI to be asked about their experience. Now the Justice Department has made clear its investigation won’t be spearheaded by the FBI but by a department lawyer who is a campaign contributor to the president and the Democratic Party. Sometimes you feel they are just laughing at you, and going too far.

For a case where a key figure promptly hid behind the Fifth Amendment, the FBI was sure quick to conclude there was no crime.

 

William Gale, Benjamin Harris, David John, State of the Union Speech Promotes New Retirement Savings Vehicles (TaxVox):

 Similar to the R-Bond discussed in a recent AARP Public Policy Institute paper written by William Gale, David John and Spencer Smith, MyRA would allow individuals to save in a government bond account similar to the one offered as an option to federal employees through the Thrift Savings Plan. The details are unclear (there’s a WhiteHouse fact sheet here), but MyRA would allow new savers and those with small balances to accumulate retirement savings without either having to pay administrative charges or face market risk.

Just inflation and government policy risk.

 

20130916-1TaxGrrrl, IRS Officially Opens Tax Season Today, Begins Processing Returns and Refunds

William Perez, IRS’s Electronic Filing Systems Opens January 31

Kay Bell, Are you ready to e-file your federal tax return? Here’s how.

Trish McIntire, IRS Notice Prevention

 

Fear the Family (and other related parties).  My new post at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record Business Professionals Blog.

 

Kyle Pomerleau notes A Few Contradictions in President Obama’s State of the Union Address (Tax Policy Blog)

Keith Fogg, Does Treasury’s Policy Restraining Referrals to Low Income Tax Clinics Harm Individuals and the Tax System? (Procedurally Taxing)

Robert D. Flach serves up his last Buzz for awhile as he begins his tax season hiatus.  It’s his 43rd tax season.  If I hit my 43d tax season, it will be in my 68th year.  I admire Robert’s endurance, but I have no plans to match it.

 

haroldDirector of Chartered firm among 13 charged over £2.5m film tax fraud (ifaonline.co.uk).  I think film tax credits are the bait car of tax incentives.

Useless tool.   Treasury Nominee Dynan Calls Home Buyer Tax Credit ‘Useful Tool’ (Tax Analysts, $link).  Not only should her nomination be rejected on the basis of her approval of the failed and fraud-ridden credit, she should be presumed self-disqualified from any public position ever.

While I think the court decision ending tax-free treatment for cash parsonage allowances is likely to stand, not everyone agrees.  Zelinsky: The First Amendment and the § 107 Parsonage Allowance (TaxProf)

 

Tax Trials continues its “Famous Fridays” series with Pete Rose, Gambling Winnings Are Income Too.

News from the Profession: PwC Doing Its Part to Keep Dog Tails Wagging in Northeast Ohio (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/30/14: Gas tax increase advances. And: IRS starts to accept 1040s, but not issuing refunds yet.

Thursday, January 30th, 2014 by Joe Kristan

 

Via Wikipedia

Via Wikipedia

They’re still trying to increase Iowa’s gas tax, reports William Petroski of the Des Moines Register:

An Iowa House subcommittee voted 5-0 today to approve a 10-cent increase in the state’s gasoline tax, although the proposal still faces steep odds of winning final approval this session.

The bill, managed by Rep. Josh Byrnes, R-Osage, would raise the fuel tax by three cents the first year, an additional three cents and following year, and four cents the third year. When fully implemented, the tax increase would generate $230 million annually for city, county and state roads.

It’s always hard to increase taxes in an election year.  There is a good argument that gas taxes are the way to pay for roads, and that Iowa’s tax needs updating, but so far Iowa’s road spending is in line with most other states, and the talk of a “crisis” isn’t convincing everyone.

 

Iowa Farmer Today, Little action expected on taxes in Legislature.  It quotes my co-presenter at the Farm and Urban Tax Schools, Roger McEowen:

McEowen, head of the Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation (CALT) at Iowa State University, says it is always possible the state might do something to clean up its tax code, but it appears unlikely this year.

“Frankly, I don’t think anything important is going to happen on taxes, not in this legislative session,” he says.

It is a sentiment echoed by many other legislative observers.

Like me.

 

 

20130419-1TaxGrrrl, IRS Accepting Returns As Part Of Test Program, Not Issuing Refunds Early

Trish McIntire, Yes, You Have to Wait.  If you haven’t received your W-2, you can’t file using your last 2013 pay stub.

Jason Dinesen, Iowa Firefighter/EMS Tax Credit.  A $50 spiff to volunteer firefighters and EMS people. One more feel-good provision that clutters up the tax law but is too small to enforce.

Brian Strahle, SALT PRACTICES: WHAT PEOPLE THINK, BUT DO NOT SAY.  “SALT” is “State And Local Taxes.”

Paul Neiffer looks at the predictably expensive and absurd farm bill: How To Make an Extra $100 Per Acre!  It brings to mind the old joke:  “How did the farmer double his income?  He bought a second mailbox.”

Related: Billionaires Received Millions From Taxpayer Farm Subsidies: Analysis (Huffington Post)

William Perez, Earned Income Credit Recipients by State

 

 

Phil Hodgen, How Many Appointments in Buenos Aires to Expatriate?  The State Department doesn’t always make it easy to shed U.S. citizenship.

Brian Strahle, FATCA and Unintended Consequences.  A story of an American in Switzerland who is losing the ability to commit personal finance because of this anti-”fatcat” legislation.

 

taxanalystslogoDavid Brunori, A Sales Tax Conundrum (Tax Analysts Blog):

The sales tax has been a blessing and a curse. One of its great virtues is that it is collected by the vendor, which then remits it to the state. Neither the taxpayer nor the tax agency has much to do except pay and collect. The vendor does the work. The success of the sales tax for the last 90 years is largely attributable to vendor collection. But if the vendor doesn’t collect and remit the appropriate tax, it is liable for the amounts. The vendor will have to pay the unremitted tax and could face severe penalties and even criminal charges.

So if a vendor is unsure about the status of an item it’s selling, it will collect the tax. Better to collect and remit tax not owed than to face the consequences of a mistake.

David notes that online vendors will have to deal with many states, with very confusing rules, and that over-collection of sales taxes is the inevitable result.  Not that the states mind.

Cara Griffith wonders, Are State Tax Authorities Hiding the Ball? (Tax Analysts Blog).  “I’ve noticed an emerging trend in some state departments of revenue – a move toward secret law. In a time when transparency has become a buzzword, some revenue departments are doing what they can to avoid transparency.”

 

William McBride, State of the Union: Corporations Continue to Flee (Tax Policy Blog)

Tax Justice Blog, Why the Business Tax Reform Proposal in Obama’s SOTU Is Not as Great as It Sounds

Kay Bell, Taxes touched on lightly in State of Union via EITC, MyRA

Joseph Thorndike, The War on Wealth Is Not New.  (Tax Analysts Blog).  True.  And it has always been dishonest, disgraceful, corrupt, and impoverishing.

 

The Critical Question.  What Happens When You Mix a Seedy Strip Club, an Unsophisticated Taxpayer and the Tax Court? (Going Concern).  I’m sure if it was one of those real elegant and distinguished strip clubs, there wouldn’t have been a problem…

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/2/2013: Remember the January 15 property tax credit deadline! And: final 3.8% tax regs.

Monday, December 2nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130117-1There’s a new deadline this year for Iowa business owners with real property.   Iowa business owners have a January 15, 2014 deadline to apply for the business property tax credit enacted in this year’s legislative session.  Many have yet to apply, reports gazette.com:

Commercial property owners have been slow to apply for a new property tax credit designed to give a little boost to small businesses.

Most business owners who own the property in which the business operates are eligible for the Iowa Business Property Tax Credit.

A $50 million pool of money is available for the first year of the new tax credit. The state legislature included the credit in an historic property tax relief bill signed into law on June 12.

“It is important they get them in now so we can process them,” said Cedar Rapids City Assessor Scott Labus.

Businesses can find the form online here.  It should be filed with the local county assessor’s office. The gazette.com article says the maximum credit for the coming assessment year is $523.

 

Paul Neiffer,  Final Net Investment Income Regs Have Good News For Farmers:

In Final Regulations issued earlier this week, the IRS changed their interpretation of this rule and have now indicated that any self-rented real estate or rental real estate that has been properly grouped with a material participation entity will not be subject to the tax.  In even better news, any gain from selling this type of property will also be exempt from the tax.

Good news not just for farmers, but for any business where the owners rent property to a corporation they control.

 

Tony Nitti, IRS Issues Final Net Investment Income Tax Regulations: A First Look And More   It was a dirty trick to issue them over Thanksgiving, when I wasn’t watching.   I will be posting on some key issues.

 

20130419-1Illinois storm victims get filing relief (IRS news release):

The President has declared the counties of Champaign, Douglas, Fayette, Grundy, Jasper, La Salle, Massac, Pope, Tazewell, Vermilion, Wabash, Washington, Wayne, Will and Woodford a federal disaster area. Individuals who reside or have a business in these counties may qualify for tax relief.

The declaration permits the IRS to postpone certain deadlines for taxpayers who reside or have a business in the disaster area. For instance, certain deadlines falling on or after Nov. 17, and on or before Feb. 28, 2014, have been postponed to Feb. 28, 2014.

The IRS is also waiving the failure-to-deposit penalties for employment and excise tax deposits due on or after Nov. 17, and on or before Dec. 2, as long as the deposits are made by Dec. 2, 2013.

You don’t have to be damaged to qualify, you just have to be located in the affected area.

 

No, that’s not the real threat.  The Muscatine Journal mistakes the painkiller for the ailment:

Tax breaks for wind-power producers are set to expire in a little more than a month, threatening hundreds of manufacturing and energy jobs in the state if nothing is done.

In Iowa, much of the attention has focused on the federal Renewable Fuel Standard in which the federal government guarantees a market for biofuels. But for Iowa’s turbine manufacturers and power companies, it’s the federal production tax credit that takes precedence.

It’s not the loss of the tax credits that threatens these industries.  It’s their inability to survive without subsidies or, in the case of ethanol makers, their inability to sell their product unless people are forced by law to buy it.  The subsidies only dull the recipients awareness of their real ailment.

 

David Brunori, Confusing Tax Cuts with Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog):

But increasing or decreasing tax burdens should not be confused with tax reform. Tax reform should mean something. I define tax reform as meaningful changes to the tax system that comport with the general notions of sound tax policy. The goal should be to make the system fairer, neutral, more efficient, and more stable. The changes should also increase economic development and job growth. And they should ensure that the government raises enough revenue to meet the public service demands of the citizenry. Changing the rates or tinkering at the margins is not reform.

Nor is giving tax spiffs to influential or sympathetic constituencies, but that’s been the Iowa way for some time now.

 

20120529-2Lyman Stone, Missouri Considering “Massive” Incentives for Boeing (Tax Policy Blog):

This is bad tax policy in spades. Governor Nixon rejected a flawed, but still broad, tax cut on the grounds that taxes don’t matter much for businesses, but government services do. Now Missouri policymakers may try to attract one specific company with a “massive” and narrowly-targeted tax break, despite lack of evidence that incentives lead to economic growth, and ample evidence that they create problems.

It’s all about directing funds to insiders with good lobbyists.

 

Cara Griffith, A Change of Culture (Tax Analysts Blog).  She talks about the natural tendency of tax authorities to conceal information and make tax practice an insiders’ game.  She notes that North Carolina doesn’t release private rulings and hasn’t updated public corporate directives since April 2012.  Iowa is better, but they haven’t updated their “What’s new” website since August.

 

William Perez, Updated Form W-9.  With the additional rules of FATCA piled on top of existing foreign withholding rules, you should make sure to get a W-9 from your vendors, depositors and ownership groups.

 

Jason Dinesen reminds us of the Iowa Insurance Premium Deduction

Trish McIntire reminds us that Refund Advances are really expensive loans.

Robert D. Flach, TO PER DIEM OR NOT TO PER DIEM – THAT IS THE QUESTION.

 

Kay Bell offers some Tax-saving moves to make by Dec. 31, 2013

Howard Gleckman,  Obama Will Try to Clarify the Role of Tax-Exempt Groups in Politics.  Your new role in furthering public debate?  Shut up!

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 207

Tax Justice Blog: This Holiday, The Tax Justice Team Is Thankful For…  In other words, watch your wallets, folks.

The Critical Question: Do We Need A Clergy Tax Simplification Act Of 2014?    (Peter Reilly)

Going Concern, 10 Things Accounting Professionals Should Be Thankful For This Year

TaxGrrrl, This Man’s Nuts: Plan To Sell Testicle For New Car Is Taxable   As if there weren’t enough non-tax arguments against this plan.

 

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Tax Roundup, 11/12/13: Mason City is cold edition. But: a reprieve!

Tuesday, November 12th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

The ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation Farm and Urban Tax School makes its Mason City stop today.  7 degrees and sunny.

20131112

But we have a sold-out house today to keep us warm!  We are also sold out for Thursday in Ottumwa.  Meanwhile Paul Neiffer helps with the second day of the show today in Sheldon and tomorrow here.  Seats are going fast for our remaining sessions in Waterloo, Red Oak, Denison and Ames, so register today!  And if you come to one of the shows, please come up and say hi!

 

The first chart for any tax policy debate is in this post from Andrew Lundeen at the Tax Policy Blog,  Government at All Levels Redistributed $2 Trillion in 2012

 givers and takers

 From the study referenced in the post:

As Chart 1 illustrates, the typical family in the lowest 20 percent in 2012 (with market incomes between $0 and $17,104) pays an average of $6,331 in total taxes and receives $33,402 in spending from all levels of government. Thus, the average amount of redistribution to a typical family in the bottom quintile is estimated to be $27,071. The vast majority of this net benefit, a total of $21,158, comes as a result of federal policies.

Before considering any more taxes on “the rich,” it’s worth stopping to understand what is already happening, and to consider that if this isn’t solving the problem, maybe more of the same isn’t the answer.

 

You don’t get a “reprieve” from something you should look forward to: “Iowa gets Obamacare reprieve.”  Coming from Press-citizen.com, the party newspaper of the People’s Republic of Iowa City, that’s probably not the sort of headline to cheer up the administration.

 

train-wreck Megan McArdle, Hope Is All Obamacare Has Left :

When the tech geeks raised concerns about their ability to deliver the website on time, they are reported to have been told “Failure is not an option.” Unfortunately, this is what happens when you say “failure is not an option”: You don’t develop backup plans, which means that your failure may turn into a disaster.

Great idea!

 

Peter Suderman, Time to Start Considering Obamacare’s Worst Case Scenarios (Reason.com):

But it’s time to start considering the worst-case scenarios: that the exchanges continue to malfunction, that plan cancellations go into effect, that insurers see the political winds shifting and stop playing nice with the administration, and that significant numbers of people are left stranded without coverage as a result. Rather than reforming the individual market, which was flawed but did work for some people, Obamacare will have destroyed it and left only dysfunction and chaos in its wake. 

None of this makes me optimistic for a repeal of the inane 3.8% net investment income tax enacted to finance the debacle.  Cleaning up the disaster will be costly, and they’ll need the money for it.

 

Trish McIntire, The New January 21st.  “Despite the delay in the start of the tax season, taxpayers won’t get extra time to file their returns.”

 

Check out Robert D. Flach’s Tuesday Buzz!

Jack Townsend,  IRS Authority to Settle After Referral to DOJ Tax, a discussion of Ron Isley’s tax troubles.

Brian Mahany,  IRS Makes Important Changes For FBAR Appeals – FBAR Lawyer Blog

Fiduciary Income Tax Blog, Valuation of Indirect Ownership Through a Trust

Norton Francis, Narrow Tax Hikes Win Support in Several States (TaxVox)

 

All the news that’s fit to print.  NY Times: Estate Planning for Sex Toys (TaxProf)

News from the Profession.  Someone With Lots of Spare Time Has Doodled Big 4 Stereotypes (Going Concern).

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 10/28/13: Maquoketa! And the experts in preposterous.

Monday, October 28th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Today is the first session of the ISU Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation 2013 Farm and Urbane Income Tax Schools.  Once again I am on the Day 1 team with Roger McEowen, the ringleader of the Center, and Kristy Maitre, the Iowa IRS Stakeholder Liaison.

We are starting in Maquoketa this year.  This is our first visit to Maquoketa, the county seat of Jackson County.   This replaces our former Muscatine session; we had to move when the conference center we were using closed.

Most Iowans know Maquoketa for Maquoketa Caves State Park.

Picture by Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

Picture by Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

If the session goes well, we won’t have to hold our next one underground.  If you can’t make it to Maquoketa, register today for one of the seven other farm school sessions!

 

Peter Reilly,  Organizing Junk Mail Does Not Qualify As Manufacturing.  Peter discusses the ADVO case we mentioned last week on the Section 199 “Domestic Production Activities Deduction.”  I like this:

The fact that what was being produced was 90,000 tons of crap, that was going to be quickly thrown away after annoying someone did not seem to be of any significance.  

It’s bad enough that the tax law has to distinguish “production.”  Imagine if the IRS agents had to distinguish crap.

 

Paul NeifferNow Congress is Calling the IRS “Preposterous” (At Least the Delay)!  Well, Congress would know about preposterous.  Paul will be one of the Day 2 speakers at the Farm and Urban Tax Schools in Sheldon, Mason City, Ottumwa and Ames.

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Low and Moderate Income Taxpayers Face High Marginal Tax Rates Too

Yesterday, the CBO released an interesting graphic showing the share of income earners below 450 percent of the federal poverty line. (Incomes up to $87,885 for a family of three).

From a sample of tax returns, they found that nearly 40 percent of those making 450 percent of the FPL and lower face a 30 to 39 percent marginal tax rate.

They also find that a good number of taxpayers face marginal tax rates that are even higher. More than 10 percent face a marginal tax rate between 40 and 49 percent. Some even face rates higher than 80 percent.

 

20131028-2

This marginal rate is part of the poverty trap caused by the phase-out of means-tested welfare benefits like the Earned Income Tax Credit.  These cause programs touted as helping the poor to punish taxpayers who try to stop being poor.

 

Phil Hodgen,  Expatriate without filing FBARs? Sure thing

Kay Bell, Almost 700 IRS contractors owe $5.4 million in back taxes 

TaxProf, WSJ: States You Shouldn’t Be Caught Dead In

Trish McIntire explains her recent blogging silence.  Get well soon, Trish!

 

Jack Townsend,  Outlier Foreign Account Conviction Affirmed; Making a Witness Unavailable to the Defense.  He discusses prosecutorial success via intimidation.

Quotable.  From a comment by Dan Hanson at Marginal Revolution (via Tyler Cowen):

Failure isn’t rare for government IT projects – it’s the norm. Over 90% of them fail to deliver on time and on budget. But more frighteningly, over 40% of them fail absolutely and are never delivered. This is because the core requirements for a successful project – solid up-front analysis and requirements, tight control over requirements changes, and clear coordination of responsibility with accountability, are all things that government tends to be very poor at.

 

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Tax Roundup, 9/10/2013: If your S corporation numbers aren’t perfect, zero isn’t good enough. And Wonka accounting!

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20120511-2As we approach the October 15 extended deadline for 1040s, some taxpayers face a tough call: they still haven’t received all of their K-1s.  Yes, the extended K-1 deadline is normally September 15, but sometimes failure to file on time is an option for partnerships and S corporations, and the K-1s just aren’t done on time.  The tax law tells you to report the income as best you can, and amend if you get better information.  The IRS usually will understand.

Except when you control the S corporation with the delinquent K-1s.

A Californian, Dr. Sampson, owned two S corporations. His preparer hit a wall preparing the S corporation returns, according to the Tax Court (my emphasis):

Mr. Araradian has been preparing returns for Dr. Sampson and the corporations for many years. He receives the information necessary to prepare the corporations’ tax returns from Dr. Sampson’s administrator, who keeps general ledgers for both corporations using a computer program, QuickBooks, which is available to Mr. Araradian electronically. He also receives copies of the actual documents, such as bank statements and payroll reports, underlying the entries in QuickBooks (source documents), which he believes are necessary to verify the data in QuickBooks.  before he will prepare a tax return. For neither of the years in issue did either corporation provide source documents to Mr. Araradian before the respective dates on which their Forms 1120S for those years were due. The corporations’ Forms 1120S for those years were delinquent because, without source documents Mr. Araradian would not prepare those returns. 

Well, he still had the Quickbooks files, so he should be able to throw together a tentative taxable income number for the doctor, right?  Apparently not:

     And since he had not prepared the corporations’ returns by the dates on which petitioners’ 2008 and 2009 Forms 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return (together, original returns), were due, Mr. Araradian did not have the corporations’ Schedules K-1, Shareholder’s Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc., from which to enter pass-through items from the corporations on the original returns.

Consequently, Mr. Araradian prepared the original returns omitting any income or losses passed through to petitioners from the corporations. He told Dr. Sampson in each case that he was making a statement on the return saying that pass-through items from the corporations were not being included. The statement that he made on each return is as follows:

      THE ENCLOSED TAX RETURN FOR REGINALD AND GERVEL SAMPSON DOES NOT INCLUDE THE K-1′S FROM MONTEBELLO MEDICAL CENTER, INC. * * * AND REGINALD SAMSPN [sic] MD A PROF CORP * * *. THE * * * [2008/2009] PERSONAL INCOME TAX RETURN FOR REGINALD AND GERVEL SAMPSON WILL BE AMENDED ONCE THE TAXPAYER RECEIVES THE * * * [2008/2009] K-1′S.

So he had the Quickbooks files, but he just used zeros.  For two years.   That turned out to be  less than the income that should have been reported, leading to over $130,000 in additional tax.  The IRS didn’t think that was reasonable and assessed penalties.

The taxpayers argued they filed a “qualified amended returns” for the two years.  The judge pointed out that the amended returns were filed after the IRS had contacted the taxpayers, so they didn’t work.

It seems strange to me that the preparer wouldn’t file a return based on the Quickbooks file alone, though maybe he felt the doctor’s bookkeeping wasn’t to be trusted without support.  Given the penalties for filing late S corporation returns, it’s surprising that the doctor didn’t turn over the “underlying documents.”  Considering that he had quite a bit of information in the Quickbooks files about the K-1 income, it’s surprising that they used zeros on the doctor’s 1040, instead of an estimate based on Quickbooks numbers.  But the tax law can be full of surprises.

The moral?  If you don’t have perfect information, the zero option may not be your next best option.  If you can’t file perfect, it’s better to file something, and to try to make it as close as you can.

Cite: Sampson, T.C. Memo 2013-212.

 

Richard Borean and Kyle Pomerleau,  Monday Map: Top Marginal Tax Rates on Sole Proprietorships and S-corporations (Tax Policy Blog).  Today, S corporations:

20130910-1

Yes, increasing rates on the wealthy also increases tax rates on businesses.

Don Boudreaux,  It’s Not Really a Taxingly Difficult Subject (Cafe Hayek): “Among the most economically naive calculations that people (including government officials) make is to estimate the growth in tax revenues based on the assumption that nothing changes beyond a hike in the tax.”

 

TaxGrrrl,  Back To School: Taking Advantage Of The Tuition & Fees Deduction 

Peter Reilly,  Sixth Circuit Highlights S Corporation Perils In Broz Decision  “Don’t rely on your accountant to straighten every thing out with journal entries.”

Russ Fox,  California to Require Annual Reporting of Like-Kind Exchanges for Out-of-State Property

Trish McIntire, Tip or Service Charge?

Robert D. Flach, When to contact your tax pro.  It’s amazing all the different things your average guy might need a tax pro for.  Robert also has fresh Buzz today!

Joseph Henchman, Wisconsin Offers Constructive Tax Filing Guidance for Same-Sex Couples

Jason Dinesen, Wisconsin State Tax Guidance for Same-Sex Married Couples   

William Perez, Statute of Limitations on Tax Refunds.  “Did you know that you can claim a tax refund for up to three years after the original deadline?”

Clint Stretch, Healthcare and Tax Reform:  “Repealing the employer-provided healthcare exclusion might make sense in economic theory, but in the practical world, it would accelerate a day of reckoning on healthcare for which we are unprepared.”

Jack Townsend, On Harmless Error

Brian Mahany, FBAR Basics – Foreign Reporting 101

TaxProf,  The IRS Scandal, Day 124

Me, Iowa’s “economic development” policy: bipartisan follies.

 

Kay Bell, Pennsylvania school tax protester pays $7,143 bill with $1 bills

News from the profession: Oh Dear Lord, Grant Thornton’s Belfast Office Has a Willy Wonka Room (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 9/9/2013: One week to deadline edition.

Monday, September 9th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130104-1Friendly reminder: it’s a week until the due date for extended corporation, trust and partnership returns.  File late and it’s a penalty of $195 for each K-1 on the late return.  That can add up in a hurry.

Because of the deadline, and because I spent too much time on a long-form piece that will go up later this morning about Iowa’s economic development follies, this roundup is abbreviated.

 

TaxProf, Sullivan: Political Reality Blocks Radical Tax Reform in North Carolina

UPI.com: Tax changes cause U.S. expats to give up citizenship

Delaware online,  NJ man gets 8 years in tax fraud scheme:

Gary Crawford Jr., 42, of Bridgeton, also known as Gary Taxes, was also order to pay more than $1 million in restitution to the U.S. Treasury and faces three years supervision following his prison release.

The tax fraud scheme was discovered in 2009 when the Internal Revenue Service’s Fraud Detection Center flagged a large number of fraudulent electronically filed income tax returns for the year 2008 seeking First Time Home Buyer Credits, said Kimberlynn Reeves, spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Delaware.

Refundable tax credit fraud?  What a surprise.

 

TaxGrrrl,  Back To School: Save Thousands Of Dollars With Education Tax Credits 

Tony Nitti, The NFL Is Back: The Tax Consequences of Sports Gambling 

Jana Luttenegger,  Is This the End of Automatic Gratuities? (Davis Brown Tax Law Blog)

Kay Bell, More Americans are paying federal income taxes

Trish McIntire, 43% – Not What Many People Think

 

Tax Justice Blog, Payroll Tax Loophole Used by John Edwards and Newt Gingrich Remains Unaddressed by Congress.  But not by me!

Alan Cole, Bruce Bartlett on Imputed Rent (Tax Policy Blog)

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 123

Russ Fox,  Did IRS Give Black Nonprofits Preferential Treatment?

Jack Townsend,  The Ripple Effects of the IRS Offshore Account Initiative – Turks & Caicos

 

The Critical Question: Is IRS Targeting Magic The Gathering ?   (Peter Reilly)

Robert D. Flach,  WHAT A CROCK

Setting the bar too low.  The IRS Apprentice Video Is Still Better Than Anything Donald Trump Has Ever Done (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 8/30/2013: Same-sex joint return frenzy edition.

Friday, August 30th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Wed in Iowa, still married in Utah.  The IRS yesterday announced that same-sex couples married legally in any state will be treated as married for tax purposes, even if they reside in a state that does not recognize same-sex marriages.

The IRS also announced that couples that married in earlier years may amend their tax returns to claim joint filing status for open married tax years.  However, they will not be required to.  Couples who extended their 2009 returns have until October 15, 2013 to file amended 2009 returns.  Otherwise, 2010 is the earliest possible open year.

The announcement cuts both ways.  If the IRS says you are married, you no longer have the option of filing as a single taxpayer.  Many couples find that marital bliss comes at a tax price.  This chart from the Tax Foundation illustrates income situations where marriage can be more costly than single status:

Marriage penalty

The opportunity for same-sex couples to choose between single and joint status for open years is unique.   This only goes one way, though; joint filers cannot amend their open years to file as single taxpayers.

Couples who have legal status short of marriage, such as “registered domestic partners” recognized in some states, are not considered married by the IRS.

Other IRS releases on the issue:

Rev. Rul. 2013-17

Frequently Asked Questions For Legally Married Same-Sex Couples  and For Registered Domestic Partners, Civil Unions

Lot’s of coverage of this in the tax blog world.  Iowa’s own Jason Dinesen has long owned this issue, and he comes through with BREAKING: IRS Releases Guidance on Same-Sex Marriage The IRS’s DOMA Guidance: How are Iowa Returns Affected?What if One Spouse in a Same-Sex Marriage Hasn’t Filed Yet? and Will Same-Sex Married Couples Be Required to Amend? 

The Tax Policy Blog has also flooded the zone:

Elizabeth Malm,  Same-Sex Marriages Recognized for Federal Tax Purposes – What Does it Mean for the States?

Nick Kasprak, State of Celebration and Marriage Penalties and Bonuses (Families with Children Edition)

Other coverage:

TaxProf, IRS Recognizes Same-Sex Marriage, Regardless of State

Kay Bell, IRS grants same-sex married couples equal federal tax filing status regardless of where in the United States they live

Trish McIntire, The IRS and DOMA – part 1

Peter Reilly, IRS Recognizes All Marriages But Not Civil Unions

TaxGrrrl, IRS Rules All Legal Same Sex Marriages Will Be Recognized For Federal Tax Purposes   

Tax Trials, IRS Recognizes Same-Sex Marriages in All States

Althouse, “All Legal Same-Sex Marriages Will Be Recognized for Federal Tax Purposes.”

Going Concern, IRS to Recognize All Same-sex Marriages, Regardless of Resident State

Linda Beale,  Same-Sex Married Couples Will be Recognized for Federal Tax Purposes Even When Moving to Nonrecognition State

The Iowa angle: IRS will recognize marriage of same-sex Iowa couples (Des Moines Register)

 

There is a little other news today:

43 percent is the new 47 percent.  And Now for the Movie: Fewer Americans Pay No Federal Income Tax (Roberton Williams, TaxVox):

The percentage of Americans who pay no federal income tax is falling, thanks to an improving economy and the expiration of temporary Great Recession-era tax cuts. In 2009, the Tax Policy Center estimated that 47 percent of households paid no federal income tax. This year, just 43 percent will avoid the tax.
That is good news, as far as it goes.  It’s not healthy to have only a minority paying income tax, the primary funding source for big government.  It’s too tempting to order a double when someone else is picking up the tab.   Mr. Williams thinks that we should count payroll taxes like income taxes, but I agree with Robert D. Flach that they’re not the same thing.

 

Tony Nitti, Tax Aspects Of The NFL Settlement Payments  “Well, if you’re a retired NFL football player, the Blue Book value has been set: your cognitive capacity is worth a cool $150,000.”

Andrew Lundeen,  Why Eliminating Taxes on Capital Would Be Good for Workers (Tax Policy Blog)

Jack Townsend, Another Israeli Bank Depositor Plea to Conspiracy

Robert D. Flach tops off a heroic week with a third Buzz!

 

Perhaps this isn’t the best way to handle an IRS exam.  Tax Analysts reports ($link) on a taxpayer who alleged that an IRS agent coerced him into sex:

Burroughs had sex with Abrahamson in September 2011 when she arrived at his home “provocatively attired,” according to the suit. U.S. Magistrate Judge Thomas Coffin concluded in the July 31 decision that Abrahamson was not acting in her official capacity, because the encounter occurred at Burroughs’s home during nonwork hours and “not in respect to the performance of official duties of the federal employee.”

One survivor of an IRS exam told me that she felt the least the IRS owed her for the experience was drinks and dinner.

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Tax Roundup, 8/22/2013: Is your passport worth your business? And a prodigal mom!

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan


passport
A great post by Phil Hodgen, Why people renounce U.S. citizenship for estate tax reasons.  It’s an issue often overlooked in cheap talk of “tax cheats,” but not by those who face a tremendous hit to their family businesses from the  U.S. Estate tax:

The senior members of these families are pressuring the younger generation give up U.S. citizenship to protect against these problems. I have heard the ultimatum from the father to the son: “The business or your U.S. passport. You choose.”

I want to emphasize that I do not hear political rants from my clients, or from the other family members who must deal with having a U.S. citizen shareholder thrust upon them. Everyone I talk to is eager to travel to the United States, enjoys meeting Americans, and bears no ill will to anyone.

But faced with the prospect of destroying the family business or giving up the U.S. passport, it is no contest. The passport has to go.

40% of the value of your business, as second-guessed by the IRS, can be a high price for a passport.

 

Sorry, “Mom.”  The Tax Court yesterday found a problem with a claim for a dependent exemption:

Petitioner has failed to show that she is entitled to the dependency exemption deduction for Mr. Salako. Petitioner claimed on her 2008 return that Mr. Salako was her son. Mr. Salako was born on January 12, 1961, and was thus 47 years old at the close of 2008. Petitioner, born in 1959, is only two years older than Mr. Salako. Thus, he cannot be her biological son, and we do not find credible petitioner’s unsubstantiated testimony that Mr. Salako is her adopted son.

Decision for IRS, not surprisingly.

Cite: Golit, T.C. Memo 2013-191.

 

Scott Hodge,  Why Shouldn’t the Tax Foundation Pay Taxes?  (Tax Policy Blog):

Just 3 percent (or 6,508) of all non-profits have assets of $50 million or more. However, these organizations took in 73 percent of all non-profit revenues and commanded 81 percent of all assets held by non-profits.  

Inequality!

 

TaxGrrrl, Michael Jackson’s Estate To IRS: Beat It.  Prompting a whole generation to ask, “who’s Michael Jackson?”

 

Cara Griffith, Textbooks with Borders (Tax Analysts Blog):

Most of us have heard of doctors without borders, but has anyone heard of textbooks with borders? It’s a reality for those using Amazon’s textbook rental service. The reason for this is very likely related to Amazon’s recurring sales tax issues.

Taxes often explain seemingly bizarre behavior.

 

Kay Bell, Maryland Rep. Van Hollen sues IRS over its application of 501(c)(4) political nonprofit rules.  Good luck with that.

 

TaxProf, TIGTA: IRS May Be Violating Copyright Law on 89% of its Software.  I don’t suppose copyright violations will invalidate an assessment.

 

Missouri Tax Guy,  DOMAs Death, There Are Questions

Trish McIntire,  Rant- Keep Your Return Safe.  Certainly never send it as an unencrypted pdf attachment to an email.

Peter Reilly,  Group Claiming To Teach True Meaning Of Islam Denied Exempt Status. 

TaxProf,  The IRS Scandal, Day 105

 

The Critical Question:  WHAT DO HERNIAS AND STATE TAXES HAVE IN COMMON? (Brian Strahle)

Personal advice section: Someone Who Has Never Dated an Accountant Came Up With 15 Reasons to Date an Accountant (Going Concern)  Someone who has dated one might come up with fewer.

 

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Tax Roundup, 8/9/2013: Another international tax enforcement milestone. And don’t count on the ex for a character reference.

Friday, August 9th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Andrew Mitchel,  Number of Expatriates Skyrockets Again (Second Quarter of 2013):

The number of published expatriates for the first two quarters of 2013 (1,809) has already exceeded the highest number of annual published expatriates ever (1,781 in 2011).  Thus, 2013 will clearly be the year with the highest number of published expatriates ever.

 

Chart by International Tax Blog.
Chart by International Tax Blog.

Another triumph for the IRS offshore enforcement program.  If you make being an American abroad a tax nightmare, people will stop being American.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 92

Phony Scandal Watch: IRS agent: Tax agency is still targeting Tea Party groups. (Washington Examiner, Via Instapundit):

In a remarkable admission that is likely to rock the Internal Revenue Service again, testimony released Thursday by House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp reveals that an agent involved in reviewing tax exempt applications from conservative groups told a committee investigator that the agency is still targeting Tea Party groups, three months after the IRS scandal erupted.

We did nothing wrong, it was just a few rogue agents in Cincinnati, and we don’t do it anymore.  Oh, and it’s phony.

TaxGrrrl,  DEA Passed Secret Data, Tips For Covering Up To IRS.   That’s reassuring.

 

Tax Analysts fights the good fight.  Transparency: Worth Fighting For  (Christopher Bergin).  They’ve done more than anyone else to fight the growth of secret tax law, known only to insiders and cronies.

 

Howard Gleckman, Beware of Tax Reform That Promises Deep Rate Cuts.  I worry more about tax reform that doesn’t promise rate cuts at all.

 

Tax Justice Blog,  Politicians Use Tax Breaks to Subsidize Manufacturing. What Could Possibly Go Wrong?  Everything, of course, though the Tax Justice Blog’s solutions would be no improvement.

 

Kyle Pomerleau, Cities, States, and Obamacare’s “Cadillac” Tax (Tax Policy Blog).

No, they shouldn’t. Cheating and Visibility on Taxes: IRS Efforts to Regulate Tax Return Preparers Should Continue (Procedurally Taxing):

Nonetheless, I believe that the IRS’s approach to the return preparer issue, with uniform identification requirements, reasonable competency testing and ongoing education requirements, will greatly enhance visibility in the return preparation process.

This is one of the better arguments I’ve seen for preparer regulation, but it is still not very good.  The preparer regulations impose restrictions on honest preparers that the cheaters will ignore.  It will raise the costs of preparation, causing many taxpayers to self-prepare and others to drop out of the system entirely. The real way to stop cheating is to remove the worst opportunities to cheating, especially refundable tax credits, and to make the law simple enough and the rates low enough that cheating is harder to hide and less attractive.


Watching the watchmen. NYPD cop faces hard time for tax fraud and identity theft. (New York Daily News):

Jonathan Wally, 34, was moonlighting as a tax preparer while working in the 34th Precinct that serves Inwood and Washington Heights. The 10-year NYPD veteran, who resigned upon entering his plea, admitted in Manhattan Federal Court to using bogus Social Security cards to list fictitious dependents.

I’m sure that with a little ethics training from the IRS, he would have turned out differently.

 

Paul Neiffer, Don’t Forget Your Retirement (Plan)!

Brian Strahle, CALIFORNIA:  HOW SHOULD YOU “SHAVE” (FILE YOUR 2012 INCOME TAX RETURN)?

Trish McIntire, Health Insurance Wizard for Business

Russ Fox,  While I Was Out…, where he discusses my post from yesterday, where the Tax Court required an S corporation $877 in taxable income to impute $31,000 in salary income to the owner to incur payroll taxes:

 I do agree with Joe’s conclusion: “When advancing and withdrawing funds from an S corporation, be sure to generate the appropriate prissy paperwork.”  If you have a loan, make it look like a loan: Charge interest and record it!  It’s possible that with good paperwork the owner wouldn’t have received such a ridiculous result.

The more I ponder this Tax Court decision, the more I dislike it.

Freakonomics Blog,  How Much Tax Are Athletes Willing to Pay?

Boxing is particularly interesting because it allows a participant to choose where he performs. If you are a pro golfer or tennis player, you might be inclined to skip a particular event because of a tax situation, but you generally need to play where the event is happening. A top-ranked boxer, meanwhile, can fight where he gets the best deal. Which is why it’s interesting to read that Manny Pacquiao will probably never fight in New York — primarily, says promoter Bob Arum, because of the taxes he’d have to pay.

Yes, tax rates matter.

 

Going Concern, After His Open Victory, It Appears Phil Mickelson Is Doing Some Tax Planning at the PGA Championship.  Yes, taxes are lower if you miss the cut.

 

I hope he didn’t solicit this character referenceA 64-year old Florida executive won’t get to enjoy a golf-course retirement for awhile.  TBO.com reports:

John D. Stanton III stalled an Internal Revenue Service audit for four years, promising he would submit corporate tax returns for his company while secretly diverting tens of millions of dollars to himself.
 
The deception caught up to him Thursday, when a federal judge sentenced him to 10 years in prison for tax evasion.

His ex-wife spoke up for him, pleading for leniency.  Yeah, sure:

The family drama emerged when a letter by ex-wife Susan Stanton was read aloud. In the letter, Stanton called her ex-husband “devious” and said he should be given the maximum prison sentence allowed. John Stanton III fled Tampa in December 2011, the letter said. An arrest warrant on a contempt of court charge was issued, stemming from a divorce case where Stanton defied an order to pay more than $6 million to his ex-wife. “He fled and stayed in $240-a-night hotels,” Susan Stanton wrote. While he was on the run, John Stanton III fathered a child with a 32-year-old woman, the letter said.

Other than that, the break-up was amicable. Now Mr. Stanton gets to spend 10 years in a federal prison, where any money he managed to hide isn’t much use.  When he gets out, assuming his health holds up, he will still have the government ready to seize any hidden cash that slips out.  It seems like the results would have been a lot better if he just had filed his returns.



A note to readers:  I have learned how to embed links to items within longer “Tax Roundup” posts.  I won’t use it for every item, but I will use them for some items that you might want to point out to someone.  There are two that you will find in this post, and they look like this:

No, they shouldn’t.

and

I hope he didn’t solicit this character reference.

Maybe I should just post these things as their own posts, but there you go.

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Tax Roundup, 7/31/2013: Cross-agency co-operation edition. And a new look for the TaxProf!

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Nothing to see here, phoney scandal.  E-mails Suggest Collusion Between FEC, IRS to Target Conservative Groups (Eliana Johnson, The Corner):

Embattled Internal Revenue Service official Lois Lerner and an attorney in the Federal Election Commission’s general counsel’s office appear to have twice colluded to influence the record before the FEC’s vote in the case of a conservative non-profit organization, according to e-mails unearthed by the House Ways and Means Committee and obtained exclusively by National Review Online.  The correspondence suggests the discrimination of conservative groups extended beyond the IRS and into the FEC, where an attorney from the agency’s enforcement division in at least one case sought and received tax information about the status of a conservative group, the American Future Fund, before recommending that the commission prosecute it for violations of campaign-finance law.

Remember, Ms. Lerner used to work at the FEC.

 

Check out the new look at the TaxProf’s place.  It’s worth the trip for many reasons, including The IRS Scandal, Day 83

 

Tony Nitti,  President Obama’s Plan For Corporate Tax Reform: A ‘Grand Bargain’ Or Simply Another Name For An Old Proposal?

Howard Gleckman, Obama’s New Corporate Tax Offer is Another Dead End

Richard Morrison, Obama Corporate Tax Proposal Limits Potential Economic Growth (Tax Policy Blog)

TaxGrrrl, Baucus & Camp Talk Reform As Tax Road Show Rolls On

Tax Justice Blog, Best and Worst Ideas for “Blank Slate” Tax Reform

Me, Grand bargains and other mistakes

 

Clint Stretch,  In the Trade or Business of Generating Capital Gains? (Tax Analysts Blog)

Kay Bell, Werfel makes IRS budget case at Texas tax preparers meeting.   Good luck with that.

 

David Brunori, Sales Tax Holidays and the Planet of the Apes (Tax Analysts Blog):

Touted as a middle class break for “hard working families,” the holidays only encourage retailers to raise prices. Because rational people change the days they shop during the holiday (rather then spend more), consumers pay more, the government loses revenue, and the retailers get a small windfall. That is why retailers lobby hard for the holiday.   

Trish McIntire,  Kansas Taxes – Even More Changes

From Robert D. Flach, SOME SHAMELESS SELF-PROMOTION.

 

Can’t we all just get along? The War Against the Billable Hour Goes Mainstream (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 7/10/13: No tax on foreign losers. And rounding up the tax criminals!

Wednesday, July 10th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

slots.jpgEveryone who is good at math knows that if you play the slots a lot, you will lose.  Sure, you will occasionally get a payoff, but over time the house wins.  That’s why they let you play.

Yet the IRS didn’t let that get in the way of taxing non-resident gamblers.  It says that non-residents have to pay a 30% tax on every winning play, regardliess of the losers.  The Tax Court upheld that position in the case of a Korean gambler, but now the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled in the gambler’s favor, allowing him to compute the tax on a “per session” basis, rather than per bet, so that the day’s losses and winnings can be offset.  The court threw the logic of a IRS 2008 technical memo back at the agency:

     The IRS has persuasively interpreted the term “gains” in Section 165(d) to allow U.S. citizens to measure gains on a per-session basis. The IRS stated that “gain or loss may be calculated over a series of separate plays or wagers.” Memorandum AM2008-11, Office of Chief Counsel, Internal Revenue Service 4 (2008) (emphasis added). In the IRS’s words: “We think that the fluctuating wins and losses left in play are not accessions to wealth until the taxpayer redeems her tokens and can definitively calculate” her net gains. Id. Because gain or loss may be calculated over a series of wagers, a “taxpayer who plays the slot machines[] recognizes a wagering gain or loss at the time she redeems her tokens.” Id. Therefore, U.S. citizens do not “treat every play or wager as a taxable event.” Id. The result is that U.S. citizens can measure their gambling winnings and losses on a per-session basis…

     Nothing in the IRS’s Section 165(d) ruling on “gains” turned on the fact that the gamblers were U.S. citizens.

TaxDood has more in Nonresident Gamblers Take a Step Closer to Equality

Cite: Park v. Commissioner, No. 12-1058 (D.C. Ct. App. 2013).

Update: The TaxProf has a roundup.

 

Russ Fox, A Gambler Gambles to Tax Court…and Loses

Trish McIntire, Gambling Rumor.  No, they aren’t disalllowing gambling losses.

 

Lots of tax crime news today.  From New Jersey, we learn that skimming business receipts is not sexy.  A Justice Department press release reports:

A Middlesex County, N.J., man who co-owns  and operates a wholesale merchandise business in New York selling adult  paraphernalia was sentenced today to 19 months in prison for concealing more  than $1.2 million in income in various domestic and foreign bank accounts, New  Jersey U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman and Assistant Attorney General Kathryn  Keneally of the Justice Department’s Tax Division announced.

From 2006 through 2009, Gupta diverted $822,916 of the business’  receipts into 17 different personal bank accounts held in the names of various  individuals, including himself and family members. He directed more than  $250,000 of those diverted funds into six different accounts held offshore at a  branch of HSBC in India. From 2007 through 2009, Gupta caused 22 J.S. Marketers  corporate checks to be made payable to
himself and family members in amounts  identical to invoices from the
business’ suppliers. Gupta endorsed those  checks, which totaled $375,138, and deposited them into bank accounts that he  controlled.

17 accounts?  That’s a lot of work that didn’t work out well.

Meanwhile in Oregon, things go badly for a tax protester:  Former Gladstone business owner jailed 97 months for tax evasion, reports the Portland Tribune:

Chester Evans Davis, a 56-year-old Oregon City corporate tax defier, got sentenced to more than eight years in federal prison starting Monday for not filing a corporate tax return five times for his Gladstone business and then trying to obstruct Internal Revenue Service laws.

Davis transferred money from his company to various shell corporations and a warehouse bank, and then used the money to purchase more than $5 million in gold bars and coins. IRS special agents seized over $1 million of that gold, as well as approximately $115,000 in cash, while executing search warrants at Davis’ residence and business.

Again, a lot more effort than filing and paying taxes, and a lot worse result.

Meanwhile in Illinois, the Rockford Register Star reports Tax evading Rockford chiropractor sentenced to prison:

Todd R. Cevene, 42, of Caledonia, was sentenced Tuesday to 10 months in prison by U.S. District Judge Frederick J. Kapala for federal income tax evasion.

Cevene admitted in his plea agreement that during a four-year period between 2004 and 2007, he intentionally evaded payment of his federal income taxes by transferring substantial amounts of Cevene Care Clinic’s income to Cevene Management Group, Todd Cevene Alaska Preservation Trust, and Cevene Enterprises.

There is no magical formula using trusts that makes your taxes go away.

The reeducation of Lauryn Hill.  The singer reported to a federal prison this week to begin serving a three-month sentence on tax charges.

 

Health care taxes: what’s delayed, what isn’t.  My new post at IowaBiz.com, the Des Moines Business Record group blog for entrepreneurs.

Susan Freed, Play or Pay Rules Delayed (Davis Brown Health Care Reform Blog)

 

Joseph Thorndike, House Republicans Would Rather Pander than Fix the IRS (Tax Analsysts Blog):

At the end of the day, they would rather score a few cheap political points than do something to actually fix the IRS.

Yes, the IRS should be adequaately funded.  Yet when the agency proves itself your electoral enemy, you aren’t exactly motivated to fund it.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 62

William Perez,  Researcher Finds Social Securty Numbers Posted on IRS Public Database

TaxGrrrl, As Second IRS Official Pleads The Fifth, Congress Pushes For ‘Lerner Rule’

 

Jeremy Scott, Summers Pushes for Tax Break on Foreign Profits (Tax Analysts Blog)

Kay Bell, Hurricane season costs tax collectors as well as homeowners

Jason Dinesen, The Oddities of State Taxes — Wisconsin Student Loan Deduction and Nonresident Tax Returns

David Brunori, Taxing Teen Texts and Other Terrible Tax Things (Tax Analysts Blog):

 In addition to fat kids, skinny kids, and kids that climb on rocks, rich kids and poor kids use wireless devices. If everyone is using them, a flat tax is regressive. It is strange that liberal New York and Washington, states purportedly looking out for the little guy, are so enamored with a regressive tax. 

Of course they aren’t looking out for the little guy.  That’s just for the rubes.

Andrew Lundeen, Links: Lap Dance Taxes and Tax Reform Options (Tax Policy Blog).  Lap Dances, marijuana taxes and Warren Buffet, all in one place!

Howard Gleckman, Not All Curbs on Tax Preferences Are Created Equal (TaxVox)

Robert D. Flach,  MY CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE WHITE HOUSE ON TAX REFORM

Brian Maharry, Cell Captive Insurance – Legit Insurance Tool or Abusive Tax Shelter:

The scam promotions typically offer to shelter a large sum of money by calling it an insurance premium. The premium is usually the same dollar amount as the deduction you seek. The promoter offers “insurance” on a highly improbable risk. Hurricane insurance in Nebraska, anyone? Magically, you get a big deduction and in a few years you are promised the ability to get back your money in the form of a “premium refund” or dividend.

It gets windy in Nebraska, especially during football season, but not like that.

 

Oh Noes!  Horror Stories From the CPA Exam: The Prometric Nose Bleed (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 7/3/2013: Effective rate edition. And Pickett’s Charge!

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013 by Joe Kristan

gao-logoA GAO study of effective tax rates has created some comment in the tax policy blog world.  For example, Howard Gleckman,  Large U.S. Firms Paid a 16.6 Percent Federal Tax Rate (TaxVox):

A new analysis by the Government Accountability Office finds that in 2010 large U.S. corporations paid an average effective tax rate on their worldwide income of 22.7 percent and U.S. federal tax of only about 16.6 percent.  The federal rate was less than half of the 35 percent statutory rate.

Large firms that made a profit that year paid an even lower effective rate—an average of 16.9 percent in worldwide taxes and only 12.6 percent in U.S. federal tax.

The always moderate and restrained Linda Beale chimes in with Corporations Never Had It So Good.

William McBride from the Tax Policy Blog doesn’t see it quite that way in GAO Compares Apples to Oranges to Find Low Corporate Effective Tax Rate:

A new study by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) claims the corporate effective tax rate (ETR) was 12.6 percent in 2010, which is about half the standard estimate found in other studies cited by the GAO and summarized here, here, and here. Based on IRS data, the corporate effective tax rate is about 26 percent  on average, though it dropped in the most recent year of data, 2009, to a little over 22 percent, due to the recession and temporary tax incentives meant to stimulate investment.

Why the difference?

So how did GAO come up with such a low effective tax rate? Mainly by comparing apples and oranges. Particularly, GAO takes the smallest measure of taxes paid and divides it by the largest measure of net income according to financial statements, even though this net income is not the tax base that the corporate tax was meant to apply to. The corporate tax rate applies to taxable income, as defined in the tax code. According to GAO, taxable income in 2010 was $863 billion for profitable corporations, while financial statement income was $1.443 trillion.

It’s true that effective rates on taxable income will never be as high as the stated rate because of tax credits, but the GAO numbers show a misleadingly low burden.

 

The Obamacare employer mandate has been delayed.  My coverage and a roundup: Don’t fire employee #50 just yet: Obamacare employer mandate delayed until 2015

 

Jason Dinesen, Do Iowa Taxes Change as a Result of the DOMA Ruling?  “The answer is: very little changes on Iowa taxes.”

Trish McIntire, DOMA is Dead

 

Joseph Thorndike, Milton Friedman Didn’t Believe in Tax Reform (Tax Analysts Blog).  Getting rid of loopholes, the argument goes, just makes room for new ones.

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 55 and IRS Hits Tyco With $1 Billion Tax Bill

Janet Novack, IRS Calls Foul Against Estate Of Late Minnesota Twins Owner Carl Pohlad.   “Carl Pohlad’s heirs contend his stake in the MLB club was worth just $24 million. The IRS pegs it at more than 12 times that.”

Zerjav update:  I have updated my post on the St. Louis tax advisor who was sentenced to 18 months in prison to include information from a U.S. Attorneys press release on the details of how the evasion was done.

David Brunori, Cuccinelli’s Corporate Tax Plan Does Not Go Far Enough (Tax Analysts Blog:

The state would be far better off repealing the tax and either 1) reducing spending by $800 million, or 2) finding other sources of revenue. An increase in the personal income or sales tax would be a better idea than trying to tax corporate income.

Amen.

 

Tax Justice Blog, Bad Budgets Become Law in Ohio and Wisconsin.  That probably means the opposite.

Peter Reilly continues to report breaking news from the Battle of Gettysburg:  Did Doris Kearns Goodwin Blow It At Gettysburg ?  I am insanely jealous.  I assume he will torture me with coverage of today’s 150th anniversary of Pickett’s charge.

 

News you can use. The Screaming at EY Has Stopped (Going Concern)

I don’t see what his orientation has do with anything.  Century old barn may’ve been started on fire by flaming raccoon (Radio Iowa)

 

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Tax Roundup, 5/31/2013: Obama and Shulman, buddies. And the hidden path to world domination.

Friday, May 31st, 2013 by Joe Kristan

Megan McArdle, Boy, the Head of the IRS Went to the White House A Lot

20130531-1

 

I believe Megan is correct when she says that it is unlikely that Shulman was spending his time there conspiring against the President’s opponents:

Why on earth would it have taken 118 meetings?  Did Doug Shulman not  understand “target the tea party” the first 117 times Obama said it?  

The close contact between the IRS and the White House is actually what you might expect to see now that the IRS has become a ridiculous superagency with a portfolio dwarfing that of the traditional cabinet agencies.  Still, it’s very weird that Doug Shulman spent more time at the White House than the Treasury Secretaries and the Secretaries of Defense — combined.

Update: It would be less weird if it didn’t happen.

 

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 22

IRS, Bureaucratic Blunder or Political Profiling? (Topaccountingdegrees.org)

 

Kay Bell, More tax professionals (including bloggers) formally support legal challenge of IRS’ effort to regulate tax preparers.  That would be me.

Kyle Pomerleau, A Redistributional Effect of Obamacare (Tax Policy Blog)  Picking the pockets of healthy young men.

Estimated effect of Obamacare on health insurance costs in select states (via Tax Policy Blog)

Estimated effect of Obamacare on health insurance costs in select states (via Tax Policy Blog)

 

William Perez,  “Complaint Case #460575036224″ — Fake Email from the IRS.  Rule of thumb: if you get an e-mail that says it’s from the IRS, it’s not from the IRS.

Trish McIntire, Phishing Again

 

Paul Neiffer, Pay Your Kids!  If you can get them to actually do some work, of course.

Brian Mahany,  The Promised Land – FATCA Causes Record Number Of Americans To Leave.  Congress is making America more of a “selective” taste.

 

TaxGrrrl, Donations Pour In For Oklahoma Relief Efforts, Including $1 Million From Carrie Underwood and Kevin Durant

Patrick Temple-West,  Evidence that tax breaks favor the rich, and more.  Common sense, folks: the rich pay most of the taxes, so any “break” will go to the person who pays most of the taxes.

Howard Gleckman,  Who Benefits from Tax Preferences? You Do. (TaxVox): “When it comes to tax preferences, Pogo was right. “We have me the enemy and he is us.”

 

Fiduciary Income Tax Blog: Decanting.  Trusts, not old wine.

Jim Maule, The Tax Woes of a Corporation Owned by an Indian Tribe

Tax Justice Blog, Governor Cuomo Hearts Tax Cuts.  But only in some places.

Brian Strahle,  MIDDLE MARKET COMPANIES:  RECENT STATE AND LOCAL TAX “PAIN” POINTS

 

Christopher Bergin, Ireland Is Not a Tax Haven, Dammit (Tax Analysts Blog)

Robert D. Flach has his Friday Buzz on! I like this: “The recent scandal has proven that the IRS can’t even properly regulate its own employees, let alone try to properly regulate tax preparers!”

 

It’s a small world after all.  McGladrey’s Plan For World Domination: Nebraska! (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 5/22/2013: Don’t blame me, I’m only the boss. Also: tornado tax relief.

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013 by Joe Kristan
Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how bad he feels about politcal harassment under his watch.

Former IRS Commissioner Shulman, showing how bad he feels about politcal harassment under his watch.

The Worst Commissioner Ever returned to Washington yesterday to testify before a Senate committee on the IRS scandal.  He bravely took responsibility for the targeting of disfavored political groups and apologized to the victims.

Well, not exactly:

 I certainly am not personally responsible for creating a list that had inappropriate criteria on it. And what I know, with the full facts that are out, is from the inspector general’s report, which doesn’t say that I’m responsible for that. With that said, this happened on my watch. And I very much regret that it happened on my watch.

In other words, I was just the boss, and you can’t blame me for what those crazy kids in Cincinnati do.

 

Just exercising the right they encouraged the Tea Partiers to use – silence.  The IRS functionary who announced the scandal in response to a planted question isn’t going to answer real ones.  From the Wall Street Journal:

Lois Lerner, the head of the Internal Revenue Service office that targeted conservative groups, intends to invoke her constitutional right against self-incrimination and decline to answer questions about the matter when questioned by a congressional committee Wednesday.

Ms. Lerner, director of the tax-exempt-organizations division at the IRS, notified the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform through her attorney that she wouldn’t answer questions on the matter, according to a committee spokesman.

When it comes to the Bill of Rights, better late than never.

 

Is Washington a suburb of Cincinnati?  Oversight from Washington, All Along    (Eliana Johnson)

TaxProf, The IRS Scandal, Day 13

Watchdog.org, Top 10 quotes about Obama’s #scandalpalooza

Via Don Boudreaux, The Real Lesson of the IRS Scandal (Richard Epstein) and The Autocrat Accountants    (Mark Steyn)

Patrick Temple-West,  White House knew of IRS scandal in April, and more (Tax Break)

Clint Stretch, Targeting tax-exempts and tax reform (Tax Analysts Blog)

Joseph Thorndike, A World Without 501(c)(4)s (Tax Analysts Blog)

Russ Fox, Ms. Lerner Knows the Fifth (IRS Scandal Update)

 

In other news:

Kay Bell, Tornado-ravaged areas of Oklahoma declared major disasters, leading to special tax relief from IRS

Trish McIntire,  Oklahoma DIsaster- Tax Relief.

TaxGrrrl, IRS Announces Tax Relief For Oklahoma Tornado Victims

 

Paul Neiffer, Will Excess Farm Loss Rules Apply With New Farm Bill?

Jason Dinesen, How to Allocate the Deduction for Federal Estimated Tax Payments on Your Iowa Tax Return

Robert D. Flach, TRUE TAX TIME TALES – IRA WITHDRAWALS

 

Brian Strahle,  MARYLAND:  WYNNE CASE UPDATE

On Friday, May 17, 2013, the Maryland Court of Appeals denied the comptroller’s motion for reconsideration in Comptroller v. Wynne,  which struck down the state’s application of credits against pass through income from S corporations; however, the court stayed implementation of the ruling to allow the comptroller to petition the U.S. Supreme Court for certiorari.

Peter Reilly,  RVania Resident Taxed By New Mexico.  State tax problems of folks who live on the road.

 

Kaye Thomas,  Self-Directed IRA Implodes.  The same case I discussed here.

 

 Jack Townsend, Tax Perjury and FBAR Charges Related to Illegal Income Fake Art Case

Jim Maule, Taxation is Not Theft.  It’s not theft when the government does it.

 

 

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Tax Roundup, 5/15/2013: Those exempt organization returns are due today.

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130515With all the excitement over tax-exempt entities, it’s worth remembering that their returns — the 990 series — are due today for calendar-year filers.  And if an organization fails to file 990s for three years, its exempt status lapses.  Extensions are available, but they have to be filed today.

Late filing can be expensive.  For small organizations, the penalty is $20 per day of late filing; for those with receipts over $1 million, its $100 per day.  That adds up fast.

More information is available at the IRS page Form 990 Resources and Tools for Exempt Organizations.

Related: Trish McIntire, Important Tax Exempt Information

 

So let’s get started with this morning’s IRS Scandal news.  The TIGTA report whose imminent release triggered the IRS announcement of the scandal last Friday came out yesterday.  I covered it in a post last night.  Other coverage:

Tax Prof links:

Aprill: The TIGTA Report on the IRS Scandal: Questions About the IRS and About the Report

Hackney: The TIGTA Report on the IRS Scandal: Be on the Lookout for False Partisan Witchunts.  Yes, insist on only true partisan witchhunts.

And his roundup, The IRS Scandal, Day 6

Other coverage:

Russ Fox,  The Cynics Were Right (The IRS Scandal Gets Official Confirmation)

Patrick Temple-West,  Uneven IRS scrutiny, and more

 

Other Tax things:

David Brunori, Balderdash Masquerading as Tax Policy Arguments (Tax Analysts Blog)

It is no secret. This may hurt my libertarian credentials, but I believe the U.S. Congress should pass the Marketplace Fairness Act.  The tax system is sound when built on a broad base and low rates. Broad  base means you tax everything without regard to who is lobbying the legislature. It follows – and it really does follow – that the sales tax  should be imposed on all personal consumption. 

I can see a need for something like this, but I think it should be done by having a single point of compliance for sellers under a uniform set of rules, rather than subjecting internet sellers to the thousands of local tax systems.  David minimizes the compliance burden.  As somebody who makes a living off of the compliance burden, I can say with confidence that he is mistaken.

Joseph Henchman, Indiana Approves Income Tax Reduction (Tax Policy Blog)

 

Peter Reilly, Doctor Joyce Brothers Cameo In Tax Court And Women’s History

Jason Dinesen, Same-Sex Marriage, Community Property, And Multi-State Income — Part 2

Fiduciary Income Tax Blog, WSJ on Reducing a Trust’s Income Taxes

Jim Maule,  Tax Ignorance Gone Viral.  It really bugs him when people say the Internal Revenue Code is 24 feet high.

 

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