Posts Tagged ‘Veronique De Rugy’

Tax Roundup, 2/13/2013: The President wants more taxes. Because they’re doing such a good job with what they get now.

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

State of the union:  raise taxes more.  It will never be enough.  If you think we don’t have a spending problem, or think we can solve it through “closing loopholes,” check out three charts gathered by Veronique de Rugy:

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The President proposes nothing serious.

Breaking news from yesterday: Look for a Call to End Oil “Subsidies” in Tonight’s State of the Union (Andrew Lundeen, Tax Policy Blog)

Howard Gleckman, Obama’s State of the Union and the Great Deficit Smackdown (TaxVox)

 

How H&R Block guy got to write preparer regs.  Civil Service! Tim Carney reports:

In 2009, the Obama administration hired Mark Ernst, the previous CEO of tax prep giant H&R Block, as IRS deputy commissioner. Ernst became a “co-leader” (in the words of an IRS spokesman) in drafting new regulations for tax preparers.

This seems to clash with President Obama’s executive order barring appointees from working on regulations directly affecting their former employers.

But thanks to a fine legal distinction, these rules didn’t cover Ernst. “Mark Ernst is a civil servant at the IRS; he is not a political appointee,” an IRS spokesman wrote me. “The Presidential Executive order on Ethics Commitments by Executive Branch Personnel only applies to political appointees.”

Nobody here but us chickens.

 

Jason Dinesen has a new installment about his client whose identity was stolen in the ID theft epidemic that really got rolling while the IRS was busy regulating preparers.  “If you hired the best comedy writers and satirists in Hollywood, they couldn’t come up with a more farcical script about government ineptness.”

Speaking of government competence:

Not only will most farmers have to file after March 1, 2013 due to a delay in tax forms by the IRS, we  now have an announcement that almost all form 1099s issued by the USDA for Natural Resources Conservation Services payments in 2012 are either wrong or were never issued.

via Paul Neiffer.

 

David Brunori, If You Hate or Love Excise Taxes Read this New Report:

A new working paper  recently released by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University… finds that contrary to conventional wisdom, sin taxes are often not used to correct externalities but rather for general fund spending. My take on that is politicians don’t really care about externalities. They would like to raise money from people whose activities they despise. The report also found that the goal of “sin taxes” has changed from correcting market failures to protecting consumers from their own choices. That is, people are too stupid to run their own lives and they need help. Finally, the report finds that sin taxes are regressive, i.e., they punish the poor. Unfortunately, my liberal friends never get exercised over this issue. Maybe it’s as the great PJ O’Rourke surmised, liberals hate poor people. 

If they would just not wear those icky Wal-Mart clothes and watch their weight, like they tell them to… (Tax.com)

 

Peter Reilly,Even Real Estate Salesman Has Trouble With Passive Loss Exception

Even accepting that he spent 520 hours working on his own properties, he still lost.  Two of the properties were short-term vacation rentals and one was being readied for sale.  The time spent on those properties could not be grouped with the time spent on properties dedicated to long term rentals.

As Peter notes, this becomes an even more important tax issue with the new 3.8% tax on “passive” income this year.

 

Kay Bell,  When will you get your tax refund? Whenever

Trish McIntire, Child Tax Credit Delays

TaxGrrrl, Spammers Target Taxpayers Expecting Tax Refunds.  If you get an email about your refund from the IRS, it’s not from the IRS.

Jack Townsend, Another Bull**** Tax Shelter Bites the Dust

Roger McEowen, Another Court Issues Ruling on Tax Impact of Demutualization.

Tax Trials,  Second Circuit: Co-Op Owner Is Entitled to Casualty Loss

Patrick Temple-West, Navigating between tax avoidance and evasion, and more

Gene Steurle, Desperately Needed: A Strong Treasury Department (TaxVox)

Robert Goulder, La Bella Italia: Fast Cars & Loose Taxes (Tax.com)

Jim Maule, When Spending Cuts Meet Asteroids: The Value of Taxes.  Taxes and spending can never be too high because, you know, asteroids!

The Critical Question.  Minnesota’s Sexiest Accountant Contest: Cute or Creepy? (Going Concern)

 

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Tax Roundup, 1/30/2013: Bah. Humbug. And where states get their cash.

Wednesday, January 30th, 2013 by Joe Kristan

20130130-4Why so grumpy?  Because it’s the first “official” day of tax season as the IRS begins processing returns.   But only some of them.  The last-minute Fiscal Cliff tax law is delaying the processing of many forms, delaying most business filings until “late February or into March.”  They also have delayed processing of returns with education credits until sometime next month.

Oh, and the streets are a mess.

Kay Bell,  Tax filing on hold for taxpayers who need 31 federal forms

TaxGrrrl, IRS Opens For Business Today, Many Taxpayers Qualify To File For Free

 

Taking your money to give to the well connected.  From Taxing the Rich to Pay for Big Business Tax Credits by Veronique de Rugy:

 

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Taking from the small businesses, giving to the big business with pull.

 

Brian Gongol on the decision of Senator Harkin to not seek an umpteenth U.S. Senate term:

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could start with a blank slate and ask ourselves (as Iowans): Who is the smartest, most dependable, most thoughtful person we could send to an august body of decision-makers who are challenged with bringing wisdom and sobriety to the decision-making process of government?

Like somebody like that would stand a chance.

 

Why bother with a state corporate income tax?  While state income taxes are a reliable source of work for people like me, they do surprisingly little for the states, according to a new report released by the Tax Foundation yesterday.  Nationwide state corporate income taxes accounted for only 3% of 2010 state revenues.  In Iowa, it’s even lower.  Here are the revenue sources from Iowa and some nearby states:

Source: Tax Foundation

Source: Tax Foundation

 

The corporation income tax raises little revenue, is expensive to administer, is exploited by the well-connected and well lobbied, and is almost certainly a job-killer.  Why not go for a low-rate, low-loophole system like The Tax Update’s Quick and Dirty Iowa Tax Reform Plan?

TaxProf,  A Distributional Analysis of the Tax Systems in All 50 States, passing on a report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities says state tax systems are regressive.  Keep this in mind:

Source: Heritage Foundation/

Source: Heritage Foundation/

If you only look at the distribution of taxes paid and ignore the value of services and cash payments received, you miss a lot.

 

Janet Novack,  IRS Tips Won’t Protect You From Identity Theft Tax Fraud.

Jack Townsend,  Article on Importance of Jury Instructions in White Collar, including Tax, Crime Cases

Jason Dinesen, An Obligatory 1099-K Post for 2013

Trish McIntire,  Before You Sign.  A timely reminder that you are responsible for what’s on your return, even when you use a paid preparer.

Patrick Temple-West,  Mickelson and the sports star migration, and more (Tax Break)

William McBride, CRS: Tax Rates Do Matter for Profit Shifting (Tax Policy Blog)

Joseph Thorndike, The Income Tax Is Inquisitorial — Get Over It(Tax.com) May he have a good National Research Project exam in his future.

Robert Goulder, French Budget Minister Caught In Tax Probe (Tax.com)

That wouldn’t take much.  Payroll Tax Cuts May Boost the Economy More than You Think (Howard Gleckman, TaxVox)

 

Bad news, good news:  The Twinkie is Dead! Long Live the Twinkie! (Megan McArdle).

News you can use.  Tax Law Warning: Don’t Cut Mom a Rent Break (Jim Maule)

 

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Tax Roundup, 12/27/2012: Why the rich don’t like being soaked. And how to make a fortune by copyrighting your name!

Thursday, December 27th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

 

From a Tax Foundation chartbook, “Putting a Face on America’s Tax Returns”

What happens as you ratchet up the top rate. A timely explanation of the effect of raising already high tax rates from Megan McArdle:

Taking your tax rate from 5% to 10% decreases your after tax income by 5.26%.  But by the time your tax rate is 50%, you’re only keeping half of your income.  So increasing the tax rate by 5% decreases your after-tax income by 10%: you used to take home 50 cents out of every dollar, but now you only take home 45 cents.  

If you were surprised that Gerard Depardieu decided to leave France rather than pay the new 70% top rate, think of it this way: the rate increase was only 30%, but it was going to cut his income in half. Yes, that would still leave him with more money than you and I live on.  But people don’t think this way: if the government came and took half your after-tax income away, that would still leave you with more money than a middle-class family in Bangalore lives on, and you would still be hopping mad, not to mention panicking about how the mortgage was going to get paid.  Even if they only took half of your marginal after-tax income away–an extra 50% of every dollar you made over $40,000 say–you would be pretty upset, because you’ve probably already earmarked uses for those dollars.

With the people in the highest-income states already pushing a 50% marginal rate under current law (and also, under what I take to be the negotiation outcome desired by most of the Democratic Party), every 10% tax hike is a 20% decrease in the after-tax value of extra work.

Applying that analysis to Iowa, the combination of the fiscal cliff and the Obamacare 3.8% “net investment income” tax can reduce the after-tax value of additional income of a top-rate Iowa taxpayer by 12.24%  — about 1/8.   For Iowa businesses that pay their taxes on owner returns — that is, partnerships, LLCs and S corporations — that’s a 1/8 reduction in their cash flow, their ability to finance expansion, their ability to service new debt.  It’s also a 1/8 reduction in the returns to taking a chance on a new product, a new location, a new employee.  That makes for fewer chances taken.

Worse, soaking the rich doesn’t even begin to solve the spending problem or close the deficit, no matter how hard you try.  The rich guy isn’t buying.

 

Fiscal Cliff Notes

Veronique de RugyA Little Symbolism to Fight Fiscal Denial (The Corner)

TaxGrrrlTreasury Advises That U.S. Will Hit Its Debt Limit In 5 Days

 

Cara Griffith,  The Promise of Tax Stability (Tax.com).  For one company, anyway; tough for the rest of Oregon.

Peter Reilly,  Retired IRS Officer Launches Petition Against Clergy Tax Benefit

Robert D. FlachWHAT’S NEW FOR NJ INCOME TAXES FOR 2012

Anthony NittiThe Top Ten Tax Cases Of 2012, #1: Obamacare Is Constitutional Because The Individual Insurance Mandate Is Both A Penalty And A Tax. Wait…What?

Romney won?  How You Can Lose Money on Paper And Still Win at Tax Time Like Romney (TaxGrrrl). 

As bad as today’s news is, it could be worse.  And it was, actually, as Don Boudreaux reminds us in  Cataloging Our Progress: Men’s Business Wear (Cafe Hayek)

 

Yeah, that’ll work.  Man jailed in federal tax fraud, bills paper for using his ‘copyrighted’ name.   A convicted tax cheat sent a $6 million invoice to the local paper for using his name twice in a news story reporting his guilty plea on tax charges.  Doesn’t he know that if he collects they’ll send him a 1099? (vindy.com)

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Tax Roundup, 12/18/2012: Fiscal cliff rumors — higher threshold for rate hikes; deduction benefit limits.

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

20121116-1iabizThe “Fiscal Cliff” negotiations seem to be heating up.  The inane haggling over the final version of the inevitably awful tax law that we will have for this year and next year seems to have heated up a bit yesterday.  Details are cloudy and could change, but here’s what it looks to me like they are talking about for taxes:

  • An increase of the top ordinary income tax rate to 39.6%, but at a level of $400,000 or higher; the President had been holding out for a $250,000 threshold.
  • Some stupid restriction in the tax benefits of itemized deductions — perhaps capping the value of the deductions at 28%.
  • An AMT patch retroactive to last year and extension of all of the “expiring provisions.”

The President’s most recent offer includes some surprisingly good tax policy in the midst of the general awfulness of the tax increase plans.  From the Wall Street Journal:

On the tax side, the administration’s biggest proposal would permanently
extend relief from the alternative minimum tax. That’s a provision
designed decades ago to target the wealthiest Americans that now hits
tens of millions of middle-class households, in part because it wasn’t
indexed for inflation.

That would be great news.  The politicians play with fire by temporarily increasing the AMT exemption every year or two as a cheap ploy to pretend they will receive additional AMT revenue after the temporary “patch” expires — allowing them to appear slightly less irresponsible.

Also:

The administration’s new proposal also would permanently extend a raft
of temporary tax breaks that Congress has passed over the years,
benefiting businesses as well as individuals. Notable examples include
the research and experimentation credit for businesses, as well as the
deduction for state and local sales tax for individuals.

While I would prefer just letting these expiring provisions expire, I’d rather they be made permanent than going through the charade of re-enacting them every year or two just to play stupid budget games.

Fiscal Cliff Notes:

Nick Gillespie & Veronique de Rugy,  Obama and Boehner, Both Reckless Spenders

New York Times,  Obama’s New Offer on Fiscal Crisis Could Lead to Deal

Russ Fox,  Fiscal Cliff Deal Near?

Kay Bell,  Boehner offers Obama a $1 million top income tax bracket in fiscal cliff talks

Ashlea Ebeling,  Millionaires Are Doing Roth Conversions Before The Fiscal Cliff Hits, Should You Too? (Forbes)

Jason Dinesen,  An Example of What Could Happen if an AMT Patch Isn’t Passed

 

IRS extends employee – independent contractor settlement program.  The IRS yesterday announced (Announcement 2012-46) that it is extending its program to resolve the classification of workers as employees or independent contractors.

 

Rudy Penner,  How Eisenhower and Congressional Democrats Balanced a Budget (TaxVox).  They spent a lot less, that’s for sure.

Dan Alban,  IRS Rule Threatens Tax-Preparing Entrepreneurs

Jeremy Scott,   Democrats Should View Japan as a Warning (Tax.com)

Joseph Henchman,  IRS Reverses Course, Will Continue Providing Migration Data (Tax Policy Blog)

Paul Neiffer,  What Does Unified Credit Mean?

Robert D. Flach,  WHAT’S NEW FOR NEW YORK STATE INCOME TAXES FOR 2012

TaxGrrrl,  Actor Called Out As Unpatriotic For Move Over Taxes Fires Back.  So patriotism means letting them pick your pocket?

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Tax Roundup, 12/5/2012: Happy Repeal Day! Too bad it’s not the tax code.

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

Happy National Repeal Day!

 

Either we cut spending or everyone will pay more taxes.  This post by Veronique de Rugy puts together in one handy package some points I have been trying to drive home about budget and tax policy.  It’s all worth reading, but some key items include:

 In my opinion, the problem with the fiscal-cliff debate has been that no one is acknowledging the fact that there is no way out of raising taxes on everyone eventually unless Congress gets serious about addressing our long-term fiscal problem, by restraining spending.

“The Rich” simply don’t have enough income to foot the bill.  But borrowing temporarily hides the problem:

This, by the way, is why I thought the Bush years were so toxic. Cutting taxes while increasing spending dramatically — Bush increased real spending by 60 percent, as opposed to Clinton’s increase of 12.5 percent — is a recipe for large deficits leading more taxes later or certainly intense pressure to raise taxes.

What will taxes look like when the bill comes due?

This weekend, Mark Steyn gave us an idea of what that tax bill would look like. He writes:

A couple of years back, Andrew Biggs of the American Enterprise Institute calculated that, if Washington were to increase every single tax by 30 percent, it would be enough to balance the books — in 25 years. If you were to raise taxes by 50 percent, it would be enough to fund our entitlement liabilities — just our current ones, not our future liabilities, which would require further increases.

Finland shows how high taxes have to be to adequately fund a lavish welfare state, as I have noted:

Finland has an extensive welfare state and most years pays for it without budget deficits.  It does so with income taxes that reach a 2012 top rate of 29.75% at €70,301, which is about $57,021 at current exchange rates.  For a US taxpayer filing single, the 28% rate doesn’t start until taxable income reaches $85,651, and not up to $142,701 on joint returns.  On top of that, Finns pay a 23% Value-added tax on most purchases — a tax that is not tied to income.  But there’s more!  There is a mandatory 4.7% payroll tax on employee gross wages, plus another 18.3% “paid” by the employer — but that necessarily reduces what they can pay the employee after-tax.

I’m not sure all that would go over well here, but that’s what we’re headed for.  Anybody who says rich people can pay for all of the free government stuff is either clueless or lying.  The rich guy isn’t buying.

 

Megan McArdle,  Who Gets More Damaged If We Go Over the Fiscal Cliff?  At least there’s a drink at the bottom.

At least the weather’s nice.  Oh, maybe not…  Top Federal Marginal Tax Rate Will Exceed 50% in California, New York, and Hawaii in 2013 (TaxProf)

Amy Feldman,  Getting ready for the Medicare tax on investment income   (Reuters)

Don’t think he actually plans to pay the higher taxes he supports.  Warren Buffett Makes Money On Tax Breaks He Discredits (Steve Stanek, IBD)

Joseph Thorndike, Moral Abdication Dressed Up Like Hard-Nosed Realism (Tax.com)

 

But think of the intangible benefits of the Iowa film tax credit program! Film financier sues state over unpaid film credits (AP)  The producer of one of the films involved in the suit pleaded guilty to felony chargesarising from tax credits for the film.

Joseph Henchman,New York Times Tells the Tale of Michigan’s Bankrupt State-Backed Film Studio (Tax Policy Blog Oh, and Happy 75th Birthday to the Tax Foundation! 

 

Kay Bell, Tax Carnival #109: Tax Stocking Stuffers

TaxGrrrl,  12 Days of Charitable Giving 2012: Be An Elf

Russ Fox,Nominations Due for 2012 Tax Offender of the Year.  ‘Tis the Season!

Must be a Cubs fan. Hapless Mr. Williams Loses Again (Jack Townsend)

Nor do I.  No, I Don’t Plan to Take the RTRP Exam (Jason Dinesen). 

Jim Maule, The Hidden Government Spending Game.  Spending doesn’t become something else just because you run it through a tax return.

Trish McIntire, Do You Have a Spare $2,350?  You do?  Good, you may need to send it to the IRS in April if Congress doesn’t “patch” the Alternative Minimum Tax for this year.

Peter Reilly, Hobby Losses – Need To Convince Tax Court You Love Money More Than The Game

Robert D. Flach has his Wednesday Buzz roundup of tax posts up!

 

 

Holistic auto healing?  Cadillac chiropractor sent to prison for tax fraud  (Mlive.com)

The Critical Question:  Bartlett: The Fiscal Cliff and the Debt Limit — What Would Lincoln Do? (TaxProf)

Judge Holmes Quote of the day. 

Allison T. O’Neil, the ex-wife of Michael J. O’Neil, does not want to pay a penny of their joint 2005 federal tax liability because, she says, it [*2] would be inequitable to make her do so.

2 Michael recalls providing Allison with $6,000 to $10,000 per month. Allison recalls getting only $6,000 per month.

Cite: O’Neil, T.C. Memo 2012-339

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Tax Roundup, September 17, 2012: non-1040 extension deadline day! Also: Iowa bluffed?

Monday, September 17th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

20080410-1ibiz.jpgToday is the extended due date for 2011 calendar year 1041, 1065, 1120 and 1120-S returns.

For pass-throughs, the penalty for late filing is $195 per K-1, per day.  E-file if you can; otherwise go with Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested or an approved private delivery service.

 

 

Was Iowa bidding against itself for fertilizer plant?  From the Quad City Times:

When Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad pulled the trigger on the biggest incentive package in state history, he said he did so, in part, because of competition from neighboring Illinois.

But economic development officials with Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn’s administration say they wanted no part of the project after they got wind of Iowa’s “excessive” bid for the $1.4 billion fertilizer plant for which the Branstad administration offered up to $240 million in state and local tax breaks.

“To be clear — the state never put an offer on the table. We recognized early on that Iowa’s bid was excessive, and we were not going to engage in a bidding war,” Marcelyn Love, communications manager for the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, wrote in an email.

True, the word of Illinois politicians isn’t the most reliable thing in the world.  Then again, neither is the word of people telling you why you should give them money:

Tina Hoffman, spokeswoman for the Iowa Economic Development Authority, said the authority relied on the word of Orascom corporate officials and news reports to determine that Illinois was making a play for the fertilizer plant.

“Company officials indicated the tax savings would be in excess of $130 million. That information was validated when an Illinois senator was quoted in several news outlets about the bill he was sponsoring to assist a project like the one Orascom was proposing,” she wrote in an email.

All right, then!   If you say so, here’s your $107 million!

Subsidizing the fertilizer plant would be unwise even if there were a bidding war  with Illinois.  It’s never wise to take money from your taxpayers to lure and subsidize people.  As I’ve pointed out, it’s like taking your wife’s purse to the bar to buy drinks for the girls.  It’s neither effective or impressive.   But apparently there was no real bidding war, and Orascom was going to come to Iowa anyway;  if so, they just bluffed Iowa into helping pay for it — and maybe also into indirectly helping finance their purchase of The Weitz Company, Iowa’s oldest and largest construction contractor.   Not exactly a shining moment for Iowa tax policy.

 

Holman Jenkins of the Wall Street Journal rips wealthy whistleblower Birkenfeld, Grassley:

[Birkenfeld] told Bloomberg: “I’m the most famous whistleblower in the history of the world. It’s a question of doing the right thing, and that’s what I did.”

What would have been right was not participating in tax evasion in the first place.

The author of the whistleblower law that so benefited Mr. Birkenfeld was none other than prairie populist Sen. Charles Grassley, who issued a statement this week: “An award of $104 million is obviously a great deal of money, but billions of dollars in taxes owed will be collected that otherwise would not have been paid.”

This is the same Mr. Grassley last heard calling for AIG workers “to resign or commit suicide” during the 2009 retention bonus furor, which also saw the New York Attorney General implicitly threatening to publish the names of innocent AIG employees who didn’t “voluntarily” relinquish money they were legally entitled to.

This is the same Mr. Grassley whom Wikipedia baldly states “repeatedly introduced measures that increase the level of double taxation on American citizens living abroad, including retroactive tax hikes.”

Need we add that Mr. Grassley’s longtime aide, who actually drafted the whistleblower law, now represents Mr. Birkenfeld and stands to collect an interesting percentage of the award Mr. Grassley so obligingly applauds?

Senator Grassley has been a major play in tax policy for nearly three decades.   The state of the tax law today isn’t exactly a tribute to the senator.

 

I’m Barack Obama, and I approve this press release.  From a Department of Justice Press Release:

Today’s announcement is part of efforts underway by President Obama’s Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force (FFETF) which was created in November 2009 to wage an aggressive, coordinated and proactive effort to investigate and prosecute financial crimes.

OK, if it’s President Obama’s task force, it’s also President Obama’s IRS that is letting $5 billion annually go out the door to identity  thieves.  It’s President Obama’s IRS that is tormenting innocent Americans for paperwork foot-faults so that President Obama’s Justice Department can slap internationa tax criminals on the wrist.  Glad that’s cleared up.


Mike Ralston,  Iowa View: Time to stop a tax hike on all Americans’ dividends:

The current federal tax rates on investment income — dividends and long-term capital gains — expire at the end of this year. Today, the top tax rates for both dividends and capital gains are capped at 15 percent. But if Congress and the president don’t act to extend them, the top tax rate on capital gains will rise to 20 percent and the top tax rate on dividends will rise to 39.6 percent.

It’s worse than that.   With the Obamacare tax hikes set to kick in, the actual top rate for dividends will hit 43.4% — nearly tripling the old top rate of 15%.

 

Kay Bell,  Sequestration’s blunt and indiscriminate budget cuts.  Also, tiny.  From Veronique de Rugy:

 

Jim Maule,  When Tax Ignorance Meets Political Ignorance.  Yet while the good professor (rightly) bemoans voter ignorance, he insists that it is wise to put more decisions in the hands of the polticians elected by the same ignorant voters.

Paul Neiffer,  Mistakes to Avoid in Lifetime Giving – Part 2

Jack Townsend,  Whistleblowers for Swiss Banks Appear to be Live and Well

Jason Dinesen,  RTRPs, CPAs, Attorneys and Grandfathering

True:   1099s From Insurance Companies – Don’t Ignore But Don’t Take At Face Value Either (Peter Reilly)

Patrick Temple-West,  Financially troubled parts of Europe consider taxing church properties, and more

TaxGrrrl,  Are Federal Taxes Driving Smokers to Stop Lighting Up?

Will Freeland,  NYC Ban on Large Sodas Plagued by Same Problems as Soda Excise Taxes (Tax Policy Blog)

Howard Gleckman,  What Mitt Romney Didn’t Learn from Ronald Reagan (TaxVox)

Anthony Nitti: For A Rich Guy Who’s Only Been Divorced Once, R Kelly Certainly Doesn’t Seem to Have A Lot of Cash

Good question:  WHAT TO DO?  (Robert D. Flach)

News you can use:  If You Get a Tax Refund That’s Someone Else’s, Don’t Spend the Money  (Russ Fox)

 

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Tax Roundup, 7/25/2012: Thrifty thief sentenced; trashy trusts; fleeing France

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

Thrifty thief gets 5 1/2 years.  The woman who got a fraudulent $2.1 million tax refund from Oregon and who subsequently went on the thriftiest spending spree ever was sentenced yesterday to 5 1/2 years behind bars.  From the Huffington Post:

Before her June 6 arrest, Reyes’ spending spree included about $1,800 in cash to buy a 1999 Dodge Caravan and spending $851 on tires and wheels.

She did allow herself a few little luxuries, too:

The affidavit says other purchases included a queen-sized air mattress, a deep fryer, an air conditioner and a cream and gray floral rug. She bought a sofa and recliner with brown leather trim.

Sadly, she was more careful with the money than the state was:

The return was set aside for review by processing staff and managers for potential fraud. But “some time later,” the affidavit said, a Revenue employee overrode the flagged payment and the refund was issued.

By policy, three agency employees are required to verify the override, the newspaper said. However, according to the affidavit, no one responsible for reviewing the return opened the file to look at it or looked at the W-2 form Reyes filed.

Call me when the state fills out its vehicle fleet with 12-year old used cars.

 In Sod We Trust.  From ArgusLeader.com:

The owner of a Sioux Falls sod business ducked taxes for almost 10 years before investigators caught on to the trust fund scheme he had used to evade capture, federal prosecutors said.

Jerome Adrian, 70, was arrested and appeared Friday in U.S. District Court in South Dakota on one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States, 12 counts of willful failure to collect or pay over tax, two counts of evasion of payment, five counts of tax evasion, four counts of willful failure to file tax returns, and one count of false tax refund.

Bogus trusts are an IRS ”Dirty Dozen” tax scam.  They don’t work, though they might seem like they do until you get caughtRuss Fox has more.

Congress is pretending to address Taxmageddon, the expiration of the Bush-Obama era tax cuts at the end of the year.  Coverage includes Anthony Nitti’s Republicans Propose Their Own Way of Dealing With the Bush Tax Cuts, Kay Bell’s Republican definition of ‘temporary’ tax breaks depends on your income bracket, and Howard Gleckman’s Senate Democrats Would Keep Dividend Taxes Low, But Why?

“Tax Fairness” advocates, like the President and Citizens for Tax Justice, seem to think that there can never be bad consequences for jacking up taxes on “the rich.”  France is about to give a lab test on such ideas, including a 75% rate on income exceeding €1 million.  Veronique de Rugy, a newly-naturalized U.S. citizen who got out of France while the getting was good, explains the Consequences of High Taxes: French Edition.

Surprise! IRS Audits of S Corporation Returns: No-Change Rate Remains High, TIGTA Finds. But there has to be a pony in there somewhere.

The Iowa Department of Revenue has issued its summary of 2012 lowa tax law changes.

I hate to disagree with anything in Peter Reilly’s space, but I can’t abide the notion that it is the fault of the taxpayers and their advisors that the IRS is valuing at $65 million an artwork that cannot legally be sold.  The artwork contains an American Eagle, the sale of which is subject to severe penalties.  But read “‘Canyon’ Controversy – Blame The Advisers Not The IRS,” a guest piece in Peter’s space by Matthew Erskine, and decide for yourself.

Robert D. Flach has a new “Buzz” roundup of tax news.

Jason Dinesen: Same-Sex Marriage, Community Property, and Self-Employment Earnings

Jim Maule concludes a riveting 14-part series on the idea of having the IRS prepare returns for individuals using third party information reporting.

Where to start? What is Wrong with the Press? (David Brunori,Tax.com).

 

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Budgeteering

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012 by Joe Kristan

The President’s new budget is out. It’s not worth a lot of busy season time, as very little of it will be enacted (thank goodness). And really, this budget is to “budgeting” what a Ghirardelli’s catalogue is to dieting. The TaxProf has a good roundup if you want the details, but Veronique De Rugy tells you all you really need to know about the tax proposals:

Remember in the president

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Why Iowans for Tax Relief and Grover Norquist are misguided about tax reform

Thursday, May 12th, 2011 by Joe Kristan

Some folks otherwise in the free-market camp have a blind spot when it comes to targeted tax breaks. Both Grover Norquist and Iowans for Tax Relief tend to support targeted tax breaks for specific industries or types of taxpayers as “tax cuts,” and to oppose eliminating such breaks as “tax increases.”
Veronique De Rugy of the Mercatus Center is puzzled by this approach:

I realize that I am risking being ostracized by some, but I have to say that I find it very strange that conservatives would defend tax breaks, and industry tax breaks in particular. For one thing, tax breaks make the market less efficient and rarely lead to lower prices for consumers. In addition, they are one of the reasons why the tax code is so complicated

She quotes Peter VanDoren and Jerry Taylor of the Cato Institute:

Whether you call them “subsidies” or “purple roses,” what

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